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Wednesday, May 5, 2010

HALF

TRACK AND FIELD

JUMPING TO VICTORY Volum e ı ı 2 N u m b e r 2 | 7 5 c e n t s

Cougars should be league contenders this season. > 5B

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Serving the entire San Mateo Coastside since ı898

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www.hmbreview.com

Coastside college saved, but classes remain undefined NO DETAILS ON FUTURE OF CAMPUS By Mark Noack [ mark@hmbreview.com ]

The College of San Mateo has published its schedule of classes for the fall semester, but don’t expect to see information on what’s available on the Coastside. Community college administrators say they aren’t sure what, when, where or exactly how classes will be offered on the Coast-

side — but they promise new courses will be here for the next school year. “We definitely want to maintain the community college on the Coastside,” said Susan Estes, CSM vice president of instruction. “We just don’t know how. We haven’t specifically defined it yet.” The Coastside branch of the community college could be homeless after the spring semester. To save money, the college branch plans to leave its rented facility at Half Moon Bay’s Shoreline Station, which costs about $130,000 a year. Instead, college officials are in the process of negotiating for

temporary classrooms with the Cabrillo Unified School District. That arrangement could mean college courses would be taught in classrooms at Half Moon Bay High School. College of San Mateo administrators say the number of classes available on the Coastside depends primarily on how many people enroll. But, so far, the community college has no way for residents to sign up for local courses. The College of San Mateo schedule of classes doesn’t list any Coastside courses, and it instead refers locals to the campus Web page. To date, the Web site See COLLEGE a 8A

[ budget ]

[ agriculture ]

CITY FINDS BRIGHT SPOT IN BLEAK BUDGET CITY NOTES MODEST REVENUE INCREASE By Mark Noack [ mark@hmbreview ]

Lars Howlett / Review

Pescadero farmer Dee Harley is one of many local farmers who have embraced social media as part of their marketing efforts. She regularly updates her blog and company Web site.

Facebook

on the farm By Lily Bixler

{ lily@gmbreview.com ]

A couple walks into Dee Harley’s goat farm in Pescadero. Wandering through the cheese tasting room and gift shop, they ask Harley about her famous five-course farm dinners. She gives them a card and refers them to the farm’s Web site. Then it’s back to the farm. Back to work. “If we didn’t have the social media, I’d be in the office all the time

SOCIAL MEDIA IS TRANSFORMING COASTSIDE FARMS

talking to people about the same things … Spinning, spinning, spinning, all the time,” Harley said after the couple left. About a year ago, Harley propelled her farm of 80 milking goats into the world of social media with a snazzy Web site, a blog and pages on Yelp

“A farmer out in the field with their iPhone can stop for a minute and take pictures of their crops, and then boom, their social media marketing is done for the day.”

and Facebook. Just last month harleyfarms.com totaled 6,185 visitors who stayed on the site for an average of nine minutes and 55 seconds. Site analytics allow Harley to track how, when and where users are coming to the Web page so her business can market to them virtually. See FARM a 8A

Sea slugs get defensive By Lily Bixler [ lily@hmbreview.com ]

On a nice day with an extra-low tide, beach walkers and tide-pool hoppers might keep their eyes on the surf grass. Nestled in an intertidal rocky reef among sea anemones, sea urchins, starfish and algae, lies a species of colorful mollusks that uses its food to defend itself from predators.

These mollusks, which are often called “sea slugs,” eat sea anemones and other species from a phylum of creatures called cnidarians that have little stinging harpoons. The slugs then turn around and use the stingers for their own protection. How do the slugs pass the stinging cells through their system unharmed? Scientists don’t really know. But for whatever reason, when a sea slug eats a sea anemone, something happens chemically that blocks most of the stinging cells from firing and allows the slugs to store them as ammunition for the unlucky at-

See BUDGET a 8A

[ moonridge ]

Irma Mitton, social media marketer

[ marine life ]

NUDIBRANCH SPECIES FIGHTS WITH ITS FOOD

Half Moon Bay officials are preparing a greatly reduced budget for next year that nonetheless contains a thin thread of optimism: The city expects the economy to improve slightly. City leaders are curbing their optimism and projecting a modest 1 percent revenue increase for the coming year. Some good news was needed as city leaders on Tuesday reviewed a drastically cut back budget for the 2010-2011 fis-

cal year. The document includes cuts to all local services and some capital projects and draws heavily from the city’s reserve fund. City Administrator Laura Snideman said there were some big variables in the coming months, but city officials were confident of the slight financial boost in the future. “We’ve done absolutely everything we can to come up with the best possible projections,” she said. “We took the best possible numbers here.” City officials are walking a delicate political path. On the one hand, they are stressing that public safety and services will remain sufficient, although reduced by new cuts.

tacking crab or fish. It turns out, some of the stinging cells actually do fire when the slug consumes the anemones. It digests and stores most of the undeveloped stinging cells, according to Rebecca Johnson, an invertebrate zoologist and geologist from California Academy of Sciences. Johnson told Coastsiders about the phenomenon during a discussion Monday at the Train Depot in Half Moon Bay. The gathering was sponsored by the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. See SLUGS a 8A

Lars Howlett / Review

Teenagers take part in a team-building exercise during a youth conference at Moonridge in Half Moon Bay on Saturday.

Teen leaders gather at Moonridge YOUTH CONFERENCE AIMED AT INSPIRING COMMUNITIES By Mark Noack [ mark@hmbreview.com ]

A sheepish teen wearing a San Francisco Giants hoodie and towing a skateboard under his arm, Carlos Camareña has had problems keeping his grades up and staying out of trouble. But unlike many teenagers who fall behind, Camareña is also considered a model community member. Earlier this year, the 14-yearold helped organize a movie screening to raise relief funds for Haitian earthquake victims, and he is a regular participant in local meetings, sports and other youth activities.

Editorial a 4A | Weather & Tides a 5A | Police Log a 5A | A&E a 2B | Sports a 5B | Real Estate a 1C | Classifieds a 3C

He attends the youth council at Moonridge Housing Complex, the largely Hispanic, affordable-living community south of Half Moon Bay. With some initial reluctance, he was convined to describe his desire to help his community. “Since I’ve lived here, there’s been a lot of drugs and gangbanging. And I want to change that,” he said. “If I have a family here, I want it to be a better place.” On Saturday, Camareña and about 70 adolescents from across the Bay Area from similar disadvantaged backgrounds came to Moonridge See MOONRIDGE a 8A


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