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History: Equestrians have been enjoying beach rides for years

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HALF MOON BAY GYM TIME PEEK INTO THE COASTSIDE’S NEW GYMNASIUM

+MAD ABOUT SAFFRON

COASTSIDE BOTANTIST COAXES DELICATE FILAMENTS TO LIFE

BEER HERE LOCAL BREWERIES TAKE PART IN SAN FRANCISCO BEER WEEK


HALF MOON BAY

Contents Features Mad about saffron 12

Botanist and Garden Apothecary owner Jennifer Lee Segale brings the enticing filaments to Half Moon Bay BY KAITLYN BARTLEY

18 Hail to the ale

SF Beer Week kicks off Feb. 10 and Coastside breweries are joining in the fun BY CARINA WOUDENBERG

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Departments CoastsideCanine

Dottie and Kora the Australian blue merle shepherds 44

Coastal Garden 42 Publisher’s Note 6 Flashback 10 Upcoming 8 Real Estate 46

On the cover: Nicole Reynolds is a beer tender at Sacrilege Brewery and Kitchen on Main Street in Half Moon Bay. JohnGreen

24 Let the games begin

New gym brings Cabrillo schools, Boys and Girls Club under one gleaming roof BY CLAY LAMBERT

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Wedding Guide Local resources to make your day special SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

COURTESY ERIK WATTS

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Publisher’s Note

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Maybe don’t try a new barber the day before your wedding

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here are few things funnier for teenage kids than looking at old photo albums of their parents before they were born. Feathered hair slays them. Braces with headgear doubles them up. But what really brings down the house is when they break out the wedding album. My wife, of course, looks stunning. Wearing her grandmother’s lace wedding dress, my grandmother’s wedding ring and a crown of flowers in her hair, she has a timeless, natural beauty. The groom on the other hand has more of a “did you not have time to get ready?” look going on. I had gotten a haircut the day before our ceremony and ended up with a bowl cut complete with bangs that a laser couldn’t have cut straighter. I wore a collarless linen shirt that was stylish in June of 1996 but looked ridiculous by that fourth of July. And for some flair, I had a friend sew a vest for me. It was maroon. And way too small. This had the effect of making the sleeves on my over-sized shirt poof out like a pirate. This be my wedding day, matey. My tan linen pants were classy, but would have looked better if I hadn’t skipped a belt loop. And for shoes? Leather sandals. Because I wanted to make sure my flip-flop tan was visible. But that’s OK. Let them laugh. No matter how ridiculous we (I) looked, our wedding day was incredible. Our favorite people were on hand to help us celebrate the most important day of our lives. Plus, when they really start to poke fun, I can just pull down the picture album when their dad used to cut their hair while they were sleeping — with the scissors on his Swiss army knife. There are few things funnier for parents than seeing how goofy they made their kids look. BILL MURRAY Publisher bill@hmbreview.com

Want to make sure your wedding look doesn’t look dated twenty years later? Impossible. But you can improve your odds using our annual Wedding Guide on page 32.

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PUBLISHER Bill Murray

COPY EDITOR Julie Gerth

BUSINESS OFFICE Barbara Anderson

EDITOR Clay Lambert

PHOTOGRAPHER John Green

CIRCULATION Lynn Altwer

WRITERS Kaitlyn Bartley Sarah Griego Guz Carina Woudenberg

DESIGN Bill Murray

ADVERTISING SALES Karin Litcher Randie Marlow Stacy Rentel

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CONTACT US 714 Kelly Ave. Half Moon Bay, CA, 94019 (650) 726-4424 www.hmbreview.com SEND LETTER AND PHOTOS Your contributions are welcome. Please send photos and letters for consideration to bill@hmbreview.com. ©2017, Half Moon Bay Review


Upcoming

~Hear a

New Orleans legend ~ You are Nicholas Payton second-lines into the Bach Dancing and Dynamite Society on the last weekend in February. He is a multi-instrumentalist who has collaborated with the greats and is a founding member of the SFJazz Collective. When: 4:30 p.m., Feb. 26 Where: Bach Dancing and Dynamite Society More info: bachddsoc.org

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getting sleepy

The science of sleep is the subject of a Brews and Views discussion with Somnology, Inc. CEO Patrick Yam. He pioneered a premier sleep monitoring device enterprise to assist everyone who has a problem getting to sleep at night. If you are one of the millions of Americans who don’t get enough sleep, you can learn how to change that. When: 6 p.m., Feb. 2 Where: Half Moon Bay Brewing Co. More info: hmbbrewingco. com

~ Dance the ~ Support night away!

the teachers

The Coastside Women’s Club has you covered this Valentine’s Day weekend. The popular group is hosting a dance and fundraiser on the Saturday before the biggest day on the calendar for lovers. There will be a deejay, artisan cheese station, wine bar and much more. When: 6:30 p.m., Feb. 11 Where: Ocean Colony Club, Half Moon Bay More info: coastsidewomensclub.org

For several years now, bighearted Coastsiders have turned out for a school supply party hosted by the Half Moon Bay Coastside Chamber of Commerce and Visitors’ Bureau. Supplies and cash donations are given to every teacher in attendance. When: 4:30 p.m. social, 5:30 p.m. giveaway, Feb. 16 Where: Mavericks Event Center, Princeton More info: 726-8380


Flashback

A history of horses on our Coastside beaches T here are many iconic images of the San Mateo County coast, but none more so than a line of horseback riders making their way down a bluff trail to Poplar Beach. Horses have used the bluff trail to get down to the beach for at least 60 years now. It is one of the checklist items that many coastal visitors hope to knock off their bucket list. That doesn’t mean that it’s always popular with the locals. For many years, some Half Moon Bay residents have complained that the coast’s visitor-serving horse stables make the beach less safe for pedestrians, contribute to beach erosion and leave poop on Poplar. As a result, every few years there is a standoff between riders and the stables on the one hand and those who say horses and beaches don’t mix here. Twenty years ago, a group of petitioners suggested to the city that there be fewer access points for horseback riders looking to get to the beach. Five years ago the city forced local stables to pay a $16,000 annual fee for use of the access to the beach. Each time use of the beach has been challenged, the equestrian community has rallied. Five hundred people signed a petition in 1997, asking that access be guaranteed south of Kelly Avenue. Fifty people showed up in 2009 to ensure the City Council heard from horse fans.

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Twenty years ago, Half Moon Bay Parks Commissioner Arabella Decker wrote an impassioned plea to allow horses to remain. “When people move to the country to experience the out of doors and other of the assets of country life, they are faced with a reality which is often in conflict with the prepackaged suburban image built upon years of television, where neither the smells nor the birth and death cycle of life is explored … Remain cautious when individuals attempt to sanitize life’s experience for they may instead eliminate a historic recreational link to the past.” — Clay Lambert


BOTANIST AND GARDEN APOTHECARY OWNER JENNIFER LEE SEGALE BRINGS THE ENTICING FILAMENTS TO HALF MOON BAY

Crocus sativus blossoms provide stigmas that are the spice saffron.

MAD ABOUT

saffron

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By Kaitlyn Bartley Photos courtesy Jennifer Lee Segale

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ennifer Lee Segale transforms the exotic into the familiar and makes the unattainable skin-close. Since high school, the Coastside native has been tilling a plot of land near Lobitas Creek Cutoff, first coaxing the five-acre parcel into producing vegetables and then medicinal herbs. Now she’s bringing the allure of the spice fields to Half Moon Bay by cultivating crocus sativus — ­ the purple blossom whose stigmas are known as the spice saffron. At the end of January, the crimson threads made their debut in the line of skincare products and tea blends Segale sells at her Half Moon Bay boutique Garden Apothecary. Before reaching her customers’ faces, each of Segale’s strands undergoes a six-year journey across the world as it transforms from bulb to blossom to the delicate filaments with their unmistakable color and scent.   Segale’s family jokes she revealed her green thumb


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Above, Jennifer Lee Segale pulls away the flower petal to reveal the saffron threads inside. Top right, crocus sativus corms. Below, saffron threads are drying.

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as a child when she was caught pruning her grandmother’s hedges with safety scissors. As a Half Moon Bay High School student, she persuaded Cabrillo’s then Superintendent John Bayless to let her garden in an unused piece of school land south of Half Moon Bay, which she dubbed Wildflower Farms. She started out with traditional farming, growing artichokes and fava beans — an experiment that did not end in success. “It was a total, epic failure,” she said, partially due to the fact that the land has no water. But from that inauspicious beginning, she learned to harmonize her growing methods with the region’s natural resources. That led Segale to dry farming, a form of agriculture that relies on rain and seasonal weather patterns instead of irrigation for water. Not surprisingly, the technique is risky, especially in years of prolonged drought, and farmers have to prepare for the prospect of years of failure. Undaunted, Segale adopted the method and then embarked on her biggest risk thus far: planting 5,000 crocus sativus. “You get them in the ground and just pray for six weeks,” she said. Saffron is one of the world’s costliest spices by weight. Bronze Age frescoes from the island of Crete depict saffron gatherers, and it has been cultivated throughout southeast Asia, the Near East, and in Europe for millennia. Its aroma is described as sweet and hay-like, and it imbues a deep amber color to food and fabrics. Today, nearly all of the world’s saffron comes from


Iran, which is where most of Segale’s bulbs originated. Hers are 6 years old, which she says is the perfect age since they’re primed to produce their biggest yield. Once the flower bulbs are planted, it’s a month and a half until they begin to flower. Each bulb bears around three lilac-colored flowers, and each flower has three stigma. Once the bulbs are in bloom, the time window to harvest is narrow — just two and a half weeks. Each flower must be plucked by hand to avoid crushing it, and its stigmas also removed manually. Segale harvested all of her crop herself in November, shortly before Thanksgiving, after watching videos of Iranian farmers to learn the best technique for harvesting. After plucking the blossoms, she brought them inside to peel away the petals and reach the stamens inside. Those she dried on a clean linen cloth, monitoring them to make sure they didn’t dry too fast and lose their pungency, or too slow and begin to mold. “Then I started over the next day, for two and a half weeks I picked three times a day,” Segale said. “I logged every day how many flowers I picked. One day it would be 500 flowers. When the season came to a close it dropped off to 20 flowers.” Next year, unless they’re eaten by gophers or other critters, the same bulbs will perform their short pageant again. And Segale is ordering 40 to 50,000 more corms to expand her yield. Despite its allure, Segale says it’s not difficult to grow saffron, just timeand labor-consuming. The flowers grow well in the compact Coastside clay, which bears similarities to the hard red Iranian clay where they flourish. Eventually, she hopes to have enough corms to sell in her shop for customers who want to bring the spice fields into their homes.    For now, customers can find the spice in a tea blend at Garden FEBRUARY

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The ingredients used in Garden Apothecary skin care products include saffron, seen in the upper left here.

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Apothecary and in a facial serum called Higher Ground, the third and last step of the skin care line that Segale debuted on Jan. 27, with the arrival of the new moon. A cleanser made with Coastside honey and a toning mist with rose oil compose the first two steps of the trio. All three products are composed from many botanicals derived from herbs and spices grown at Wildflower Farm. Segale says she approaches skincare from the plant’s perspective. “I’m a gardener, I’m not a cosmetic chemist. My interest in skin care is based solely on my love for a specific plant,” she said. “What medicinal qualities does this (plant) have? I’m constantly trying to figure out what the best product is and is it sustainable for us to cultivate and are people going to love it.” BAY

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Segale also conducts plant research in Belize a few times a year, where she collaborates with a Mayan shaman. “It sounds ridiculous, but I do,” she laughed. “We chat as friends, two people totally obsessed with plants, total dorks.” And it was the shaman who gave her the idea a few years ago to explore cultivating saffron. “I would ask her, ‘What are your staple herbs, and, if you could grow anything, what would you grow?’ She kept saying this Mayan word and it was ‘saffron,’ but I didn’t know it at the time.” Eventually Segale realized what the shaman meant, and “from there I dove into the cultivation and medicinal benefits.”      Those benefits include the spice’s ability to boost circulation, to aid in the body’s capacity to absorb nutrients. It’s also high in B vitamins

and minerals. With her new skin care line, Segale hopes to bring something of beauty from across the globe and root it in Half Moon Bay. She takes pride in the fact that every step of her business is conducted here on the Coastside. “I love the aspect of bringing a new crop to Half Moon Bay and a new industry,” she said. “We do all of the manufacturing and making here in Half Moon Bay. It’s challenging sometimes, but it’s super important that we keep business growing here.” And she hopes her customers will appreciate the process by which their products are created. “I have a handful of employees who live in Half Moon Bay, pay taxes here, shop here,” she said. “Not everything is perfect, but we try to do as much as we can locally as possible.” HALF MOON BAY


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HAIL TO THE ALE AND LAGER, AND IPA, AND PORTER ...

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SF BEER WEEK KICKS OFF FEB. 10 AND COASTSIDE BREWERIES ARE JOINING IN THE FUN Friends gather at Hop Dogma Brewing Co. Co-owner Dan Littlefield says he is glad to see craft beer taking root on the Coastside.

By Carina Woudenberg • Photos by John Green

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any of the participating Bay Area breweries will be taking the opportunity to experiment with new offerings. On the coast, the Half Moon Bay Brewing Co. will be releasing seven new draft and bottled brews. This includes double and triple IPAs for hop lovers and a chocolate-vanilla-coconut porter for those who prefer a darker, sweeter concoction. In collaboration with Hop Dogma Brewing Co. — a newer venture about a mile south of the Princeton FEBRUARY

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Joe Pacini, left, serves Andrew Dorn a beer

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establishment — the brewery will also be offering a new beer called “Lost in the Fog.” In addition to the collaboration, Hop Dogma Brewing Co. co-owner Dan Littlefield says his brewery will also be trying out a new take on a drink they serve called “Silly Gimmick.” Littlefield describes this brew as a juicy, northeasternstyle beer that is unfiltered and cloudy like a Hefeweizen. He adds that the brewery will aim to bring something new for customers to try each day of the weeklong event. “We always release some of our more special beers during SF Beer Week,” Littlefield said. It’s the time of year to splurge on different hops and styles, he noted, and the brewery will be offering specials throughout the week as well. The local breweries will also be participating in some of the wider SF Beer events in addition to holding their own.

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The Half Moon Bay Brewing Company will be participating in events throughout the week including a Bottle Release Party at 7 p.m. on Feb. 11 at Pacific Standard. Here the Berkeley-based brewery will be featuring the Half Moon Bay Brewing Company’s Flanders Red Sour, which is aged with cherries and Papa Juice Old Ale, which is aged in rye whiskey barrels. Joe Pacini, owner of the new Sacrilege Brewery and Kitchen on Main Street in Half Moon Bay, said the brewery will be offering a variety of events throughout the week. On Sunday, Feb. 12, the brewery will be featuring live music from Jon Gunton who is from the band The Dirty. To fit the theme, the brewery will be featuring house-made dirty martini beer and barrel-aged beers, Pacini said. On Feb. 14, Pacini is offering a “Sour


Hop Dogma co-owner Dan Littlefield stands behind his bar on a recent weekday. The brewery will be taking part in SF Beer Week.

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Top, a flight of beer sits ready to be tasted at Hop Dogma. Bottom: Ryan Hick and Tracy Tao enjoy a beer at the brewery.

Valentines,” for people who aren’t in relationships. Naturally, it will be a night focused around sour and tart beers with featured beers sourced from Field Work, Alpha Acid and Ommegang, to name a few. Couples can come if they want — but “no public display of affections,” Pacini warns playfully. Couples can also choose to head over to the Half Moon Bay Brewing Co. that night where they’ll receive a tasting of the brewery’s special, “Crazy For Coconut” porter, select from Valentine’s Day menu specials, nibble on free snacks from Pampered by the Chef and participate in a Geeks Who Drink trivia game. On Feb. 15, Sacrilege will be hosting a Boat to Table dinner and will pair seafood with Field Works beers. A Saison Seminar will be offered at Sacrilege on Feb. 16 where a sales representative from Sierra Nevada will be pairing four funky saisons with different foods. “A little bit of a sensory class,” Pacini said. The participants say the SF Beer Week event appears to have grown over the years. “You can see and feel this kind of beer renaissance that’s happening now where people are starting to respect beer for its flavor,” Littlefield said. “I’m really proud of the craft beer scene that’s developing on the coast.” HALF MOON BAY

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s e m a g begin e h t Let

NEW GYM BRINGS CABRILLO SCHOOLS, BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB UNDER ONE GLEAMING ROOF 24

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John Green

The new gymnasium on the Cunha Intermediate School campus is ready for its close-up as the date for an official opening nears.

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By Clay Lambert

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People who frequent Kelly Avenue in Half Moon Bay have watched the building take shape. 26

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John Green

d Watkins has grown used to the reaction. The Cabrillo Unified School District construction manager pulls open the door leading from the atrium into the new gym at Cunha Intermediate School and suddenly visitors are awash in the spectacle of 15,000 square feet of brightly lit, brand-new recreational space. “You’ll have the same reaction everyone has,” he says. “Man, is this big.” And that is indeed the first reaction upon entering the gym floor. There is room for a collegiateregulation basketball court running north and south, but that doesn’t do the space justice. An electronically controlled curtain can be lowered to bisect that court, leaving a high school court running east and west on either side of the curtain. Kids can play on four shorter north-south courts instead, if they choose. The space is also striped for badminton and volleyball. On either side of the court, there are retractable seats that run eight rows


By the numbers

John Green

The gymnasium’s maple floor features the logo of the Cabrillo Unified School District.

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Basketball backboards

Volleyball courts

Badminton courts

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Clay Lambert

There are two locker rooms in the new facility, as well as a room for referees that features a shower. There are also restrooms, storage rooms and a concession area.

John Green

“WE’VE GONE FROM THE WORST FACILITIES IN THE AREA TO THE BEST,” — ED WATKINS, CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

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high. There are two team locker rooms, a room for referees (the only one with a shower) and restrooms. In the front, there are ticket windows, a concession area, a trophy case and “recognition wall” that will feature a big-screen television. There are two storage rooms because, as Watkins notes, “storage being something you never have enough of.” Out back, there are three tennis courts. When the facility opens, those courts will feature temporary striping, but when the rain stops a special sporting surface will be applied and it will be restriped. Watkins says school officials hope to leave one tennis court accessible even during the school day. Those tennis nets can be raised to make for outside volleyball courts. There are other features too. Among


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“YOU’LL HAVE THE SAME REACTION EVERYONE HAS. MAN, IS THIS BIG.” the most important is a 24-speaker, $130,000 sound system. It benefits from dozens of soundproofing tiles hung high on the walls that deaden the ambient sound. The result is elimination of the echo associated with big indoor gymnasiums. In fact, two people can have a comfortable conversation across 15,000 square feet of maple playing floor. When the gym opens for play on Feb. 10, it will instantly be the Taj Mahal of Coastside recreational areas. In fact, you would have to look quite a ways to find a better recreational facility for kids. The new facility is just one of several recent upgrades. There has also been work in recent years on the high school baseball and softball fields; the city and Boys and Girls Club of the Coastside collaborated on a new skate park; and the school district plans to revamp the high school football field and track. “We’ve gone from the worst facilities in the area to the best,” Watkins says with some pride. Watkins is a Boys and Girls Club of the Coastside board member and the construction manager for Cabrillo Unified School District. He symbolizes the cooperation that made the gym itself possible. The project cost about $11.5 million. The Boys and Girls Club, aided by a generous anonymous donor, contributed more than $8 million of the total. Cabrillo paid $3 million from bond proceeds. During the school day, Cunha Intermediate School administrators will control the space. After school the curtain will drop and the school will have the south side of the building, while the Boys and Girls Club — which is based right across Kelly Avenue in the Ted Adcock Community Center — will use the north side. The gym has been in the works for years. Public infrastructure projects 30

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on the coast seem to move at a glacial pace, and this one is no exception. Work was originally supposed to begin in November 2014, but workers didn’t break ground until December 2015. Then it was to be complete in August 2016. Now, six months later, it is ready for its close-up. The price of the building has fluctuated with the plans. An original plan for a dual gymnasium — one for the school and another for the Boys and Girls Club of the Coastside — were scrapped when the cost estimate ballooned over $15 million. When the gym opens this month, few people are likely to be focused on details like that. Instead, they will probably be wowed by the Coastside’s newest manmade jewel. HALF MOON BAY

SHOP & DINE

ON THE COASTSIDE

Opening night The Boys and Girls Club of the Coastside and the Cabrillo Unified School District plan a grand opening from 4 to 6 p.m. on Feb. 4. The first big games at the new gym will pit the boys and girls basketball teams from Half Moon Bay and Terra Nova high schools. Those games are scheduled for Feb. 10. For details, see hmbhsathletics.com.

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ngplanner The Coastside is an incredible spot for your perfect wedding. Let these local businesses help make your day as special as possible.

Jewelry, cakes, dresses , flowers, venues, gifts and more ... Find these local businesses inside Pasta Moon 35 Harley Farms 35 Goldworks 36 The Mountain House Restaurant 36 Mazzetti’s Bakery 36 Sweet 55 39 Hastings House 39 Suneenat Dressmaker 39 Lovey’s Tea Shop 40 Long Branch Saloon 40 Half Moon Bay Optometry 40 Driftwood and Roses 41 Repetto’s 41 Wong’s Photos 41 Pacifca Coastside Museum 41 Jewels Forever 41

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WeddingGuide

Throw a casual wedding to remember

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legant, lavish weddings provide moments couples will remember for years to come. But while such storybook ceremonies and receptions remain popular, casual affairs are gaining popularity. According to the bridal resource The Knot, more and more couples are opting for less pageantry and more laid back panache when planning their weddings. For those who prefer something more intimate and more personalized, casual weddings may be right on target. There are many advantages to having a “luxe with less” wedding, including the ability to break molds and impart more of the couple’s personality into the event. Another advantage is the price tag. The average U.S. wedding, according to The Knot 2014 Real Weddings Study, costs $31,213. In some urban areas, particularly New York City, average costs are three times that amount. Although wedding costs have gone up, the average number of wedding guests has gone down. As such, certain couples might look to rein in other aspects of their wedding. Transforming the festivities into a casual affair can help keep the overall budget low while still allowing for an exciting and enjoyable event. To put casual plans 34

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into motion, consider these ideas to help the wedding vision come to fruition. Venue Catering halls and other reception sites do a wonderful job of meeting the needs of their clientele. However, food and beverage costs are often the most expensive wedding expense. To reduce the per-guest cost and also incorporate some variety into their wedding days, couples can consider a venue change. Look for public locations that allow couples to hire their own caterer, which may be a favorite restaurant or specialty food shop. The cost per person may decrease dramatically from the venue costs. Changing the venue also enables couples to pick unique spots that may hold special meaning to them. For example, couples can choose the site of their first date or the location where their proposal took place. Contrast Enjoy a casual, free-spirited wedding that incorporates some aspects of formality in an offbeat way. Think about serving fast food, such as fried chicken or pizza, on fine china. Those wearing tuxedos and gowns can opt for casual footwear, such

as athletic shoes. Place wildflowers in crystal vases. These are just some methods to give a rich feel without removing the fun element. Personal touches Menus or wedding programs printed at home in a fun font can set the casual tone couples are looking for. Look for eclectic fabrics to use as gift tags or napkin holders. Handpainted signs or a hodge-podge of picture frames can display pertinent information, such as itineraries or seating arrangements. Encourage friends or family to contribute a favorite menu item to the food offerings. A home-baked dessert can be delicious and budget-friendly. Wardrobe Clothing often indicates the formality of an occasion. Everyone from the wedding party to the guests can dress down. Sundresses can replace taffeta bridesmaids’ gowns. Guys can opt for tailored sports coats with jeans. Guests may feel comfortable in less formal attire that facilitates dancing and mingling. Casual weddings are becoming more popular as many couples are playing down the party for various reasons.


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WeddingGuide

Successful toasts help shape social events

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toast is a drink raised in the health or honor of someone. Such salutes are typically accompanied by some heartfelt words or tokens of advice. Toasts are a common component of social gatherings, including retirement parties, milestone birthdays and weddings. Toast of the town It’s difficult to pinpoint who originated the practice of toasting. Several ancient societies would raise a glass in honor of deities or special guests. Ancient Greeks offered libations to the gods as a part of ritualistic practices and also as a point to drink to each other’s good health. Ancient Romans at one point instituted a practice that all people must drink to Emperor Augustus at each meal. The term “toast” has an interesting history. Dating back to the 16th century, “toast” refers to a piece of toasted bread. A piece of toast was commonly added to wine during this time because wine was quite inferior in quality then compared to modern vintages. Stale bread was placed into the jug to soak up acidity and improve the flavor. The

wine also improved the palatability of the old or spiced bread. According to National Geographic magazine, by the 18th century, the term “toast” had been transferred from the floating piece of bread to the person honored by the toast. Eventually, “toast” represented the drink raised or the words offered with the gesture. Prepare for a toast Toasts can be off-the-cuff remarks shared in the moment, but for many special events, they should be prepared well in advance. Nowadays, some toast-givers devote extra time to preparing toasts, particularly because they know these sentiments can live on indefinitely on social media. Giving a toast can induce anxiety, but some nerves can be relieved simply by doing one’s homework and not procrastinating. Writing tips A person giving a toast is trying to gain the attention of a group of people who may not be very attentive. These tips can improve the content of the toasts and their delivery. Keep ‘you’ out of it. This toast is

not about you. It’s about the person you are honoring. Therefore, do not put any selfcongratulatory messages in the toast. Make it all about the person — even beginning the toast with that person’s name. Hook people in. Open the toast with a good joke or anecdote that will help introduce the person of honor. For example, Jake is a great guy because he’s the type of person who will offer to meet you at your dorm room at 2 a.m. with pizza and beer to get you through a study session. Too bad he has a horrible sense of direction and repeatedly shows up at the wrong door. Tell a story. Reference the person in the toast, other audience members, and even yourself if you can be painted in a selfdeprecating light. Keep it short. This is a toast, not a monologue. Be brief so that the audience doesn’t lose interest. Set a five-minute limit. Wrap it up. Conclude the toast by tying the story back to the introduction and making sure to include the audience once more. This will help you get the biggest laughs and applause.

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WeddingGuide

Reconnect during wedding planning

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edding planning can be intense and often requires dedication and many hours of work. Coordinating a wedding often requires that couples make many different decisions and spend a considerable amount of time in the weddingplanning trenches. Couples expend so much energy planning their weddings that it can be easy to lose sight of the bigger picture — namely the relationship that is the basis for the marriage in the first place. But as easy as it can be to get lost in wedding planning, couples can use this time together to connect on a deeper level and learn to work cooperatively. Divide and conquer. Separate wedding planning duties so that both of you feel you

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are contributing equally and no one person gets overly stressed out. Stress can lead to short tempers and arguments. Establish a mutual budget. Even the healthiest couple argues over finances from time to time, but budgetary debates should not set a negative tone for wedding planning. Couples should discuss their potential budget before they even begin to plan their weddings, and both partners should do their best to compromise while also understanding where the other person is coming from. Schedule time for fun. Do not let wedding planning be all-consuming. Schedule days that allow you to enjoy yourselves together without having to think about or discuss your pending nuptials.

This may include date nights that may have fallen by the wayside since getting engaged or periodic day trips to get away from it all. Explore your mutual hobbies or try something new. Learn to laugh at the little things. Not every detail will go off without a hitch. How you react as a couple may influence how much you enjoy your wedding. Recognize that certain things will not go your way, but that unforeseen circumstances will not ruin your wedding day, no matter how unpleasant they may seem. Laugh at what cannot be changed and recognize that, in the long run, the details you think are major today may actually prove trivial when you look back on your wedding day in the years to come.


Did you know? According to the 2015 Real Weddings Study from the premier multiplatform wedding resource The Knot, the most popular month for couples to get engaged is December. Sixteen percent of survey respondents became engaged in the final month of the calendar year. The survey also found that the average length of a couple’s engagement is now 14.5 months. Where June once was the most popular month of the year to tie the knot, today’s couples are now heading down the aisle most often in October. Seventeen percent of weddings now occur in October, closely followed by 15 percent in September. And at what age are couples saying their “I dos”? The average marrying age for a bride is 29 and it is 31 for the groom.

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Did you know?

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hen making floral arrangements for special events, such as weddings, anniversary celebrations or company galas, party planners can save substantial amounts of money sticking with native and in-season flowers. While exotic flowers flown in from afar may make stunning dining table centerpieces, the cost of importing those flowers can be considerable, possibly even more than the cost of the flowers themselves. In addition, conditions to keep non-native flowers looking their best must be ideal, which can be difficult for party planners to ensure. In-season plants are budgetfriendly, as prices can skyrocket when party planners choose out-ofseason blooms for their get-togethers. While it’s possible get many flowers out-of-season, others are available only in-season, saving planners the trouble of finding ways to pay the often exorbitant costs associated with finding and securing such blooms during their off-seasons. Planners who have their hearts set on particular blooms that are temporarily unavailable should discuss their options with local florists, who may suggest look-alike flowers that are similar in appearance and in-season.

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Wedding RESOURCES

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CoastalGarden

Time to start your orchard

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WINTER IS PERFECT FOR PLANTING BARE ROOT FRUIT TREES

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t’s the new year, and a time for fresh beginnings and new growth. In other words, the perfect time to plant a bare root fruit tree! You will have no better start for your backyard orchard, whether it will contain a single tree or half a dozen. Start by choosing a variety suited for our coastal climate. Fruit trees require a certain number of “chill hours” to set fruit, meaning the number of hours falling below 45 degrees between Nov. 1 and Feb. 28. In the Bay Area, this limits our choices somewhat. The best way to figure out what works is to ask your neighbors what they’re growing! The secondbest way is to look at the recommended chill hours for the varieties you’re considering. Santa Rosa plum or Comice pear, at only 300 hours? Perfect. Gordon apple at 400? Beautiful. I have an unknown cherry that fruits every few years when it’s been cold enough, but only the warmest yards should attempt peaches and apricots. There are low-chill varieties, but most of us do not get enough summer heat to ripen. Take into account whether your chosen variety needs a pollenizer. If you’re only planning on planting a single tree, you’ll need a self-fruitful variety. If it needs a pollenizer, make sure your companion tree is compatible. Once you’ve chosen your tree, you can either order it online or visit your local nursery. You don’t want the biggest one on the lot; University of California research has shown that a trunk about as big as your thumb has the best outcome. Keeping the roots moist is essential, so get the

tree in the ground as quickly as possible. Dig a hole that’s wide and deep enough to accommodate the roots, but no deeper; above all, you don’t want the tree to sink down into the soil with repeated watering. Root tissue can harden and survive above ground, but trunk tissue will rot if it’s underground, so keep the top of the root ball level with the native soil. The graft scar (the stub where the chosen variety was grafted to a sturdy rootstock) should face north as it’s more susceptible to sunburn. There is no need to amend your soil; research has shown that it doesn’t enhance, and may hinder, your tree’s growth. Now comes the hard part. Unless you want a huge tree for aesthetic reasons, most orchardists strongly recommend a hard heading cut at no higher than 24,” or about knee height. That’s right, cut that beautiful, tall trunk right off, just above a bud. You will have a sad-looking stub, but that harsh cut stimulates amazing winter growth, and the top three or four buds will sprout into long, elegant branches soon enough. Young trees grow faster than we expect, and within a few years an un-cut bare root tree will be fruiting far our of our grasp. This early pruning sets the stage for the elegant “wineglass” shape you see at professional orchards everywhere. Now let the lengthening days work their magic and enjoy the fruits of your labor!

BILL MURRAY

By Arwen Griffith

Arwen Griffith is a master gardener serving San Mateo and San Francisco counties. Contact your local Master Gardeners to answer all your gardening questions and find out about free classes at smsf-mastergardeners.ucanr.edu

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CoastsideCanines Dottie and Kora Breed: Australian blue merle shepherds Age: Dottie is 2; Kora is 9 Australian blue merle shepherds Dottie (bottom) and Kora pose in the yard of owner Karen Taylor in Moss Beach. Both are expertly trained and have been competing in agility trials. In fact, Kora holds a national championship title. While not in training, they like to take walks on the bluffs with their friends. Everybody loves to give them treats and they will eat anything. They love belly rubs. They travel with Karen and her husband, Greg, who is a drag racer. They love to watch Greg race. Dottie is the tomboy, while Kora is known as the princess. — John Green

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The Half Moon Bay Magazine is supported by our advertisers. Visit them and thank them for making this publication possible!

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RealEstate

Realtors: Do you have a recent sale that you think might make a good

featured home? Contact Karin@hmbreview.com. There is no charge.

RECENT SALE

Address 659 Grove St., Half Moon Bay Bedrooms 3 Bathrooms 3 Sale price $812,500 Square footage 1,880 sq. ft. Lot size 9,680 sq. ft.

Downtown Delight

This 3-bedroom, 3-bath home on large oversized lot has lots of potential. It feautres hardwood floors, a separate dining room, laundry, and family rooms and an attached 2-car garage. Fenced yard and RV parking area with room for expansion or second unit. Great location near restaurants, parks, trails and not far from the beach. Starting out or retiring, the delight of small-town living awaits you.

PROVIDED BY ARA CROCE, CRS, INTERO REAL ESTATE SERVICES

S N A P S H OT

Median home sales price

$915,000 -14.5% Year over year

TRULIA.COM MARKET TRENDS 46

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RealEstate Select recent Coastside real estate transactions

Seller

Property

Buyer

Amount

Kenneth E. Gates and Valerie D. Jones

209 Eagle Trace, Half Moon Bay

Jeffrey A. Myer and Elizabeth Moncada

$1,450,000

Tamara Trejo

731 Main St., Half Moon Bay

Jerry and Nancy A. Whiting

$895,000

Christopher S. Sears and Rene L. Schilling

1201 Audubon Ave., Montara

Leah Podkaminer

$754,000

Karl and Paula J. Bozicevic, trustees

839 Linda Vista St., Moss Beach

Mission Mile LLC

$2,498,000

Carlos G. Bolanos

vacant land, Pescadero

Butano Canyon Mutual Water Co.

$43,182

Barry J. and Wendela De Wys Schiffman

10721 Cabrillo Highway, Pescadero

The Wakelee Trust

$6,875,000

Gary W. Palmer and Joan C. Kirkaldie

461 Dearborn Park Road, Pescadero

Waldemar J. and Ellen E. Bruj

$680,000

Steve and Anna Smith

vacant land, El Granada

Glenn E. Reynolds and Nancy M. Bell

$300,000

Jujhar S. and Harmeet K. Sodhi

162 Sevilla Ave., El Granada

Gordon Y. Lewin and Hilary N. Rowen, trustees

$1,100,000

Bruce J. and Cynthia J. Russell

103 Carnoustie Dr., Half Moon Bay

Joseph E. Rizza, trustee

$2,200,000

Nila Rodriguez, trustee

100 14th St., Montara

Charles W. Leiter and Susan Levine, trustees

$2,675,000

Stephen H. Cotterill and John R. Calcagni

840 Lincoln St., Moss Beach

Daniel O. and Erica Starks, and Cheryl Holmes

$1,264,000

Patrick L. and Barbara J.S. McKee, trustees

139 Madrona Ave., El Granada

Brent A. and Jennifer E. Simmons

$1,015,000

R. Michael Lydon, et. al.

vacant land, Half Moon Bay

Katharina Powers, trustee

$1,600,000

Elio Carloni

327 Filbert Ave., Half Moon Bay

John and Anna Sewart

$865,000

Daniel R. Sanchez

487 Pine Ave., Half Moon Bay

Simon S. and Angela P. Liu

$890,000

Gary S. Amaral

521 Terrace Ave., Half Moon Bay

Brina Elmore

$525,000

Michael B. and Monnie E. Mount, trustees

265 Troon Way, Half Moon Bay

Judy Lloyd

$650,000

Patrick J. and Laura J. Hawkins

vacant land, Moss Beach

Vincent T. Armando

$353,500

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RealEstate How to protect a coastal property

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any people dream of owning coastal properties. Some aspire to have a home away from home for vacations or long weekends, while others move to the coast to be nearer to family or when they reach retirement age. Living close to the water can be relaxing, and it’s hard to beat the fresh air and the relaxing sound of the waves. However, coastal homes require some unique upkeep that prospective buyers should familiarize themselves with before buying a property.

particularly at risk because they face the constant onslaught of Mother Nature. Fiberglass, vinyl and aluminum are less corrosive than other metal parts and should be considered in window framing. Humidity and salt concentrations also can cause concern indoors. Mold likes damp, dark conditions, so homeowners should do their best to keep their homes dry and well-ventilated. Rely on dehumidifiers to take moisture out of the air. Install more vents to draw air outside and create fresh air flow.

Salt water Salt buildup is one of the pitfalls of living close to the ocean. Salt is corrosive to metal components, so homeowners are advised to avoid metal parts in various areas of construction on their homes. Windows and doors are

Coastal flooding Coastal flooding is another concern for homeowners who live close to the water. Prospective buyers should first determine if the house they want to buy is in a flood zone or an evacuation zone. This is information that

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may come up when applying for homeowner’s insurance, as flood insurance is a separate policy. Privacy and safety Living by the ocean can be great, but coastal towns are often a magnet for tourists. Homeowners with seaside homes or homes in popular tourist areas may want to take extra steps to create privacy and security. Fencing and natural windblocks can block the view of backyards and other outdoor spaces. An alarm system can offer peace of mind in areas close to resort towns. Adequate lighting can deter trespassers as well. Living by the ocean is a dream for many people. The increased upkeep required on a coastal home is often a small price to pay for such luxury, but it’s something prospective buyers should consider before buying a home.


Profile for Wick Communications

Half Moon Bay February 2017  

Half Moon Bay February 2017