Issuu on Google+

FEBRUARY 2014

Half Moon Bay

DayTripping ~ Redwood trees

and killer burgers

MARRIAGE

~ An officiant, a mother, and

a lawyer chime in on what the vow really means

Vtoaulting victory ~ Sisters head to Europe

to compete for their country


2012 2013models modelsatat closeout closeout prices prices while whilethey theylast! last! Come see our wood, pellet & gas stove showroom.

CREATIVE ENERGY

Warm it up! Feel the warmth of HotSprings Spas and the heat of an Avalon Fireplace! Come in for a “honey” of a deal.

1917 S. EL CAMINO REAL SAN MATEO “JUST SOUTH OF HWY. 92”

(650) 574-7600

Creative Energy offers a full range of gas, wood, pellet stoves, inserts and fireplaces. With three San Francisco Bay Area showrooms to serve you, you're sure to find the perfect fireplace or stove. 2 1

Half

Moon

Bay

FEBRUARY

Serving the Bay Since 1976!

2014

OTHER LOCATIONS:


Ara Croce, CRS BRE00483961

Real Estate Broker

QUIET CENTRALITY

Enjoy being close to everything in this upper quiet end unit. Whether you want to wander the beaches, trails, or meander downtown Main Street for coffee or a good meal — you are but a moment away from a carefree lifestyle. Unit features 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, fireplace, balcony, and in-unit stackable laundry and covered parking (with extra storage) for 2 cars (1-car garage & 1-car carport.) Kitchen has been updated with new cabinetry, granite, and stainless steel. Start a carefree lifestyle for a price that can’t be beat! $429,000

UNUSUAL OPPORTUNITY

Ara Croce, CRS Real Estate Broker Phone: (650) 712-1299 Fax: (650) 888-823-7453 E-mail: ara@aracroce.com

2 homes, 2.8 acres, plus barn & out buildings, on west, ocean side of Hwy 1, only 2 miles to HMB center. Current zoning R1-B-2, Subdivision possible — Extensive report available. Formerly a Dairy farm, last 25 + years as small ranch w/animals. Surrounded by Ocean Colony Golf Course Development, near Ocean & Open Space. Possible uses: small ranch and/or multifamily uses for $1,900,000.

1-800-59-CROCE w w w. a r a c ro c e . c o m FEBRUARY

2014

Half

Moon

Bay

1


Half Moon Bay

Contents

FEBRUARY 2014

Features Departments Musical Moonlighting 10 After the lights go out and the workday is done, some Coastsiders grab their instruments and head to their next gig.. BY MARK NOACK PHOTOS BY DEAN COPPOLA

18

Bird heaven on Devil’s Slide

Falcons, owls, cormorants and murres all call Devil’s Slide home. The trick is keeping it that way.

OpenDoor

El Granada bathroom gets Zen makeover. 42

Q&A

Palmer sisters are making a name for themselves in international equestrian competition. 28

BY JULIA REIS

DayTripper

34

Chamber leans on its senior staff

Three women put wealth of experience to use serving tourists BY CLAY LAMBERT

Purisima Creek Redwoods offer a perfect outing capped off with a burger. 46

Words on a word

Coastsiders weigh in on a word that is on many lips. This month: Marriage 35

CoastsideCanines

Cricket is a welcome friend at the harbor. 44

Publisher’s Note 4 Contributions 6 Real Estate 48

The Palmer sisters practice their vaulting. Photo by Dean Coppola

2 3

Half

Moon

Bay

FEBRUARY

2014

BILL MURRAY

on the cover


Toque Blanche Cooking Newsletter

Sharing the Love In this season of passion, we thought we’d share with you things we are passionate about. Of course that means being in the kitchen. Here are some items our staff loves: Sonomic “Almost Vinegar” - $24.99

“This magical elixir is my favorite food product in the store. Sonomic is like a balsamic vinegar, but better. This cabernet sauvignon grape reduction, has just the right combination of sweet, tart and rich flavor, this makes me want to eat my spinach! Delicious on berries, cheese, ice cream or meats. The possibilities are endless!” -- Leslie

Vitamix - $499.99-$629.99

“Since I grew up in a household where food is a priority, my favorite item in the store is the wonderful Vitamix-perfect for fresh pesto sauces, tomato-based soups and is even great for grating cheese!” --Pauline

Urfa Chili - $6.99

“I love all the spices we carry. Being Italian I didn’t know much about the spices from other countries, I only knew parsley, basil, oregano and rosemary. Being introduced to them has opened a door to another way of cooking for me. I now can cook with marash chili, urfa and many others. It’s a great experience! My favorite is Urfa chili!” -- Lilliana

Soda Stream – $99.99-199.99

“I love the Soda Stream. It’s very user friendly and perfect for soda drinkers and carbonated water drinkers, alike. You save so much money with one Co2 cartridge for $15 you can make 60 liters of bubbly water. Even Costco can’t beat that price!” -- Grace

VMatter Knives – $249.99-399.99

“The makers of VMatter knives are out to make all other knives obsolete. These revolutionary knives are made out of an “amorphous metal alloy” that is “stronger than steel” and are touted to “never need sharpening.” I can tell you that in addition, they are beautiful and feel great in the hand. I think it may be the perfect knife!” -- Charles

Westmark Reversible Peeler – $14.99

“I love the fact that this peeler has only one, slightly curved blade. Most peelers have two blades facing each other and they just get in the way. This one is reversible so you can use it either right or left handed, or as I do going away from me on longer items like cucumbers and carrots, or toward me when peeling rounded fruits such as apples.” – Stuart

Book of the Month One Pan Two Plates

Carla Snyder teaches us how to get a healthful meal on the table in less time and with less clean up. All dishes are made from scratch, cooked all in one pan (one pan clean-up) and take under an hour to prepare, many under 30 minutes. There’s no need to think about side dishes as all meals have a veggie in the pan as well. One of the recipes that grabbed us was sautéed pork chops with sweet potatoes, apples and mustard sauce.

Question of the Month Why does my chocolate have white on it? Is it safe to eat? Over time, chocolate loses its temper (as it were). Tempering is a process of heating and cooling chocolate to form stable crystals. These crystals then assure that the chocolate will be firm at room temperature. Think of that perfect, snappy coating on a truffle. If the chocolate gets warm again and then re-cools, a mottled white coasting will appear. It's called "blooming", and the chocolate is safe to eat. This effect is one of the main concerns in the production of chocolate, even though it is purely cosmetic. The best way to fix this dilemma is to melt the chocolate in a space that is between 86 and 90 degrees, which just happens to be the temperature inside your mouth. That’s what we call convenient!

Upcoming Demos

All demos are on Saturdays from 11am - 2pm for FREE February 1st Molé Tasting

February 15th Salt Tasting

February 8th Neo Cocoa Tasting

February 22nd Inna Jam Tasting

See other specials and sign-up for our newsletter at www.MyToque.com or visit F E Bus R U at A R 604 Y 2 0 Main 1 4 H a St. l f in M oHalf o n BMoon ay 3Bay.


Half Moon Bay FEBRUARY 2014

Publisher’s Note

T

he Coastside is a pretty romantic place. Come Valentine’s Day, you can be sure the restaurants with ocean views will be packed like See’s candies in a heart-shaped box. And you can also be sure there will be a number of engagement rings found in the bottom of champagne flutes or given on bended knee as the sun dips into the Pacific. Let’s hope these proposals go more smoothly than my attempt at a romantic engagement back in 1996. At the time, my future wife and I did a fair amount of backcountry skiing, a blend between cross-country and downhill skiing. I decided many months earlier that I was going to pop the question, but courage and the perfect setting never seemed to intersect. The summit of this lonely mountain with its sweeping views of the Sierra Nevada Mountains would be an ideal spot. I couldn’t have spit if you asked me to — let alone string together an eloquent proposal — so instead of asking aloud, I stomped out the words “Marry Me?” in the snow just behind us. I would ask her to come take a look at the view from the other side and she would stumble across the question. Perfect. Until, of course, a fellow skier and his dog joined us at the summit. The three of sat at the summit eating lunch while six feet behind us sat the most important question I would ever ask. Meanwhile, the skier’s dog bounded in the snow and I was sure my “Marry Me?” would soon become illegible, or worse, that our intruder would stumble on the message before I had a chance to show her. “You lovebirds just get engaged?” he would ask. Finally, after ignoring every question he posed — “ You ski here often? Great weather, huh? What kind of skis are those?” — and being accused of being rude by my girlfriend after our visitor finally skied away, I was able to present my cryptic, and now somewhat smudged, marriage proposal. She said, “yes,” I placed a metal ring from my ski boot on her thumb, as it was way too big for her ring finger, and we skied down the mountain as an engaged couple. Check out Words on a Word on page 45 for some other takes on the word marriage. Bill Murray Publisher bill@hmbreview.com

4 5

Half

Moon

Bay

Publisher Bill Murray

COPY EDITOR Julie Gerth

Business Office Barbara Anderson

Editor Clay Lambert

Photographer Dean Coppola

Writers Mark Noack Stacy Trevenon Julia Reis

design Bill Murray Mark Restani

Circulation Catherine Zurak Advertising Sales Linda Pettengill Louise Strutner Joanne Wright Barbara Dinnsen

FEBRUARY

2014

contact us 714 Kelly Avenue Half Moon Bay, CA, 94019 (650) 726-4424 www.hmbreview.com send letter and photos Your contributions are welcome. Please send photos and letters for consideration to bill@hmbreview.com. ©2014,Half Moon Bay Review


Because a handshake stillstill Because a handshake Because a handshake still click means more than a mouse means more than a mouse click means more than a mouse click Sure, there are lots of good

Sure, there are lots of good Sure, there are lots of good deals

Sure, there are of good offered on lots the internet. But when it

Stop Stop by ororcall call today! Stopby byor calltoday! today!

Kevin O’Brien, Kevin O’Brien, Kevin O’Brien,Kevin O’Brien, Adam Underwood, Adam Underwood Adam Underwood Adam Underwood Claudia Lopez & Heidi Frank & Barbara Guaraglia && Barbara BarbaraGuaraglia Guaraglia

License #0C17330 0C17330 License License # # 0C17330

But to insurance comesit insurance you more But when when ittocomes comes to need insurance thanit justcomes value.than You Premier But todeserve insurance you need more just value. youwhen need more than just value. Service. And that’s what you’ll get you more than just value. You deserve Premier Service. Youneed deserve Service. from ourPremier agency and Allied InsurYou deserve Premier Service. And what you’ll ance. We take time to getget to know you And that’s that’s what you’ll get And that’s what you’ll get and your insurance needs. And Allied from our agency and Allied from our agency and Allied offers you money-saving discounts; from our agency and time Allied Insurance. We take to Insurance. We take time 24-hours-a-day, 7-days-a-week Insurance. We take time totoclaim get to know and reporting;you and fast, fair your claim service. get to know you and your get to know you and your insurance needs. And Allied insuranceneeds. needs.And AndAllied Allied insurance

Stop by or call today!

discounts; 24-hours-a-day, discounts;24-hours-a-day, 24-hours-a-day, discounts; 7-days-a-week claim reporting; 7-days-a-weekclaim claimreporting; reporting; 7-days-a-week and fast, fair claim service. and fast, fast,fair fairclaim claimservice. service. and

720 Kelly Avenue 720 720 Kelly KellyAvenue Avenue Half Moon Bay Half Half Moon MoonBay Bay 726-6328 726-6328 726-6328 kevin@wellerobrien.com kevin@wellerobrien.com kevin@wellerobrien.com FEBRUARY

2014

Half

Moon

Bay

5


~ Share with us

Contributions

Send letters and comments about Half Moon Bay Magazine to letters@hmbreview.com. Please limit to 300 words. Send photos to photo@hmbreview.com. Please include information about location and date.

Natural beauty Though most would have preferred a few storms to find their way to the Coastside this January, the weather did provide a beautiful backdrop for the start of the year. Right, a mid-January swell sent surfers looking for Mavericks famous big waves. Kirk Moore. Below left, the southern end of Montara Beach. Tess Camp

Above, an inspiring sunset near Pillar Point. Janice Conn Right, fiery skies at sunset. Jeff Rupert Above, Martini Creek makes its way across Montara Beach. Tess Camp

6 7

Half

Moon

Bay

FEBRUARY

2014


SUMMER AT SERRA COED ACADEMICS + SUMMER CAMPS

MIDDLE, PRE-HIGH & HIGH SCHOOL ACADEMICS NEXT LEVEL SPORTS CAMPS

SERRA SWIM SCHOOL

CHILDREN’S SPORTS & RECREATION CAMPS GOLDEN STATE AQUATICS CAMPS

For more information on our Summer at Serra programs, please visit us online at:

WWW.SERRAHS.COM/SUMMER14 FEBRUARY

2014

Half

Moon

Bay

7


Upcoming

Fitzgerald Marine Reserve / Charlie Russo

~ Jazz, rock, electronic and more

Feb. 9 February is often slow, but not at the Bach Dancing and Dynamite Society this month when the Bach features top Bay Area jazz, rock, electronic and experimental musicians of Disappear Incompletely to perform new arrangements from the Radiohead songbook. That’s set for 4:30 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 9, at the Douglas Beach House on Miramar Beach. Tickets are $35. Come back a week later to hear the Dr. Lonnie Smith Trio in performance at 4:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 16. With a reputation as a master, if not guru, of the Hammond B-3 organ for more than five decades, Smith has been featured on more than 70 albums, and has recorded and performed with a virtual Who’s Who of jazz and R&B greats. No genre escapes the good doctor’s musical notice: He has recorded covers of the Beatles, the Stylistics, the Eurythmics, Jimi Hendrix, John Coltrane and others, backed by trios to big bands, and also through his own recording label Pilgrimage Productions, put together in 2012. On Feb. 16 he’ll be joined by Jonathan Kreisberg on guitar and Jonathan Blake on drums. Tickets to his concert go for $45. And you can wind up the month with the Helen Sung group debuting Anthem for a New Day at 4:30 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 23. A Thelonius Monk Institute of Jazz performance graduate, Sung nabbed the Kennedy Center’s Mary Lou Williams Jazz Piano Competition prize with her funky, intelligent and unique playing and her topflight albums made with equally high-quality ensembles behind her. Tickets to her concert are $40. 726-4143. 8 9

Half

Moon

Bay

FEBRUARY

2014

~ Learn about the status of the San Francisco Bay

Feb. 6 Are you a fan of the San Francisco Bay and eager to learn about ongoing efforts to protect it? Then stop by the February program of Brews & Views presented by the Half Moon Bay Brewing Company, from 6 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 6, to hear Save the Bay Executive Director David Lewis discuss the work of Save the Bay with its 50,000 supporters, advocates and volunteers making the Bay safer, cleaner and healthier for people and wildlife. Admission is free. Snacks, wine and the full menu are available for purchase. 728-2739.

~ Romance melts the stage

Feb. 7 A 50-year relationship between troubled rich girl Melissa and successful self-made Andy, chronicled in their letters to each other since childhood, is captured in the Pulitzer Prizenominated script “Love Letters” by A.R. Gurney, presented by Coastal Repertory Theatre through March 1. Five real-life couples who are involved with Coastal Rep perform the simple but riveting play at 8 p.m. on Friday and Saturday evenings and 2 p.m. on Sundays. Prices range from $17 to $35. 5693266.

~ Catch the seals at sunrise

Feb. 8 Sunrise is the time when the elephant seals at the Año Nuevo State Reserve are the most active, and if you get up early you can get some great shots of them at the final Sunrise Photography Tour. Today’s the last of four days that photographers can capture some great shots of the huge seals, on a tour from 6 to 9:30 a.m., escorted by a park ranger to optimal viewing locations. The cost is $200 per person with a $10 parking fee, and space is limited. To reserve a spot and for directions, go to www.coastsidestateparks.org.


Handcrafted

american furniture

cOttaGe

Disappear Incompletely

~ Girls soccer winds down

Feb. 13 The Half Moon Bay High School girls soccer team ends its season at 4 p.m., when it hosts Jefferson in the Peninsula Athletic League Ocean Division finale. Many consider the Cougars a favorite to contend for the league title. There is no admission charge. 712-7200.

~ Splash it up with the marine reserve

Feb. 17 Friends of the Fitzgerald Marine Reserve President Tom Ciotti will discuss the Moss Beach marine reserve in a presentation offered through the Coastside branch of the American Association of University Women. The presentation, following a short business meeting, will take place from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Community United Methodist Church at 777 Miramontes St. in Half Moon Bay. It is free and the public is welcome. Gael Erickson, 726-4416.

induStrieS

~ Network for business while you help students

Feb. 27 The Half Moon Bay Coastside Chamber of Commerce and Visitors’ Bureau will combine its next Network@Night event, which brings Coastside business people together, with its annual Education Fundraiser. Attendees are invited to bring school supplies for Coastside students from kindergarten through high school. You can also participate in the Teachers Raffle by donating $100 to a teacher in attendance for use in his or her classroom. It’s free, and the public is welcome. 726-8380.

S i n c e

1 9 9 6

621 main Street | Half moon Bay www.myhandmadehome.com 650-712-8078

FEBRUARY

2014

Half

Moon

Bay

9


Musical

moonlightin they earn their keep at their day jobs, but music is a passion for many coastsiders

By Mark Noack Portraits by Dean Coppola

11 0

Half

Moon

Bay

FEBRUARY

2014

Local musician also keeps bodies in tune

A

s a boy, Mark Heath sang in church and tried to learn to play guitar, but his real love of music began in 1985, at his girlfriend’s house on Miramontes Avenue. He meant to spend time with her but was drawn by the siren song of a banjo and fiddle floating from her garage. It was his girlfriend’s roommates, two young guys blending a captivating style that reminded Heath of the music of comedian and banjo player Steve Martin. He asked the two musicians if he could join in and jam with a spare guitar. It was his first encounter with bluegrass — though the relationship with his girlfriend hit a wall. “This was music that I just fell in love with,” the 53-year-old Heath said. “It was the end of one relationship and the beginning of another.” With his new buddies from the garage ensemble, he formed local bluegrass band Snakes in the Grass. Since then, Heath has been a t


ing t musical force on the Coastside. He later helped organize the first Half Moon Bay Bluegrass Festival, a now-defunct event that featured, in its heyday, a young, up-and-coming Alison Krauss. Heath joined Mariners Church as music director, a role that put him in charge of leading hundreds of members in song on a weekly basis. He also regularly performs at local senior centers and nursing homes. A devout Christian, Heath believes that God must have been pushing him toward refining his music ability as a way to serve others. Around the same time he fell in love with

music, Heath started on his other major vocation helping relieve aches and pains as a chiropractor. His joined his stepfather’s practice on Main Street, where he continues treating patients today. An upbeat man with a warm smile, Heath insists chiropractic care and his music work in tandem. His day job and his music both continue to give him pleasure and satisfaction. “Both have a tremendous healing ability,” he said. “And both also have this sense of hope and encouragement.” — Mark Noack

FEBRUARY

2014

Half

Moon

Bay

11


13 2

Half

Moon

Bay

FEBRUARY

2014


From Grateful Dead to gospel and genres in between

K

ellie Morlock likes to say it took her 30 years to finally work up the courage to join a band. But she’s been rehearsing for most of her life. Since 2011, Morlock has been the lead singer for Blame it on the Dog, an eclectic rock band that often performs on the Coastside. In her words, their sound is a blend of the Grateful Dead and Bonnie Raitt, mixed with The Band, John Hiatt, Lucinda Williams, Van Morrison and a few other familiar names. “We keep ourselves interested,” she said. “We like to mix it up a bit and not hear the same old songs that you hear everywhere else.” By day, Morlock works as the office administrator for the Edward Jones financial adviser at the Shoreline Station, a job she appreciates for the freedom it gives her for her music. By night, she’s stretching her vocal chords to belt out classic rock tunes, gospel songs and anything else that captures her fancy. Morlock was convinced at an early age that music was her calling; she was involved in some kind of music ensemble at nearly every stage of her life. Growing up in Davis, Morlock sang alto in school choirs. She stuck with singing through college and took voice lessons to expand her abilities into a soprano range. She became immersed in gospel singing at Foothill College. Later, she moved to Southern California and earned a master’s degree in entertainment business with a goal to make a career in the music industry. She improvised on that pursuit and landed jobs in television and film, as the music side provided fewer opportunities. “It really is who you know — and hard work,” she said. “What I found out is that the music industry isn’t as well-structured as other parts of the entertainment industry.” She returned to the Bay Area around 2000 and held down a number of jobs while pursuing singing as her passion. Today Morlock is a committed member of the Oakland Interfaith Gospel Choir and commutes across the bay for rehearsals. She also makes an annual summer pilgrimage to YMCA Camp Jones Gulch to attend Jazz Camp West, a weeklong music retreat. “It’s like heaven,” she said. “It’s my musical reboot every summer.” Her first foray into singing with a band came with a local blues-rock group Big Crawdaddy, fronted by Grant Walters. Joining Blame it on the Dog happened organically. Morlock was singing in 2011 at the Cunha school track for the annual Relay For Life American Cancer Society fundraiser. Members of the band liked her performance, and they hit it off. Today the band’s schedule depends on the availability of its members. One lives in Grass Valley and another takes a yearly sojourn to Mexico. The group performed on Jan. 17 at Cameron’s pub, but it doesn’t have any firm commitments going forward. The next surefire chance to see Blame it on the Dog, Morlock said, would be at the 2014 Relay for Life this summer. — By Mark Noack

FEBRUARY

2014

Half

Moon

Bay

13


15 4

Half

Moon

Bay

FEBRUARY

2014


Love Your

Teacher by day, band leader by night

SMILE!

M

ichael Ahern wears many hats today — He’s a schoolteacher in Los Altos, a board member for Cabrillo Unified School District, and a sound engineer nearing the finish line on his first patent. Amid all that, Ahern also manages to be one of the area’s most prolific musicians. For years Ahern has fronted his own namesake band and regularly performs on the Coastside. He has also helped produce more than 10 commercial albums with the bands Lords of Tone and the Little Wheels. His most ambitious project to date was his 2011 self-engineered album “Drive” that blended American blues, country and rock sounds. Asked how he can accomplish everything, Ahern cuts to the chase: Unlike many people his age, he doesn’t have children. That’s given him more time to pursue his own passions. But he also says he’s trained himself to split his mental energy between the rigors of being an efficient teacher and the artistic side of being a musician. He doesn’t get burnt out as easily as others when he “shifts gears,” he said. “It’s a whole different pacing,” he said. “Art is an independent truth. Education is science; it’s results-based.” In fact, Ahern has often mixed music and education. In his younger days, he played guitar to help pay for his college. Later in life, he helped run an outdoors education program in San Luis Obispo. His role was “master of firecircles,” meaning he was in charge of leading the kids in song around the campfire. Music is a great teaching tool, he said. Today, Ahern regularly performs on the Coastside. His next performance will be on Feb. 15 at the Half Moon Bay Brewing Company. — Mark Noack

on Valentines Day and Every Day! Braces for Children & Adults Elite Invisalight® Provider Comfortable Treatment Caring & Friendly Staff

Call Today! FREE Exam & X-Ray

Orthodontics (650) 716-6321 • www.GotToSmile.com 705 Purissima Street, Half Moon Bay FEBRUARY

2014

Half

Moon

Bay

15


Old buddies still dropping rhymes

H

idden next to an auto shop in Moss Beach, the J7 Studio looks like a drab industrial building from the outside. But once you’re through the doors, the studio screams out in a kaleidoscope of paintings and possibilities. Both a recording studio and an art gallery, J7 has become the pet project of Mark Weisbarth, 35, and Rajan Bechar, 34, two friends who first met at Half Moon Bay High School, where they began rapping. Although they were in different grades, they bonded over the alternative hip-hop group A Tribe Called Quest. Before long, they were hanging out at each other’s homes, trading their own freestyle lyrics over beats. They performed for the first time at Round Table Pizza, of all places. It was a pioneering act, Weisbarth recalled, as it may have been the first hip-hop show ever on the Coastside. A crowd of friends packed the dining area, and Weisbarth remembers coming out in capes and alien antennas for the show. “Back then we were the only ones on the Coastside doing hip-hop,” Weisbarth said. “Now there’s a ton of local artist emcees.” Hip-hop remained mostly a hobby for the duo, but both lean on their music skills for their day jobs. Weisbarth, a real estate agent, has started producing a series of instructional YouTube videos “Keeping it Real ESTATE” to answer questions about the local market. He continues to deejay private parties and teaches classes on music production. Still, he explains that it’s harder to find the space and time to produce music. “I’m married. I own my own home. It’s harder and harder to do what I love,” he said. “Both of us have our careers, but we don’t lose who were are.” Bechar works today as principal at Pilarcitos High School, where he keeps a drum set in his class. He’s known to sometimes drop a rhyme in class, and sometimes he’ll see a student listening to Wu Tang Clan or another group he used to follow when he was their age. “That always trips me out!” he said. Today, the two friends see their role partly as helping to nurture other talent, particularly through the J7 Studio. They took over the space from their friend Jasiri Stewart, and over the last few months, they’ve been working to open it up as a recording studio and performance venue. — By Mark Noack

17 6

Half

Moon

Bay

FEBRUARY

2014


FEBRUARY

2014

Half

Moon

Bay

17


DEAN COPPOLA

Falcons, owls, cormorants and murres all call devil’s slide home. the trick is keeping it that way.

19 8

Half

Moon

Bay

FEBRUARY

2014


Bird heaven

Hundreds of common murres crowd Devil’s Slide rock.

Devil’s Slide

on

By Julia Reis

FEBRUARY

2014

Half

Moon

Bay

19


“You will hear them; they’re pretty loud.” T

DEAN COPPOLA

hat’s the assurance of a construction worker as he and his partner work to secure fencing into the ground at the Devil’s Slide Trail, the nearly two-mile long former stretch of Highway 1 that is set to reopen as a recreation area next month. The worker isn’t referring to the whir or clash of machines, but the call of the peregrine falcon, a pair of which has been known to nest on the Devil’s Slide cliffs since the mid1980s. The species was formerly listed as endangered but lost that classification when population numbers stabilized after effects of poisoning and other influences declined. Still, the falcon remains a fully protected species, which means it’s illegal to take the bird, the active nest, its eggs or its young for any reason. These protections also mean that the construction crew working on the Devil’s Slide Trail, as well as the visitors that will soon flock to the new recreation spot, must take certain precautions when in the area. Lead biologist Jim Martin of the biological consulting firm Environmental Collaborative, based in Emeryville, gave a training class on sensitive species and plants in the construction zone before work began in December. The class informed the construction crew on what to look out for and how to respond to signs of distress. Besides the peregrine falcons, several other species of birds nest in the trail area, including t

21 0

Half

Moon

Bay

FEBRUARY

2014


Patrick Kiernan, left, and Matt Glass put up fencing along the Devils Slide Trail.

FEBRUARY

2014

Half

Moon

Bay

21


ALLISON FULLER

Biologists have worked hard to bring the Murre population back to a healthy population after gill nets and an oil spill affected their numbers.

“The big challenge with any sensitive habitat is the degree to which the individual bird or the pair have acclimated to the activity.” 23 2

Half

Moon

Bay

FEBRUARY

the great horned owl, common murres, Brandt’s cormorant and more. “The big challenge with any sensitive habitat is the degree to which the individual bird or the pair have acclimated to the activity,” Martin said. “In using the peregrine as an example, that pair acclimated to vehicle traffic on the highway to the point where it was predictable to them and to some degree they were oblivious to it. If someone were to pull over and start scrambling the nest, that’s been relatively infrequent activity that most likely would have triggered distress of those birds.” What biologists like Martin are keeping a close eye on as the trail nears completion is the behavior of the Devil’s Slide birds and whether they are exhibiting signs of distress due to the construction noise. That noise, along with what will be the footsteps of pedestrians, the dinging of bicycle bells and other sounds that will arrive with the trail’s mid-March opening, cannot be avoided.

2014

But Martin and others have provided extensive input into ways the birds can be shielded from further disturbance. The San Mateo County Parks and Recreation Commission held two public meetings last summer to showcase project designs and gather public comments. At the first meeting, the commission revealed a design for a six-foot cyclone bird protection fence along the cliff meant to keep visitors away from nesting birds. That design was revised to a four-foot fence after complaints that the original design would block the ocean views. “This fence was the end result of getting public input,” said San Mateo County Assistant Engineer Krzysztof Lisaj, the trail’s project manager. “The purpose is holding everybody back so they don’t disturb the birds.” On late January afternoon, a cold wind whipped through the trail construction zone as landscaping contractors placed rows of plants


Medical, Dental, and Vision Care Free Taxi Rides

+

to your medical appointments

FEBRUARY

2014

Half

Moon

Bay

23


“Over time the idea is that the birds are going to acclimate to the new stream of bike and pedestrian activity.” in the ground. The plants will sit behind the protection fence to act as another barrier to the cliff ’s edge, Lisaj says, as it “gives the perception that you shouldn’t be in the area.” Signs that warn of trespassing into the sensitive habitat will be posted along the fence, as well as interpretive signs that will inform the public of the birds in the area and the need to protect them. Trail ambassadors will also be recruited and trained by the county parks department, and their job will be to interact with visitors, answering questions and also informing people to stay on the trail. “San Mateo County Parks Department sees the Devil’s Slide Trail as a tremendous opportunity to build public awareness for coastal species and ecosystems and in doing so, further protect these special places and sensitive species,” Lisaj said in an email. Lisaj says the trail is on track for the slated mid-March opening, though rain could impede that schedule. Between now and then, Martin will keep an eye on how the pair of peregrine falcons appear to be acclimating to the construction noise. February is a critical time for these birds, as breeding usually begins around that time. “Birds typically begin nesting selection in the late winter or early spring,” Martin said. “It becomes important, then, to look at any

tanoa2_FebMag14.indd 1

1/27/14 11:13 AM

HELLO, BURLINGAME .

WE’RE MOVING IN! Visit our new branch in Burlingame Plaza.

Get $100 for banking with us. Visit SanFranciscoFCU.com/SanMateo to learn more.

Federally insured by NCUA

25 4

Half

Moon

Bay

FEBRUARY

2014


COURTESY CALTRANS

A Peregrine falcon flies up to its nest near the Devil’s Slide Trail.

COURTESY U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

activity within the assumed buffer zone around the presumed nest location and whether those activities the bird has acclimated to or could result in some disturbance that would stress the bird and have it leave the area.” Martin added that more people will be brought onto the trail before its opening, such as Sequoia Audubon Society members, to help get the falcons used to increased activity in the area. “The theory is that the birds are going to acclimate to that new service factor,” Martin said. “Over time the idea is that the birds are going to acclimate to the new stream of bike and pedestrian activity.” Back on the trail, a squawking resonates over the sound of crashing waves and light construction. Overhead, four birds appear, two gulls and the two peregrine falcons. “There it is right there,” one of the workers says. If bird-watchers and biologists’ hopes are realized, the pair of falcons that have called the dramatic landscape of Devil’s Slide home for nearly two decades will remain swooping overhead or nesting on the cliffs for years to come. HMB

Common murre decoys and mirrors have been employed to make the colony look bigger than it is in order to attract more actual birds. FEBRUARY

2014

Half

Moon

Bay

25


B

Bringing back the Murres

ack in the 1970s, common murres were abundant on Devil’s Slide Rock, located just a few hundred yards offshore from cars that whirred by on Highway 1. Roughly 3,000 of the birds nested on the rock before two significant events led to a precipitous decline in their population. In the late 1970s, common murres and seabirds began to get captured and drowned in gillnet fishing nets after the growth of a major gillnet fishery. The Central California murre population declined 50 percent within a few years, and that was before the Apex Houston oil spill in 1986. A barge lost a hatch cover while being towed from the Shell Oil refinery in Martinez to Long Beach, spilling close to 30,000 gallons of oil and killing 6,000 common murres in its wake. A settlement yielded $4.9 million to recolonize the common murre population, including the 3,000 birds at Devil’s Slide Rock. That’s where Gerry McChesney comes in. Though he has not been involved in the recolonization project since the very beginning, he has been the project manager for the last several years, overseeing methods to slowly bring the population back to where it had been before the oil spill and fishnet deaths. “We had to find a way of getting the murres back to the rock,” said McChesney, who works for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. McChesney and his colleagues used the social attraction technique to bring back the murres, which usually return to the place they were born to breed. That technique entailed putting common murre decoys on the rock, along with a sound system that played murre calls and mirrors that showed reflections of the decoys and whatever murres landed on the rock. The mirrors made the colony look bigger and made the birds more inclined to stay on the rock. “We used the technique out there for 10 years,” McChesney said. “By that point we realized there were enough birds breeding on the rock that we felt they were self-sustaining.” 2005 was the last year decoys were placed on the rock. The common murre project recently reached the goal it had sought since first placing the decoys on the rock, as close to 3,000 nesting birds are now back on the rock. “This year (2013) was a milestone,” McChesney said. “The numbers are pretty much back up to where they were before the colony was wiped out in the mid-1980s.” The common murre project continues, however, as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service continues to educate boaters and pilots about the sensitivity of the Devil’s Slide Rock colony. McChesney said that while he doesn’t think the murre population on the rock will be affected by the new types of activity when the old Devil’s Slide reopens as a trail next month, he will keep an eye on them, as well as some murres that nest below the cliff. “It’s going to be a bit of a test to see what kind of effect all the people are going to have,” McChesney said. “It’s a really special spot.”

27 6

Half

Moon

Bay

FEBRUARY

2014


NEVER WATER OR MOW YOUR LAWN…EVER! Discover why thousands of Bay Area homeowners are choosing to install artificial grass from Heavenly Greens.

incredibly realistic these products look as the most common reaction from people is disbelief that it’s not real. You would have a very hard time pointing out which was which, if you saw a real grass lawn side by side like one of the multi-tone products show above. These latest generation turf products are very durable; incredibly realistic, 100% recyclable and engineered to last over 15 years. As the cost for water continues to grow throughout the Bay Area installing an artificial lawn makes complete sense as the average homeowner can save up to 60-70% on their water bill. With over a decade in the business and a 15-year warranty on most installations, Heavenly Greens only installs products from the country’s top rated US manufactures. Take the time to learn more about artificial lawn products by visiting the HeavenlyGreens.com website and download free consumer awareness guides like, The 8 Facts you should know about Artificial Turf. Alternatively, you can visit the Heavenly Greens showroom in San Jose or let them bring the showroom to you. Give Heavenly Greens a call to set up your FREE site evaluation at 888.295.5766, to take advantage of their Spring offer below.

Heavenly Greens, the Bay Area’s Leading installer of artificial turf, are not only helping homeowners put an end to wasting time and money on their lawns, the company has collectively saved the Bay Area over 1 Billion gallons of water since the beginning of 2001. Did you know the average lawn consumers over 56,000 gallons of water a year? The recent water shortage is shedding new light on the undeniable benefits associated with replacing your lawn with an artificial alternative. You may be surprised at how

(650) 570-2273 • No appointment needed • Physician always on duty • Walk-in clinic • Most major insurances accepted

• Workers’ Comp & Industrial Medicine • Preplacement (DOT) Exams • Drug Screening • Travel Immunizations • High School Sports Physicals

Before

After

FREE LEAF BLOWER

60 N. El Camino Real, San Mateo www.immediatecare.org

With Every Purchase and

GET $500 OFF YOUR INSTALLED LAWN With minimum of 300 sq. ft. purchase. Limited time offer. New customers only. Not good with any other offer. Lic #923094

Feel it.

The Bay Area Leaders in Artificial Turf

HeavenlyGreens.com

Monday-Friday 8-7 Saturday 9-4 Only 1.3 miles north of Hwy 92

888.295.5766

Showroom: 370 Umbarger Road, SJ 95111 FEBRUARY

2014

Half

Moon

Bay

27


Q&A

29 8

Half

Moon

Bay

FEBRUARY

2014


DEAN COPPOLA

Vaulting to success K

Palmer sisters head to france for next level of international equestrian competition

immy and Cassidy Palmer live south of Half Moon Bay, but, as you read these words, they are likely traveling in the south of France. And they are no mere tourists; Kimmy, 18, and Cassidy, 20, are international stars in a sport that draws rabid fans in Europe and a lot of questions at home.

MARK FOYER

The sisters are equestrian vaulters. Think of it as gymnastics aboard a moving horse. It is as astounding as it sounds. The Palmer sisters began riding horses before they even toddled off to kindergarten. They work out constantly and train with their horse, Hudson, four days a week. They think about the costumes, music, movements and travel pretty much every hour in between. In November, they became the first Americans to win a Federation Equestre Internationale meet when they captured the Stuttgart German Masters vaulting title. They are currently in Bordeaux, France, and competing in the FEI World Cup championships. We managed to corral both women long enough to better understand their sport and their motivation. t

Cassidy, left, and Kimmy Palmer practice for an upcoming horse vaulting competition at home in Half Moon Bay,

By Clay Lambert / Photos by Dean Coppola FEBRUARY

2014

Half

Moon

Bay

29


31 0

Half

Moon

Bay

FEBRUARY

2014

DEAN COPPOLA

“Right at the beginning we were introduced to vaulting. My mom had done it and she remembered. She let us try out on a team and we’ve been doing it ever since.”


t Clay Lambert: When did you start riding? Cassidy Palmer: When I was 5 and she was 3. So, basically, our whole lives. CL: And when did you decide it wasn’t enough to just sit on the horse? CP: Right at the beginning we were introduced to vaulting. My mom had done it and she remembered. She let us try out on a team and we’ve been doing it ever since. CL: It’s hard enough to watch my daughter ride. I can’t imagine watching her do the kinds of things you do on a horse. Kimmy Palmer: Parents don’t like to see their kids do it at first, but then, well, when the kid gets more used to it they know how to fall off. It’s dangerous. CL: Do you learn how to fall? CP: Yeah, how to land. You don’t want to fall on your head, you want to fall on your back, or roll. CL: Did you take gymnastics? KP: We were in gymnastics since the beginning.

CL: How does the judging work? CP: Well, there are four judges. One judges only the horse — how the horse moves and goes around the ring, how his attitude is, how he looks. The other three judges judge us. Two of them judge technique, and the other one is artistic, (judging) our music, our uniforms. That one is kind of subjective. KP: If they don’t like your music, they will score you low. CP: Our theme this year is “The Great Gatsby.” Our music comes from that. We’re getting new costumes for the finals, but our past costumes were black and gold and, like, jewels all over. CL: Are all the competitions in Europe? KP: We have them around here also. The closest ones are Woodside and Saratoga. And there are some in the Los Angeles area. CP: There are really good teams around Woodside and Saratoga. None of them qualified for the World Cup, though. CL: How did you qualify for the world finals? CP: In the summer, we were at an international competition. We were eighth and they took eight teams into the World Cup series. CL: This sounds like a huge time commitment. KP: We practice about an hour on the horse four days a week, give or take. Every other day we work out, like, two hours.

DEAN COPPOLA

CL: Do you get tired of explaining what vaulting is? CP: A lot of people say, “Oh, I know what it is!” KP: They don’t. CP: No, they don’t. KP: Then, we explain it and they are like, “No way!” CP: They say, “I never knew that was a sport.”

CP: Exercise, cardio, running — you have to be in really good shape to be able to lift each other and have the stamina to do the routine. CL: Do you think it helps to be sisters? CP: I think it helps, definitely. We have been together our whole life and we’ve been vaulting our whole life. We kind of just feel what is happening. If I were to vault with someone else, we couldn’t just read each other. KP: We don’t even have to speak and we already know what’s wrong with a move. CP: We sometimes don’t even have to speak. We just know. … We still yell at each other and get mad at each other — a lot. (Laughs.) CL: Tell me about the music used in vaulting. CP: You can use any kind of music you want. No swear words. FEBRUARY

2014

Half

Moon

Bay

31


DEAN COPPOLA

Cassidy, left, and Kimmy Palmer pose with their horse Hudson. 33 2

Half

Moon

Bay

FEBRUARY

2014


Get one FREE class

CL: Do they prefer a certain kind of music at the European competitions? KP: Definitely the ballet type of music. CL: Is this only for girls and women? CP: There used to be just boy-girl teams, but the rules just changed two years ago, so it could be girl-girl teams or boy-boy. CL: How long can you compete at this level? KP: We know people who are in their 30s who are still doing it, but I feel like that is too old. CP: The best (age) is probably 23, 27, somewhere in that range. KP: Your joints start to hurt. CL: Tell me about it. Have you ever been hurt while vaulting? KP: We both have had our fair share of injuries. CP: I dislocated and fractured my knee last year in one of the competitions. So I was out for about six months. I didn’t even know I was coming back. I thought I was done. But I couldn’t stop, so I came back. CL: I understand vaulting is huge in Europe. CP: They have big competitions almost every weekend over there. Here, we have one big one a year. (In the United States) there are probably 500 vaulters of all levels. There are probably 50,000 — just in Germany. It’s a big difference. CL: Are you a novelty, being American? KP: Yeah, definitely. People look at us and think, “What are they doing here?” CP: Everyone’s pretty nice. There are a few who are stuck up, but that’s just like anything.

when you ★ like us on ★ Facebook! ★

★ ★ ★

★Get toned ★Get flexible ★ Get smart ★ Get Pilates ★

★ ★ ★

213 San Mateo Road, Half Moon Bay www.studio4pilates.com

We love your pet as much as you do.

CL: I imagine it takes a particular kind of horse to compete well in vaulting. CP: They have to be big and kind of roundish. There is more space. If we are on a little tiny horse there isn’t room to move around. KP: They have to not mind touching places you wouldn’t normally touch, like far out on the butt, or touching the neck. CL: What’s next? CP: We both took this year off just for vaulting. After France, we’re going to try out for the World Equestrian Games. It’s basically like the vaulting Olympics, since it’s not an Olympic sport. The top two American teams will go. CL: This sounds expensive. CP: It’s very expensive. Usually the federation will pay for some of it, but for the World Cup they don’t pay for anything. CL: Do you have sponsors? CP: We don’t. That would be cool. HMB

Now Offering: Laser Therapy for anti-inflammatory and pain treatment. FEBRUARY

2014

Half

Moon

Bay

33


Chamber well served by

‘senior staff’ these Three put wealth of experience to use serving tourists By Clay Lambert

35 4

Half

Moon

Bay

FEBRUARY

2014

DEAN COPPOLA

Left, Martha Drendell poses outside the Half Moon Bay Chamber of Commerce and Visitor’s Bureau on Main Street. Right, Karen Palmer, in white, traveled to Half Moon Bay on the spur of the moment one weekend in January, coming all the way from her home in the Washington D.C. area. Her first stop: The Half Moon Bay Coastside Chamber of Commerce and Visitor’s Bureau, where Georgie Yerby was waiting to guide her through the coast.


Hometown Friendliness Meets Personalized Ca

Hometown Meets Friendliness Meets P Hometown Friendliness Personalized Locally Owned and Operated

T

Hometown Friendliness Meets Personalized LocallyCare Owned and Ope Locally Owned and Operated

Locally Owned and Operated Hometown

Friendliness M 2010 Vo

lunteer of the Ye ar • 2009 Ad ministrat or of the Ye ar 2001 HU20• 10 Volun D Se cretar y’teer s Commen dation • 2 • 0 09 Adm 2001 Hu inis mane So Paws fo ciof et y’se Yea th r Applau se Awar d •

Locally Owned 2010 Vo

lunteer of the Ye ar • 2009 Ad ministrat or of the Ye ar 2001 HUD • Secretar y’s Commen dation 2001 Hum • ane Soci Paws fo ety’s r Applau se Awar d

2001 HU D Sec Commen re dati • 2001 Hu mane Soc Paws fo r Applau se

Senior living with hospitality and concierge services he Half Moon Bay Coastside Please calltotoarrange arrange aapersonal tour Chamber of Commerce and Visitor’s Please call personal tour 707 Elm Street, San Carlos, CA 94070 707 Elm Street, San Carlos, CA 94070 www.sancarloselms.com Bureau has a three-pronged secret weapon in the ongoing Senior living with hospitality and concier Email:650-595-1500 info@sancarloselms.com battle to win the hearts and minds of visitors. President and Please call to arrange a personal Senior living with hospitality and concierge services and Senior living with hospitality concierge services CEO Charise McHugh calls it her “senior staff.” 707 Elm Street, San Carlos, 94070 www.sa Senior CA living with hospitalit A Non-Profit Community Sponsored by the San Carlos Development Corporation License #415600135 That’s senior as in “experienced.” The staff is comprised of Please call to arrange a personal tour Email: info@sancarloselms.com Please call to arrange a personal tour Hometown Friendliness Meets Personalized Care info@sancarloselms.com Please call to arrange 707 Elm Street, San Carlos, CA 94070 www.sancarloselms.com three women — Georgie Yerby, Martha Drendell and Susan Hometown Friendlinesswww.sancarloselms.com Meets Personalized SCE 7-11 Chronicle v2_2.indd 1707 Elm Street, San Carlos, CA 94070 707 Elm Street, San Carlos, CA 940 Email: info@sancarloselms.com Shapira — who have worked previous careers before retiring Locally Owned Operated Email: and info@sancarloselms.com Email: info@sanca A Non-Profit Community Sponsored by the San Carlos Development Corporat Locally Owned and Operated or otherwise deciding to ease up on the work schedule. All SCECarlos 7-11 Chronicle v2_2.indd 1 Non-Profit Community Sponsored by the San Development Corporation License #415600135 three have been gently coerced into making time in their Abusy A Non-Profit Community Sponsored by the San Carlos A Non-Profit Community Sponsored by the San Carlos Development Corporation License #415600135 schedules for periodic shifts manning the Chamber office over 2010 Vo lunteer SCE 7-11 Chronicle v2_2.indd 1 10:09 AM of the7/3/11 SCE 7-11 Chronicle v2_2.indd 1 Year 2010 Vo • the weekend. luntee 2009 Ad SCE 7-11 Chronicle v2_2.indd 1 ministra tor • of the Ye 2009 Ad ar mi “It’s hard to find someone who just wants to work 10 a.m. • of the 20

www.sancarloselms.com

650-595-1

650-595-1500650-59

Y 2001 HU • D Sec Commen da • 2001 Hu mane S Paws fo r Applau s

01 HUD Secretar y’s Commen dation • 2001 Hu mane So Paws fo ciety’s r Applau se Awar d

Senior living with hospitality and concierge services Senior living with hospitality and concierge services Please call to arrange a personal tour Please call to arrange a personal tour 707 Elm Street, San Carlos, CA 94070 www.sancarloselms.com

707 Elm Street, San Carlos, CA 94070 www.sancarloselms.com Email: info@sancarloselms.com Email: info@sancarloselms.com

650-595-1500

A Non-Profit Community Sponsored by the San Carlos Development Corporation License #415600135

650-59

A Non-Profit Community Sponsored by the San Carlos Development Corporation License #415600135 SCE 7-11 Chronicle v2_2.indd 1

7/3/11 10:09 AM

CLAY LAMBERT

SCE 7-11 Chronicle v2_2.indd 1

FEBRUARY

2014

Half

Moon

Bay

35


Georgie Yerby has been working on the weekends for the Chamber of Commerce for the last six years.

www.naturallyorganicsleep.com Extensive range of chemical free organic mattresses and pillows Bed frames • dual adjust beds • temperature control beds

650.344.0100 • 1375 Burlingame Ave., Burlingame 37 6

Half

Moon

Bay

FEBRUARY

2014

to 3 p.m. on Saturdays,” McHugh said. She stumbled onto the idea of seeking out outgoing seniors while talking to a previous recruit almost a decade ago. “We love having them come in, and they love coming in,” McHugh said. “They get to sit behind a desk and have a job again.” Yerby has been the weekend face of Half Moon Bay for six years now and she definitely fits the bill. She remembers when the job entailed braving the elements from a kiosk at the edge of Mac Dutra Park. There was a lot of foot traffic passing by her perch back then, but, all in all, she prefers her seat at 235 Main St. to what was in some ways a more prominent location. “This is more advantageous,” she said. “We have the computer and can look up things.” While the Chamber office isn’t quite as centrally located as Mac Dutra Park, she is sure she actually talks to more people these days. “Then, maybe one person would come up to the kiosk and the rest of the family would stand around behind,” Yerby


‘Where’s the beach?’ If you work the Visitors Center in Half Moon Bay you can count on all kinds of questions. One in particular strikes Coastsiders as strange: Where’s the beach? “I get that all the time. That is a very common question,” Martha Drendell said with a laugh. “When I first started, I thought they were kidding.” Usually the question is a bit more nuanced. Visitors want to know how best to access local beaches and where they can park. Drendell said other common questions are: Where is the Ritz-Carlton, Half Moon Bay? Where can I take my dog? And what can I do with a couple of hours on the coast? All three Chamber of Commerce weekend warriors say they vary their answers according to the circumstances. Drendell tells families with young children about the Fitzgerald Marine Reserve, but not when the tide is in. Another favorite destination: Harley Farms on the South Coast. There is at least one thorny question that comes up regularly: Where should we eat? And “senior staff” is cognizant that many eateries on the coast are members of the Chamber. They try not to take sides. “We ask them what they are looking for,” Georgie Yerby said. “We try to talk around ‘go here or go there.’” — Clay Lambert

CLAY LAMBERT

Bay City

“There are a lot of people who come over from Silicon Valley and they’ve never seen the Pacific Ocean before.”

MEDICAL SUPPLIES

Compression Therapy • Bathroom Safety • Orthopedics Canes & Crutches • Equipment rentals • Home Care Supplies Ask about our home care direct Home Delivery service! We service all Peninsula and Coastside communities We are Comitted to Superior Customer Service and Quality Compression Stockings

Walkers

Burlingame 1465-A Chapin Ave 650.347.6606

Wheelchairs

Mobility Scooters

TWO Peninsula locations Monday – Friday 9-6 • Saturday 10-4 www.baycitymed.com Caring, knowledgeable staff

FEBRUARY

2014

Lift Chairs

Redwood City 1040 Brewster Ave 650.367.6900

Half

Moon

Bay

37


You are invited! Friday Social Hours 4:30-5:30 P.M. Enjoy great music, delicious snacks and beverages, and the best company in town! And if you’d like to learn more about our options for independent and assisted living, just let us know. We’d love to share.

You are invited! Friday Social Hours At Sterling Court, we’re proud of what we offer. 4:30-5:30 P.M.

Enjoy great music, delicious snacks and beverages, and the best company in town! And if you’d like to learn more about our options for independent and assisted living, just let us know. We’d love to share. At Sterling Court, we’re proud of what we offer.

Sterling Court, A Community For Seniors 850 N. El Camino Real, San Mateo • 650 344-8200

Sterling Court, A Community For Seniors 850 N. El Camino Real, San Mateo • 650 344-8200 39 8

Half

Moon

Bay

FEBRUARY

2014

The Coastside mural that adourns the walls of the Chamber comes in very handy for guiding visitors to popular destinations.

said. “Now the entire family comes in.” All three members of the senior staff are prototypical people persons. And all three come from previous professions that required a lot of human interaction. Yerby was an accounting manager for a relocation company. Drendell was a sales rep for WaterfordWedgwood, the crystal and china manufacturer, and said she has always enjoyed helping people. “Women in my generation didn’t work,” Yerby said. “I didn’t start working until I was 50 and I just loved it. There were all these people who had already been working 25 years and were just putting one foot in front of the other and I wasn’t that way. Of course, that didn’t make me too popular!” All three women say their favorite part of the job is encountering whoever opens the door to the office. Visitors come from near and far, and sometimes the nearest neighbors are the least knowledgeable about the Coastside. “There are a lot of people who come over from Silicon Valley and they’ve never seen the Pacific Ocean before,” Shapira says. She tells of one young man who saw the ocean from the top of Highway 92 and decided to park right there and hoof it down. That turned out to be more challenging than he thought. “He said he just wanted to put his feet in the Pacific Ocean, but he said it was a lot more dangerous walking down Highway 92 than he realized.” Shapira gave him an apple, some water and some energy bars that were in the Chamber kitchen. “I think he was surprised that I would give him food, but he had a long way


RYAN A. HENSPETTER, D.M.D.

CLAY LAMBERT

DIANA DIZIK, D.D.S.

We

All Kinds of Smiles

669 CRESPI DR., SUITE F, PACIFICA, CA 94044 PHONE (650) 359-1646 • PACIFICADENTIST.COM to go to get home!” International visitors are always interesting, according to the senior staff. Drendell is originally from Switzerland and still has a Swiss lilt to her voice. She says she particularly enjoys chatting with European visitors. “A lot of the travelers end up in Carmel or Monterey so they want to know how long that will take to get there,” she said. “We also have a tremendous amount of people who come from India.” “I remember these young people from Germany who were taking a year off to travel all over the United States,” Yerby said. “They just exuded so much energy. But we meet so many people.” One of the perks of being a member of the senior staff is that they set their own schedules. They trade emails, a month or so out, to determine who can work which weekends. “We all have a lot of family and grandchildren and things,” Shapira said. All three women can relate to tourists getting their first peek at such a beautiful place. None more so that Drendell. She remembers coming to the coast and then not wanting to leave. “We moved here in 1960. We were living in Belmont and we couldn’t afford a house over there,” she said. “So my husband and I came over here one weekend and drove around and saw a little house on Spruce Street.” They’ve been there ever since. HMB

Three Bells of Montara SENIOR RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITY An elegant, senior residential care facility in the beautiful, coastal town of Montara. • 24-hour personalized care • Nutritious meals and snacks • Hospice care and special programs for memory impaired • Transportation to and from medical appts. Wellness nurse • Private and shared rooms available now!

Ask us about our Veterans Assisted Living Benefit. 1185 Acacia Street | Montara 650-728-5483 Facility #415600502 www.threebellsofmontara.com FEBRUARY

2014

Half

Moon

Bay

39


DEAN COPPOLA

BigShot

41 0

Half

Moon

Bay

FEBRUARY

2014


Dropping In Danilo Cuoto takes off on a wave during the Mavericks Invitational surf contest on Jan. 24 off of Pillar Point. The contest brings together 24 of the best surfers in the world to test their skills on waves reaching 40 feet or more. The winner was Grant Baker of South Africa. Photo by Dean Coppola / Half Moon Bay Review.

FEBRUARY

2014

Half

Moon

Bay

41


OpenDoor

PHOTOS COURTESY TIMOTHY MANNING

open El Granada bathroom gets Zen makeover 43 2

Half

Moon

Bay

FEBRUARY

2014

Before


C

Before

Details

Homeowner: Chris Madison and Emery Gordon Designer: Spaces Within Contractor: Coastside Cabinets Goal: A peaceful retreat Constuction time: 3-4 weeks Approx. cost: $25,000

hris Madison and her husband, Emery Gordon, bought their El Granada home in 1995. While their upstairs landing bathroom remained functional over the nearly 20 years that have passed since then, it was, in Madison’s words, worn out. “My goal was to have it reflect me,” Madison said. “(I wanted it to have) a Zen feel, but not too Zen.” Madison said that she was impressed with interior designer Lauren Shelby, who owns Spaces Within Interior Design in Half Moon Bay and brought up the Zen theme based on Asian-themed elements in Madison and Gordon’s home. “The interesting thing about Lauren is she picked that up from my house,” Madison said. “She got it.” Shelby said that the challenges for this project included adding a dark cabinet while still keeping the small space light, as well as adding more storage. The tall cabinet, which was built by Bob Collihan of Coastside Cabinets and finished by Moss Beach artist Edna Crowe, fit in with the theme and doubled the bathroom’s storage. “It was fun for me to build the cabinetry (because) I don’t ordinarily do that,” Collihan said. Besides adding the custom-built cabinet, Collihan’s crew removed the wallboards, retiled the shower, added new flooring and did electrical work. The bathroom took three to four weeks to complete, with some additional downtime to wait for a new countertop. “We changed everything,” Shelby said. “One of her passions is nature and she wanted natural materials. The floor is porcelain but it looks natural, and everything else is stone.” Shelby added that a couple welcome touches were making the shower glass, which makes the ocean view outside visible from the bathroom, and a mirror with an adjustable arm that can be pulled out at various angles. “I think we achieved our goals really well,” she said. Madison says Collihan and Shelby did a great job on the bathroom and advises those considering a remodel to hire a designer and think about how long they plan to remain in their home as a factor in the renovation process. “Even though I’m an artist, I didn’t know how to go about doing it, so having professional help really helps,” she said. — Julia Reis

T A E I NG

& H ATING air conditioning

E & H IN Ayou&T airWhether conditioning E need heating orG airH conditioning, at Gaffigan we’ll take care of air conditioning Whether you need heating or air conditioning,you at Gaffigan we’ll take care of Whether need heating all your commercial or residential needs. or air conditioning, Carbon Monoxide Testing at Whether you need heating or Duct Cleaning • Installation Gaffi gan we’ll take care air conditioning, at Gaffigan we’ll take care of Service • Sales all commercial or residential needs. ofyour all your commercial Carbon Monoxide Testing or Duct residential needs. Cleaning • Installation Service • Sales

all your commercial or residential needs. Carbon Monoxide Testing Duct Cleaning • Installation Service • Sales

A&TING E H

Carbon Monoxide Testing

Duct Cleaning GAFFIGAN COMPANY Installation EST. 1917

• Sales (650) 574-5740 air Service conditioning GAFFIGAN COMPANY www.gaffiganhvac.com 720 So. Amphlett Blvd. | San Mateo EST. 1917 Whether you need heating or Whether youState need or Contractors Licenseheating #286582 air at we’ll 574-5740 air conditioning, conditioning,(650) at Gaffigan Gaffigan we’ll take take care care of of all your commercial or residential www.gaffiganhvac.com all your commercial or residential needs. needs. Carbon Monoxide Testing 720 So. Amphlett Blvd.Testing | San Mateo Carbon Monoxide Duct Cleaning Installation State • #286582 Duct Contractors Cleaning •License Installation Service Service •• Sales Sales

GAFFIGAN COMPANY EST. 1917 GAFFIGAN

R E A D E R S

CHOICE

COMPANY GAFFIGAN COMPANY (650) 574-5740 2013 GAFFIGAN COMPANY EST. 1917 EST. 1917 EST. 1917 www.gaffiganhvac.com (650) 574-5740 574-5740 (650) 720 So.www.gaffiganhvac.com Amphlett Blvd. | San Mateo www.gaffiganhvac.com 720 So. Amphlett Blvd. | San Mateo 720 So. Amphlett Blvd. | San Mateo Contractors State License #286582 Contractors Contractors State State License License #286582 #286582

Now with a full service bar!

RV Camping Available R E A D E R S

CHOICE 2013 Winner! Favorite restaurant to bring the kids 1410 S. Cabrillo Highway Half Moon Bay (650) 726-5705 www.cameronsinn.com FEBRUARY

2014

Half

Moon

Bay

43


CoastsideCanines

Cricket Jack Russell/ rat terrier mix Age: 5 “Everybody knows Cricket,” says fisherman Bill Webb. He’s not referring to his boat, the Cricket, but rather the lively, personable, 5-year-old Jack Russell/rat terrier mix named after the boat. The canine Cricket spices up fishing trips with her chipper barking and hopping to and fro on deck. “She knows everyone at the harbor,” he added. “She’s goofy but I love her to death,” said Webb, an Antioch resident whose boat is berthed at Pillar Point Harbor and who got Cricket from a homeless woman giving away a litter of pups.

DEAN COPPOLA

Early in the morning, Webb heads out to catch crab, salmon or tuna under Cricket’s watchful eye. When he’s after crab, Cricket is restrained on a short leash lest she go after the crab buoys and because of the heavy crab pots being used on the boat. But when he’s after salmon or tuna, she gaily hops around the deck, barking at the colored “flashers” Webb drops into the water to attract salmon or at dolphins she spies leaping in the surf. Once, he said, a deckhand teasingly questioned him about his priorities around the pooch, and Webb’s jovial answer said it all. “You’ll go before the dog will,” he said. “No question about that.” 45 4

Half

Moon

Bay

FEBRUARY

2014


Wordsonaword The word: Marriage

In honor of Valentine’s Day, we asked three Coastsiders, each with a unique perspective, for a few words on the institution.

Terry Plank

I

must start with mine. As a former marriage counselor, I support knowing as much about yourself and each other as possible, but we met and married in six months. That was 52 years ago. We knew intuitively we had the right person and shared as much as we knew about ourselves as very young people could. Fortunately, we were correct. The key for us? We’re compatible in philosophy, politics, love of theater, music and novels. Most importantly, we have healthy individual lives and give each other physical, emotional and relational space. My parents were joined at the hip, which means one person is not being fully himor herself. I’ve officiated at the weddings of more than 2,000 opposite- and same-sex couples. Here’s my key advice for a happy ceremony: Don’t let your expectations for the day keep you from rolling with whatever happens. Laugh at the things that don’t go as expected — after all, you’ll have a lifetime of that happening! Terry Plank is owner of Weddings by the Sea and a regular officiant of weddings on the Coastside.

Patricia Roma

Marie C. Baca

he reasons why people marry are varied. They include, but are certainly not limited to, love, money, sex, social status, tradition, necessity — and even for political reasons. For example, I was recently deputized in San Francisco to perform a marriage ceremony for two people of the same sex who were from a state that did not recognize gay marriages. They wanted to get married here so that they could join a class action suit in their home state to get a ruling from the court that would recognize gay marriages in that state. And these days, one can hardly raise the subject of marriage without also raising the issue of divorce. There are just as many reasons why people get divorced. According to our own prophet, Father Miles of Miramar, love is the most powerful force on earth and marriage cannot be ruled by a 50-50 standard or any other equation, but must be a 100 percent commitment with no strings attached, no judgments and no expectations.

y husband is many things, but a handyman he is not. He once used blue painter’s tape to hang Christmas lights and was confused when they blew away. He nearly electrocuted himself with a hedge trimmer by cutting through its own cord. One time I opened the freezer and found an external hard drive, and when I asked him about it he said he put it in there to “cool it down.” They seem like little things now, but at the time I wanted to strangle him. Why couldn’t he be more methodical, more cautious, more organized — more like me? It took five years of marriage and having a child for me to realize how much better our relationship was when I allowed him to support me in his own way. Now I do the home repairs and he does the cooking and we are happier than ever. He’s only set fire to the house once.

T

M

Marie C. Baca is an El Granada-based writer and mother.

Patricia Roma is an attorney in Half Moon Bay with more than 35 years experience in handling divorce cases.

FEBRUARY

2014

Half

Moon

Bay

45


Daytripper

47 6

Half

Moon

Bay

FEBRUARY

2014


PLACE TO GO

Purisima Creek Redwoods Open Space Preserve

Cameron’s Inn Purisima Creek Redwoods

BILL MURRAY

Although Coastside beaches tend to dominate the landscape and garner the lion’s share of the attention, the inland canyons and open spaces are equally majestic. The Purisima Creek Redwoods preserve is a jewel that should not be overlooked. The 4,711-acre preserve centerpiece is the Purisima Creek Canyon, with its towering redwoods, rushing creek, densley growing ferns and delicate wildflowers. Bordering the canyon are forested ridges of oak, madrone and Douglas fir. The highest points of the preserve afford sweeping views of Half Moon Bay and the Coastside. 24 miles of trails provide opportunities for easy walks or long strenuous hikes. The Redwood Trail, accessed from Skyline Boulevard, is suitable for visitors of all physcial abilities.

PLACE TO EAT

The main entrance to the preserve is four and a half miles south of Highway 92 on Skyline Boulevard. To access the Redwood or Purisima Creek Trail, continue two miles further south. Visitors in Half Moon Bay can find a trailhead to the western side of the park off of Purisima Creek Road.

HALF MOON BAY MAGAZINE FILE PHOTO

If you are a cyclist, the long, winding trail from Skyline Boulevard. via the Purisima Creek Trail to Half Moon Bay should not be missed. Bring your mountain bike and a camera. Watch for hikers and other wildlife!

Scan here for a trail map of the preserve.

Cameron’s Inn

Quirky. Eclectic. Unique. Cameron’s Inn is part British pub, part sports bar and part amusement park. The menu is daunting, but favorites are the killer burgers, the traditional fish n’ chips, and, of course, the beer. Usually voted Favorite Restaurant to Take the Kids in the Half Moon Bay Review, there are plenty of diversions for the younger set — including a double-decker bus with old-school video games — while parents can nurse a Guinness with French fries. If the weather is nice, there is a great patio for Fido and a sand volleyball court. Just a few miles from the open space trailhead, right along Highway 1. 1410 Cabrillo Highway. Open daily 11 a.m. - 11 p.m. 726-5705.

FEBRUARY

2014

Half

Moon

Bay

47


RealEstate RECENT SALE

ddress 240 Poplar St., Half Moon Bay A Bedrooms 4 Bathrooms 3 Single Family 2800 square feet Year Built 2001 Sale Price $1,217,000 Photo courtesy intero real estate services

Over the moon

This home is situated within walking distance of the beautiful Poplar Beach and the Coastside Trail. The modern design affords large picture windows and an expansive deck.

H A L F M O O N B AY M A R K E T T R E N D S

49 8

Average home price

Median home price

Average price per sq. ft.

$1,135,471

$742,500

$461

Week ending Jan. 22

Oct. - Jan. 2014

Oct. - Jan. 2014

-0.7%

+13.4%

+24.9%

Week over week

Year over year

Year over year

Half

Moon

Bay

FEBRUARY

2014


RealEstate Seller

Transactions Dec. 12 - Jan. 15, 2014 Property

Buyer

Amount

David J. Psternak

vacant Land, El Granada

Romeo Packing Company

$125,000

Henry J. and Maxine J. Corriea, trustees

2381 Winged Foot Road, Half Moon Bay

Robert A. and Lynn D. Backlund, Trustees

$1,50,000

Austin J. and Mary M. Maguire

236 Eagle Trace, Half Moon Bay

Frank G. and Margaret R. Seidel

$1,275,000

Stebbins Construction Co.

vacant Land, Half Moon Bay

Joshua R. Greenbladtt and Amy J. Ulrich

$1,390,000

Cheri A. Robison

1355 Birch St., Montara

Sarah S. OBrien and James F. Goodrum

$790,000

Lillian A. Holsworth

1208 Date St., Montara

Kevin Power and Amy Kirwin

$499,000

Domingo Y. Dacumos, et. al.

738 North St., Pescadero

Gary L. Jr. and Sharle Giovannoni

$390,000

Jesus H. Acosta and Margarita Cabrera, et. al.

1528 Hawser Lane, Half Moon Bay

Jesus H. Acosta and Margarita Cabrera

$186,500

TDR Properties

vacant Land, Half Moon Bay

Joseph A. Zarry and Cynthia A. Talley

$697,500

Fraser E. and Thelma C. West

468 Laurel Ave., No. 23, Half Moon Bay

Kevin O’Connor and Stefanie Feilinger

$405,000

G. Jr. and Nancy Auld

vacant land, Half Moon Bay

Coastside Land Trust

donation

Terry E. Totten, Trustee

vacant land, Half Moon Bay

Coastside Land Trust

donation

Robert M. and Jean R. Haaf, trustees

vacant land, Half Moon Bay

Coastside Land Trust

donation

Holly M. Berney

vacant land, Half Moon Bay

Clifford Pinto

$275,000

Steven M. Lidia and Jennifer L. Castner

882 Etheldore St., Moss Beach

Todd Enders

$695,000

Donna M. Voss, et. al.

712 Main St., Half Moon Bay

Steven Hochelser

$800,000

Holly M. Berney

vacant land, Half Moon Bay

Bhushan Hedea, et. al.

$325,000

Laura A. Sheehan, trustee

115 W. Point Ave., El Granada

Reza Malek

$1,308,000

Daniel A. and Merlie R. Grumley

20 Trace Lane, Half Moon Bay

Greg A. Reynolds

$1,200,000

Thomas Daley, trustee

vacant land, Ocean Ave., Half Moon Bay

Coastside Land Trust

donation

Vita Hall

WANTED: Your listing!

Inventory is at an historic low. Call me today if you’re thinking about selling. Vita Hall. Relocation specialist.

650.823.9248

Allison Akana

Juliette Kulda

Experience the Coastside!

• Realtor on the Half Moon Bay Coastside since 2003.

“If you are looking for a real estate agent to represent you in one of the most important transactions of your life, you simply can’t do better than Allison Akana. She has handled three transactions for us.” – TJ Glauthier and Brigid O’Farrell, Moss Beach

• 2013 Voted one of the Favorite Realtors on the Coast • Closed over $30 Million in Real Estate transactions in 2013

5 star customer service.

FEBRUARY

2014

Half

Moon

Bay

49


We Welcome New Patients!

Our staff and state of the art technology are here to make your family’s dental visit a comfortable, pleasant experience! CAD-CAM Cerec crowns in one visit! BRIAN SHEPPARD, DDS C. RAY SHEPPARD, DMD

R E A D E R S

CHOICE 2013

CEREC ONE VISIT CROWNS

SH

EP

PAR D

FAMILY DE

T N TIS

RY

A PROFESSIONAL CORPORATION 50

Half

Moon

Bay

FEBRUARY

890 Main Street, Suite A, Half Moon Bay SheppardDentists.com info@SheppardDentists.com

2014

Office hours by appointment:

650.726.3355


Half Moon Bay February 2014