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Half Moon Bay 

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Meet the new Superintendent  Upgrade your child’s lunch  Spanish immersion  Bingo is the game-o

Pescadero Marsh


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Half Moon Bay 

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on the cover

Morning at the Marsh, Erika Perloff 14 x 18, Pastel, 2012

From the artist: I love painting Pescadero Marsh as the seasons shift, the sky is swept by clouds and the tide rises and falls. We are fortunate to be surrounded by open spaces filled with color and light on the Coastside, a paradise for the artist. Erika’s work can be seen at www.ErikaPerloff.com The Pescadero Art and Fun Festival (Aug. 18-19) The Coastside Land Trust Gallery, Half Moon Bay (through Aug. 26 ) Santa Cruz County Open Studios Tour (Oct. 13-14 & 20-21) Made in Pescadero Gallery

Publisher Bill Murray Editor Clay Lambert Writers Sara Hayden, Mark Noack, Stacy Trevenon COPY EDITOR Julie Gerth Photographer Charles Russo design Bill Murray, Mark Restani Business Office Barbara Anderson Circulation Sonia Myers Advertising Sales Linda Pettengill, Louise Strutner, Susan Verlander, Barbara Dinnsen Find us 714 Kelly Avenue, Half Moon Bay, CA, 94019, (650) 726-4424, www.hmbreview.com

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publisher’s note

time is all relative when it comes to summer

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was recently treated to an inspiring keynote address at the start of my daughter’s summer camp. The speaker was introduced, approached the podium and proceeded to stand there silently. She looked out at the gathered crowd while a cell phone rang and was muted, a young child started to cry and was hushed, and the campers turned and looked at one another trying not to laugh. This went on for a full 60 seconds, and then, finally, she began her speech. Her point, which was well made, was that 60 seconds in a certain context may seem like an eternity, yet in another is like the blink of an eye. ¶ Kind of like summer. I contend that the 10 weeks between mid-June and the end of August are not the same length as the 10 weeks between midJanuary and the end of March. Yes, it looks that way Tony Roehrick is the new superintendent. on a calendar, but, as Albert Einstein teaches us, time is relative. And for me, and I would guess the majority of school-age kids and their parents, time is currently moving at light speed. My son is an elementary school student at Farallone View, my daughter is a middleschooler at Cunha, and my wife is a high school French teacher in Redwood City. They are all trying to slow down time before heading back to school. Best of luck.¶ Of course, not all of those involved in education get the summer off. I’m certain that Tony Roehrick, our new Cabrillo Unified School District superintendent, is hard at work preparing for the new school year and adjusting to the new position. You can meet him and several other key players in our school system in the following pages. ¶ Enjoy this issue. And even if you aren’t heading back to school in the fall, may your short summer feel like an eternity.

HALF MOON BAY is published the first week of every month and inserted in the Half Moon Bay Review. The entire contents of the magazine are also available online at hmbreview.com. ©2012, Half Moon Bay Review

— Bill Murray, Publisher

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Before school starts,

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August highlights include the Kings Mountain Art Fair, the Relay for Life, and the Pescadero Arts and Fun Festival. Page 5

Celebrating Home Improvement Products made in the USA.

Sale

back to school

working at the school

Half Moon Bay education supported by inspired individuals. Page 6

two languages, one goal

Bilingual education helps all students excel. Page 16

beyond the pb&J

Healthy school lunches start at home. Page 22

bingo is the game-O

Local game a draw on Coastside. Page 24

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Art in a community fit for Kings September 1-3 The 49th annual Kings Mountain Art Fair shows how a small community can do big things, putting top-quality fine art into a quiet redwood grove to provide this forested community with fire protection and a beautiful community center. For all three Labor Day weekend days, it begins with breakfast at 8 a.m. and goes from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in and around the Kings Mountain Community Center. The fair showcases the work of 135 professional fine artists from the Western United States as well as more than a score of fine artists who are mountain residents. Adding to the fair’s unique flavor is the fact it is 100 percent volunteer-run without commercial sponsorship or electronic music. You’ll only hear soft strains by harpist Aryeh Frankfurter among the paintings in the fine art grove. Kids can try out art and oldfashioned crafts in Kiddie Hollow. Tasty giant cookies are for sale to benefit Kings Mountain Elementary School. After breakfast, lunch food is available for purchase. Admission is free, and there’s a shuttle to carry visitors from parking along Skyline Boulevard to the fair and back to their cars. 851-2710.

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Get in the Groove

August 4 Two stages of live music, crafts vendors, live and interactive arts and food make up the Project Knew Groove Third Annual Art & Music Festival. All ages are invited to enjoy music and arts from noon to 7 p.m. to benefit PKG, which fosters artistic creativity through local events and educational programs. (650) 488-8161.

South Main Street blooms

August 5 Art galleries and art businesses on the south end of Main Street, known as SOMA, invite visitors to the Summer Art Stroll. Those businesses in the 600-800 blocks of Main Street will welcome art lovers from 2 to 5 p.m. Local musicians will be out adding their music to the festivities. 728-7518.

Cycle for Life

August 11 Hop on your bike for a giant loop through the Coastside while benefiting children with lung disease. One of about 50 Cystic Fibrosis Foundation nationwide rides sponsored by the Aptalis pharmaceutical company, this ride offers three routes for beginning to advanced riders. Volunteers are also needed to help on the day. All ages welcome. For info or to sign up, visit www.cycleforlifesf.org.

Take steps to help others

August 11-12 Get on your walking shoes and make tracks for the Hatch Elementary School lap track and the annual Relay for Life, which raises funds for the American Cancer Society. As always, it begins with a Survivors’ Lap, includes a touching lumenaria ceremony paying tribute to those lost to the disease, and will feature guest speakers including local dignitaries. Last year’s total was $88,000 raised; this year organizers hope for $100,000. Relayforlife.org.

It’s the spotted cow again

August 18-19 The 22nd annual Pescadero Arts and Fun Festival brings fine arts by South Coast Artists Alliance members, crafts by scores of vendors, live music by mostly local bands, and food made by local cooks. It all benefits youth activities on the South Coast. It’s from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. in and around the Pescadero I.D.E.S. Hall at 22 Stage Road in Pescadero. 879-0848.

Kickoff for a season

August 24 The Half Moon Bay High School football team kicks off its season with a four-way scrimmage against Hillsdale, Sacred Heart Prep and Galileo high schools. The frosh-soph scrimmage is at 5 p.m. and the varsity scrimmage follows at 7 p.m. All four teams will scrimmage each other at 30-minute intervals. There’s no admission charge, and the snack bar will be open. 712-7200. A U G U S T

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 education

oo sch l work By Sara Hayden

Half Moon Bay education supported by inspired individuals

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he backbone of Half Moon Bay’s schools is not made of the bricks and mortar that make the buildings so much as the passionate people who work there. Every one of the employees has a different story and reason for working in education, but they all have one thing in common: a commitment to making their schools the best they can be. As they get kids where they need to go, singing the praises of veggies, taking advantage of technology and more, each person’s job is integral in giving students a fair shot at a holistic education that prepares them for a bigger, brighter future. Meet some of Half Moon Bay’s finest who are working with students and faculty to help make this happen.

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bartel gives sea crest a tech boost


JIM BARTEL

What Bartel is looking forward to most after the school year starts: “Watching the new ways our faculty and students will use the tools and systems we’ve put in place for them over the summer.” What students need most these days: Inspiring educators who help them become confident and creative thinkers. “I believe today’s teachers have a deep understanding of their students, knowledge of both new and traditional education resources and the skill to combine them to create an engaging learning environment,” he said. Favorite tech toys to date: Bartel loves his third generation iPad with its crystal-clear retina display. For photography, Bartel the Olympus OM-D and f2.8 12-24mm lens are his devices of choice. “Last year was about imagining technologies. This year’s about watching some of them come through.”

Charles Russo

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n the middle of a classroom at Half Moon Bay’s Sea Crest School rests a plain, metal cabinet. It’s just large enough to be awkward and doesn’t really fit the decor, which is speckled with a riot of cheery construction paper and crayon creations. The only clue to its contents is the friendly beach-ball-like logo quietly stamped on the side. It turns out that it contains new Chromebook computers from Google — one for each of Sea Crest’s 76 middle school students. The school also has a collection of Apple iPads stashed away so every middle-school student has access to one. Some of these devices were donated, and the school purchased the rest. However, none of the tech toys would have made it to Sea Crest without the efforts of Bonfire Labs CTO and parent volunteer Jim Bartel, who used his tech savvy and connections to reach out to the companies. Bartel has volunteered at Sea Crest just over one year so far, but he’s already clocked in over 400 hours. “With things changing and constantly evolving, I’m happy to

help move that along. It’s one of the ways I can contribute and make a difference,” he said. Bartel hopes that these devices will supplement the needs of the teachers and the missions of the school, like working collaboratively and cutting back on paper use. They’ll also help kids explore their writing and science projects, data collection and analysis, and language learning activities. “Last year was about imagining possibilities. This year’s about watching some of them come through,” Bartel said, who looks forward to establishing a vision for future programs. In addition to helping launch major projects like Google app and iPad pilot programs, Bartel also sets up e-mail accounts, expanding wireless networking and fixing printer hiccups. “One thing led to another and I found there’s a lot of things to do,” he said. “You get involved in something and you want to make sure it’s done the right way. Every one of those hours has been a joy.” — Sara Hayden A U G U S T

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Maggie Van Horbek

Previous job: Fourteen-year-long stint as the Cunha Intermediate School secretary What she thinks of school: “I had no idea of the difference between elementary, middle and high schools. Elementary is a completely different world.” About her family: “(My children) both have boys. Still waiting for that granddaughter! Other than that, everything’s fine.”

Charles Russo

Myriad tasks make up Van Horbek’s day Special focus on report cards

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s the children’s testing period ends, Maggie Van Horbek’s begins. The students have “filled in the bubbles” to answer hundreds of Standardized Testing and Reporting questions, and Van Horbek swoops in to clean up hundreds of stray pencil marks with her eraser so the test answers can be properly read by the grading machine. “It can be exhausting,” Van Horbek said, but she’s happy to do so, explaining that all parents send “their best child to school” to give him or her a chance to succeed. Van Horbek is intensely committed to creating an environment where this is possible. This is just one small task that represents the minute level of detail Van Horbek attends to as administrative assistant to Cabrillo Unified School District’s Assistant Superintendent Elizabeth Schuck. Van Horbek is Schuck’s right-hand woman, and helps her with the process of developing instruction and curriculum, ordering textbooks, scheduling meetings, producing her report cards and much else. “We went to standards-based report cards,” said Van Horbek, who

has been working in this position since 1997. “I’ve gotten to be like the district guru on it.” Of course, it helps to be one of the system’s creators. In designing the system that is now used kindergarten through fifth grade, she put Microsoft Publisher through its paces, tweaking the format and theory until it satisfied teacher feedback. “It gives students a very clear picture of where they’re at … That’s one of my greatest accomplishments,” she said, but some of her proudest moments have been during her involvement with the Kickoff to Kindergarten program in the district that helps prepare kids for the school environment. She brings supplies, handles forms to be filled out and filed by parents and supports the teachers. “The kids are 4 years old — and they’re actually doing things!” Van Horbek marveled. “The ones that are most terrified, within three days, they love school.” It’s all in a day’s work for a person who makes sure each parent’s “best child” gets the best education they possibly can. — Sara Hayden

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Allison Silvestri

When she realized her calling was in education: The third grade. “It was something that was a part of our family,” remembered Silvestri, the teachers in her family. If she had time to unwind, she’d be: “Scuba diving. It’s like yoga under the water. It’s very peaceful and tranquil.” First day of school ritual: “I’ll get my best orange and black outfit ready for day one.”

Charles Russo

Silvestri ‘bleeds orange and black’

New principal is a familiar face

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n her time as an educator, Allison Silvestri has traveled coast to coast, from Costa Rica to the Coastside. She’s taught English in the South Pacific and special education at Woodside High School. Now she’s stepping up as principal at Half Moon Bay High as she hands off her former duties as the school’s assistant principal. “I was seeing myself as a principal,” Silvestri said of her goals. “I didn’t want to leave the Coastside. I didn’t want to leave the school. I bleed orange and black for this community.” Silvestri admits it’s going to be hard to let go of her old role. However, her present responsibilities as summer school principal, academic year principal, assistant principal of curriculum and instruction, summer school teacher and more leave her little time to get too caught up in the recent past. “I think it’s a mystery that I’ve got a lot of energy, a lot of enthusiasm,” she said. Plus, Silvestri is looking forward to being a principal as the class of 2013 — the class she started with when she came to the school several years ago — prepares to graduate. “They’re really an amazing class and they’ll go so far. I’m looking forward to the culmination, but I don’t want to rush it. Neither do the parents,” Silvestri said. In the meantime, Silvestri is getting ready for the start of school, planning a rally, freshman orientation, barbecues and socials. Because there is no furlough this fall, everyone has time to prepare for the start of school, she said. “Right now, it’s just go-time … It’s going to be a great year. I’m excited.” — Sara Hayden

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Administrative assistant keeps schools running Laura Torre supports district maintenance, operations and transportation

dministrative Assistant IV of Maintenance, Operations and Transportation sounds like a futuristic, other-worldly title, but the actual job couldn’t be held by a more down-to-earth person than Laura Torre, who first came to CUSD 15 years ago. After her mother died, Torre needed a change from her retail job. After picking up some new computer skills, she landed a position in the district as a coordinator of substitute teachers. She took a break, but ultimately decided to return. She’s been back working in the district for eight years. Technically, Torre’s current role is to provide support to James Tjogas, the director of maintenance, operations and transportation. “There’s a lot of work involved with that,” Torre said. That’s an

understatement. Daily responsibilities include keeping logs of time sheets, attendance, vacations, purchase orders, work orders, and other records. She secures substitutes when people are absent from departments, schedules repairs for broken down machinery, schedules the use of facilities, deals with site administrators, keeps track of certificates of liability and insurance, pays the bills and more. “I really like this,” said Torre, whose most recent job was as a clerical worker in the district. “I’m in contact with everybody. You have to deal with everybody on so many levels.” When she’s not managing those tasks, she keeps tabs on the students, too. She said this may be one of the most challenging parts of her job. “Finding children that are lost — that’s a real stressor. I won’t leave if there’s a child missing or not found. I feel obligated to do it, as a mother and a community member and my job. (Once they’ve been found), it’s like a hundred pounds has been lifted off your chest… They’re back home. We can carry on,” she said. But the people she works with on a daily basis make it entirely rewarding. Especially while facing cutbacks, her colleagues have found ways to provide support. “We just like to help each other out. When we help each other, it makes everybody’s jobs a little bit easier,” she said. As of July 1, her position has been cut by 50 percent. “But I’m still grateful to work here,” Torre said. “It’s going to be interesting to see how this work can be done in four hours instead of eight, but I’m still glad to work here.” — Sara Hayden

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All in a day’s work for Altamirano

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— Sara Hayden

Joel of all trades stays busy

hen Farallone View Elementary School’s day custodian Joel Altamirano rolled up for his interview, his wheels might have grabbed the attention of passers-by. He smoothly slid his 36-foot-long vehicle into a parking space next to the other bright, yellow school buses. Was this a typical ride for a custodian? Only if you’re doubling as a substitute bus driver, Altamirano said. “It’s a lot of responsibility,” he explained. “They give you a notice only in the morning. You don’t know when you’re going to be there … We must know all the routes. We don’t know who’s going to get sick.” He knows the face of every one of the kids he’s responsible for and the houses of the special education students who are picked up and dropped off at their homes. Once he’s done with his driving duties, he shifts gears, switching into the role of custodian. At Farallone View, he sets up for events, fixes things that have broken and ensures that the grounds are safe for staff and students. Sometimes, he takes care of things that are not always obvious functions of his job. “I noticed something on the roof. I was surprised,” he remembered. “It was a big sofa!” Altamirano had to secure the area so no one would walk underneath the roof as he threw the sofa to the ground. Altamirano first took on custodial responsibilities in the district at Hatch Elementary in 1997. He’s now in his second year at Farallone View, but he remembers the first days there clearly. The superintendent asked him to fix a broken sink. “I went with him to the lunchroom,” he said. The sink was fine. Instead, “They had a party to welcome me to the school. For me, they sang a song, and declared me the king of Farallone View School. It touched me.” The job allows him to spend time with his wife and three children, who are students within the district. His eldest daughter, Carmen, 19, just graduated from Half Moon Bay High and will be the first person in the family to attend college. In the fall, she will attend Wesleyan University in Connecticut to study to become a veterinarian. “It seems like it’s nothing,” said Altamirano of his various jobs that have included working on a farm and in a kitchen. “But when you don’t have the education to choose what you want to be, you get what’s in front of you, and not what you want.” But because of the Altamiranos’ hard work as immigrants from Oaxaca, Mexico, his children may very well be whatever they want to be. “I’m happy to be here and to have my kids offered this opportunity from this country,” he said. “I hope they take advantage of that.”

sara hayden

Joel Altamirano

Why he likes working during the day: “Working in the night, you don’t have the opportunity to have lunch with your family because your lunch is at 7, 7:30. It’s their dinner and your lunch!” Favorite pastimes: Taking walks on the beach with his family, or doing nothing at all. “We just relax, but we are together,” he said. How he ended up in Half Moon Bay: “I don’t like big cities. I like small towns. This was the best place to raise my kids. There’s no distraction for them to get off track. When you’re working all the time, it’s hard to bring home the responsibilities and care for them as an immigrant.”

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TONY ROEHRICK

The most surprising thing about moving to the Coastside: “The lack of big box chain stores.” Roehrick is enjoying the locally operated shops and services. “Employees are very knowledgeable about their products and are easy to find in the stores. It’s just a different mindset. (It’s) refreshing.” Back-to-school ritual: Visiting each school and checking in with office staff and visiting classrooms. “As a district or site administrator, you work weeks and even months preparing for this first day,” Roehrick said. “Seeing teachers and students re-engaged in teaching and learning is very satisfying.” Favorite hobby: Growing vegetables. Roehrick has been part of a small collaborative with his family that grows organic fruits and veggies. “Now that I am living in on the Coastside, I am excited to begin experimenting with the types of crops that flourish in this area.”

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Cabrillo’s New superintendent follows passion Roehrick began as photojournalist

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Charles Russo

or a time, Tony Roehrick, the new Cabrillo Unified School District superintendent, did everything he could to be around schools to prepare him for a career in education. He even spent his off-hour on lunch yard duty for credit in high school, but his dream took a detour when he got to college at San Francisco State University. Life magazine had always been a staple in his home when he was growing up, and he admired how photos could inform what was happening. “You had these limited windows into the rest of the world,” he remembered. “I realized one day, people actually do this for a living, and I’m pretty good at it.” So he packed his bags after graduating and headed to Los Angeles to work as a photojournalist. But the passion passed after a couple years. “I wasn’t making a difference in the world,” Roehrick said. “I knew, at least for 30 kids as a teacher, I could make a difference.” He returned to his original plan and went on to obtain his teaching certification and additional degrees in education administration and educational leadership. Serving as a teacher, an elementary school principal and superintendent in other districts, he put his own education to use. In his new role as Cabrillo’s superintendent, he said he’s looking forward to initiating programs that serve the diverse needs of the kids in the community, working with an articulate board of education and good community listeners. He’s especially interested in expanding opportunities that link high school students to real-world experiences. Not every high school student wants to work in the lunch yard the way Roehrick did, but some might want to work in marketing, medicine, science, law, technology or maybe even photojournalism. Whatever their dream careers may be, Roehrick wants students to have a chance to experience them in practical settings. “It’s something that can only happen with the community. We’re not leveraged to build a high tech company,” he said, hoping to establish relationships with local businesses so high school students can get involved with internships for credit outside of the classroom. Roehrick said that the effort is coming out of a state- and country-wide movement that aims to reduce drop-out rates by meeting the needs of the students. “We all want to do something we enjoy,” Roehrick said. “For me, part of that is doing something meaningful for society.” — Sara Hayden

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 education

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ectangulo,” said a summer instructor at Hatch Elementary School to a boy of preschool age. He took a blue puzzle piece in the shape of a rectangle from her and repeated in his native Spanish, “Rectangulo.” Older students discussed books nearby. They used complex sentence structures and challenging vocabulary, all in English — their second language. On the playground, children rushed to get snacks, chattering in both languages. They engaged in activities that naturally encourage interaction and communication, like oneon-one talks with teachers and making crafts in small-groups. Whether they knew it or not, the kids were absorbing language fundamentals that will help them succeed when the school year starts. Hatch Elementary School’s summer programs represent a small sampling of the many efforts in the Cabrillo Unified School District designed to bump English language learners to fluency so they can stay afloat in American schools.

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goal

Bilingual education helps all students excel By Sara Hayden | Photos by Charles Russo

“It’s a big thing, and the population (of English language learners) has grown and grown,” said Assistant Superintendent Elizabeth Schuck. When she started working in the district 14 years ago, about 10 percent of the student population was learning English as a second language. That figure is now between 35 and 40 percent as the district hustles to bridge the achievement gap between English language learners and native English speakers. In the 2007-2008 school year, 42 students were re-classified, meaning students performed satisfactorily in reading, writing, listening and speaking on the California English Language Development tests to demonstrate fluency in English. Four years later, the number of children qualifying for re-classification has more than doubled, to 106. Re-classified students’ eagerness to return to help their peers is perhaps one of the greatest indicators of the programs’ success, like that of 12-year-old Alma Sanchez. She helps run a class of 16 first and second grade students with reading, writing and coloring. The young ones are sometimes reluctant to break away from Spanish, but all their activities are in English, so they gradually get more comfortable. It also helps to have a mentor like Sanchez. She will start the seventh grade in the fall, but was already reclassified by the time she was in the fall of her sixth grade year. “I wasn’t expecting it. The counselor called me up and then game a certificate and told me I was re-classified,” she said. Sanchez aspires to be a teacher, so helping other students in the summer program, as well as helping her parents translate at home, are good fits for her. In the hubbub of Hatch’s cafeteria where kids are eating hot dogs with ketchup, Sanchez remembers when she first moved to the


Local high school freshman Francisco Valencia helps with Hatch Elementary students play a mathematics game. Valencia had learned English by progressing through the program years earlier.

United States from Santa Ana Zegache, Mexico. She was in the second grade – about the age of the students she’s responsible for now. Prior to that, she had no formal English instruction. She started to learn the language at school, but much of her practice came from sitting on the carpet of the home she shared with her family and a friend, a girl three years older than Sanchez who has also since been re-classified. Sanchez’s friend helped her with numbers and other basics, but the district also supported both girls’ English studies. Students now receive support funded by tax receipts and various grants until they can enter the mainstream English language program. In addition to summer programs, tutoring and learning clubs are available during the academic year, as well as a two-way Spanish and English immersion program that was first established at Hatch in 1991. It originally aimed to develop bilingual fluency and literacy, achieve proficiency across all academic subjects and cultivate an understanding and appreciation of diverse cultures and people. The district continues to carry out that vision with

Bilingual students can now earn new state seal Students now have more than just talk to prove that they’re multilingual -- they have something to show for it. At the beginning of the year, California began offering the State Seal of Biliteracy to high school students who have achieved proficiency in one or more languages in addition to English. Attaining the seal is no easy feat. Recipients have to prove they’re mettle in reading, writing, listening and speaking by maintaining a satisfactory grade-point average and passing Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate exams. But in the Cabrillo Unified School District, where nearly one in three kids is an English language learner, it’s a natural goal. “I’m proud to say Cabrillo was one of the first districts in San Mateo County that got on board with the new Seal of Biliteracy,” said Elizabeth Schuck, Cabrillo Unified School District’s assistant superintendant. Graduates who meet the requirements will be honored with a gold stamp on their diploma and medallions paid for by the San Mateo County Office of Education. According to state superintendent, more than 10,000 students throughout California were recognized with the seal this year for proficiency in Spanish, French, Mandarin, Japanese, Cantonese, German and other languages. — Sara Hayden A U G U S T

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Alma Sanchez works with Hatch Elementary students during summer classes.

self-contained classes that focus on bilingual support for students from kindergarten through the fifth grade and zero-period classes for sixth through eighth grade. Advanced Placement Spanish language classes are available at the high school level. While some students take advantage of these more advanced options, others need help with things as simple as learning language basics and getting to school. Finding ways to support this is challenging due to budget cuts. The district has had to turn to other resources to provide such services, like a special migrant program that receives federal funding. The migrant program helps the 400 students in the district who are the children of migrant families working in the agriculture or fishing industries, as identified by program administrators. “We’re part of the layer of the frosting of the cake,” said Rosalva Segura, a community relations assistant for the district, referring to the migrant program. She stopped herself a moment, adding, “Actually, we’re part of a cake at this point.” As the migrant program starts to fund transportation for migrant kids to get to summer school, remedial classes to get students on the road to graduation, workshops that help parents get involved with their child’s academic success and

other services, this appears to be increasingly true. Segura estimates $1,500 is spent annually on each student. This year, 13 of the 14 students in the migrant program graduated from high school and are pursuing higher education at colleges or vocational schools. Skeptics of English language learner programs are concerned that native English speakers are short-changed in their instruction time, but that’s not necessarily the case, said Schuck. These students get instruction in Spanish or other supplemental courses. “We’re setting up schedules where each group of kids is getting enrichment and enhancement,” she said. None of this would be possible without a dedicated, welltrained staff. All teachers in the state of California, including those in Cabrillo, are required to be certified in cross-cultural, language and academic development. Presently there are nine bilingual secretaries in the district, and Shuck hopes there will be more. In the mean time, the kids, whether their first language is Spanish or English, are doing well. “Kids are learning -- not all the time by the teacher, but by their class peers and community helpers,” Segura said. 


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 good ideas

Healthy school lunches startat home

By Amy Fothergill

Tomatoes

Tomatoes are high in vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium, potassium and high in lycopene, which helps prevent heart disease and cancer.

Eggs One egg has only 75 calories but 7

grams of high-quality protein, making it a good meat alternative. Eggs provide iron, vitamins, minerals and carotenoids, and are a powerhouse of disease-fighting nutrients lutein and zeaxanthin. Brain development and memory may be enhanced by the choline content.

acking a healthy lunch for your children can be easy if you keep to the basics.

One component of healthy eating is balance. Try to include protein, whole grain, fruit and a vegetable or two. If you don’t hit each one each day, that’s OK; look at the whole week. A good rule of thumb is to buy products that only contain whole ingredients, and avoid additives, preservatives and unnatural colors. Choosing organic is a great way to avoid harmful ingredients and genetically engineered materials. When selecting pre-made foods, start by reading labels. Look at sugar and sodium amounts. An easy way to make a decision is to look at the percentage of the recommended daily intake on the package. Keep sugar below 15 percent and sodium under 20 percent per item.

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Sunflower seed sprouts

Sunflower seed sprouts are a highly nutritious “living food,” full of living enzymes, iron and other essential vitamins, minerals, healthy fats, essential fatty acids, dietary fiber, amino acids, and disease-fighting phytosterols.


Olives

Kalamata olives contain monounsaturated fats, which are good for the cardiovascular system and for controlling blood sugar. They also contain vitamin E, polyphenols and flavonoids, which protect the body against free radicals, reduce inflammation, build the immune system and improve heart health. Good for strong bones and clear skin.

Dressing

Annie’s Organic Green Goddess Dressing is a tangy blend of sweet tarragon, vinegar, garlic and green onion and sour cream for a satiny smooth texture and delicious flavor. It’s gluten-free and vegetarian.

Back to School Bash

Bring the family to New Leaf ’s Back-to-School Bash from noon to 3 p.m., Aug. 18 for free activities and snacks. More information at: www. newleaf.com.

cantaloupe

Bite-sized, colorful cantaloupe is sweet and delicious, very low in calories, and high in anti-oxidants that can help prevent cancer and heart diseases. It’s also a good source of folic acid, potassium, vitamin C, vitamin B complex, and dietary fiber.

Red quinoa

Red quinoa, which has the highest protein content of all grains, is a great meat substitute. One cup contains 8.14 g of protein. It has a delicate flavor and crunchy texture, is rich in essential minerals and vitamins, and is gluten-free.

A U G U S T

For more ideas on healthy lunches, come to Chef Amy’s free Healthy Lunches Class at New Leaf Community Market in Half Moon Bay. It’s set for 6 p.m., Aug. 30 at the market. Preregister at www.newleaf.com or call 726-3110 ext. 101. Visit her blog for recipes, http://thefamilychef.blogspot.com. Bring the family to New Leaf ’s Back-to-School Bash on Aug. 18 from noon to 3 p.m. for free activities and snacks. More information at: www.newleaf.com.

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 games

bringsout the crowds

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Local game a draw on Coastside

By Mark Noack | photos by charles russo

linkity-plink, plinkity-plink, plinkity-plink — it’s the constant sound that echoes through the packed Cañada Cove community center every Wednesday night. It’s the patter of 75 numbered balls being churned around in a weekly exercise of organized chaos. It’s the staccato of coffee percolating in the corner of the room. It’s the percussion of feet tapping on a vinyl floor and a dozen felt markers simultaneously dabbing the surface of paper. As the tension reaches its climax, a yelp shatters the silence ... “Bingo!” The room erupts in a chorus of groans, torn paper and table chatter. But 30 seconds later, a new game begins. It’s bingo — and the game of chances has been going strong at Cañada Cove for more than three decades, regularly drawing upward of 50 avid players from across the Peninsula. In recent years, the maestro of the bingo game has been Steve Guaraglia, the housing park’s facilities manager. Wearing a Giants cap and jersey, he sits every week on stage loudly announces the numbers. After reading each number, he shows the ball to the room of players in a graceful sweep of his arm. “Sometimes I feel like a preacher, giving people the gospel,” he said. “But if I ever call a wrong number, these people will definitely let me know.” For many, the Cañada Cove weekly bingo game stands out as special, although for different reasons, Guaraglia explained. The game maintains a feel-

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Steve Guardaglia, facilities manager at Cañada Cove, serves as master of ceremonies and bingo caller at the popular Wednesday night gatherings.

Bill Murray / Review


good vibe and friendly atmosphere, which draws not just many neighborhood residents but also their families, friends and fellow bingo-holics from across the Peninsula. It didn’t hurt that the Half Moon Bay bingo spot was also regarded as one of the higher payout games in the area, with all proceeds going directly to winnings instead of a charity’s coffers. Sitting at their usual spot in the corner of the room, Dave and Barbara Canada of Pacifica prepared for the evening game. Unabashedly in love with bingo, the couple regularly makes the drive down the coast every Wednesday for the Half Moon Bay game. But they also attend a biweekly game at the Pacifica Moose Lodge

and a monthly bingo event at the Coastside Adult Day Health Center. Sometimes, if they want more, they travel to Redwood City for an extra game. Dave explained that his sister was even more obsessed, playing seven days a week at various games. “If you want to play, you can always find a place to play,” he said. “People do it because it keeps them sharp and it gives them something to do. “It can also be a real moneymaker,” he added. For the cost of $5 per bingo card, a player could buy a ticket to join in the game. But with odds to win increasing with each bingo

A U G U S T

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A Bingo alternative Four-year-old Xochitl Nieves plays a round of Loteria at the Half Moon Bay Library. Similar to Bingo, Loteria is a Mexican game that involves players covering certain symbols that are called out.

Barbara Canada, of Pacifica, marks her bingo cards at bingo night in the community center at Cañada Cove.

card, most players would buy no fewer than six. Organizer Pat Lancaster sat at the entrance to the room, selling the bingo cards. She’s made the game a weekly routine for the last 13 years. It was originally a way to meet people, and now she’s the person in charge of the game. Neighborhood resident Bea Phillips can’t remember a single time she’s won a game, but she enjoys playing for its own sake. Doing the math in her head, she estimates she’s been to 350 games since starting up in 2004. She counts 13 as her lucky number even though she admits it’s bad luck. This evening she sat with eight game sheets in front of her, midway into a round. She perked up as she dabbed her fourth number in a column, one number away from her first win. “What do you need?” asked the woman sitting across from her without glancing up from her gameboard. “63.” The woman gave a stern look at Phillips’ game piece and admonished her. They weren’t playing regular bingo, but rather Four Corners, a variation. As she finished explaining things, two people called out bingos. “I’m a better loser than I am I winner,” Phillips surmised with a sweet smile. One of the winners of that round’s $30 pot was Joan Kilinski, a Cañada Cove resident. She stood out in the room as the A U G U S T

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only person using a crayon to mark her bingo game board because she felt allergic to the ink markers. A British woman, Kilinski said it never ceased to amaze her how many odd spinoffs of bingo were played in the states. In fact, at Cañada Cove, everything seemed to be played except for standard bingo. The game names include Two Postage Stamps, Three Layer Cake, Winnamucca, and Block of Nine, each with its own rules to win. What drew her to play? Well, the money was a draw, she admitted. But it was also something else. “There’s a mature drive of hoping to win something and have fun,” she said. “But it’s the child in us — we just like to play games.” 

After numbered Bingo balls are called, they are carefully slotted into their proper spot on the Autotronic 4000’s consul.

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Cabrillo Unified School District Together we are making a difference. CEF’s endowment allocation for 2012/13 The Cabrillo Education Foundation is pleased to announce the details of the first annual endowment allocation. In this inaugural year, we are able to allocate $90,000 of the proceeds from the endowment to support some fantastic, strategic opportunities at each school that will enhance our students overall education. Here are the details:

Technology Pilot(s): $15,000 to fund technology pilots within one or more classrooms in CUSD to learn the best way to incorporate technology into the curriculum. The goal is learn this year and then broaden over future years to more classrooms. Details of the pilot will be recommended by newly formed technology committee, and approved by CEF.

ment technology. The goal is to test the technology’s ability to provide ongoing insight into student learning, enabling individualized education plans, improved academic outcomes, and freeing up teacher time from rote testing. Details will be determined by Kings Mountain staff and approved by CEF.

Elementary Science: $36,000 to augment the existing science curriculum at each of the “big three” elementary schools. Individual school sites will propose how to spend the allocation to best enhance their existing science program, and proposals must be approved by the leadership team and the parent organization at each school, as well as CEF.

High School 21st Century Elective: Cabrillo Unified School District

partner with the district to purchase a Cabrillo Unified School District smart board for Pilarcitos Alternative High School.

Science Collaboration: $4,000 to fund substitutes or stipends to provide collaboration time between all four elementary schools and Cunha science teachers to coordinate curriculum and approach, and to make a recommendation for a unified allocation in 2013/14 that will begin movement to a unified science program across all elementary schools and eventually all the way through the high school.

Half Moon Bay High School

$20,000 to enhance the schools technology program by providing an elective to prepare students for 21st century careers. Selected section: Animation. Chosen by CEF from several options proposed by the high school and input from the students. Cunha Field Trip: $6,500 to fund one new field trip (bussing and admission) for an entire grade at Cunha to enrich curriculum. Details will be determined by Cunha staff and approved by CEF. High School Teacher Collaboration Fund: $2,500 for a discretionary fund to be used specifically for substitutes to enable teacher planning, collaboration, and training. Assessment Pilot: $3,000 to fund a pilot at Kings Mountain for student assess-

www.ceffund.org

Half Moon Bay School Pilarcitos SmartHigh Board: $1,000 to Pilarcitos Field Trip: $2,000 to fund one or more field trips either to colleges or to a curriculum based destination. Proposals will be prepared by the school site and approved by CEF. Each allocation has a detailed set of guidelines and oversight to ensure that the money is providing the opportunities as intended (see www.ceffund.org for details). While this first allocation of $90,000 is impressive, it is relatively modest compared to what will be given each year going forward. The larger the endowment fund becomes, the broader and deeper the impact will be. Donate today to do your part to help it grow!

Cabrillo Education Foundation | P.O. Box 354, Half Moon Bay | 650.726.7871 3 2

H a l f

M o o n

B a y

A U G U S T

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AIR-INCLUSIVE

air-inclusive PACKAGES DEPARTING

SAN FRANCISCO packages departing selected gateways $1,699* from for travel in August

$$1,399* *

1,299

for travel in September per adult & October *per adult

Selected gatewayS in the following citieS:

• miami • new york • Boston • washington, d.c. • chicago • dallas • los angeles • San francisco

Turkoise, Turks & CaICos The resort is in Grace Bay, north-east of the largest of the islands, Providenciales. Colourful bungalows and blooming hibiscus line a beach with seashell-pinksands that stretches as far as the eye can see. An adults-only resort, you can spend the day enjoying your favorite sports before dancing the night away.

You’ll enjoy: • Our resort exclusively for adults • Aquatic flora and fauna in one of the world’s best diving locations • Playing volleyball, soccer, softball, kayaking and swinging from a flying trapeze • The opportunity to get the PADI certification

For more information or to book, please contact: Travel Agency Phone Number Address Station, 225 S. Cabrillo Hwy., Ste. C108, Half Moon Bay Shoreline Web Site / e-mail 650-726-7345, WWW.BAYWORLDTRAVEL.COM

Bay World Travel

*Price is available for a limited time only, subject to capacity control and may increase at any time. 7-night stay required. Price is per person based on double occupancy, varies based on actual date of departure and is not combinable with any other offer. Price valid for select departures from 5/5/12 to 10/26/12. Holiday restrictions and other blackout dates apply. Promotion may be withdrawn at any time and is subject to capacity restrictions. Club Med membership fees of $60 per adult. Other restrictions apply, including brochure terms and cancellation/change fees. Not responsible for errors or omissions. Void where prohibited or restricted by law. For information on baggage fees, refer to clubmed.us. CST#: 2020955-50.


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Half Moon Bay Magazine August 2012