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Contents: ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

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Changing for the better

LARRY HURRLE | ARGUS OBSERVER

Saint Alphonsus-Ontario recently added a new sign to its building in Ontario.The hospital has facilities in Ontario and Fruitland and is part of the Saint Alphonsus group.

• Sweeping changes at local hospital mean better care for the growing population

maneuver by Trinity, taking over hospitals in Nampa, Ontario and Baker City, creating a network of four Saint Alphonsus medical centers along the Interstate 84 corridor stretching from Boise to Baker LARRY HURRLE City. ARGUS OBSERVER “Overall, it’s been pretty ONTARIO smooth,” Leanna Bentz, execuFor the better part of the tive director of foundation and year, Ontario’s local hospital has marketing for Saint Alphonsusbeen undergoing sweeping Ontario, said. “There’s a lot to changes. But from the outside, learn and a lot of changes to at least for the most part, every- take on. Everybody has been thing is business as usual. looking forward to the changes. The Trinity Medical Group Overall, it’s been pretty posiofficially took over Holy Rosary tive.” Medical Center from Catholic Those changes started with a Health Initiatives, April 1, ribbon-cutting event March 17, 2010, which since that time has 2010, at the Fruitland become known as Saint Dominican Health location, offiAlphonsus Medical Centercially changing it to Saint Ontario. The move was a strong Alphonsus Dominican Health.

It’s kind of like the duck. You look really calm on top, but underneath you’re paddling like heck.

— Rick Palagi Saint Alphonsus-Ontario CEO

Later, the Ontario hospital officially changed its name to Saint Alphonsus Medical CenterOntario and, most recently, there was announcement that Saint Alphonsus would build a 30,000-square-foot medical plaza in Fruitland. Saint Alphonsus-Ontario CEO Rick Palagi said the change from CHI to Trinity was more of a geographical necessity for the local hospital. “With only one or two of us SEE HOSPITAL, PAGE E42

Saint Alphonsus ..........E2 Ogawa’s........................E3 Internet Truckstop .....E4 Subway.........................E6 Mandarin .....................E7 Poultry plant................E8 TVCC..........................E10 Payette County Title and Escrow .......E11 Flesh Pleasures.........E12 Fruitland Book..........E13 Mike and Jo’s.............E14 Jolts & Juice...............E15 NAPA..........................E16 Mackey’s....................E18 Body Shop .................E19 Mil-Stak......................E20 Hotshots.....................E24 Bixby and Sons..........E25 Ontario Brew Supply.........................E30 Kloy’s Pizza................E31 The Argus Observer 2011 Crossroads edition was produced with the help of many people throughout the newspaper, including Tom Perryman, Lori Schaffeld and Kari Massoth in our graphic arts department; Andy Shimojima, Jo Ogburn, Lisa Puccio, Shela Gerdau and Marylee Bleson in advertising; and Jessica Keller, Brandi Stromberg, Larry Meyer, William Anderson, Sheri Bandelean, Scott Ford, Lindsey Parker and Larry Hurrle in the editorial department.


Ogawa living the dream in food service industry

E3

WILLIAM ANDERSON

where his grandfather was the head cook. Ogawa would spend ONTARIO much of his time by his grandfaTommy Ogawa always knew that thers side, preparing the food to he wanted to work in the food in- be cooked. dustry, and a few life experiences After working hard, he was achelped him to get to where he is tually offered a job, making $8 a today as the owner of Ogawa’s day at something he loved to do. restaurant. A third experience was not as Back when Ogawa was in grade positive in Ogawa’s life, but just as school, he said he would somememorable. times fake himself being sick, to While eating out at a former loWILLIAM ANDERSON | ARGUS OBSERVER get out of going to school. When cal restaurant, Ogawa’s son began Ontario resident Shar Helton (center) orders dinner on a Thursday evening with her his parents would leave for the to choke on a severely over-cooked daughter Savannah Helton (right) at Ogawa’s restaurant in Ontario as waitress Sharla McClean takes their order. day, Ogawa said he would head to piece of chicken. Ogawa was able the kitchen and bake brownies or to use the Heimlich maneuver to So, when the opportunity for make other food. dislodge the chicken and open his the child and to himself. From that point on, Ogawa Ogawa to purchase a restaurant When Ogawa was 8 years old, son’s airway. knew he could not run a restauhe spent the summer with his Ogawa said the owner of the restaurant acted callously towards rant the same way. grandfather at a camp in McCall, SEE OGAWA, PAGE E41 ARGUS OBSERVER

ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011


Moving the industry to new heights ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

E4

SUBMITTED PHOTO

The Internet Truckstop headquarters is situated in New Plymouth.The new, three-story building opened in 2010.

• Internet Truckstop in New Plymouth continues as industry leader in matching trucks with freight LINDSEY PARKER ARGUS OBSERVER

NEW PLYMOUTH

Scott Moscrip, New Plymouth, founded the Internet Truckstop in 1995. The Internet Truckstop was the first business of its kind created at the infancy of the Internet. Moscrip got the idea when he was

unemployed and driving through the Nevada desert. “Necessity is the mother of invention,” Moscrip said. The Internet Truckstop, 222 Plymouth Ave., New Plymouth, gives carrier members the ability SEE TRUCKS, PAGE E5

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Trucks:

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ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

It ’s

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factoring business which sells acsmall office in Meridian. counts receivable to a third party, In the 16 years since its foundor factor. The factor purchases acing, Moscrip has expanded the FROM PAGE E4 Internet Truckstop from one busi- counts receivable from the busito find freight loads and connect E5 nesses to improve the cash flow. ness to four. The Internet with other carriers and brokers to The factor, a specialized third parTruckstop works closely with haul freight across the United ty or financial association, receives D&S Factors, Roady’s Truck States. payments and bills the debtor for Stops, uDrove and uDrove Truck brokers and carriers can Wireless. All the related business- the invoice amount. D&S Factors search for and post loads and use es were founded and are owned by was originally housed in the same Web enhancement tools such as facility as the Internet Truckstop. Moscrip. Carrier Clear, allowing users to As both businesses grew, D&S Today, the Internet Truckstop find loads faster, and ITEX, which Factors needed a larger facility. It has expanded into a three-story, lets users communicate quickly moved to a larger location in 66,000-square-foot facility. The and effectively about transportabuilding houses several businesses, Fruitland — the former student tion postings. including a branch of the Malheur loan building south of Fruitland — Moscrip’s goal for the Internet and today employs more than 40 Federal Credit Union, Roady’s Truckstop was, “To provide innoTruck Stops, uDrove and uDrove people. vative and reasonably priced servRoady’s Truckstop was founded Wireless. Scott Moscrip ices for the transportation indusin 2007 and is headquartered in “We still have room to grow, try.” not open 24 hours, but runs in and we use about half of our cur- New Plymouth. Roady’s is the Today, the Internet Truckstop is shifts from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. largest chain of independently a locally-owned, nationally-recogMoscrip’s employees tend to stay rent building space,” Moscrip said. owned truckstops in the United D&S Factors, 6905 U.S. nized freight tracking service. Not with the company once they start. Highway 95, Fruitland, was found- States. It has more than 350 locaonly do they service the United “We have very low turnover,” tions in 45 states. Roady’s sponStates, they also offer services in Moscrip said. “We’ve grown from ed in 2003 by brothers Scott and Doug Moscrip. D&S Factors is a Canada and Mexico. SEE TRUCKS, PAGE E41 30 employees to over 160. From PAYETTE • WEISER • FRUITLAND • ONTARIO • NEW PLYMOUTH • EMMETT • WILDER In 1995, at its founding, the 2003 to 2011 we’ve added 130 poInternet Truckstop employed three sitions. Our longest employees people. The business grew quickly, have been with us between 13 and mostly by word of mouth, and had 14 years.” a reputation for excellence, reliabilMost employees of the Internet ity and teamwork. Internet Truckstop live near New Truckstop quickly expanded from Plymouth and Fruitland, but some one to three houses between 1995 drive from Middleton. and 2003, employing about 30 At one time, Moscrip had empeople. Employees work providing ployees driving over from Boise, so customer service in a call center to accommodate those who lived We can save you time & money! environment. The call center is further away, Moscrip added a Mention this code: sp-1101 for special pricing!


Subway employs local contractors for new store BRANDI STROMBERG

We have been very welcomed by the community, it feels. People have seemed to really like the idea that we used almost all local contractors.

ARGUS OBSERVER

ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

E6

PAYETTE

The Payette Subway has had a busy few years, moving to Ontario and then a new building in Payette, but owners John and Kay Cox are proud of the new addition to their four-store franchise. The Coxes have Subways in Weiser, inside Wal-Mart in Ontario, Fruitland and the newest in Payette. Gayla Myers, regional manager for the four stores, said the stores employ around 42 employees. She said, during construction of the new Payette building, John Cox contracted out almost all local contractors. “We have been very welcomed by the community, it feels,” Myers said. “People have seemed to really like the idea that we used almost

— Gayla Myers Subway Regional Manager

BRANDI STROMBERG | ARGUS OBSERVER

Olive George (left), is the manager of the Payette Subway. Silas McCourt is a sandwich artist at the store.The store was constructed in late 2010 by nearly all local contractors.The owners of the four-store franchise of the Ontario Wal-Mart Subway, Fruitland Subway,Weiser Subway and Payette Subway, John and Kay Cox, employ around 42 employees in the four stores.

all local contractors.” Subway offers winter soups, salads, sandwiches and flat bread. The restaurant caters and will supply giant Subway sandwiches and mini sandwich platters. The restaurant is open seven days a week, and the Payette location is open from 7 a.m. to midnight. Myers said Cox is very into community support and volunteer-

SEE SUBWAY, PAGE E37

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Mandarin Restaurant finds its home in Payette

E7

said. “We like the location better, and we can hold banquets in here PAYETTE now.” The Mandarin Restaurant The Mandarin was closed from moved locations in 2006 because July 1, 2006, to July 16, 2006. Ma of the need for more room. But it and other owners decided on didn’t move far — just a few blocks opening the restaurant in Payette south on Main Street in Payette. because the potential of the small The new location of the area. The decision to come to Mandarin is 136 S. Main St., Payette was finalized in 2001, across the street from Dart’s True when Ma and other owners rented Value. the building downtown, as well. The move was caused by a need The lady who pre-owned the for a larger location, and the owners of the Mandarin now own the build- restaurant quit, and Ma wanted to keep serving the people of Payette, ing they occupy. They did not own she said. The new location can the building they were in before. “It is definitely bigger and better hold banquets for up to 30 people in here,” part-owner Sharon Ma SEE MANDARIN, PAGE E38 ARGUS OBSERVER

BRANDI STROMBERG | ARGUS OBSERVER

The Mandarin Restaurant situated at 136 S. Main St. in Payette.

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Christine Tyler

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ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

BRANDI STROMBERG


Retirement turns into fowl business for two local entrepreneurs

ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

E8

FARMER’S SUPPLY CO-OP

SCOTT FORD

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birds in the area, and that area includes Wendell, Riggins, Meridian, FRUITLAND Emmett, Kuna, Boise, Payette and In 2009, Ontario residents John many other places,” Gerry Kelly and Gerry Kelly were set to retire said. “We have about 300 cusbut instead decided to open a new tomers that bring in their birds for business to help them through the us to process. People just want to golden years. However, the busieat chicken.” ness they chose was one out of the Countryside Processing is limitordinary, a poultry processing and ed in the number of birds it can packing plant. process in a year. That number is The plant is situated at 600 S. 20,000. Idaho Ave. in Fruitland. The build“That is what the state and feding is small but efficient for the eral government said we can do more than 14,000 birds the Kellys with our licensing,” John Kelly process each year. said. “We have had a number of John Kelly said he was just sitpeople calling us to process birds, ting around thinking about what but we cannot accommodate them type of business he wanted to all because of the cap the governopen, and one day it came to him. ment has on us.” “We have butchered chickens by The processing part of the busihand for years, so we decided that ness is quick, clean and professionthis was something we could go in- al. The Kellys bought the equipto,” John Kelly said. ment they needed from a With no big bird farms in the Mennonite processor in area, the Kellys still manage to Pennsylvania, and John Kelly said process thousands of birds every it is a simple operation to run. year. The live birds come into the “We process the birds of individuals that raise a few hundred SEE POULTRY, PAGE E9 ARGUS OBSERVER

FULLY STOCKED CLEAN CONVENIENCE STORE

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“Performance On Command”


Poultry: FROM PAGE E8

E9

SCOTT FORD | ARGUS OBSERVER

The Countryside Poultry Processing plant in Fruitland handles more than 14,000 birds every year. This 3-year-old business is the idea of Ontario residents John and Gerry Kelly, who were looking for something to do after retirement.

“Fruitland was more than willing to work with us when we came to them with the business,” Gerry Kelly said. “We are very happy to be working with the City of Fruitland.”

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ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

plant and go through a series of steps to ensure the utmost professional processing and are sent out packaged, weighed and stamped. Countryside can only process live birds according to the licensing they are under. Making the adjustment from backyard butchering to a plant process, the Kellys said the adjustment was easy. “With six people we can process 130 birds an hour,” John Kelly said. “Learning the process is like any other job. It takes a person about two weeks to understand the entire process.” Processing birds is not a job for everyone, and Gerry Kelly said, in the beginning, the turnover was huge. “If they did not show up the next day, we understood,” Gerry Kelly said. “Not everyone can do this job. But we have a good staff on hand now. We look at it from a stand point if we will not put it on our dinner table then that bird is not going out the door.” Countryside currently does not sell packaged birds to the general public. They currently package birds from private growers, who in turn sell the packaged birds to various locations.


Young at the heart ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

E10

• New Treasure Valley Community College president has spent most of her first year listening to people throughout the community JESSICA KELLER

tive team members, who seem to appreciate her open and collaboraONTARIO tive style of management. Working under four different “I’m definitely a listener,” Young college presidents with different said, listing that as an asset to bemanagement styles has given ing college president. Treasure Valley Community She has spent a lot of time lisCollege President Dana Young a tening to people, including those pretty good idea of what best among her administrative team, works for her. during the past few months, and Young, who was hired in the now she and her administrative spring of 2010 and formally began team are listening to the concerns in the summer, said working at and visions of department heads TVCC has been great, and she has of the college. That, she said, is been fortunate in her administra- very useful when planning for the ARGUS OBSERVER

Christian Books, Gifts and More! •Willow Tree Angels •Yankee Candles •Bibles & Bible Covers •Greeting Cards •Regional History Books •Framed Art •Local Authors •Wedding & Baby Gifts

JESSICA KELLER | ARGUS OBSERVER

Treasure Valley Community College President Dana Young (left) reviews her schedule with Public Information Director Abby Lee in her office at TVCC.Young, who started working at the college this past summer, said collaboration is a central aspect of her leadership style and recognizes the value of collaboration and partnerships in education.

future. Planning for the future is key, especially when money is tight and education throughout the state is receiving less money. The development of the plan is essential, and Young said the goal is to have the college’s strategic plan coincide with the ones required in the college’s accreditation process. Once a

plan is in place and she has an end product to work from, Young said, she will work her way back and formulate the details of how that plan will come together. “Many times it’s about the journey. How you handle something and how you get there is as impor-

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E11

Kerri Frye (left), escrow officer, Melissa Fry (center), title officer, and Melissa Garatea, manager of Payette County Title and Escrow, stand in the newly constructed office located in the Pioneer Plaza, near Arctic Circle in Payette.The company, which came to Payette in 2009, moved to the new office in April 2010. Renee Bonfiglio, not pictured, is the long-term escrow account executive.

Customer service stands out for Payette County Title and Escrow BRANDI STROMBERG

says she really lucked out when she hired her employees when the company came to Payette in 2009.

ARGUS OBSERVER

PAYETTE

Payette County Title and Escrow manager Melissa Garatea

SEE TITLE, PAGE E39

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ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

BRANDI STROMBERG | ARGUS OBSERVER


ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

E12

More than meets the eye • Local tattoo store strives to be part of the community JESSICA KELLER ARGUS OBSERVER

FRUITLAND

Flesh Pleasures in Fruitland is more than just a tattoo shop. The business, which opened at 1213 N.W. 16th Ave., has skilled tattoo artists for people looking to get inked, however, it will offer more than that, Mike Moreno, general manager, said. “We’re not tattoo and piercing only. It’s going to be a store,” he said. In tough economic times it’s

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Flesh Pleasures general manager and tattoo artist Mike Moreno works on a customer’s tattoo at the new business in Fruitland. Moreno said, however, Flesh Pleasures is more than just a tattoo business and will also sell clothing,such as T-shirts, and sunglasses and jewelry.

prudent to expand retail services, he said, which is why the business will have its own clothing line and will also feature sunglass and jewelry lines at some point. A movie room toward the back of the business is set up so people have a place to “hang out” while friends are getting tattoos, as well, Moreno said. The concept is newer among tattoo businesses, but he said it only makes sense to expand the market to include more things people are interested in. “What we’re trying to do is just market to the people here in town,” he said, adding, if the store offers tattoos and other items that people enjoy, it means more monSEE TATTOO, PAGE E38

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JESSICA KELLER

but began book selling online in California. The world of online FRUITLAND book selling is very different, she After garnering 10 years of exsaid, and is more limited in its perience selling books online, scope in that the Perrys would sell Fruitland residents Charie and Bill to specific clients looking for cerPerry decided to broaden their tain books or genres or authors. scope in the retail industry by While that was fine for awhile, Charie Perry said, a few years ago opening their own bookstore. Fruitland Book, situated just off she and Bill began discussing opening a general used bookstore that of U.S. Highway 95 near the outwould cater to everyone. skirts of Fruitland, opened the “We decided to do a bookstore week before Thanksgiving and has because every book has a value,” been very well received by the she said. community, Charie Perry said. Fruitland Book, Charie Perry Perry and her husband have lived in Fruitland for eight years SEE BOOKS, PAGE E34 ARGUS OBSERVER

JESSICA KELLER | ARGUS OBSERVER

Charie and Bill Perry, Fruitland, stand in the Kids Corner of their used bookstore, Fruitland Book,situated just off of U.S.Highway 95 near the outskirts of Fruitland.Since opening the week before Thanksgiving last year, the business has been very well received by community members and people passing through Fruitland, Charie Perry said.

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E13

ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

Perrys boast plenty of experience in bookstore industry


Mike and Jo’s: Big name goods at discount prices

ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

E14

Supporting our Troops through our programs Pencils For Peace

LARRY MEYER ARGUS OBSERVER

NYSSA

Treats for the Troops Quilts For The Troops 484 SW 4th Ave., Ontario OR 541-889-1978 110 N. 3rd St., Nyssa OR

Squeezed into space between Marilyn’s Pickets and Patchwork and the Nyssa Tavern, Mike and Jo’s is Nyssa’s newest store on Main Street, in the 100 block, selling mainly items that did not sell or could not be sold at the big chain stores, with familiar names

such as Sears, Kmart and WalMart. They opened the store Jan. 18. On the shelves and around the store are lots of toys, dishes, exercise equipment and small appliances such as microwave ovens or toaster ovens, at half the price of regular stores, Mike Berg, who SEE MIKE AND JO, PAGE E37

Proceeds are used for veteran programs. For further information go to: www.veteranadvocates.org

DJ’S PILGRIM MARKET

LARRY MEYER | ARGUS OBSERVER

Open: Sun. 8-8, Mon.-Sat. 7-9

102 N Plymouth Ave., New Plymouth, ID

(208) 278-3090

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Shop 208-278-5812 Cell 208-412-6308

Mike and Jo’s in Nyssa features toys, appliances and even exercise equipment at a discounted price.

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EMP/ERNIE’S ELECTRIC MOTORS • PUMPS • TOOLS 541-881-1327 or 541- 889-6912

Join Us On Facebook 435 South Oregon Street, Ontario, Oregon


SHERI BANDELEAN ARGUS OBSERVER

ONTARIO

SHERI BANDELEAN | ARGUS OBSERVER

Jolts & Juice moved forward and expanded its business at its downtown Ontario location not only in size but in what the business serves. Jolts & Juice doesn’t just sell coffee and smoothies. It now serves specialty beers and wine and lunch items such as sandwiches. “It was the right time. We needed more room, and it is now more

Jolts & Juice has expanded its downtown Ontario location to offer more than just coffee and smoothies.The location now serves specialty beers and wines, along with lunch items.

SEE JOLTS, PAGE E33

Ontario’s Oldest and Most Reliable Wrecker Service

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ONTARIO

541-889-5811 1-800-697-2494

Emergency Road Benefits BECOME A MEMBER TODAY!

n Mechanical First Aid n Tire Changing n Battery Service

n Emergency Towing n Extrication/Winching Service n Lockout Service

BODY REPAIRS Small or large jobs! AUTO PAINTING Cars or Trucks

ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

Jolts & Juice broadens its horizons to offer more than just coffee E15 and smoothies at its downtown location


ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

E16

Bigger store doesn’t stop NAPA for focusing on customer service SCOTT FORD

“For the most part, the customers are pleased with our new ONTARIO location,” Dayton said. “We have Three years ago, NAPA Auto freeway access, but there are some Parts moved to a new location in customers at the other end of Ontario, situated at 80 S.E. Second town that wished we would have St., Suite 3, so it could expand its stayed where we were.” inventory and service the commuNAPA has covered all its bases nity of Ontario better. Its prior lo- when it comes to serving the west cation was on Southwest Fourth end of the Treasure Valley with loAvenue in Ontario. cations in Payette, New Plymouth, Store manager John Dayton said Nyssa and Vale. since he has been at the new loca“We have this area surrounded,” tion he has seen a steady increase Dayton said. “The expansion gave us in customers. Dayton became the the ability to carry more inventory.” Ontario store manager two years Dayton said the store does have ago and transferred from the New its competition with other local Plymouth location. automotive stores, and that compeARGUS OBSERVER

SCOTT FORD | ARGUS OBSERVER

The Ontario NAPA store moved to its new location three years ago and since that time, store manager John Dayton said he has seen a steady increase in customers. NAPA is situated at 80 S.E. Second St., Suite 3 in Ontario.

tition is for service. “We stress service to our employees,” Dayton said. “And our service makes us better than the rest.” According to the NAPA website,

NAPA Auto Parts knows the importance of having the right parts and service the community can depend on. It installs NAPA brand SEE NAPA, PAGE E37


E17

Gary and Debby Trick, Owners / Funeral Directors

ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

Since 1919 the Ontario area deaths were originally handled by the Peterson family who owned the Peterson Furniture Store. Caskets were kept in the basement of their establishment. In 1935-36 they built a new “modern” funeral home on Northwest First Avenue. Soon after the Peterson family sold the funeral home to George Beechler. On February 15, 1961 Bertelson and Lienkaemper purchased the business. Burt & Joyce Lienkaemper started Nyssa Lienkaemper Funeral Home in 1933. Their son, John and his wife Norma later ran the businesses, buying out the partners. In 1971 the High Funeral Home was built in Vale, Oregon. In 1985 the Lienkaemper’s purchased the High Funeral Home. In October 1989 Malletta-Vertin partnership purchased the 3 businesses and sold them to the Corporation in August 1993. In June 2007 Gary & Debby Trick purchased the 3 businesses, Ontario, Nyssa and Vale Chapels back from the corporation to return them back to being family owned and operated. Both Gary & Debby Trick grew up in the local area. Gary in Fruitland, where he graduated from Fruitland High School in 1972, and Debby in Payette where she graduated from Payette High School in 1973. Gary while in High School at Fruitland back in 1969, was hired by John Lienkaemper to help around the funeral home and later served his apprenticeship under John. Thomason Funeral Home was started by Lloyd Northam in 1910 and sometime during the 1940’s, Billy Jones purchased the operation from Mr. Northam, whereupon it was renamed Northam-Jones. Dale Thomason purchased Northam-Jones from Bill and Evelyn Jones in 1966. Bob Thomason took over from his father in the mid 1980s through the ‘90s and for half of the current decade. In 2005 Bob Thomason decided to retire and sell the funeral home to Gary and Debby Trick. With the purchase of the Thomason Funeral Home in 2005 and Lienkaemper Chapels in 2007 the facilities were updated along with the installation of an onsite state of the art crematory at Thomason’s to serve the needs of families choosing cremation. This ensures the families using Lienkaemper- Thomason’s that their loved ones never leave our care. Whether you want a complete traditional service with burial, or simple cremation with a memorial service, or other type of celebration of life service, you can depend on us to accommodate you with dignity, respect, compassion, and professionalism. At Lienkaemper-Thomason Funeral Centers and Crematory we take pride in being locally family owned and operated. Serving Malheur, Payette, Washington and Adams Counties striving to provide unique and meaningful experiences for our families in all areas in which we serve them. We truly care for our community in all of life’s celebrations and activities through community support. Gary and Debby Trick together with Gary Meeker, long time director at Lienkaemper’s, bring many years of experience and understanding when working with families at a difficult time. Our goal is to provide exceptional services, professionalism that exceeds our families’ expectations.


ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

E18

Mackey’s bring a touch of the Irish home with restaurant and pub WILLIAM ANDERSON

opened up their Irish style restaurant/steakhouse and pub in March ONTARIO of 2008 and have recently celebratThe concept of the restaurant ed their third anniversary. was thought of after a bad day of Knowing they wanted to open elk hunting, while at elk camp. up a restaurant after spending a Some of the recipes used every year getting a Winger’s restaurant day were created and fine-tuned in up and running in Klamath Falls, the kitchen of a mother of one of the Groves spent a day elk hunting. WILLIAM ANDERSON | ARGUS OBSERVER the owners. A less than stellar day hunting had These are just two of multiple the Groves back in Ontario, when a Mackey’s owner Angie Grove calculates a bill during their St. Patrick’s Day celebration March 17 in Ontario. Mackey’s recently celebrated its third anniversary in business. reasons why the owners of business partner began showing Mackey’s have striven to make their them a property of a former restau- about the place and what they said. “We wanted to make it comrestaurant have a homey type of rant in Ontario. would do with it. fortable, a come-as-you-are place.” feel. Later that night, back at camp, “It has always been our idea to Owners Shawn and Angie Grove the Groves could not stop thinking have a restaurant,” Shawn Grove SEE MACKEY'S, PAGE E32 ARGUS OBSERVER

LIVESTOCK & Breeder DIRECTORY BELL KEY ANGUS Females and Bulls with Best Modern Bloodlines Dennis & Jim Boehlke BETTER ANGUS SINCE 1953 5 1/2 miles south of Nampa, ID 83686

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VALE, OREGON JERRY BAKER • 208-739-3449 2175 Bench Rd. • Vale, OR 97918 Herdsman - Samuel Mohler 208-739-0475

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LINDSEY PARKER ARGUS OBSERVER

FRUITLAND

and showers. Each location has unlimited tanning for an extra fee. The Weiser facility is largest at about 4,500 square feet. Both the Payette and Fruitland locations are about 3,500 square feet Each center has treadmills with

HDTV, recumbent bikes, upright bikes, elliptical machines, free weight training areas, LCD flatscreen TVs, exercise circuit stations and upbeat digital music. The Body Shop Fitness Centers offer yearly, monthly and weekly rates. They also offer corporate discounts. The newest addition to the Fruitland location is a 900-squarefoot, multi-level exercise studio. “This location used to be a church,” Jim Smith said. “We were able to expand the area (into an exercise studio) and convert it. It

SEE FITNESS, PAGE E29

LINDSEY PARKER | ARGUS OBSERVER

The newly-completed 900-square-foot exercise studio in the Fruitland Body Shop Fitness Center location.The women are completing their warm up during Zumba, one of the exercise classes offered by Body Shop Fitness. Body Shop, now hosts three exercise classes completely free to gym members. Classes offered include Turbo Kick, Cardio Blast, and Zumba.

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541-889-8693

We want to help you plan for the future and prepare for potential "problems". Accidents do happen and result in financial hardships. Solutions will provide money to recover from damage to your home, auto and most important "YOU". Please call today to schedule an appointment.

ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

Body Shop Fitness Center is a 24-hour fitness center open all day everyday, including holidays. Body Shop Fitness was purchased by Jim and Anita Smith, Fruitland, in June 2008. Body Shop Fitness has three locations in Fruitland, Payette and Weiser. Addresses are as follows, Weiser, 35 W. Commercial St., (208) 414-2639, Payette, 541 S. 16th St., (208) 642-1326, and Fruitland, 1322 N. Whitley Dr., (208) 452-7799. All locations have been expanded and include changing rooms

Fitness: All day, every day at Body Shop Fitness

used to be an apartment.” The studio is home to a variety of weekly workout classes including Zumba, Turbo Kick kickboxing E19 and Cardio Blast aerobics. Zumba is a popular aerobics fitness program combining Latin music and dance moves. Dance move types include salsa, meringue, cha-cha, mambo and shuffle steps. Routines involve interval training, alternating between fast and slow rhythms, and resistance training. Zumba instructors teach basic routines and add more complicated movements as the class progresses. Zumba routines are designed for all types of people, from beginners to advanced. Zumba helps speed up metabolism and burn calories. Turbo Kick kickboxing is a combination of kickboxing and dance moves. Turbo kick includes interval


ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

E20

N

ecessity proves to be the mother of invention for Millsaps LINDSEY PARKER

ing and transferring small bales of hay. Eventually mid-sized bale FRUITLAND clamps were standard over small Mil-Stak Inc.®, situated at 1350 bales. Glenway Ave., Fruitland, is a farm Because of significant experiequipment resale shop, owned by ence, and thanks to a brilliant brothers Leland and Ken Millsap, mind, Leland Millsap came up of Fruitland. The Millsaps grew up with a way to stack and haul midlocally and worked together on sized bales using his own small their family farm. They harvested bale wagon. This was so farmers hay and used small hay bale stack- could stack small and mid-size ers to collect it each season. bales without the need for two difThe Millsaps purchased their ferent sized bale wagons. A hay first bale wagon in 1990 for haul- bale stacker clamp is an attachARGUS OBSERVER

188 East Lane, Suite 3 Ontario, OR 97914

541 881 3912

Custom Smiles Denture Specialist

Heidi van Giffen L.D. Licensed Denturist

LINDSEY PARKER | ARGUS OBSERVER

The new 13,500-square-foot shop and office of Mil-Stak equipment. Brothers Leland and Ken Millsap, Fruitland, needed to expand their business after inventing and patenting the Mil-Stak bale clamp to use the bale wagon’s existing machinery and controls to stack small and medium sized hay bales.

ment on the hay baler that picks up and stacks finished hay bales. Bales can be collected from the field and stacked together in a bale stacker wagon. The Mid-Size Bale Loader was invented by Leland Millsap, and the first prototype was built by Ken Millsap in 1999 in his shop. The Millsaps’ goal was to design a fast, simple way for one operator to load and stack mid-size bales with his existing bale wagon and yet retain the ability to quickly switch back to small bale loading. Both worked diligently to improve the bale stackers and iron out the kinks in the ever-changing

design. The Millsaps had a prototype, and by the spring of 2000, the brothers had a baler. The hay baler was an attachment that was easy to add or remove and would convert a small bale stacker to a medium bale stacker, even if the bale wagon was meant for small loads. The MilStak® bale loaders convert small bale stackers to large bale stackers using existing equipment and controls. The bale loader clamp the Millsaps designed gave the operator the control to make a tight uniform stack of mid-size or small bales. Mil-Stak® bale clamps get SEE MIL-STAK, PAGE E21

CONNIE’S SERVICE & REPAIR, LLC

Since 1948 I recently relocated from Klamath Falls, Oregon where I served the community for almost 5 years. I am excited to establish “Custom Smiles” in the Treasure Valley and offer quality denture care to patients. Here at Custom Smiles, our work is customized for each individual to create a denture that functions properly, is comfortable, and looks natural. I am currently the Vice President of the “Oregon State Denturist Association” and member of the “National Denturist Association.”

www.customsmilesdentures.com

DRIVELINE AND GEAR SPECIALISTS

541-889-5797 After Hours: 541-212-8516 515 Hwy. 20-26, Ontario, Oregon


Mil-Stak: FROM PAGE E20

soon as the bale is clamped, it gets loaded. Leland and Ken Millsap started working together on their family E21 farm. Their first shop was 1,500 square feet. Mil-Stak’s new location has a 12,000-square-foot shop in the back and a 1,500-square-foot office in the front. They have four employees, and have sold an estimated 450 bale stakers. LINDSEY PARKER | ARGUS OBSERVER Mil-Stak® sells large bale stackThe 1032 Mil-Stak bale clamp.The 1032 bale clamp is adjustable and can lift hay ers all over the United States and bales of 3X3 or 3X4 sizes.The bale clamps Canada, even shipping some bale were patented and created by Leland and Ken Millsap, Fruitland, and were designed stackers as far as Saudi Arabia and to work with New Holland Bale wagons. Brazil. These clamps stack hay quickly and effiThe Millsaps offer demonstraciently and allow the bale wagon operator to stack small- and medium-sized bales tions of their newest bale wagons with the same piece of machinery. throughout the summer, and the farm or in a commercial operation. current schedule is first cutting: June 18, second cutting: July 19 They have three sizes, the MilStak® 1028, Mil-Stak® 1030 and though July 21, third cutting: Aug. 16 through Aug. 20, and fourth the Mil-Stak®1032. Mil-Stak large bale clamps work cutting: Sept. 13 through Sept. 17. For more information see with New Holland bale wagons and automatically start loading. As http://www.milstak.com. Wedding gowns • Bridesmaid dresses Mother’s ensembles • Tuxedos • Flower girls Shoes • Veils • Accessories • Prom • Quinceanera Special Occasion Dresses

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ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

the bales quickly off the ground for fast, non-stop loading. This reduces the time the bales slide on the ground, embedding dirt and debris into the hay. With the encouragement of friends and neighbors, the brothers patented, built and sold their clamps. It took two years to obtain their patent for the Mil-Stak® mid-size bale conversion. By February 2001, Leland traveled to the World Ag Expo in Tulare, Calif., and showcased the clamp to New Holland®. During that year, Ken and Leland sold nine of the model 1,000 clamps. After trial and error and a growing scrap pile out back, MilStak’s® hay farming customers loved the functionality of the new clamps. Mil-Stak® bale clamps are specially designed to work with

New Holland® bale wagons. In 2002 Leland and Ken had a booth in the World Ag Expo and sold 28 bale clamps. Some stacker clamps were used thousands of times, which caused wear and tear. Improvements were made to the design, and better materials and reinforcements were used. Since the brothers patented their first attachment, their annual sales have increased as more and more people have seen the simplicity of the operation and as the industry changes over to the popular midsize bale. Leland and Ken also began work on their pull-type wagon, which works with the Mil-Stak® bale clamp. Today, Mil-Stak® makes three models of bale clamp converters. Two are adjustable. The attachments can be sold with New Holland bale wagons, or separately. The bale loader clamps can work with machinery used on the family


Your Community Hospital...

The past 12 months have been filled with change and excitement for Holy Rosary Medical Center, starting with becoming part of Trinity Health, the nation’s fourth largest Catholic health care system, becoming a proud member of the new Saint Alphonsus Health System, and changing its name to Saint Alphonsus Medical Center– Ontario. Throughout the changes the Medical Center’s commitment to its patients and community has remained the same. Regardless of the name or logo this hospital is a community hospital, your community hospital, and is committed to providing healing and hope, close to home. 351 SW 9th Street • (541) 881-7000

SAINT ALPHONSUS MEDICAL CENTER — ONTARIO


As we honor the Medical Center’s heritage of serving your family and loved one’s for nearly 100 years we look to the future and recognize the importance of keeping this hospital viable for another 100 years. The Fruitland Health Plaza will help do just that. The 30,000 square foot, estimated $10 million investment will bring many benefits to Ontario, Fruitland, Payette, Weiser, Nyssa, Vale and surrounding communities. This expansion of locally available services is only the beginning of the fulfillment of Saint Alphonsus’s commitment to being your trusted health partner for life and ensuring the continued health of surrounding communities.

SAINT ALPHONSUS - FRUITLAND HEALTH PLAZA COMING SOON!


Gymnastics, dance and cheerleading

ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

E24

• Hotshots brings fun to fitness for youth in western Treasure Valley

DRAPER’S

that has several programs offered. The classes range from their Bush Babies pre-gym classes for ages 2 to 4 years of age through the Junior Olympic program, level SHERI BANDELEAN four, five or six for both boys and ARGUS OBSERVER girls. Their competitive team comONTARIO petes throughout the Treasure Area youth have a place to go Valley and has won numerous allwhere they can learn gymnastics, around medals. They also have bedance and cheerleading at ginning ballet and hip-hop classes Hotshots Gymnastics at West Park that perform throughout the comPlaza. munity with their Demo Hotshots opened up in Ontario Gymnastic Team. Their cheerleadin October of 2009, moving from ing program prepares students for Fruitland, and has been owned by the cheer squads in the middle and John and Anna Avera for the past high school. Besides the classes, four years. they have an open gym from 6 “I am very passionate about the p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Fridays, and they benefits our gym has to offer, and rent the facility out for birthday I am grateful that so many parents parties. realize that fitness gives way to a “Children with gymnastics healthier, happier child,” owner training experience have a greater Anna Avera said. success at other sports,” Avera The facility is 21,000 square feet, and it is a full-size gymnasium SEE HOTSHOTS, PAGE E28

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Headquarters 2090 Center Ave. Payette, ID 83661 Fax: 208-642-9009

Weiser Branch 14 E Idaho Weiser, ID 83672 Office: 208-414-4942


Bixby and Sons a family affair

JESSICA KELLER

E25

ARGUS OBSERVER

VALE

Smith’s Pack & Ship Authorized Shipping Outlet USPS and Truck Freight Domestic or International Shipments Custom Made Boxes & Crating Mailboxes/Copies/Fax Service Hours: M-F 8am - 6pm

251 W. Idaho., Ontario 541-889-7690 Fax: 541-889-4027

www.mackeysonline.com

Come as you are! Family! Friends!

7 Days a Week!

541-889-3678 111 SW 1st Street, Ontario 97914

Have an Event? We Can Help. We Have Facilities Including a Banquet Room & Patio. Have Your Own Location? We Travel Too! Just Give Us a Call!

ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

As the name suggests, Bixby and Sons LLC is a family affair. One of Vale’s newest businesses, the mother and son pair of Vicki and Paul Bixby own and operate the 24-hour towing/recovery and transport business, situated at 287 Glenn St. N. Vicki Bixby manages the bookkeeping and office aspect of the business, while Paul is responsible for everything else. But it was no accident the longtime Vale residents entered into the automotive industry — cars are a passion of the entire Bixby family, and both mother and son have experience in both. The business actually started JESSICA KELLER | ARGUS OBSERVER with automotive transport — Paul Bixby (left) and his mother Vicki hauling cars — almost two years Bixby stand in the office of their vehicle ago, Paul Bixby said, which still towing/recovery and transport business in Vale. Both Bixbys have past work expericomprises a small aspect of the ence in the automotive industry, and Paul business today. initially started his own business trans“We haul all over the porting other vehicles but expanded to towing and recovery last August. Northwest,” Paul Bixby said, adding most of the jobs come from er. used automotive dealerships purThat aspect of the business, chasing cars at auction and hiring however, was and is limited to the him to transport them — three at a time — from one place to anothSEE BIXBY, PAGE E27


ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

E26

ASSISTED LIVING • Studio and 1 bedroom units with privates baths & kitchens • Individual climate control • Medication assistance and monitoring • 24 hour staff and after hours on-call nurse • Assistance with activities of daily living • Personalized care plan • Laundry and housekeeping services • 3 levels of care determined by assessment process • Social, recreation and wellness programs • Competitive rates NURSING HOME SERVICES • (15) Private rooms and (9) Semi Private rooms • Physician and Physician Assistant rounds • Nursing assessments on each resident • Staffing exceeds federal and state requirements • Medication administration and monitoring • Therapeutic diets and diet plans • Whirlpool tub and bath aide • Individual activity, social service plans and schedules • Medical supplies & incontinent products included in room rates • Electric beds

P

R

IONEE PLACE

Nursing Home • Assisted Living 1060 D. Street W, Vale, OR

541-473-3131

Medicare and Medicaid Certified

Mission Statement: To provide professional,compassionate and safe care for our residents. Your Peace of Mind is Worth the Drive to Vale You’ll Like What You See.

www.pioneerplacevale.com


Bixby:

Paul Bixby said the nice thing about running their own business is the stability it offers, especially in today’s economy, which is one of the reasons why he left his former employment as a mechanic for a car dealership in Ontario. “This way when you get up in the morning you know you have a job,” he said. Vicki Bixby, who still works at Ore-Ida when she is not at the towing business, worked for a number of years as the manager of the NAPA Auto Parts store in Vale. And although towing and hauling keeps them busy, they have plans to expand the business further by performing oil changes in the future. While local automotive shops in town offer the same service, Paul Bixby said, once a concrete slab is constructed, they will do the same to offer people a quick place to stop for an oil change. At that

time, he said, they hope to have another person hired to help with operations. And although the Bixby and Sons has only been open a short E27 period of time the Bixbys have already become involved in the community through the business by sponsoring different groups and organizations and donating scrap cars to the Vale Fire Department for training. It’s important to them, Vicki and Paul Bixby agree, because they have been in the community for such a long time — since the mid-1970s — and know everybody. It is also a way to give back. “If it wasn’t for them, we wouldn’t be here,” Paul Bixby said. For more information about Bixby and Sons, call the business office at (541) 473-3311. The 24hour towing line is (541) 2351683.

ORE-IDA® HISTORY Ore-Ida Potato Products, Inc. was formed in1952 with its first and largest Ore-Ida® potato-processing facility located in Oregon. It was here that founder F. Nephi Grigg procured many of his potatoes. Thus, the brand name “Ore-Ida®” was born, combining the first few letters of Oregon and Idaho. This name inspired one of the world’s most memorable advertising slogans: “When it says Ore-Ida®, it’s All Righta,” which was used for more than a decade.

ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

in Malheur County,” Paul Bixby said. FROM PAGE E25 While the business is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through spring to the fall months. “In the Friday, the towing side is a 24/7 winter we do not transport beoperation, and the business recause of the weather and the ceives calls at all hours to tow cars, roads,” Paul Bixby said. frequently in wrecks, from private Looking to expand to a yearround business, the towing opera- individuals as well as the Malheur County Sheriff’s Office and tion began last August, and the Oregon State Police. Bixby and Bixbys moved to their current property in October. Towing now Sons as well as the other towing business in Vale both answer calls makes up the biggest part of the business, Paul Bixby said. There is from the two law agencies, deonly one other towing business in pending on who is on rotation at town, with the owner of that busi- any given time. “That way it’s fair for both comness also providing trucking servpanies,” Vicki Bixby said. ices, and Paul Bixby said there is Once a vehicle is towed, it is imenough towing needs in the area pounded at the car impound lot to support both businesses. He behind the business and kept there said Bixby and Sons towing district extends outward from Vale to until the owner or insurance company makes arrangements for pick Unity and to the far side of Juntura, almost to Cairo Junction up. If a vehicle is forfeited, Paul Bixby said they sell whatever parts and out toward Adrian. “It’s one of the biggest tow zones of the vehicle they can for a loss.


Hotshots: FROM PAGE E24

ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

E28 said.

The mission at Hotshots Gymnastics is to help children feel good about themselves, to help raise their level of fitness and selfesteem, and to help them believe they can accomplish whatever they put effort toward. Hotshots philosophy is to develop a child’s self-esteem by providing successful experiences in a non-competitive environment. They define winning as “personal best” instead of being better than others. Although the gym offers an accelerated fitness program they still consider themselves a recreational gym. There are physical, mental and emotional benefits of taking gymnastics. Some of the physical bene-

ences. “With our strict hands-on spotting policy, our students quickly become comfortable trying new skills, knowing they will succeed,” Avera said. Students come from the surrounding communities including Weiser, Nyssa, Vale, Parma and New Plymouth. “We are proud to support our community in this way, hopefully contributing to the healthy and creative attributes of our future citizens and leaders, and hope to continue with this business for years to come,” Avera said. The teachers at Hotshots are the Averas, Amanda Higdem, SHERI BANDELEAN | ARGUS OBSERVER Alyssa Alvarado, Kristen Willson Hotshots owner Anna Avera (center) helps some of the youth at the gymnasium go and Abby Barlow, and altogether through some tumbling routines recently. Hotshots is situated in West Park Plaza mall approximately 175 students are enin Ontario. rolled. For questions or more inforfits are coordination, balance, agili- centration. The emotional benefits mation on what the gymnasium offers, contact the Averas at (541) can be confidence and managing ty and flexibility. A few of the 881-9991. mental benefits are focus and con- fear associated with new experi-

These local houses of worship welcome you to attend… Wo r s h i p Directory

Payette United Methodist Church

River of Life Christian Center

502 North 11th St., Payette (208) 642-2475 Pastor Bill Hays

800 17th Ave., N. Payette (208) 642-4416 Pastor Joel Wendland

Sunday Morning Classes all ages: 9:30 am Coffee Shop: 9:30 am Worship Service: 11:00 am

Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Morning Worship 9:00 am & 11:00 am Sunday Evening 6:00 pm Wednesday Family Night Service 7:00 pm www.riveroflifecc.net

email: payetteumc@yahoo.com

Bethany Presbyterian Church

First Baptist Church

1712 West Idaho Ave., Ontario. (541) 889-5752

336 SW 7th St. Ontario, OR 97914 (541)-889-5639 Pastor Scott Lundy

Come worship with us at 10:00 am "Our Mission" is to serve God, share the message of God’s love and forgiveness, teach the word of God and develope and strengthen our relationship with God.

Sunday School: 9:45 am Worship Service: 10:45 am

Come Join us There’s Life Inside

Christian Life Fellowship 366 S.E. 5th St., Ontario (541) 889-7264 A Caring Family of Faith Ministries For All Ages Doug Hezeltine - Lead Pastor Joshua Brown - Youth Pastor Ashley Clason - Children’s Ministry Director Jack Becker - Pastor Emeritus

1st Service 9:00 am • Sunday School 9:00 am 2nd Service 10:45 am • Wednesdays 7:00 pm

St. Matthews Episcopal Church 802 S.W. 5th Street, Ontario (541) 889-6943 Reverend James Mosier

St. Paul Lutheran Church 842 Alameda Dr., Ontario (541) 889-9349 Pastor James Aalgaard

Sunday School 9:00 am

Sunday Service 7:30 & 10:00 am

Sunday Service 10:00 am

Nursery & Sunday School for Children 10:00 am

CALLED TO RECEIVE, SENT TO SERVE

Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church 829 S.W. 2nd Ave., Ontario (541) 889-8469 Father Robert Irwin

St. Peter’s Catholic School 98 SW 9th St., Ontario (541) 889-7363


Fitness: FROM PAGE E19

E29

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The workout room in the lower level of the Body Shop Fitness Center in Fruitland. Body Shop Fitness has centers in Fruitland Payette and Weiser. All locations have newly remodeled showers and indoor tanning available.

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ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

training, strength training and a cool down. It’s an abdominal cardio workout, and participants can burn 1,000 calories an hour. Aerobics aims to improve the flow of oxygen throughout the body. Aerobic workouts may be performed at different levels of intensity for short or extended time periods. Cardio exercise strengthens the heart, lungs, boosts metabolism, increases energy and promotes restful sleep. Body Shop Fitness has a regular group of exercisers. “We have a mixed demographic and steady stream throughout the day,” Smith said. Member benefits include access

to all exercise classes and access to any of the three locations, Smith said. “Members can use any of the three gyms. Lots of members use the Weiser gym during the Fiddle Fest.” Each member is required to obtain a membership card, even if the members are in the same family. Children under age 12 are not allowed in the fitness center, and children age 12 to 15 can have a membership but must be accompanied by a parent or guardian member at all times. The reason for the membership cards is to keep the costs down and to ensure a safe and enjoyable workout experience for the guests. The facilities are not staffed 24/7, but are monitored closely throughout the day and night.


ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

E30

Poor economy spawns brew supply business for Ontario couple SHERI BANDELEAN

from OHS. ARGUS OBSERVER They left Ontario in 1991 for Mike to pursue college but moved ONTARIO back a year ago when Tami’s father Husband and wife team Mike passed away. and Tami Anderson open up a “Mom was here, and we always home brew supply store called thought we would move back here, Ontario Brew Supply on Black but we just didn’t get around to it Friday of 2010 in downtown for 20 some years,” Tami said. Ontario. Mike has a degree in construcBoth were born and raised in tion engineering management, but Ontario. Tami said she was raised with the economy the way it is, here even though she traveled the construction not really busy and country with her family growing because Ontario doesn’t have a lot up in a military family but graduat- of commercial construction, the ed from Ontario High School in Andersons decided to do some1979. Mike graduated in 1974 thing different.

Bargains on Brands You Trust!

SHERI BANDELEAN | ARGUS OBSERVER

Ontario Brew Supply owners Mike and Tami Anderson opened their business on Black Friday 2010.

The Andersons lived in Corvallis, and there was a home brew store there. The couple started to home brew and decided to bring their knowledge of home brewing to Ontario. “Even during the worst of the worst economy, the store in Corvallis always seemed to be busy,” Tami said. “We thought it would be fun to have our own home brew store.” The Andersons said they ran out of options, and they didn’t want to commute to Boise for work so they decided to open the store. “We have really been well-received, and we are really excited

about being here,” Tami said. Along with the store being a place to buy all the basic supplies, they also have tastings that they started a couple of weeks ago. Since they have opened they have discovered that there are a lot of wine makers in the area. There have been patrons that have come in stating that their grandmother made wine or that it is a family tradition. Wine makers utilize the fruit in the area such as choke cherry, gooseberry, apricots and peaches. “I think it will be really fun here in the summer when all the fruit here is ready,” Tami said. SEE BREW, PAGE E31

2670 SW 4th Avenue, Ontario, Oregon • 541-889-3738

20% Off All Wine Join Us For a Wine Tasting Class March 30 th 6-8 pm


Kloy’s Pizza the perfect opportunity for Warden BRANDI STROMBERG ARGUS OBSERVER

Kloy’s Pizza and More in Payette will be experiencing a new change in the next few months, and Russ Warden is excited about the change. Jeff and Kloy Debban opened Kloy’s Pizza, situated on Main Street in Payette, in 2008 and have stepped back in managing the restaurant to make way for Russ and Julie Warden to take over management. “We have been in here for about two weeks, and we are loving it, so far,” Russ Warden said. “I am still kind of getting my feet wet, but it’s been fun and I am really liking it.” Warden said he is hoping to reopen the restaurant for lunch by the summer and become an all day place, again, but he wants to make sure his feet are under him, first. “So far, I am loving it,” Warden said. “We have really good employees, and they make this light and fun. I want to remain as stress free as possible.” Kloy’s Pizza and More is open seven days a week and hosts banquets, birthday parties, meetings

BRANDI STROMBERG | ARGUS OBSERVER

Russ and Julie Warden are now managing Kloys Pizza and More in Payette.

and any other event. There are currently two banquet-sized rooms, one large and one small. Kloy’s Pizza and More currently serves salads, pizzas, sandwiches, hot wings, bread sticks and cheesy bread sticks, French fries and tater tots. There are numerous beers on tap and served by the bottle, along with wine and soft drinks. The restaurant is open from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Thursday and from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m Friday through Sunday.

FROM PAGE E30

They have started in the tradition of Friday Night Beer Call, where the military men gathered at the Officers Club to rehash the week. They are also going to have “Ladies Wine Call,” a time for women to gather. “This is in memory of my dad, who was in the military, and he gathered with his buddies for as long as I could remember,” Tami said. They said they would also be working on more specialized advertised events throughout the year. The events wouldn’t be large events because they only have approximately 1,000 square feet of area with which to work. That includes the store and what they call the “lounge,” which is the tasting area and is a cozy, intimate area to

gather. Ontario Brew Supply is a member of the Downtown Business Association and Ontario Chamber E31 of Commerce. It works closely with the Downtown Business Association and with the Farmers Market. “I think the Farmers Market is a fantastic thing for Ontario,” Tami said. Mike Anderson also is on the school district facilities oversight committee. If you are in need of supplies to brew your own wine or beer or would like to go for a tasting, the store is situated at 246 S. Oregon St., Ontario. “We are surprised at how many talented brewers are in the area. We didn’t know what to expect, but we are happy with moving back and opening the store,” the Andersons said.

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ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

PAYETTE

Brew:


Mackey’s: FROM PAGE E18

In December of 2007, the couple

ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

E32 closed on their loans for the loca-

tion, 111 S.W. First St., and three months after that, Mackey’s was opened on March 3, 2008. While applying for the loans and getting their finances in order, the couple, along with their children, moved in with Shawn’s mother. While living there, many of the recipes used at the restaurant were from Shawn’s grandmother and were fined-tuned during this time. The Groves named their restaurant after their grandfather, Thomas Mackey Grove. On the front of their menu, the story of how their grandfather, an avid lottery player, would slip money to visitors while he was in his hospital bed, asking them to buy a lottery ticket. “Grandpa Grove had always said

he would buy us a restaurant with his winnings,” the menu states. “Although he never won, we come from a family used to doing things the hard way … which is part of our heritage from Grandpa as well.” The couple later honored their grandfather, who passed away four years ago, by having a place to have unique homemade food, in a casual dinning environment for hard working people. The Groves pride themselves in owning and running a familyfriendly — with an emphasis on friendly — dining experience for the entire family. Upstairs is the full-service restaurant and steakhouse, providing opportunities for families to enjoy a dinner together in a relaxed atmosphere. The downstairs of the building is a sports pub, equipped with four televisions and a pool table. There is also a patio, which is

used once the weather warms up and dries out. Mackey’s also offers full-service catering, as they have a staff of 19 employees. Even during the economic downturn, the Groves have been able to find success. “We are showing growth in this economy. That is success,” Shawn Grove said. “We have an advantage over (businesses that were open prior to the downturn). Our money is already tight. There is no transition. Opening up in this economy is a huge success.” Both Angie and Shawn spent much of their working careers in the food industry. Shawn began working while in high school. Angie got her start at a “mom and pop” restaurant in western Oregon. “We don’t miss much with our kids,” Angie said about owning and running their own business. “Our extended family really loves what

We are showing growth in this economy. That is success.

— Shawn Grove Owner of Mackey’s

we do.” Along with all the food that the restaurant does, Mackey’s also has live bands perform each weekend on the patio throughout the summer. “That is one of the most fun things,” Angie said. “We are concert junkies. We like good, live music. We incorporate that here.” The Groves said they have had comparisons to a popular bar, “Cheers.” The reason for the comparisons is because when somebody walks through the door, if they have been in before, chances are Shawn and Angie will remember his or her name.

Presbyterian Community Care Center

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541-889-9133

Top Row: left to right: Scott MacGregor, Rehab Director, Physical Therapist; Mae Lande, Occupational Therapy Assistant; Grace Crumrine, Physical Therapist Assistant; Tinley Vickers, RN Care Manager; Carolyn Blackford, Rehab Aide; Sharon Butler, Speech Pathologist; Patrick Hessler, Physical Therapist. Bottom Row: left to right: Caren Imada, Occupational Therapist; Becky Clark, Occupational Therapist Assistant, Nikki MacGregor, Physical Therapist Assistant; Kerrisue Monihan, Social Services; Stephanie McVey, Physical Therapist Assistant.


Jolts:

Elvis has been there since 2002 and has even been kidnapped a few times, but has always been returned to us. ‘We have pushed the envelope with its quirkiness at this store and we are continually working to update it.

E33

— Todd Heinz Owner of Jolts & Juice

town revitalization, and the Heinzes are ready to jump in and be at the forefront, and they hope it is an incentive for others to also. “We like to think outside the box,” Todd and Vicki Heinz said. Jolts & Juice is just a place to meet and relax and enjoy a cup of coffee, or now a glass of wine or beer. Bring your date or meet someone new. Vicki Heinz said that couples have gotten engaged here, and April one of the couples have even decided to get married there in April. There have been travelers

from Portland and Seattle that have stopped at Jolts & Juice and said that this store is equal or even better than the ones in the big city. “That isn’t just us but because of the baristas that work here they are the forefront,” the Heinzes said. If you are looking for a new place to hang out, Jolts & Juice is open from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Thursday, from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. Friday, from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday and from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday and is situated at 17 S.E. Third Ave., Ontario.

White House Dental

Call 541-889-8837

We cater to your dental needs.

New Patient Special Free Exam • Free Consultation • Free X-Rays • Dental Benefits Check

White House Dental Bernt E. White DMD • Richard White DMD 347 W. Idaho Avenue, Ontario, Oregon www.whitehousedental.net

ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

fied baristas, which is a person who is specially trained in the making and serving of coffee FROM PAGE E15 drinks in a coffee bar. visible up-front,” owner Todd Todd said that business has reHeinz said. mained steady, but the price of cofThe expansion of the business fee has gone up tremendously. took two years to complete and They have been trying to mainwas finally finished in October tain their costs. 2010. The store also roasts its own Besides the downtown location, coffee and has been doing so for there are two other locations for about nine years. Jolts & Juice also Jolts & Juice. One is situated in roasts coffee for other shops, the Ontario Marketplace that which helps in costs. opened in 2004 and one in “I learned how to roast from the Caldwell that opened in 2008. house of hard knocks, by practicThe expansion gave more opportunities for the community to gath- ing recipes,” Todd said. All the stores are similar in moer and for families and for couples tif, but the downtown location is to get together. totally different. “With the expansion it gave us “We have pushed the envelope more opportunities to do other things,” Todd said. “We also want- with its quirkiness at this store, ed to create more of a community and we are continually working to update it,” Todd said. feel.” The building that Jolts & Juice The Heinzes are originally from Portland and came to the Treasure is in was originally a bank in 1899. Valley in the early 1980s because In the upstairs window, if a person of a job transfer. With their move looks up, they will see Elvis greetthey brought their experience of ing them. retail. In the mid-1990s the oppor“Elvis has been there since 2002 tunity to purchase a bike shop and has even been kidnapped a came along and then came Jolts & few times, but has always been reJuice. turned to us,” Todd said. With the three stores, there are The Heinzes are members of the around 22 employees with 15 to Ontario Chamber of Commerce 16 of them at the Ontario locaand the Downtown Business tions. Association. Eight or nine of them are certiThere are rumors of a down-


Books:

ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

U.S. Highway 95 and can be seen by travelers driving through FROM PAGE E13 Fruitland. Customers, Bill Perry said, have said, also allows the couple to enE34 come from all over the area, from joy the more social aspect of retail Council and Cambridge to New sales by interacting with the peoPlymouth and Emmett and ple who come into their store. “Most of all we like meeting the Ontario. But it is also a neighborpeople looking for the books,” she hood bookstore, as well, Charie Perry said. said. It is actually situated in the The customers who visit neighborhood in which the Perrys Fruitland Book, Perry said, like and appreciate the business and its reside, and Charie Perry said she can walk to work, and she enjoys offerings as well as its pleasant, the fact that she has met most of homey atmosphere. That was by design, Perry said. The building it- her neighbors as they have visited the store. self is a converted home and has “It’s really a perfect location for three different rooms filled with people to stop in,” she said. books. When the Perrys first opened, “People seem to be really excited the bookstore had an inventory of about that when they come in,” Charie Perry said. 4,000 books, which they purBoth Bill and Charie said they chased from a woman in Vale are very fortunate in the location who, coincidentally, used to run a of their business. It is situated on a used book store in the same town residential street running next to in California they used to reside

but whom they didn’t meet until they moved up here and she held a yard sale with the intention of getting rid of the books from her former store. While that offered them the start to their business, Perry said, that really isn’t very many books. Now, however, after only a little more than four months, Fruitland Book’s inventory is about 10,000 books, in large part because of people coming in with used books they want to trade for others, although Charie Perry said Bill will go out and look for used books to add to their collections at a variety of venues, including libraries, yard sales and auctions. While Fruitland Book does offer a small number of new books, mostly for customers’ convenience if they are looking for a new book by an author, the lion’s share of the inventory is used. Charie Perry said, unlike other used bookstores that mark their books according to price, she and her husband use a much simpler point system. When a person brings in a used book, they receive a point. One point is worth half the value of a used, but not new, book. And the Perrys keep track of both the books and the points in their computer system, which is convenient because they are able to tell a customer if they have a certain book or books by a certain

Hours... Monday - Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

author if they ask without them having to search through the shelves. The books, however, are kept in various sections. Charie Perry said she and her husband are very proud of the children’s book section, which is popular with the children of the neighborhood. They also have just about every other genre from romance to mystery to science fiction to religious to history and more. Charie Perry said she would like to expand on their collection of books printed in Spanish because they have had customers looking specifically for them. She and her husband also plan to expand their shop in the near future, upon the completion of two more rooms. When the weather gets nice, Charie Perry said, she and her husband, who are members of the Payette County Chamber of Commerce, plan to have a grand opening celebration formally welcoming everybody to the store. Fruitland Book is open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and is situated at 725 S.W. Eighth St., Fruitland. Call the bookstore at (208) 452-3665, or visit its website at FruitlandBook.com for more information.

2520 SW. 4th Ave. Ontario


E35

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ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

•COMMERCIAL•INDUSTRIAL • RESIDENTIAL


TVCC:

ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

he has been impressed with her efforts to hear from administrators, faculty, staff and students as well FROM PAGE E10 as participate in a number of difE36 tant as the end product,” she said. ferent events and become connected both on campus and in the Young said participation from community. staff, administration and the “I think she really has made a board is key in formulating the determined attempt to be incluplan. She said she needs to hear from everybody on what direction sive, and I think she has really tried to be approachable,” he said, they think the college should foladding it’s difficult to always make low, , whether its for viticulture, the time and effort to do that, but solar energy or health care. she has succeeded. She said when there’s a finite Lawson said the college has alpot of money, it’s necessary to identify how money will be spent ready benefited from Young’s style and what the community — mean- of management. Even though the ing the region the college serves — community college is encountering challenging financial times, her deneeds. sire to gain staff and faculty input Again, though, collaboration is and meet with them has helped key. keep up morale. Her management TVCC Board Chairman Peter Lawson said Young’s willingness style and desire to meet the beneand desire to collaborate across factors and share their contributhe campus and into the communi- tions has also benefited the colty is one of her greatest assets, and lege’s science center campaign by

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helping sustain the momentum in the latter phases of the fundraising efforts. “You know it takes some real leadership to continue the momentum on projects like that,” Lawson said. Looking to the future, Lawson said he thinks Young is very committed to building direct relationships with people and organizations in the community above and beyond the science center. Her conversations with Saint Alphonsus-Ontario, Saint Lukes and the National Guard as well as her participation in the Ontario Chamber of Commerce are key to the college’s continued success. “All of those things are going to have a huge impact on what services we’re able to provide and what the institution looks like down the road,” Lawson said. Lawson said a philosophy of collaboration, communication and education are a necessary combination to move any institute forward. “I don’t think you can operate (a college) in a vacuum, as it were,” Lawson said, adding if they have been in the past they certainly can’t now because regional partnerships are that much more critical in getting past the current economic challenges and maintaining and expanding services in the future.

At the same time, Lawson said, Young has not let a desire for collaboration hamper her decisionmaking abilities, and, already, she has been faced with some hard decisions and has been able to make those choices when the time has called for it. Lawson said the future construction of the new science center is also key in the community college’s continued success. “Well, I think it’s absolutely critical for how we, as an institution, define ourselves in the next 10 years,” he said. “I think it’s part of the continuing evolution of the way we as a campus, we as an institution engage both our students and the community, and I think it shows great vision by the institution, by the board and by the administration that we’ve really taken a stance that we’re going to identify and meet the needs of the students.” That commitment to students’ needs, however, didn’t begin with the science center, Lawson said, but began with the construction of the new dorms on campus. He said the construction the dorms as well as the science center project are “part and parcel of what keeps us competitive” and ensures students can achieve success after leaving TVCC.

Items we accept...Newspapers • Magazines • Scrap Metal • Cardboard Aluminum Cans • Plastic Milk Jugs • Office Paper • Plastic Bottles Tin Cans • Computer Parts & Televisions

Recycling service is same day as garbage pickup

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NAPA:

Mike and Jo:

time and decided it was time for a change. “I didn’t want to do it anyFROM PAGE E14 more.” Before opening the store in owns and operates the store with Nyssa, the Bergs had operated a his wife, Jo, said. similar business, the Covered Merchandise includes shelf Wagon, in Ontario, Berg said. pulls, overstocks and freight dam“We sold out and moved down age, Berg said. There is some small furniture, camping equipment, air here. The community appreciates mattresses, fishing gear and dish- the store.” Berg said it is competitive es. among the stores that sell excess “We also have to repair stuff, or freight-damaged items. He has too,” Berg said. If necessary they will go out and to be on the Internet to find out who and what is selling. The merbuy the parts and put the items back together before putting it out chandise is sold by full truck loads, and the Bergs have received two on the floor. truck loads. Since opening in “I wanted to work for myself. I January, the Bergs have sold the didn’t want work for anybody equivalent of one truck load. else,” he said, explaining why he “We’re really doing well,” Berg went into business. He had been working for other people for a long said.

Subway: FROM PAGE E6

ing. He issues reading certificates for the younger-aged children and donates through the community and school sports. He has sponsored teams, donated sandwiches and will help with gift certificates for silent auctions and other events.

John and Kay Cox opened their first Subway in 1997 in Weiser. In 2007, they purchased the Fruitland and Payette Subways. A year later, they relocated the Payette store to Wal-Mart. In 2010, they reopened the new Payette restaurant. John and Kay Cox both grew up and went to school in Payette, and their two young boys will do the same, they said.

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E37

ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

covered with a 12-month, 12,000 mile nationwide warranty. FROM PAGE E16 The Ontario store has 10 employees to service the needs of the parts at an excellent value with community and offers a wide more than 80 years of dependabili- range of services to its customers. ty. Installation of minor parts such NAPA has been recognized as a as wiper blades, head light bulbs quality leader in the auto parts and batteries, as well as testing of and repair business for decades. batteries and other electronic parts NAPA stands by its parts perof an automobile, are available. formance and durability and has a When it comes to major repairs, vast selection of more than NAPA can refer a customer to one 375,000 parts to choose from and of its many NAPA certified repair many of its parts and labor are shops in Ontario.


Tattoo: FROM PAGE E12

ey will be kept in the community,

ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

E38 which benefits everyone.

Moreno said Flesh Pleasures is part of a chain that started in Southern California and is trying to move its way up the coast. He said, however, the business is very community-oriented, and since the store opened Jan. 1, it has become very involved in community activities, sponsoring events. “That’s our main focus — events and stuff like that,” he said, adding Flesh Pleasures will help an event or fundraiser get started or sponsor prizes, such as tattoo work. Recently, Moreno said, the business participated in a fundraiser for the family of Shane Tremble, who was diagnosed with a rare brain cancer. Moreno said the business doesn’t benefit monetarily from taking part

F

in the events, however, the store’s participation helps draw people in and it also benefits the community. “If we can do the right thing here, everything is history,” he said. “If we can represent our people right, we can definitely make

it. “It’s a relationship. It’s not just a business,” he added. Moreno said the philosophy of community partnership at Flesh Pleasures is also a way to dispel negative perceptions of the tattoo

too businesses in the area, including Devil’s Ink, in Payette, Moreno said another tattoo business is not a bad thing because friendly competition only improves the quality of work by the artist. “Everything’s a kind of showand-tell kind of a deal,” he said. Moreno said Flesh Pleasures currently has five employees, including three tattoo artists who do a little of every tattoo style. The equipment meets all safety requirements, and the inks are top-of-the-line, Moreno said. Touch-ups are free. “That’s how we guarantee our wants people to accept that tattoo artists are just like anybody else. work,” he said. Flesh Pleasures is open from “It’s an art, and art should be noon to 9 p.m. Monday through shared with everybody,” Moreno Saturday. For more information, said. Even though there are other tat- call (208) 452-9736. industry by demonstrating that tattoo artists and businesses can benefit communities. “We’re trying to be different than other tattoo shops,” he added. In addition, Moreno added, he

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Title:

Garatea said there are a couple title companies in Payette that offer the exact same product, so having a little more friendly customer service is what Payette County Title and Escrow strives for. “It definitely takes a certain mindset for this job,” Garatea said. “We really like to try to up the other companies with our customer service.” The company moved to Payette in 2009 and was situated in the Hunter’s Gate Plaza, near Grandma’s Kitchen, on U.S. Highway 95. They are now located in their new building in Pioneer Plaza, near Artic Circle, still on U.S. Highway 95. The new building was completed, and the move was made in April 2010. The company focuses on searching records of the county for title records, issuing title commitments and also closing the loan. Garatea said issuing the title commitment is the title part of the company and closing the loan is the escrow part. “We are a property research company,” Garatea said. “It’s a kind of fun puzzle to put together.

E39

— Melissa Garatea Payette County Title and Escrow

You don’t want to have anything missing and fall back. Being exact is a must in this business.” Garatea said she came with the company, transferring from another title company. She said Kerri Frye is an escrow officer, Melissa Fry is a title officer and Renee Bonfiglio is the long-term escrow and account executive. “My staff is just really great and works very well with their clients and the community,” Garatea said. “We really stress getting involved in the community and being involved.” Garatea said being a locallyowned company is also something she is proud of. She said the company supports the Payette County Chamber of Commerce, local activities and sports for the schools, participates in a couple of annual golf tournaments and is an associate member of the Board of Realtors. “We try to be a part of everything that goes on in this community,” Garatea said. “You’ve got to

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ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

My staff is just really great and works very well FROM PAGE E11 with their clients and the “I couldn’t have gotten any luck- community. We really stress ier with my staff,” Garatea said. getting involved in the community “Our customer service is really good and we really stress about it.” and being involved.


ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

E40

Located in St. Alphonsus Medical Center - Ontario 1050 SW 3rd Ave. Ste. 1200 Ontario, Oregon 541-889-3111


Ogawa: FROM PAGE E3

Trucks: FROM PAGE E5

sored the Humanitarian Bowl from 2007 to 2009, and uDrove took over sponsorship of the Humanitarian Bowl in 2010. uDrove, an affiliate company of the Internet Truckstop, was founded in 2009. uDrove was created to expand services of the Internet Truckstop. uDrove, “Provides innovative mobile solutions for the transportation industry, using a revolutionary new compliance management tool.” Using the functionality of a smartphone including Androids, iPhones and BlackBerrys, uDrove is a smartphone application that replaces incab paperwork providing a simple, easy to use tool that allows truck drivers to keep a driver’s log, track mileage for tax purposes, record fuel and business expenses and deliver data instantly to a Web ac-

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count. This allows truck companies to manage their business faster, smarter and more effectively. E41 uDrove Wireless, another affiliate company, works with uDrove to “Replace in-cab paperwork and use smart phone technology to record driver logs, track mileage, submit fuel expenses, and more.” The Internet Truckstop is the largest online freight matching service in the trucking industry. When asked how he is able to run four businesses, Moscrip said, “I don’t run them all. I hire good people. They run the businesses and I run them.” Moscrip expects his businesses to keep growing. His goal for the next 10 years: “We will continue to do what we do, grow, expand, start new businesses and help the transportation industry.” Locally owned by Rodney Rhinehart since 1995

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ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

came up, he made customer service, as well as great food, a priority. Ogawa’s first opened its doors in 1997, when Tommy Ogawa’s mother, Cathy Ogawa, began selling rice bowls with chicken or beef skewers and vegetables. The store moved to a new location, downtown in Ontario in 2000, being open from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., just for lunch. “My sister started a couple restaurants in Boise,” Tommy Ogawa said. “The concept was of a rice bowl, with chicken and beef skewers over rice with veggies.” Ogawa said his mother went and learned the recipes before opening up the shop in 1997. Tommy began working there, with a plan to buy out his mother in a few years. In 2004, Tommy Ogawa purchased the restaurant from his mother and began looking into expanding his menu. “I always wanted to do more. I thought sushi,” Ogawa said. “It was a lot of trial and error with the sushi.” Ogawa said it took him a long time to get his sushi recipe correct before he was willing to put in on the menu. “It took off and did really well,”

Ogawa said about the sushi. “When I added the sushi bar, business exploded.” In 2007, Ogawa was approached about a partnership to open up a restaurant and bar at a new location, 375 E. Idaho Ave., so he jumped at the chance. “It was a spur of the moment,” Ogawa said. Ogawa said his partner, David Sullivan, runs the bar and sells drinks to those in Ogawa’s, while Ogawa runs the restaurant and sells food to those in the Kanpai bar. The move proved to be a good one for the restaurant, as Ogawa’s suffered only a slight loss during the economic recession but has stayed busy enough to staff 10 employees. Recently, Ogawa has expanded his menu even further, adding Angus beef hamburgers. “There are not many burgers as good as ours,” Ogawa said. Getting into and running his own business, Ogawa knew what he was getting into with the ups and downs, having worked in a restaurant for 10 years. “I like dealing with people. I like making people happy,” Ogawa said. “Everybody who comes through the door, I want to help them.”


Hospital:

ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

“We’re poised to only do more,” he said. “We can bring in more FROM PAGE E2 specialists. Over the next two to four years, I expect to see two fullin the area, all the attention was time cardiologists that have a pracE42 focused in the other area where they had most hospitals together,” tice here. We’re never going to do open-heart surgery or that type of Palagi said about CHI owning thing, but we certainly can manage most of its hospitals in the Midwest. “Often, they were just a and assess people with heart conway far away entity here that real- ditions pre-intervention and postly didn’t know about the area, our intervention. We can follow and needs, our patients, the communi- work with that patient without ty, etc. Not by any lack of work or that person ever having to leave the area.” attention, we were just so far reAs far as the transition from moved from the core of what they Holy Rosary to Saint Alphonsus, were involved with. It was a geographical problem to really provide Palagi said there are always changes that have to be dealt with. us with support or make us a sysHowever, he said, he hopes most tem, if you will.” Palagi said Saint Alphonsusof those changes are internal and Ontario services roughly 70,000 go unnoticed by the general public. people in the immediate area. “You want it to feel like (a That, he said, provides the oppor- smooth transition), but it’s kind of tunity to bring in refined special- like the duck,” Palagi said. “You ists and increase the medical atten- look really calm on top, but undertion the area has been lacking. neath you’re paddling like heck.”

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Bentz concurred, saying it was the goal of Saint Alphonsus to keep the community hospital as a community hospital. “Our goal is that we paddle like the duck, but we hope the community sees a very simple transition and use of our services,” she said. “We hope they don’t notice anything at all.” Bentz went on to say that the announcement that Trinity would take over the Ontario and Fruitland medical facilities, along with the announcement of the new Fruitland Medical Plaza, were only the bigger announcements. “There are a lot of smaller things going on here,” she said. “We now have our comprehensive breast care center with digital mammography, which is a great addition to this community.” Palagi said the move to a digital mammography system was a system initiative, meaning rather than the hospital purchasing equipment by itself, it was done at all four hospitals. By purchasing the equipment in larger numbers, the hospitals received a better price and saved money overall. “For women in the region, this is the best diagnostic care you can have, and now we have it available in all four of our communities, in all four of our hospitals,” he said. “In the new Fruitland project, we’ll include a second piece of equip-

We hope the community sees a very simple transition and use of our services. We hope they don’t notice anything at all.

— Leanna Bentz Executive director of foundation and marketing, Saint Alphonsus-Ontario

ment like that, so we’ll have two diagnostic and digital mammography equipment in both places.” Palagi said there is nothing but excitement with the hospital currently. “We have a pretty aggressive growth plan laid out,” he said. “We want to have more breadth in areas like cardiology. I suspect a couple years after getting cardiologists on the ground, we would recruit a pulmonologist right behind them, so that group would extend the service we can provide in the population we can support.” Palagi also said the hospital is aggressively recruiting for an additional 18 to 24 physicians over the next five years, including new physicians at the Saint Alphonsus Dominican Health Center and the new Fruitland Medical Plaza. What was the Treasure Valley Medical Group has now become the Saint Alphonsus Internal Medicine Group. “We are on the verge of bring-

SEE HOSPITAL, PAGE E43


Hospital: FROM PAGE E42

ing in our fourth OBG doctor,

who will join us in July,” Palagi said. “In two years, we’ll have another one, and we’ll have four to five (OBG doctors) depending on Dr. Duncan and how long he prac-

Saint Alphonsus Medical Center-Ontario CEO Rick Palagi shows a new digital mammography unit at the hospital. Palagi said the new unit will help ensure women of the area receive the most up-to-date mammography screening available.

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The new Fruitland Medical Plaza, which will be situated on U.S. Highway 30 in Fruitland between U.S. Highway 95 and the Snake River bridge, is currently in E43 the planning stages. Palagi and Bentz said a “formal” groundbreaking ceremony is scheduled for April 28. “I suspect, by the first of May, we should be close to actually breaking ground,” Palagi said. “We’re going to get the whole thing thought out and planned out before we turn a spade of dirt.” Once that happens, he said, he originally wanted the facility operational by the end of 2011. However, after looking over plans, Palagi said he has been consistently told that isn’t going to happen. “I think it’s going to be the first part of next year before it’s built and open,” he said. “We’re going to try to stay as fast-tracked as we can be.”

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ARGUS OBSERVER SUNDAY, MARCH 27, 2011/ INDEPENDENT ENTERPRISE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 2011

LARRY HURRLE | ARGUS OBSERVER

tices.” As well, Palagi said, they would like to bring in another urologist. “Dr. Iseri has done a marvelous job for a lot of years,” Palagi said. “We need more than one of him.” Palagi also talked about a contract between Saint Alphonsus and the Oregon Department of Corrections to serve the prison population of 7,000 plus staff, as well as partnering with Treasure Valley Community College. “There’s a real synergy in the things they can to in terms of training for professionals in various sorts for the hospital,” he said. “That holds nothing but blue sky for us.” Bentz said the hospital currently employs 465 people in the area. The new Fruitland Medical Plaza, she said, will add another 30 to 40 jobs within the first two years. “We’ll be in excess of 500 (employees), I’ll bet, by the end of next year,” Palagi said.


Crossroads 2011  

Progressive Business in the Western Treasure Valley.

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