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Hope Community Resources

Helping People with Disabilities Achieve Their Dreams


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“I came. I helped. The couch didn’t even miss me.” It’s amazing to see what a little effort can do when everybody pitches in. The results are unforgettable. 

We’re proud to salute Hope Community Resources. Rick Flake • Alaska Commercial Banking Group • 907-265-2735 J. Megan Davidson • Wells Fargo Insurance Services • 206-892-9255

wellsfargo.com © 2013 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. (870437_07968)

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A Time of Hope H

ope. The word itself has many meanings. When applied to individuals and families who experience disabilities, it can take on a whole new dimension.

Community Resources, Inc.

The history of disabilities is one tragically overflowing with a long and scarred past of institutionalization, exclusion, isolation and even brutalization. From out of state placements to psychiatric hospitals, from large congregate facilities to developmental centers, children, adolescents and adults were cruelly removed from home, family, friends and culture simply because of a singular labeldisability.

Hidden away in remote parts of a state, shrouded from opportunity and experience in community, they became our “ forgotten children”- invisible in the mainstream of society, deprived of the fullness of a typical life. Although the body might have been physically incarcerated in an institution, the spirit remained free to hope, free to dream, to “never give up.” Despite the trials, despite the abuse, so many retained their resilience and never abandoned their dreams, never gave up hope. Incorporated in 1968, Hope Community Resources has always vehemently rejected institutionalization for any Alaskan, and opened wide its doors to community.

Board of Directors Hope’s Board of Directors is comprised of a diverse group of caring community and business members who volunteer their time to make a difference in the lives of Alaskans who experience disabilities.

As a result, the same human beings who were denied access to community just “yesterday” are now living independently, with minimal supports, in rural and urban areas of our state. Some maintain apartments and others own their own homes. With individualized supports, children with complex medical conditions and technology dependence can remain at home with parents and family no longer challenged by residence in costly, impersonal long term care facilities. Founded on a no discharge policy, Hope will never abandon those who choose our supports simply because medical needs have intensified, or challenges have grown too fast and too difficult to handle. As long as an individual wishes to remain with Hope, they will always have a meaningful place within our statewide family. We attempt to begin our service delivery system by listening, by hearing what families tell us they want and what they need, not what we can provide; by exploring their personal dreams and aspirations for tomorrow. If a problem or concern surfaces, there is no need to travel a long and twisted road to resolution. Our Open Door policy invites all of our members to contact who they wish - a supervisor, director, or even go “straight to the top.” At Hope, everyday is a new day of discovering personal gifts, long embedded in the spirit, waiting to be released. This can be artistic expression by painting, executing a CD, producing a DVD or movie; it can encompass basket weaving, carving, acting on a stage with our troupe, Actabilities; or it can embrace playing an instrument, singing, sharing unique and beautiful talents with others. Here, everyday can be an exciting time to realize or approximate a dream. We reject the word “impossible” and honor the dreams of all who choose our supports, and we have been witness to so many amazing accomplishments. Today is a time of hope. It is a time of realization. It is a time of found gifts, extraordinary talent. It is a time of dignity, value, worth and contribution- of belonging! From a history of despair and exclusion, from generations of separation and isolation, today is a new era of promise and discovery and acceptance. The pages that follow are filled with dreams realized, dormant gifts awakened, and talents, capabilities, and unique, exciting skills, discovered and shared. They speak of opportunity, experience, accomplishment and experiencing our amazing value of “ joy.” Yes, today is truly a time of Hope.....

2012 - 2013 Officers Charles Brower, President 8 Years, Private Business John Dittrich, Vice President 9 Years, Accounting/Finance Eugene “Gene” Bates, Treasurer 25 Years, Real Estate Charleen McBratney, Secretary 29 Years, H&SS, Retired Members Phil VanDaff, Member 35 Years, Psychologist, retired Mary Bolin, Member 36 Years, Health Care Petter Jahnsen, Member 27 Years, Investments Paul Foutz, Member 28 Years, CPA Stacy Niwa, Member 3 Years, Human Services Avalon Rachelle-Kraft, Member 24 Years, Real Estate Jo Ann Stromberg, Member 25 Years, Communications Robert Owens, Member 16 Years, Attorney

Stephen P. Lesko

Molly McMamamin, Member 2 Years, Education Jeff Case, Member 2 Years, Investments

Executive Director

Encouraging Friendships for Life! SERVICES OFFERED Day Habilitation- Day, Evening & Summer Programs Respite- Hourly & Daily Respite Services Residential HabilitationFamily Habilitation Group Home Happy, Harmonious & Peaceful Assisted Living Homes

In-Home Supports- Teaching Life Skills Party Time PartiesJingle Bell Jam Valentine’s Day Dinner & Dance Spring Fling Summer Sizzle Halloween Party

Mission Statement

It is the mission of this organization to provide services and supports for all people with developmental disabilities. We focus on individual strengths and natural abilities so they may achieve their maximum potential to be active citizens in our community.

929 E. 81st. Ave. Suite #103, Anchorage, AK. 99518 (907) 244-8427 or (907) 230-3618


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Hope Community Resources Corporate Culture H

ope has developed a corporate culture that is based on a set of Beliefs, Values, Mission, Vision and Expectations. This culture forms the foundation of the agency. It communicates the essence of who Hope is; what Hope is trying to accomplish; and why Hope exists as an agency.

• In the dignity of life. • In doing the right thing. • That within each person there is an essence of beauty, value, worth, and goodness. • In selfless leadership.

Our Mission: “To provide services and supports, that are requested and designed by individuals and families who experience disabilities, that result in choice, control, family preservation and community inclusion.”

As members of the community of Hope, we believe that our actions of kindness, fairness, trust, compassion, forgiveness and understanding derive from a shared kinship, founded upon values and grounded in integrity, loyalty, wisdom and our belief in the importance of dreams. We will approach each person and each day with balance, commitment and vision.

• That compassion and forgiveness are virtues. • That understanding and effectiveness comewith empathy, not sympathy. • That all people seek a sense of belonging and competence to feel worthwhile. • That conflict is “normal.” • That “Magic Moments” not only happen but can be fostered. • In the importance of an ethical and moral foundation within a spiritual life.

This will assist us in building inclusive communities that promote intellectual, emotional, social and spiritual development within one another while allowing for healthy conflict. It is our desire to leave a legacy of sustainable excellence built upon continuous learning, reflection, evaluation and innovation, which create outcomes that better human kind.

Hope’s Fundamental Principals • All individuals are capable of continuous learning, growth and development. • All individuals are born inexorably equal and are, therefore, entitled to equality in every aspect of the daily life experience.

Families and individuals who experience disabilities have bestowed us with a sacred trust that we must never betray or take for granted.

• Culturally normative means must be utilized to establish and maintain behaviors and characteristics that are as culturally normative as possible. By Age

Total Number Served in 2012 - 1403

• Security/Stability • Independence

Barrow Region - 23

• Self-Advocacy

Dillingham Region - 27 17% Age 30-49

• Integration/Inclusion

Kodiak Region - 99

• Relationships

Mat-Su Region - 105

• Joy

Kenai Peninsula/Seward Region - 110 Anchorage Region - 984 0

200

400

600

22% Age 50-64

2% Age 65+ 9% Age 1-5

Southeast Region - 55

• Choice/Preference

2. Is manifested before the person attains age 22. 3. Is likely to continue indefinitely. 4. Results in substantial functional limitations in three or more of the following areas of major life activities:

e. Self-direction

• All planning and service delivery supports must be person- centered and person- directed.

• Opportunity

1. A mental or physical impairment or combination of mental and physical impairments.

• Discovering the essence of an individual must be at the very heart of the person directed planning process.

• Confidentiality is rooted in an innate respect for the dignity, status and value of all who choose our supports.

• Dignity/Status

The concept of a developmental disability, according to the State of Alaska, is defined as a severe, chronic disability of a person that:

c. Learning

• Regardless of change or challenge we must never “give up” in a concerted drive towards normalization.

• Individuality

What is a developmental disability?

• Active listening is a process essential to discovering each individual’s unique story.

• All individuals are entitled to full participation in their lives and daily life experiences.

We further our mission through ten agency values, which are the focal point of our everyday activities and decisions.

Through nine regional offices, serving Anchorage, Barrow, Dillingham, Juneau, Kenai/ Soldotna, Ketchikan, Kodiak, the Mat- Su Valley, Seward and their surrounding communities, Hope reaches even the most remote locations of our last frontier. Ongoing expansion throughout the state is based on requests from individuals and families seeking individualized, person-centered services in the community of their choice.

a. Self-care

• All actions must be aligned with values and adherence to those values in the discharged of our responsibilities.

Our Values:

For 44 years, Hope Community Resources has provided services and supports to Alaskans experiencing intellectual and developmental disabilities, mental health challenges, physical challenges and complex medical conditions.

• All individuals have a right and a need to dream, and the dream must be recognized, acknowledged and honored.

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Helping people with disabilities achieve their dreams.

Our Vision:

Our Beliefs:

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22% Age 6-12

22% Age 20-29 21% Age 13-19

b. Receptive and expressive language d. Mobility f. Capacity for independent living g. Economic self-sufficiency 5. Reflects the person’s need for a combination and sequence of special, interdisciplinary, or generic care, treatment, or other services that are of life-long extended duration and are individually planned and coordinated.

What is an intellectual disability? Intellectual disability is a disability characterized by significant limitations both in intellectual functioning (reasoning, learning, problem solving) and in adaptive behavior, which covers a range of everyday social and practical skills.


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Donor Dollars Hard at Work Why I Give...

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onor dollars provide additional support to the more than 1,400 Alaskan families and individuals that choose Hope as their service provider.

Donor dollars can: • Assist with inclusive cultural and recreational activities. • Provide security and stability in the form of permanent housing. • Bridge the gap when traditional funding sources may be insufficient or inadequate to meet every day needs. • Allow families to stay together, in the community of their choice. • Cover emergency medical needs. • So much more!

Get involved! Donating to Hope gives me the opportunity to directly affect the lives of Alaskans with developmental disabilities in a positive manner. I know that every dollar given to Hope will be used to assist those individuals right here in our community.

As an employee, I find it very important to be philanthropic to this Agency. I truly, from the bottom of my heart, believe in what Hope does. It gives me a bigger stake in the agency when I am contributing to our mission statement.

Ben Wallingford,

Katie Johnston,

Long-time volunteer and donor

Development Officer, Hope Community Resources

44th Annual Walk & Roll for Hope West end of the Park Strip Saturday, May 4, 2013 Sign up yourself or a team at www.HopeAlaska.org

14th Annual Hope Golf Classic Four-person scramble format golf tournament Thursday, July 18, 2013 Palmer Golf Course Alaska Serigraphics has been a strong supporter of Hope Community Resources for over 30 years. Assisting the individuals who choose Hope’s supports to achieve independence and inclusion in our community is simply the right thing to do, and in return, their happiness becomes our own. David Powers, Owner, Alaska Serigraphics

Having worked for and personally grown with Hope and its mission for 28 years of my life, I know first hand the importance of supporting individuals with developmental and other disabilities to be independent and all that they can be in their lives. The pursuit of joy and happiness is everyone’s right in life. It is for these reasons and many more that I give my financial support to Hope. Corbett Mothe, Hope Former Employee

18th Annual Hope Auction Dinner, Live & Silent Auction Saturday, October 26, 2013 Hotel Captain Cook

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The Walk for Hope 44 years of walking and raising funds for Alaskans with disabilities

T

he Walk & Roll for Hope has evolved over its 44 years, but the event has maintained its generous spirit as Alaska’s oldest walk. The Walk allows businesses, individuals, and families to gather together and support all of the life-changing works that Hope is doing in communities across Alaska. The Walk for Hope, now known as the Walk & Roll for Hope, has seen drastic changes over the years. As the city of Anchorage developed, shutting down many major streets throughout town to hold the 31-mile walk became impossible. While many nostalgic Alaskans wish for the longer route, the changes have allowed for continued success of this historical event.

Online registration and fundraising has helped the Walk continue to make great strides. Currently, fundraising takes place throughout Alaska with physical events being held in Anchorage, Kodiak, Ketchikan and the Kenai Peninsula, while virtual events online support the other regions Hope serves. With the route and location changes and the addition of online fundraising, the Walk & Roll for Hope continues to gain speed. In 2012, the Walk & Roll for Hope campaign raised over $100,000 statewide.

Then

Now

• The first Walk for Hope was held the first Saturday in May of 1970.

• For 44 years, the Walk & Roll for Hope has been held on the first Saturday in May.

• This walk was organized completely by volunteers.

• Each of Hope’s nine regional offices holds a live or virtual walk.

• The route in Anchorage was approximately 31 miles.

• Over 1,000 walkers still come out statewide each year.

• Thousands of peanut butter sandwiches were made and frozen to feed the many walkers.

• Anchorage offers three routes: 16k, 5k, or a “walk- lite” route around the Park Strip.

• Over 4,500 walkers came out for the first Walk for Hope and raised over $100,000.

• BBQ’s are held after each live walk with many hosting fun activities for the community.

• Over 11,000 walkers came out for the second Walk for Hope.

• Over 3.2 million dollars has been raised to date to support Alaskans with disabilities.

Come out and join us May 4th! Register at www.HopeAlaska.com


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Willow Ranch Provides Rural and Subsistence Living I

n the spring of 2006, a dream and desire of several people that chose Hope’s supports was recognized. This dream is the same that many Alaskans have: living a non-urban lifestyle that encompassed a subsistence way of life. In an effort to realize this dream, and provide this opportunity, the Willow Ranch was born.

In October of 2006, Hope acquired the 70-acre property which is now referred to as the Willow Ranch. It consisted of one main house and a small cluster of outbuildings. The plan was to create, build and begin a ranch and farm lifestyle opportunity for people who expressed a desire to move out of their current city environment and into their own rural residence. In the spring of 2007, construction began and the first two men who held the dream and embraced the challenge of creating a new life moved to the ranch. The concept of the Willow Ranch was to create an infrastructure that would support hunting, fishing, trapping, animal husbandry, gardening; developing marketable skills in the areas of wood working, mechanics and firewood; raising and selling livestock; learning proper riding skills of ATV’s and snow machines; and many other aspects associated with living off the land in a rural environment. Over the next six years, and a lot of hard work the Willow Ranch has flourished and there are currently six men who have chosen this lifestyle as their home. Four of the men have chosen to live in a duplex, two to each side, while another chose to live on his own in a small, single family home. The main house is where the sixth man lives, sharing the home with the ranch manager. The property hosts a large barn, vocational shop, a guest cabin, a food smoker and assorted animal structures. The men, along with support staff, have cleared and made pastures for the livestock and have large productive gardens in the summer. The ranch has raised and sold livestock, firewood, and hay. The recent purchase of a sawmill has allowed them to produce lumber for projects around the farm, and for wood working crafts, along with specialty woods. The greatest success the ranch has provided is supporting the six men living there to actualize a dream they never thought possible. Their lives have meaning and you can see the pride in their eyes when they are giving people tours of the ranch or when they process their own meat, or ride up on their own ATV. They engage in all of the daily activities that keep a ranch functioning and productive. One of the men has surpassed all expectations from when he first arrived at

the ranch. He is a hard worker and is proud to be a part of the ranch. He is always happy to tell people, “This is my home.”

Ranch Overview Livestock: The ranch has a large variety of farm animals. They include: yaks, horses, hogs, goats, turkeys, chickens, ducks and cattle. In the spring they look forward to the birthing of all the young. The animals are raised for both farm usage for outside sales. Wood Working: Two years ago the ranch purchased a sawmill. This allows them to make their own lumber for shelves, building projects and other projects. They are developing a niche for milling wood to be used for signs, garden boxes, coasters and other crafts. They will be adding picnic tables and birdhouses to their list of products in the near future. The next goal is to take custom orders for specific needs. Recreation: Numerous people from all over the state, both those supported and employees have utilized the ranch as a place to come and enjoy recreation activities. Some of these activities include: riding four wheelers and snow machines; camping in a tent or staying in the cabin; petting, grooming, muck-

ing stalls and taking pictures with the different animals; enjoying a camp fire; hunting/fishing; processing meat; working in the garden; hiking and bike riding; or just relaxing. The ranch is a great experience for everyone. Sales: The ranch has sold a variety of products including wood, hay and livestock. Raising the animals, finding a market and selling the products have given a sense of pride and ownership to the guys that live and work on the Ranch. They look forward to developing new products and projects for the wood working business.


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Hope’s Regional Offices

Barrow/North Slope Borough Region

Anchorage/South Central Region Kenai Peninsula Region Dillingham/ Bristol Bay Region

Mat-Su Valley Region

Juneau/ Seward/Resurrection Bay Region

Southeast Region Ketchikan/ Southeast Region

Kodiak/Aleutian & Pribilof Island Region

Dillingham/ Bristol Bay Region • The Dillingham/Bristol Bay regional office was established in 1986 and currently serves 27 people and employs 10 full and part-time employees. • For nearly two weeks each summer people who choose Hope’s supports in the Bristol Bay region fish for Bristol Bay Reds. Hundreds of pounds of fish are harvested, cleaned, cut and then vacuumed sealed or smoked. The individuals who choose Hope’s supports utilize the majority of the fish that they catch. Donations are made to the Senior Center to assist with lunches that feed the elders. Another portion of the fish is shared with the families of those receiving Hope’s supports and who can’t fish for themselves. • Each fall at the end of August, individuals that Hope supports and staff go “up river” via boat for moose hunting. While hunting for that perfect moose is the main focus, the individuals enjoy roasting hot dogs and being outdoors. Once the moose is harvested, they return home for the processing of the meat. Getting a moose each year not only incorporates generations of hunting but also provides a second source of protein and variety to their diet. • Various animals are harvested for the protein their meat provides and their pelts, which are made into hats and gloves. Berries are picked for Akutaq, jellies and syrups. Plants such as fiddleheads are gathered to add vegetables to diets.

Anchorage Region

Kodiak/ Aleutian Region

• The Anchorage regional office was established in 1968 and currently provides services to 984 people and employs 726 full and part-time employees.

• The Kodiak/Aleutian regional office was established in 1991 and currently serves 99 people and employs 58 full and part-time employees. • The Men’s Group is an opportunity for males supported by Hope to get out into the community and experience various group activities directed to their interests. The group participates in a wide variety of activities including playing basketball, dodge ball, hiking, playing the Wii, sledding, going to the gym and cooking.

• Types of supports offered in the Anchorage Region: spiritual and cultural supports, housing and daily living support, supported employment, after school and weekend recreation programs, summer camps, mental health and behavioral health services, supported parenting, and systems navigation.

• The Aurora Art Studio gives people the opportunity to develop individual art skills and to collaborate on projects as a group. The art program is a place where participants let their creative talents flow by sketching, painting and designing original art works.

• The Anchorage Region includes the Discovery Center, Hope Studio (see expanded articles) and a Subsistence Program.

• The Kodiak Recreation Program’s passion is to provide access to all the recreational opportunities Kodiak (and beyond) has to offer, especially those that often seem to be out of reach for people who experience a disability.

• The region actively supports university students fulfilling practicum and internship requirements as well as hosting a robust International Volunteer Program.

• An eight-week “Summer Camp” focuses on the beautiful outdoors and includes activities such as hiking, swimming, tide pooling, kayaking, rock wall climbing, ropes course, camping and a cycling club just to name a few. • The Kodiak Subsistence Program offers year-round activities accessing the natural resources and pristine beauty of the island. The fully equipped subsistence boat allows individuals to experience the thrill of the catch and gather the joy of inclusion working next to their Kodiak neighbors.


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Barrow/ North Slope Region • The Barrow/North Slope Borough regional office was established in 2001 and currently serves 23 people and employs 26 full and part-time employees. • The Barrow Mental Health Home will open in the summer of 2013. This one-of-a-kind home will be opening at the request of Barrow community members. This home will allow individuals experiencing mental health challenges to remain in Barrow and receive services in the community of their choice. • Hope is able to offer the Personal Care Assistance Program to eligible residents of the North Slope. This program allows individuals who are not able to care for themselves the opportunity to receive services that they choose and to remain in their own homes. • In collaboration with Camp Fire Alaska, Hope was able to provide an inclusive day camp program for a week this last summer to the residents of Wainwright. The camp allowed for all individuals, with or without disabilities, to participate in meaningful and culturally relevant activities during the summer break.

Mat- Su Region • The Mat-Su regional office was established in 1999 and currently serves 105 people and employs 59 full and parttime employees. • Through a partnership with Aurora Equine Therapy, people who choose Hope’s supports in the Mat-Su Valley are able to participate in Equine Therapy. Equine Therapy helps people open up and be free of anxiety and behavioral challenges while riding the horses. This is truly a joyful time for all involved. • The Mat- Su Region has had great success with its Healthy Lifestyles Program, which focuses on good life habits such as exercise and a healthy diet. This program has enabled many of the individuals who choose Hope’s support to lose weight and lead healthier, more positive lives. • The Mat-Su Region has many inclusive opportunities for people who choose Hope’s supports. You regularly find such social activities as: the spring formal dance, Taste N’ Tour culinary and cooking class, Camp Mani summer program, potato planting and community gardens. • Camp Mani is a summer program that runs from May through August each year. It consists of events that are free or low-cost to any member of the community who experiences a disability. Activities include tie dying, kite making and flying, ceramics painting, participation in community clean up events, visiting the Imaginarium, Arctic Thunder Air Show, paddle boating and swimming.

Juneau Region • The Juneau Regional office was established in 1997 and currently serves 41 people and employs 60 full and parttime employees. •

Juneau’s summer program offers activities such as berry picking, whale watching, picnicking, swimming, gardening, camping and participating in arts and crafts.

• The Juneau team supports several Native Alaskans and assists them in connecting with their culture. Many of the individuals who choose Hope’s supports perform in local dance and drumming groups. • Cooking classes are a popular offering in Juneau. Participants learn how to cook and are taught healthy and nutritious recipes, while learning about food allergies.

Ketchikan Region • The Ketchikan regional office was established in 2009 and currently serves 14 people and employs 16 full and parttime employees. • Encourages individuals who experience disabilities to participation in athletic training and competitions to increase their physical wellbeing. • Coordination and participation in Southeast Alaska outdoor recreation activities such as kayaking, hiking and camping with Southeast Alaskans for Independent Living. • Promotes salmon fishing as a traditional Alaskan activity and a means of putting food on the table for those who are interested in a subsistence lifestyle. • Day habilitation activities include arts and crafts projects for holidays and special occasions.

Kenai Peninsula • The Kenai Peninsula regional office was established in 2004 and currently serves 110 people and employs 151 full, part-time and on-call employees. • Each winter, Hope’s Kenai Region holds a Fall Festival, Winter Holiday, and Spring Formal that include collaboration with other community services agencies. Dancing, music, food, games, and plenty of integrated socialization. The team also takes advantage of the great winters by ice fishing, trapping, snow machining, snowshoeing, ice tubing and sledding. • The Recreation Center is a busy hub for Hope’s Kenai Region all year long. Pieces from Serendipity Studio, our collaborative art studio, are displayed in the local community and sold to support Serendipity. Cooking, pottery, self- defense, and fur sewing incorporate community members and volunteers sharing their talents along with the use of hides gathered from winter trapping. • Summertime on the Kenai Peninsula is busy and full of outdoor activities. Everyone is included in picnics, rafting, hiking, biking, and trips to Anchorage for shopping and zoo viewing. Subsistence events continue from winter to summer and include dip netting, fly fishing, halibut trips, and jaunts down the peninsula from Clam Gulch to Homer for clamming, fishing, camping, hiking and sightseeing.


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Anchorage Region Hope Community Resources first base of operations began in Anchorage and continues to be the administrative hub of the agency after 44 years. Service delivery for this region reaches from Girdwood to Eklutna, encompassing the whole Municipality of Anchorage. The Anchorage Region operates a family outreach program called “Family Matters.” This program includes the administration of the Anchorage STAR (Short-Term Assistance & Referral) Grant, which is funded by the State of Alaska. The STAR Program helps families navigate the state funding eligibility process, provides referrals for guardianship, and assists with questions about educational and medical support services and funds emergency requests. In addition to the services provided through the STAR Program, the Family Matters team offers the next level of support for families who choose Hope’s services. Individuals may elect supports in such areas as: care coordination services, assisted living, recreational and community access, respite services, employment, mental health, in-home, behavioral health and nursing support. Others may choose to design individualized supports or select a combination of both to meet their goals and dreams. Hope owns a number of single-family homes and apartment complexes in Anchorage with the goal of stabilizing the housing needs of hundreds of individuals who choose its supports. A portion of fundraised dollars has allowed Hope to adapt these homes for accessibility, enabling individuals to be supported in their own homes as physical needs change. The Discovery Center (see expanded article) is the newest program to be offered in the Anchorage Region. Within the Discovery Center, a variety of programs are offered, such as: a robust after school and recreation program, a summer camp called “Camp Cara,” a dynamic collaborative art studio called Hope Studio along with a gallery to showcase the amazing creations. The Discovery Center programs are actively engaged in supporting children and adults with structured programs.

Barrow/ North Slope Borough Region The Barrow/North Slope Borough (NSB) Region encompasses Barrow, Anatuvuk Pass, Atqasuk, Kaktovik, Nuiqsut, Point Hope, Point Lay and Wainwright, an area which is approximately the size of the state of Minnesota, and has a population of about 7,500 people, 75% of whom are Alaska Natives. Hope recognizes that values, culture and tradition play a significant role in the lives of NSB residents and has made the programs provided within the NSB to be a bridge that keeps people connected to their culture while receiving services in their community. As part of that commitment, Hope operates an Elder Care Home for the elders of the region, which enables them to remain close to their families and community. Having the elders present to continue to guide and teach the community is an invaluable resource that might otherwise be lost. Hope also offers a program in which families, who care for their elders at home, can stay at the Elder Care Home for up to two weeks so they can engage in whaling, subsistence activities, or just take a needed break. One of Hope’s important roles in the region is providing outreach to help identify individuals who may be in need of services. This region is so vast and remote that many families don’t realize that there are services available or how to access them.

__________

“The heart of Hope’s mission is providing services designed by individuals and families that result in full participation in community life and dreams coming true. Services and supports are provided to all ages, and through one’s entire life span.” __________

Dillingham/ Bristol Bay Region The Dillingham/ Bristol Bay Region encompasses approximately 31 villages surrounding the main hub of Dillingham. Each surrounding rural community that is served by the main office in Dillingham requires transportation off of the main road system. The number of people supported by Hope throughout the Bristol Bay Region has gradually been increasing due to both outreach travel to several of these rural communities and a revived presence in these communities. Rural communities have been extremely welcoming during Hope’s outreach visits. Families desiring support in navigating the Senior and Disabilities Services (SDS) system have been very appreciative. Many of the people receiving supports are Native Alaskans with the majority being of Yupik heritage. Hope’s Bristol Bay office strives to incorporate much of the cultural subsistence lifestyle that Native Alaskans have lived for generations. These activities include fish camp, moose camp, trapping, hunting, bird harvesting, berry picking, ice fishing and plant gathering (just to name a few). Snow machines or “snow-gos” as they are called in this region, are often utilized as a means of transportation during these activities in addition to skiffs (boats) and four-wheelers (ATVs). Hope operates one assisted living home in Dillingham, while providing respite, day habilitation, supported living and in-home supports in the community and the surrounding villages.


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Juneau Region

Mat-Su Region

The Juneau Region provides services and supports in over ten boroughs in Southeast Alaska. The office is located in Juneau; however, over the year’s Hope has provided services in Auke Bay, Hoonah, Yakatat, Wrangell, Petersburg and Douglas.

Hope’s Mat-Su Region provides services and supports on a road system that stretches from Talkeetna, to Sutton, to Butte and everywhere in between. Honoring on of Hope’s values, inclusion, can be a challenge when communities are so spread out.

Services are provided based on people’s needs, desires and location and can involve members of the Juneau team traveling to meet people’s needs. The Juneau Region provides residential and community services, along with Care Coordination services to help families navigate the Alaska Senior and Disabilities Services (SDS) system. Hope operates one assisted living home in Juneau, lovingly called “Jeffry’s Hope.” The home, which was built in memory of Jeffry, a child from Juneau, was a collaborative effort between Hope, Jeffry’s family and a variety of Juneau businesses. The home is unique in the fact it was built with families in mind, providing an upstairs bed-

Kenai Peninsula Region The Kenai Peninsula Region spans from Seward to Homer, each community with its own water front beauty, surrounded by majestic views of the Kenai Mountains and Redoubt, Illiamna and Spur. The majority of the population of the Peninsula resides between Kasilof and Soldotna.

room and bathroom for visiting family members. All too often, in order for someone to receive services, families are separated, which was the case with Jeffry. His family wanted to ensure the home would provide a place for families to reunite if they had to be separated. There are four people currently living at Jeffry’s Hope. With its large space and big windows, the home acts as a vibrant hub for group activities such as cooking classes, arts and crafts, games, and much more.

ing a driver’s license. In Kenai, people are supported to live their lives to the fullest. The Kenai Peninsula team is very involved in the community as a whole, coordinating service delivery, collaborating on projects and raising funds for the good of the program. They definitely know the meaning of community and how to be a part of it.

Promoting community inclusion, a partnership was formed between the University of Alaska’s Experimental Farm and the Valley homes to assist the farm with their potato harvest in the fall. The potatoes picked are then donated to the local Food Bank and in return the farm supplies the homes with a variety of seed potatoes to plant in the spring.

The Kenai is Hope’s fastest growing region and is a dream place to live. People who choose Hope’s supports on the Peninsula are encouraged and supported in living out their dreams. Whether that encompasses a rock concert lip synced in the park with a crowd of groupies, or shooting a cannon into the waters of the inlet under the shadow of Illiamna, Kenai makes it happen. Future dream planning includes: living independently for people who never believed it could happen; a vacation in Hawaii; and even something as simple as hav-

Whether you’re an artist, a social butterfly, a cook, a gardener, or someone who loves quality time with friends and family, Hope’s Mat-Su Region is committed to helping people lead full and meaningful lives.

Ketchikan Region

Kodiak/Aleutians Region

The Ketchikan Region serves southern Southeast Alaska and is comprised of three separate municipalities within 40 miles of island road. Services are provided to residents of the City of Ketchikan, the Ketchikan Gateway Borough and the Organized Village of Saxman.

The Kodiak/Aleutian Region serves the city and villages of Kodiak Island, as well as the Aleutian Chain and Pribilof Islands. Although most individuals supported in this area reside in the City of Kodiak, Hope team members also travel to other villages to provide assistance to those who choose to receive supports.

The people to whom the Ketchikan team provides services and supports are a highly diverse group. The individuals who choose Hope’s supports participate in many traditional Southeast Alaska outdoor activities such as kayaking, hiking, camping and salmon fishing. The Ketchikan team has fostered and maintained secure and stable relationships with the individuals that choose Hope’s services and their families. Providing excellent services and supports is the goal as they look at potential for growth for the Ketchikan Region. The team eagerly awaits the opportunity to focus on outreach, education and collaboration within the community to build sustainable growth numbers of people supported. As the region grows, traditional Alaskan activities and extend culturally enhancing opportunities will be incorporated into the program to ensure the needs and desires of this diverse community are being met.

The Mat- Su team is very serious about community inclusion and takes great strides to ensure all of the individuals that choose Hope’s supports have the opportunity to live a full and meaningful life. These opportunities begin at the activity center, which is operated out of the regional office in Wasilla. The Center offers at least three events a week and is open to community members. Some of the activities hosted have included sign language classes, clowning skills, guitar class, yoga, felting, karaoke, and beading. In addition, they offer an art program, through the All Birds Studio, to people of all abilities. The Studio focuses on the use of recycled/reclaimed materials and encourages people to be joyful in their creative process.

The services offered by the Kodiak team have greatly increased over the last couple of years. The Kodiak community is comprised of many culturally diverse groups and Hope strives to provide services that are meaningful to each individual and cultural group. Many of the staff members are bilingual, with a good understanding of the cultural needs of the children and adults supported by Hope. The Kodiak team provides services that support the individual to increase independence and inclusion in their community. Hope operates an assisted living home where three ladies have chosen to live together, and two apartment complexes where eight individuals receive supports. Most people, however, have chosen to live in more independent environments throughout the community or prefer to live with their families.

The Kodiak Region oversees a Respite Program, which offers families a much-needed break from the daily demands of an individual who experiences a developmental disability. In addition, this office administers the Kodiak STAR (ShortTerm Assistance and Referral) Grant, which is funded by the State of Alaska. The STAR program helps Alaskan families avoid crisis by connecting them with short-term assistance to meet disability-related needs. This program links families and individuals to resources and services, as well as walks them through the process of gaining critical eligibility and navigating complex state systems.


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Hope Studios __________

Provide artists an environment that has no walls, no barriers and no limits on imagination, and magic will happen.

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hen you walk into Hope Studios you can’t help but smile! Bright colors come at you from all angles. There are painted canvases made of recycled sheets, furniture of all shapes and sizes, fabric art and wooden figures. This is an art studio with a mission: provide artists with the space and opportunity to create art of their choosing, in collaboration with other artists; enhance life through artistic self-expression and display works in local community venues.

Alaska is filled with amazing and talented artists. Some are famous, and some are relatively unknown. Hope Studios is here today due to one such artist, a wonderful woman named Agnes. Born near Northway, Alaska, Agnes was raised in the traditions of her Athabascan culture. She was eventually removed from her home, due to intellectual and physical disabilities, and placed in an institution. Like many Alaskans experiencing a disability during the 50’s and 60’s she lived in institutions both in and outside of Alaska. In 1996, Hope Community Resources assisted Agnes to move into her own home in the community and receive the support necessary for her to age gracefully and peacefully.

__________

Agnes loved to paint and her favorite designs were big, bright, beautiful flowers. Agnes didn’t speak many words, so it was difficult for her to share her inspiration for these brilliant flower designs. When Agnes passed away, her friends accompanied her body back to Northway to be buried and it was there, during a potlatch in her honor, that it became clear where Agnes received her inspiration—women in her community beaded the exact same flower designs that Agnes was painting. Agnes was expressing herself culturally and artistically. Hope Studios was born from this realization; inspiring Hope to help others discover personal gifts and talents. Not long after, Patty Mitchell, a visionary artist from Ohio, visited Alaska to promote a collaborative method of creating art. Patty joined Hope for an intensive art residency and Hope Studios adopted the collaborative art method, embedding it within the belief that all people, regardless of physical or intellectual abilities must have a mechanism to express themselves artistically if they choose. The collaborative process allows people to be creative in a free and flexible way, working together as a team to create finished pieces. Each person’s physicality is considered, and tools or work areas are built to meet specific needs. One person begins a piece but others, including community volunteers, help to finish it. The artists welcome you to join in this exciting and playful adventure.

“It was there, during a potlatch in her honor, that it became clear where Agnes received her inspiration—women in her community beaded the exact same flower designs that Agnes was painting.”


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Showing Art Hope believes art should be shared with the community. Over the past years, Hope Studios’ artists have exhibited work at local venues including First Friday events at the Out North Theatre, Snow City Cafe, Middle Way Café and Brown Bag Sandwich Company. The artists sell their work at local seasonal bazaars including the Spenard Farmer’s Market. It’s an amazing moment when an artist sees their work through the eyes of another person. The goal is to provide an avenue by which the artists of Hope Studios can be valued, contributing members of Alaska’s art community. Hope Studios’ artists have travelled to other regions throughout the State to help expand this concept. The studio has completed permanent art installations at the Cook Inlet Native Head Start Program in Anchorage and several places in Barrow including the Kitta Learning Community School and Fred Ipalook School. Hope Studios has recently been invited to hang a permanent art installation in the redesigned children’s area of the Loussac Library. But perhaps one of the most exciting projects that Hope’s artists completed is a collaborative storybook with the children of Nunaka Valley Elementary a regular basis, as well as hone skills in the retail market. The goal of the Store is to establish itself as a viable local small business, creating a market for unique art designs, as well as consignment work by other local artists.

Come shop for one-of-a-kind wall art, t-shirts, furniture, garden art and much more. Visit our studio and meet the artists. Current hours are Monday through Friday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Hope Studios is seeking artists to perform short-term residencies with them. Come share your particular area of expertise! Local artists interested in volunteering or for more information about participating in the collaborative art program contact Julie Mettler at 907-433-1702.

School. The children from Nunaka Valley wrote nine short stories that the studios’ artists illustrated. What came from this collaboration was Nine Heroes Teaching Lessons, a beautiful children’s book that teaches about sharing, being nice to others and how to be a hero. The book is available through the Anchorage School District library system and at the Hope Studios Gallery.

Accessibility Hope Studios was recently able to purchase a Smartboard through a grant from the Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority. This new piece of technology is a large, interactive whiteboard that provides easy touch control of computer applications and software. Digital work can readily be created and manipulated and blended into finished items like greeting cards or t-shirt designs. This board can also raise and lower easily allowing a person utilizing a wheelchair to position themselves to work on the board.

Hope Studios Store Hope Studios Store is attached to the Anchorage work studio, located at 650 West International Airport Road. The Store is open to the public and welcomes visitors to the store. The store offers an opportunity for studio artists to interact with the public on


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Discovery Center Offers Enriching, Exciting Adventures for All Ages I

n November 2010, a very special dream was realized at Hope Community Resources. This dream was a centrally located arts and recreation facility to serve all community members, not only individuals supported by Hope. Since its opening, The Discovery Center at Hope has been helping people find activities they love to do and to enjoy them to the fullest. Art, music, cooking, dance, karate, theatre, swimming, outdoor sports, movie-making and personalized physical training are just some of the exciting activities the Discovery Center offers.

Opened upon the request of families who were seeking a safe place for their family members to engage in recreational opportunities, the Discovery Center has become the hub of Hope’s service delivery in Anchorage. Participating at the Discovery Center can also be a cultural experience. Most of the staff are graduates of recreation programs in Ireland. They come here to volunteer, bringing their education, talents and culture with them. The result is a lively and stimulating atmosphere. It’s a delightful place to be! The group has given several public performances, to great reviews.

Expressions Unlimited Show Choir and Theatre Group In partnership with the Alaska Fine Arts Academy, two new adult performing groups have been added to the Center’s line-up. The Show Choir is for folks who would like to take their singing to a new level. Aspiring actors and actresses will find the Theatre Group a perfect outlet for their creativity. Each of these groups plans multiple public performances in the next year.

Camp Cara and Summer Discovery

Afterschool Program Weekday afternoons at the Discovery Center provide energetic youngsters, tweens and teens with a wide range of enriching activities. Maybe it’s a special art project or a musical jam session. In Life Skills class they can learn things like how to start conversations or how to budget money. They can exercise to music or play theater games. With the Teenage Club, they can visit the library or the Parachutes Teen Center. For those ready to learn a disciplined art, there are Karate classes. All this and more happens every day starting at 3:00 PM.

Adult Activities The Discovery Center also offers an array of activities for adults. The Social Club makes weekly bowling events or trips to local bistros for coffee and conversation. Water aerobics is offered twice a week. Recently, the Discovery Center re-launched Friday Karaoke Nights. Our new adult room provides comfortable space for arts and crafts or just socializing.

Underground Dance Company Hip-Hop Classes This past year, an amazing collaboration has developed between the Discovery Center and Underground Dance Company. Young hip-hoppers perfect their dancing skills in an exciting, high-energy class.

The Discovery Center at Hope offers two different weekday summer programs. Camp Cara is an emphasis-based camp where campers explore a new theme each week: science week, animal week, splash week (water sports), etc. Summer Discovery offers a daily lineup of arts, music, outdoor recreation, and field trips.

Media Center The media center is designed to aid the dream of filmmaking, musical production, and other digital dreams. Using the latest digital technology, the media center has produced short films, original music tracks, commercials, and so much more.

Discovery Center programs are open to the whole community—those who experience disabilities and those who do not. Daily activity fees may be applicable. For more information call Matthew Gallatin at 907-433-1703.

__________

Life is all about discovery, and the greatest discoveries of all live within our potential and our dreams. __________


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Hope’s Nurses Trek Statewide H

ope’s mission of providing services to individuals who experience disabilities knows no boundaries. Nurses employed by Hope travel to every corner of the state from Barrow to Southeast, from the Kenai Peninsula to Bristol Bay and the Yukon Kuskokwim. The goal of this team is to support individuals and families so that they can live in the community of their choice with the best health and medical supports possible.

Currently the team consists of 14 Community Health Nurses, two Health Associates, a Nurse Educator, a Medical Director and an Administrative Assistant. There are over 300 individuals and families supported by the Health and Wellness Team. They assure advocacy for the best healthcare and medical support designed to meet the unique needs of each individual. Terrain and weather can be challenging when reaching out to individuals. Nurses drive, fly, sail and snow machine about 60,000 miles a year. The teams that work throughout Alaska provide significant support to individuals living in assisted living homes, supported living, independent living, family habilitation homes and natural family homes. People supported range in age from three months old to 96 years old. Often team members are called to assist individuals to overcome barriers to health care that are caused by restrictive government funding, lack of medical and technical resources, and a shortage of healthcare providers familiar with disability-related health care. Additionally, this team provides training and education and a vaccine program for all employees. Tuberculin testing, flu vaccines and Hepatitis A and B vaccines are provided by the agency.

• Anchor Point

Juneau

• Nikolaevsk

• Soldotna

As needed, direct support staff receives training from a nurse in how to best meet the health needs of each individual. While most training occurs in the individual’s home, nurses also do long-distance education and training using video-telecommunication technology.

• Anchorage

Kake

• Ninilchik

• Sterling

• Barrow

Kasilof

• Palmer

• Sutton

• Bethel

Kenai

• Peters Creek

• Wasilla

• Dillingham

Ketchikan

• Point Lay

• Willow

• Glenallen

Kodiak

• Razdolna

The Health and Wellness Team provides educational opportunities to students who are pursuing education in the fields of Health Services. RN and LPN nursing students, Occupational Therapy interns, and medical students have all been provided with a variety of experiences and opportunities to learn about individuals who experience developmental and/or physical disabilities.

• Homer

Koliganek

• Seward

• Hooper Bay

• Nikiski

• Sitka

By providing services in each person’s home, and in their community of choice, Hope’s team strives to help people experiencing disabilities to live the fullest life possible in their home.

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� � ��� Some of the Services we Provide: �� � �� Adaptive Equipment Loan Low Vision Services � Interpreter Referral Services Home & Community Based Care Coordination Individual & Systems Advocacy Consumer Directed PCA ������������������������������� Information & Referral

Independent Living Skills Instruction

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Peer Counseling Technical Assistance on Disability Rights Youth Transition from School to Work Independent Wellness Self-directed Mental Health Program ATBI Case Management Management TABI Case

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Emotional Wellness W

__________

Maintaining a balanced work and personal life promotes the emotional, physical and spiritual wellbeing of one’s self. __________

orkplace wellness has historically focused upon the physical safety and physical health of the workforce, e.g., hard-hats and steel-toed boots for construction workers, fire-proof clothing and personal breathing equipment for fire-fighters, general information concerning exercise and nutrition, health screenings, etc. However, personal wellness is much more than simply physical health and wellness. Emotional health and wellness and spiritual health and wellness are often key parts of our own personal wellness. Therefore, it is not a coincidence that more recent workplace wellness concepts sometimes include emotional and spiritual wellness efforts.

“At Hope, the job demands are

Hope is a very unique workplace in countless ways. Workplace wellness efforts at Hope began by first focusing on the emotional and psychological wellness of the workforce. As a value driven organization, whose primary work products are needed supports for those experiencing a disability, the workforce of Hope is comprised of caring individuals with big hearts and a genuine and personal dedication to help people who have been historically marginalized to experience a real and meaningful life. As a result of their disabilities many of those who choose Hope’s supports are medically fragile with congenital medical conditions that may shorten their lives, and many others have experienced life-long challenging behaviors, thus requiring direct support professionals to implement complex medical and/or behavioral support scenarios. Caring and dedicated staff, supporting someone who dies from the medical complications of their disability is emotionally difficult, just like coming to work prepared to care and provide support for someone whose behavior is extremely challenging and hurtful is also emotionally difficult. Consequently, Hope’s workforce is more likely to experience emotional hurt in the workplace. The starting point of workplace wellness efforts at Hope was to figure-out the “hard-hats” and “steel-toed boots” needed for the emotional safety of Hope employees.

and necessary element of

One of Hope’s early and continuing workplace wellness efforts is a monthly wellness seminar. The curricular content of these seminars have primarily emphasized the “hardhats” for one’s emotional health, e.g., managing stress, work-life balance, keeping gratitude, and more than thirty other courses that have been developed and implemented over the past dozen years. Hope’s monthly wellness seminars are open to the community

emo t iona l we l l n e ss

physica l we l l n e ss

spi r i t ua l we l l n e ss

extremely high. Consequently, social support within the workforce at Hope is a crucial

effective emotional and psychological workplace wellness.“ and other service agencies. Perhaps the most important emotional wellness protective gear at Hope is “social support.” The Job Strain Model (Karasek), which has been applied and referenced extensively in the research, has shown that people experience emotional job strain as a result of high job demands and low job control. However, the research also shows that high social support in the workplace effectively mitigates against the job strain effects of job demands and job control. At Hope, the job demands are extremely high. Consequently, social support within the workforce at Hope is a crucial and necessary element of effective emotional and psychological workplace wellness. There are several monthly wellness seminars about social support, but more importantly the executive leadership of Hope has expanded the Beliefs, Values, Mission, and Vision of Hope to include Expectations of how people are to behave towards one another while at work. People are expected to find the good and strengths in one another; to not reject or abandon one another; to be respectful to each other, and are encouraged to do the right thing instead of simply doing things right. Clearly Hope is asking its employees to be better people when they come to work. If employees follow Hope’s expectations in earnest, their behavior with one another (and ones self), will lead to strong social supports and their emotional and psychological wellness will be strengthened.


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Physical Wellness A

t Hope the concept of physical wellness is viewed the same for people who experience disabilities and those who do not. Achieving and sustaining good physical health opens the door to inclusion and participation. Consequently, Hope strives to address physical health concerns of both its employees and the people who choose its supports (stakeholders). Take a moment to think about the many choices one faces each day that can affect personal health and wellbeing. Think about the amount of sleep one might get, the foods a person consumes, the exercise a person engages in and the things a person is exposed to. There are so many choices to make each and every day that maintaining a healthy lifestyle can be challenging. To assist stakeholders in making health-wise choices, Hope offers a variety of health related supports. Some of these support services are longstanding, while others are new and just getting off the ground.

Longstanding support has been offered to help reduce the negative impact of smoking. For example, years ago a no smoking policy was implemented that also included minimizing the effects of second hand smoke. Access to bottled water was provided throughout the various offices to help office-bound staff members maintain good hydration. Ergonomic considerations in the workplace have helped address the prevention of related health concerns in the workforce. There are increasingly more nutritious snacks in the vending machines. Many of these supports have become so much a part of the work culture that sometimes they are now taken for granted. Other newer initiatives are offered regularly and sometimes these seem to “come and go,” somewhat like New Year’s resolutions. Over the years and currently, staff members and support recipients are offered incentives to join Weight Watchers, attend Zumba classes, get reduced rates through Body Re-

Spiritual Wellness S

piritual wellness is integral to personal wellness. Even though Hope is a secular agency, it has long desired to be a spiritually healthy workplace, offering spiritual supports for the people who choose its supports and its staff.

Hope has adopted this definition of spirituality: “Spirituality is the aspect of humanity that refers to the way individuals seek and express meaning and purpose, and the way they experience connectedness to self, others, nature, and the transcendent, the significant or sacred.” This definition is intentionally broad enough to include but not be limited to only religious expressions of spirituality. Hope believes that people who experience disabilities should be able to participate in the full range of human experience, including spirituality. Many people who experience intellectual and developmental disabilities report that spirituality is as important to them as any other area of life, if not the most important area of all. Many ways to come alongside people spiritually are offered at Hope, including: facilitation of spiritual renewal, connection to faith communities, end-of-life planning, appropriate spiritual resources for spiritual wellness and renewal, celebrations of life and grief support.

Hope’s supports, in a thorough but personal way. It is Hope’s intent to respect each person’s financial, legal, medical, cultural and spiritual choices at the end of life. When a member of Hope passes away, there is a shared celebration of their life. Grief recovery and access to bereavement resources is offered to supported individuals and staff during the process of grieving. Spiritual wellness is important for Hope’s staff as well. Dr. Chuck Lester, Hope’s Clinical Director has stated it this way: “The wellness initiative at Hope is about the work, and the people who seek our supports. Our staff best help to achieve Hope’s mission when they are physically, emotionally, and spiritually healthy.” All spiritual supports at Hope are voluntary. Hope’s official Best Practice on Faith, Religion and Spirituality states, “Spiritual and religious practices are allowable in the community of Hope as long as no one is coerced to participate, and no single form of expression is favored over another.” Hope’s goal is spiritual supports, offered and available upon request, with respect to everyone involved. Experience has shown that a spiritually healthy workplace, where multiple expressions of spirituality co-exist,can be maintained, even in a growing, diverse agency like Hope.

Care coordinators are trained to learn the endof-life wishes and choices of the people who choose

“Many ways to come alongside people spiritually are offered at Hope, including: facilitation of spiritual renewal, connection to faith

new and other gyms and fitness centers throughout the community. While may people initially take advantage of these offers and while many individuals benefit from participation, sustained follow-through can be challenging. This is where focusing on developing a “healthy lifestyle” has the advantage. Hope has incorporated lifestyle decision making into its health and wellness initiatives. Hope employs a “Nutrition Educator” who helps with menu planning, utilizing fresh locally available foods and making healthy choices regarding eating habits. Healthy choices are also incorporated into support recipients’ Plans of Care when individuals request assistance to develop their skills in this area. As a result, Hope continues to encourage the use of tried and true methods, ongoing supports and new initiatives to help stakeholders make healthy lifestyle choices that support physical wellness.

Wellness Hope promotes wellness for both employees and those who choose its supports.

Employees: • Employee wellness seminars on subjects like managing stress, forgiveness, and accountability. • Employee Assistance Program, which provides counseling opportunities for employees and their immediate family members who may be experiencing personal or workplace problems. • Discounted health club memberships. • Spiritual assistance

People who choose Hope’s supports: •

Nutrition and healthy living classes

• Exercise opportunities like: karate, dance and discounted health club memberships. • Spiritual assistance and end of life planning. • Community partnerships with wellness organizations. For every $1.00 spent on a corporate wellness programs, the cost savings are between $2.30 and $10.10 per employee for the company. There is an industry average of 28% reduction in absenteeism due to illness with enrollment in a corporate wellness program. There is an industry average of 26% reduction in health costs to companies who implemented a wellness program.

communities, end-of-life planning, appropriate spiritual resources

There is an industry average of 45% of employees surveyed said they would stay at their jobs longer due to a wellness program.

for spiritual wellness and renewal, celebrations of life, and grief

Personal health costs to the employee are reportedly reduced by 30% with enrollment in a corporate wellness program.

support.”


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A Legacy of Hope “Reflecting on my life growing up with Hope I realize how natural it all felt. Everyone at Hope, including the guys in our house, were my family.”

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hat is it that drives someone to seek a career in the field of human services? At Hope Community Resources there is a growing trend with people who have grown up with friends or family members involved with Hope and are now returning to lend their own contributions to the agency. Living with parents who have dedicated their life’s work to giving back to others can have a major impact on young people. These young people get to see what it is to be selfless and loving in ways many will never know. This instills in them knowledge of what it means to have a servant’s heart, and can encourage them to seek a profession that involves giving back to their community. It’s a legacy they’re leaving to their children - a legacy of hope.

Deputy Director of Community Support Services, Michele Girault, believes that this growing trend is due in part to people wanting to belong to something larger than themselves. “In terms of the kids of staff that grew up in our system (Hope) I think that what they experience is a vision of what community can be like. A vision of a community that values all people.” One of those people who felt the draw to come back to Hope is Thom Hill. He is currently a live-in staff known as a Home Alliance Coordinator (HAC) in one of the many homes that Hope owns throughout the State of Alaska. As an HAC, Thom lives in a home provided by the Agency with the individuals he supports. Thom, along with his wife Jes, have made it their mission to create a supportive and nurturing environment for those who choose Hope’s supports. As part of building this environment, the couple has worked hard to fill the home with art, crafts, sports, music and games that are meaningful to everyone living there. Thom’s journey toward a life with Hope began when his Father, Thom Sr., retired from the military. As a single dad coming out of the Marines, Thom Sr. knew he “wanted to give back to life.” After spending sever-

Thom Hill and his wife, Jess, fill their home with original artwork created by Jes.

al years in a variety of direct support positions, Thom Sr. still felt he wasn’t doing enough to give back to the community. A friend recommended that he look into Hope. Thom Sr. found it to be a good fit, and spent several of Thom’s teenage years as an HAC in Kodiak and Wasilla. Thom fondly remembers how quickly they became a family with the individuals they shared a home with. He would cook, play, and pitch in with household chores, often jumping into the back of the van to strap in wheelchairs. Thom says, “Reflecting on my life growing up with Hope I realize how natural it all felt. Everyone at Hope, including the guys in our house, were my family.” Once Thom was out of college he knew he wanted to continue his father’s legacy of helping others. He tried several other positions, but didn’t find the satisfaction he always had when working with the people who choose Hope’s supports. Thom decided it was time to get back in touch with the family at Hope he had missed. After a meeting with Deputy Executive Director, Roy Scheller, it was clear to both Thom and Roy where he should be. “Look Thom, you’re made to be an HAC,” Roy said. Thom loved the idea. It would enable him to satisfy his need for service, save for the future, continue school and also allow him to pursue his love of music. “Coming back to Hope didn’t feel like work, it felt like coming home,” Thom said of starting as the HAC in an assisted living home. After three weeks of settling into their new home, Thom, Jes, and the gentleman living in the home embarked on an 1,800-mile RV road trip. “What better way to bond with your new family than by camping and fishing?” Thom said. The group camped and fished their way through Alaska, making it from the tip of the Kenai Peninsula all the way to Fairbanks. “That was my first month. It was crazy thinking about doing it, but once we did it; it was awesome,” Thom said of the experience. “This


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Employees: Total number of people employed by Hope Community Resources: 1,103 Full-time employees: 526 Part-time employees: 324 Seasonal/on-call employees: 148 Other: 105

Employees by region: Anchorage: 726 Barrow: 26 Dillingham: 10 Juneau: 57 Ketchikan: 16 Kodiak: 58 Mat-Su Valley: 59 Kenai Peninsula: 151

Longevity: Employees that have been with Hope 3-5 years: 178 Employees that have been with Hope 5-10 years: 157 Employees that have been with Hope 15-20 years: 32 trip helped to solidify the family relationship within the house.” Now the new family is in a regular routine. They have movie nights, trivia nights, play Rockband, have special dinners for holidays and do craft projects. They are a singular unit, a family living in a home. Jes is an integral member of the family filling the role of cheerleader, art project manager and friend. “Jes and I assume our responsibilities around the house, just as any member of a family does. I have never seen my job as a burden or an exceptional thing. It is just part of my duty as a member of this family,” says Thom. “Everything I do is a legacy to my

dad. We’re just a big family.” Thom’s story is one of many at Hope that reflect the same drive others feel as they return to work or volunteer at Hope. Once you’ve known a place that values all people, values you, it is an attractive concept to come back to, and be a part of. Michele Girault says “People get a passion for changing the world one day at a time. If I value you then other people begin to see your value and community attitudes begin to shift. I think it’s really beautiful to see people that work at Hope and have kids that come back and say I want to be part of that vision.”

Employees that have been with Hope 20+ years: 36

Diversity: 33% are men 67% are women Over the years, Hope employees have represented 42 different countries of origin.

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April 4, 2013

Hope and Camp Fire Alaska bring a summer of inclusion to St. Paul and Wainwright A

sk an adult in a rural Alaska community how they learned to swim, and there’s a good chance they will say “Camp Fire.” That’s because, each summer for the past 48 years, Camp Fire Alaska has travelled to Alaska’s rural communities to teach water safety and swimming. The Rural Alaska Program began solely as a means

all-around amazing experience,” said Kimberli Scott, a Camp Fire rural staff member. “One thing that I remember above all is that one of the eligible youth was able to make contact with a great aunt in the community that Hope had been providing services to previous to our visit. When we invited her to come join the activities with the kids, she was so happy and enjoyed the program as much as if she was one of the youth. It was a bright spot in the program to have her there participating with the youth and showing them that she could be involved in programming as much as them!” The Hope and Camp Fire staff made a particular effort to identify and integrate youth experiencing physical, mental and behavioral disabilities into all the activities they offered, making it a truly inclusive experience for children in the communities. “This partnership was great for Camp Fire because inclusiveness is one of our core values,” said Barbara Dubovich, Camp Fire’s CEO. “Sometimes it can be hard to identify and reach out to children experiencing special needs in the rural communities we visit because we are in the communities for only 2-4 weeks each summer.” “Our partnership with Hope helped us reach out to all children and get them involved in our activities

“Our partnership with Hope helped us reach out to all children and get them involved in our activities and having fun at summer camp!”

to address the high rate of accidental drowning in Alaska, which is more than 10 times the national average. However, today, the Rural Program provides not only swimming and cold-water survival instruction, but also a full range of traditional day-camp activities to children and teens living in Alaska’s rural communities. The program promotes healthy life skills and choices such as nutrition, cooking and oral health, along with arts and crafts, cooperative games, hikes, camp-outs, teen activities, service projects and community events. Last summer, the rural program served 26 communities, providing 60 weeks of day camp to more than 1,700 participants - and a new partnership with Hope Community Resources made the programming offered in two of those communities extra special. Hope secured funding for Camp Fire to provide two weeks of day camp in each of the communities of St. Paul and Wainwright, and also provided recreation specialists specially trained to work with children experiencing disabilities, to help deliver the programming. “Having Hope with us in St. Paul was an

and having fun at summer camp!” she added. “Our mission states that ‘every child will have an opportunity to discover the best in themselves and others in a fun and safe learning environment,’ and, with the help of Hope, we were able to make that truly possible in these communities.” Hope and Camp Fire are now working together to identify which rural communities will benefit from this partnership this year and in coming summers.


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Hope Aids in International Disability Issues __________

The United Nations considers Poverty and Disabilities as global issues. Hope Community Resources seeks to be part of the international efforts aimed at positively impacting both. __________

A

pproximately 17 years ago, Hope initiated a practicum program with a University in New York State from which Anthropology students came to Alaska to work on social inclusion associated with people who experience disabilities. This early focus combined with some local University internships and practicum placements enabled Hope to enhance learning opportunities for the future work force, while also enhancing the daily experiences of those who chose to receive supports from the agency. These early efforts grew into an outreach program affiliated with multiple Universities across six different States. About the same time Hope was privileged to invite volunteers from the country of Ireland to provide volunteer efforts to the Agency especially in the areas of recreation and social care. Over the years Hope came to an understanding that regardless of the jobs that these volunteers returned home to carry out, they brought with them the Beliefs, Values, Mission, Vision and Expectations learned from their experiences with Hope. This awareness resulted in Hope seeking the appropriate funding that allowed for similar exchanges with countries such as Russia, Belarus, Kyrgyzstan, Ethiopia and Senegal-Gambia. Volunteers from these countries have included university students; administrative personnel from within the field of disabilities; as well as family members of people who experience disabilities. Throughout the years that these volunteer opportunities have occurred, Hope has consistently seen a cross exchange of values and ideas. Hope’s organizational values and strategies have been brought back to people’s home countries and implemented in other organizations. In return, Hope has learned about other people’s customs and strategies for social inclusion. As Hope learned more about how people became included while here in Alaska, we were able to make continuous changes in its own approach to supporting inclusion amongst all of Hope’s stakeholders. Each and every volunteer went away as a different person, while leaving behind a different organization.

One of the key factors in the success within the volunteer’s country of Hope’s International Volunteer Program is that it is always linked with a local University system. This allows for cultural and educational exchanges not just for the individual volunteer, but also for the college professors and fellow students all who in some way are touched by the ongoing partnership with Hope. All volunteers come to Hope through volunteer clubs associated with local universities. The volunteers are required to have the support of university lecturers, many of whom were once volunteers themselves. Educational materials such as DVD’s, brochures and web sites are shared amongst the students prior to the recruitment and application process begins. Volunteers who return to the college become the ambassadors between Hope and future volunteers. The end result is a wide spread knowledge about Hope, in it’s efforts and systems, multiplied

many times over in the past two decades. Two stories highlight the beauty of these volunteer opportunities. Two volunteers came to Hope from Kyrgyzstan. They worked as direct support staff in a local orphanage in Kyrgyzstan. Upon returning home, they translated Hope’s orientation and training materials and started to teach their staff Hope’s introductory curriculum. A second story demonstrates another benefit of the volunteer program. A person from Ireland came over and volunteered for the summer. Over a decade later his son and daughter also came over as volunteers. Each of them returned as employees of Hope.

Volunteer Demographics and Stats Approximate number of International volunteers Hope has hosted: 2000 Number of countries that international volunteers have come from: 10 Countries represented: • Ireland • Spain • Germany • England • Belarus • Russia • Cameroon • Austria • Ethiopia • Kyrgyzstan

Number of Universities volunteers that have come from: 15 U.S. Universities that volunteers have come from: • New York • Utah • North Dakota • Oklahoma • Iowa

Disability Inclusion Officers (DIO) currently serving in Ireland: 22 Current DIO’s that have come through Hope: 11 Types of projects they have come here to do: • Exploring the culture of disabilities • Exploring aspects of community inclusion • Adaptive recreational activities


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April 4, 2013

Supported Employment Provides Meaningful Opportunities H

ope Community Resources values of individuality, choice and inclusion are the backbone of supported employment services. Although the paycheck is also very important, earning money is not the only reason people work. Meaningful employment or volunteer work provides individuals, who experience a disability, with the opportunity to develop work skills, contribute to their community, increase self-esteem and expand social networks.

Hope works with individuals to locate jobs or volunteer opportunities that meet persons’ interests and skills. People seeking employment, along with their support team, meet with a Supported Employment Job Developer to identify their work interests, skill strengths and work constraints. With this information, the Job Developer approaches businesses that potentially could use assistance and they discuss how a job could be “carved out,” if necessary, to meet both the employer’s needs as well as the individuals’. Hope’s ability to offer a Job Coach to support an individual in learning the job can help ensure a smooth transition and a successful employment journey. Christina is an excellent example of a supported employment success story. After completing school, Christina was looking for a job. She preferred a qui-

et environment, routine tasks and part-time hours. One of her skills was accurate data entry, which she learned at a prior volunteer placement. Aim Alaska was advertising for a full-time position to prepare medical record files to be scanned. Hope’s Job Developer approached them, suggesting they might higher Christina on a part-time basis, with the option of adding hours at a later date if both parties agreed. The placement has worked out beautifully. Christina has been working part-time at AIM Alaska since May of 2012, to both her and her employer’s satisfaction. Calvin is another success story. After working for two years with Hope’s Grounds Maintenance Crew developing a variety of work skills, he was ready to move on and secure other employment in the community. Calvin really liked working with equipment and wanted to be in a “guy” environment. Hope’s Job Developer approached Specialty Trucks and Auto to see if they would be interested in hiring Calvin on a part-time basis to provide basic shop cleaning. Calvin was hired in May of 2012 and really likes his job and has progressed to where he doesn’t need a job coach. Specialty Truck and Auto’s President, Keith Manternach, works directly with Calvin and couldn’t be happier. “Calvin has a great attitude and does an incredible job,” says Keith. “I can’t say enough good things

about Calvin.” Hope works with a number of employers in the food service industry, providing jobs from silverware rolling to dishwashing to food preparation positions. Some of the businesses Hope has worked with include Olive Garden, Glacier BrewHouse, Sam’s Club, Papa John’s Pizza, Papa Murphy’s Pizza, Creekside Dining at UAA, Serendipity Adult Day Center, and Sugar Spoon. In addition, Hope offers supported employment jobs with its Grounds Maintenance Crew who maintains the yards and walkways of several homes along with clerical positions in the administrative office buildings. When someone has the desire and ability to move into more skilled positions, the Supported Employment Team is there to assist a person in making the transition possible. Hope has established several community volunteer positions with local non-profits to assist individuals, who are not ready for the work force, to build the work habits, attitudes and skills necessary to ready them for paying positions. This may include the development of time management skills, the ability to adhere to formal standards and learning to follow directions. Volunteer sites are also used when an individual desires to experiment with a varitey of jobs in order to see what best suits them. By participating in the volunteer program, they can gain job specific skills, some work history and hopefully a good reference. This is also an opportunity for people to give back to the community. Some of organizations Hope has partnered with for this program include Catholic Social Services’ St. Francis House Food Pantry, Bishop’s Attic, Habitat for Humanity, Kids’ Corps Head Start, Anchorage Pioneer Home, and NeighborWorks Anchorage. Hope’s Supported Employment team also assists individuals in pursuing entrepreneurial endeavors such as stocking vending machines, selling arts and crafts and creating customized promotional items. Supports vary from person to person, but can include shopping, stocking, money handling, planning and hands on assistance in use of equipment. The Supported Employment team’s emphasis is on providing employment opportunities that meet the specific needs of the individuals who request support. If you are interested in exploring potential employment opportunities in your business, please contact the Supported Employment Network at 907-5615335—they’d love to talk with you!


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Behavioral Health H

ope has always recognized that all human beings experience a multiplicity of challenges throughout the course of a normal lifetime. In order to meet and address such obstacles to personal growth and development, the whole person is recognized using a holistic approach to person-centered planning.

Hope has provided behavioral supports for over twenty five years, and some that are requested by families include skill building opportunities, technical and consultative assistance to teams, learning the effective use of positive behavior supports, and providing an array of mental health treatment options within the community. When behaviors significantly interfere with an individual’s ability to learn, to be included in community, or negatively interrupt the daily life experience, specialized, individual interventions are activated to assist in coping with such challenges. Many times it is important to work on social skills in the process of socialization with others in a variety of everyday environments. Hope staff lead by example first, showing typically accepted behavior responses to an assortment of situations. Understanding social cues is taught along with independent living and employment skills. All therapeutic assistance is primarily taught and learned within the community, and not in long term care institutional settings removed from the real world.

cultural activities such as luaus, a blanket toss, and ice fishing. Building on a child’s interests and strengths, Hope provides a high level of individualized attention to each child discovering what motivates, what reinforces and what works. Culture, spirituality and ethnicity are honored in all activities and treatment. Many learn to cope with feelings and emotions; how to deal with frustration and stress; and how to react to the negatives in life and the “down� moments that we all experience. Recognizing the need to begin rehabilitative and clinical services throughout Alaska, Hope has expanded its scope of services to the North Slope where it will soon launch a mental health home in collaboration with the North Slope Borough. This home will allow individuals who were born and raised on the North Slope to remain with family and friend and community, celebrating the beauty of their culture. As the program expands, others can return to this area that is called “home�, where healing and a circle of support can add heavily to a future filled with value, worth, and renewed contribution.

Hope continues to adamantly believe that learning is best embraced in natural every day settings, and not removed from a normalized life experience. For example, improving attention and learning attention skills occurs while making pottery, learning how to cook, participating in arts and crafts, immersed in

__________

Hope believes that individuals who experience behavioral challenges have an equal and valid right to a full and meaningful life within the community of their choosing. __________

“Building on a child’s interests and strengths, Hope provides a high level of individualized attention to each child discovering what motivates, what reinforces and what works. Culture, spirituality and ethnicity are honored in all activities and treatment.�

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Stone Soup Group is a statewide nonprofit that provides information, support, training and resources to assist families who care for children with special needs in Alaska.

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A new condu survey of par cted ent Diseas by the Cent s, er e 1 in 50 Control, sug for ge s are affe chool age chi sts ld ct study r ed by autism ren . This eflects b o th a fam perspe ily c t i ve and increas an Autism ed awarenes s Spectr um Di of sorder.

UPCOMING EVENTS - STATEWIDE www.stonesoupgroup.org

April 8th - The Story of Luke: A comedy about a young man with autism who embarks on a quest for a job and a girl. In Anchorage at Beartooth Theatre 5:30 PM. The Alaska Autism Resource Center (AARC) and Stone Soup Group (SSG) will speak and be available for Q&A after the film.

April 20th - Barnes & Noble Bookfair: Activities, information and books! Proceeds from the book fair will be used to buy books on autism and sent to libraries around the state. Organized by AARC from 11 AM - 6 PM at Barnes & Noble in Fairbanks, Alaska.

April 12th - “Autism: A Global Story” Part of the Conversation Series: Be a part of the interactive radio audience for KSKA’s “Line One: Your Health Connection” 12:00 PM to 1:30 PM at the Hilton Hotel in Anchorage. Organized by the Alaska World Affairs Council.

April 26th - Autism Rocks! A benefit concert to raise awareness and funds that support families of children with special needs throughout the state. All proceeds stay in Alaska and go to support SSG programs and services. Event starts 6:00 PM at the Snow Goose Restaurant Theatre.

April 13th - Autism Nutrition and Eating Issues: Learn from various experts, including an SSG Parent Navigator, about difficult eating behaviors and nutrition for children with autism 9 AM to 11 AM at Access Alaska in Fairbanks.

April 27th - Alaska Walk for Autism: The 5th annual 5K walk/run sponsored by the Autism Society of America. Walk/run starts at 11:00 AM at the Carlson Center in Fairbanks.

907-561-3701 :: 307 E. Northern Lights Blvd., Anchorage

April 4, 2013


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