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A 2018 SPECIAL PUBLICATION OF THE CAPITAL JOURNAL

Capital Journal November 16, 2018 1

Holiday Happenings

Holiday Happenings


Capital Journal November 16, 2018

Pierre Area Chamber of Commerce

Parade of Lights 2018 18TH ANNUAL

Monday, November 19th

HELP US RING IN THE HOLIDAY SEASON 5:00pm Line up & Judging at Riggs High School 6:00pm Parade Begins! Same parade route as Riggs Homecoming Parade

(Broadway - Highland - Pleasant - Pierre Street)

SUPPORT YOUR SMALL BUSINESSES SHOP LOCAL THIS HOLIDAY SEASON! The Chamber Annual Celebration 2018 BOOK A TABLE TODAY FOR YOUR HOLIDAY PARTY

featuring

with entertainment to follow Tickets can be purchased at the Chamber of Commerce or online $50 per person • $400 for a table of 8 Call (605) 224-7361

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Holiday Happenings 2

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 13 PIERRE RAMKOTA 5:30 Reception 6:30 Dinner Seating

Visit: WWW.PIERRE.ORG for more information!


Some homes are seemingly built for entertaining, while others may need a little help to make them more fit for hosting dinner, holiday gatherings or an evening with friends. Overall, one-quarter of people entertain guests in their home either daily or weekly across the globe. One-third entertain monthly, according to findings from GFK Insights. People who open their homes to loved ones may want to make some modifications to their spaces to improve the experience for all involved. • Tame the clutter. Look for ways to reduce clutter in rooms where entertaining takes place. Built-ins with bookshelves and cabinets can hide electronics and wayward toys or collectibles. Focus attention on the entryway, hanging hooks for collecting coats, keys and shoes, so they do not overrun the foyer. Remove any knickknacks or other breakable items from shelves or on coffee tables to free up more space. • Improve conversation seating. Arrange tables and chairs to create conversation nooks for guests who want to talk and get to know one another better. Consider moving out big and bulky sofas in favor of love seats or comfortable chairs that will take up less room and improve flow in entertaining areas. • Find the pieces you like. Think

about how you tend to entertain and then cater your space to those preferences. For example, a large dining table with fold-out extensions or leaves is ideal for someone who regularly hosts formal dinner parties. Renovate a room to include a small bar and club chairs for a lounge feel if cocktail parties are typical. • Improve lighting. Work with an electrician and/or designer who can offer ideas for lighting that can set the mood for entertaining. Rooms that are dull and dim can benefit from overhead lighting fixtures if there are none already available. Task lighting in the kitchen under cabinets can make it easy to prepare food for guests. Wall sconces or focused lighting on artwork can establish a dramatic effect. • Do major construction. Consider working with a builder to make some changes if you simply don’t have the space to entertain. Taking down a wall can open kitchens to living spaces, while adding a deck or three-season room off the kitchen or dining room can provide more space for guests to congregate. • Install a guest bath. Update or add a bathroom near the main entertaining areas. This allows guests to discretely use the bathroom and keeps them from roaming in areas of the house you would prefer they avoid.

Capital Journal November 16, 2018

IMPROVE ENTERTAINING SPACES

A few improvements around the house can make entertaining more comfortable for hosts and their guests.

4 tips to simplify cooking for a crowd this holiday season

3. Only make what guests are likely to eat. Hosts also should not feel pressured to cook more food than is necessary. Holiday meals have a tendency to be lavish, but hosts don’t have to spend all day in the kitchen preparing food that will likely end up as leftovers or trash. Get a final headcount in the days before everyone comes over and adjust your recipes accordingly.

Holiday Happenings

Hosts may agonize over their holiday menus, and some may feel compelled to prepare a family specialty or the same dishes their parents or grandparents prepared for holiday dinners when they were children. But holiday hosts can make things easy on themselves by choosing dishes they’ve made in the past, regardless of their place in family history. Chances are the ingredients for hosts’ own specialties are already in the pantry, saving a potentially time-consuming trip to the grocery store.

Another way to simplify cooking for a crowd is to invite guests to bring along a side dish or dessert. Guests who live nearby can make something in advance of the big meal, while hosts can hand over their kitchens to overnight guests who express a willingness to contribute their own homecooked dish to the party.

4. Start early. If the big is on Christmas Day, that does not mean hosts have to start cooking while everyone unwraps their presents.

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1. Prepare a familiar dish.

2. Share some cooking duties.

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Families big and small typically celebrate the holiday season together. For some, celebrating the holidays with family requires traveling, while others stay put and welcome family and friends into their homes. At some point during the holiday season, celebrants who host family and friends will no doubt prepare a homecooked meal for their loved ones. Cooking for a crowd can seem like a daunting task, especially for first-time hosts. However, there are various ways for hosts to simplify cooking for a crowd this holiday season.


Capital Journal November 16, 2018

2018 Holiday Happenings Events Calendar Monday, November 19

Thursday, November 29

Friday, December 7

Monday, December 17

18th Annual Pierre Parade of Lights •Lineup and Judging, 5:00 pm • Parade: 6:00 pm

Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm

Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm Pierre Players present “Whodunnit, Darling?” Grand Opera House, 7:30 pm

Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm Stanley County Elementary School Christmas Concert, Parkview Auditorium, 6:30 pm Riggs High School Band/Vocal Christmas Concert, Riggs Theater, 7:00 pm

Tuesday, November 20 Christmas at the Capitol Grand Lighting Ceremony, 6:30-7:00 pm

Wednesday, November 21

Friday, November 30 Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm Pierre Players present “Whodunnit, Darling?” Grand Opera House, 7:30 pm

Saturday, December 1

Saturday, December 8 Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm Pie Day at the Capitol, 11:00 am-3:00 pm Pierre Players present “Whodunnit, Darling?” Grand Opera House, 7:30 pm

Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm 16th Annual PARC Turkey Trot, 5k/10k run Pierre Chamber of Commerce office • Registration, 9:00 am • Race, 10:00 am

Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm Holiday Craft and Vendor Fair, Northridge Plaza, 10:00 am-7:00 pm A New Christmas Tradition Concert with a cowboy twist, Riggs Theater, 4:00-6:30 pm December River Boat Cruise, Lily Park boat dock, 7:00-8:30 pm Pierre Players present “Whodunnit, Darling?” Grand Opera House, 7:30 pm

Friday, November 23

Sunday, December 2

Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm

Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm Holiday Open House, Cultural Heritage Center, noon-4:00 pm Fort Pierre Annual Christmas Tree Lighting Celebration • Horse-drawn Wagon Rides, 4:00-6:00 pm • Chili Cook-off Contest, 6:00 pm • Tree Lighting Ceremony, 7:00 pm Black Friday Paddleboat Cruise • Lily Park boat dock, 5:00-7:30 pm Black Friday retailers’ sales event, times vary

Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm Holiday Craft and Vendor Fair, Northridge Plaza, 11:00 am-6:00 pm In Concert for Christmas, First United Methodist Church, 2:00-4:00 pm Pierre Players present “Whodunnit, Darling?” Grand Opera House, 2:00 pm

Wednesday, December 12

Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm

Thursday, November 22, Thanksgiving Day

Saturday, November 24 Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm

Monday, December 10 Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm Georgia Morse Middle School Band/Vocal Christmas Concert, Riggs Theater, 7:00 pm

Tuesday, December 11

Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm

Thursday, December 13 Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm Holiday Jam with the Hegg Brothers, Riggs Theater, 7:00-9:00 pm Pierre Area Chamber of Commerce Annual Celebration featuring “Divas through the Decades” • Social, 5:30 pm • Dinner with entertainment to follow, 6:309:00 pm

Friday, December 14 Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm

Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm

Tuesday, December 4

Monday, November 26

Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm

Saturday, December 15

Holiday Happenings

Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm Stanley County Middle School and High School Christmas Concert, Parkview Auditorium, 7:00 pm

Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm

Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm

Wednesday, December 5

Tuesday, November 27

Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm

Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm Last Chance Craft and Vendor Fair Northridge Plaza, 10:00 am-7:00 pm

Thursday, December 6

Sunday, December 16

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Sunday, November 25

Monday, December 3

Sunday, December 9

Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm

Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm Pierre Players present “Whodunnit, Darling?” Grand Opera House, 7:30 pm

Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm Last Chance Craft and Vendor Fair Northridge Plaza, 11:00 am -6:00 pm

Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm Christmas with Storyteller Tom Roberts, Cultural Heritage Center, 7:00-8:30 pm

Wednesday, November 28

Tuesday, December 18 Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm

Wednesday, December 19 Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm St. Joseph’s School Christmas Concert, Riggs Theater, 6:30 pm

Thursday, December 20 Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm

Friday, December 21 Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm

Saturday, December 22 Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm

Sunday, December 23 Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm

Monday, December 24, Christmas Eve Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm

Tuesday, December 25, Christmas Day Christmas at the Capitol, 8:00 am to 10:00 pm

Thursday, December 27 “Carols and Keyboards” Christmas Hymn Sing First Baptist Church, 7:00-8:00 pm


The retail industry started using the

While Black Friday may have been the catalyst, in recent years shoppers have made the entire weekend of Black Friday a lucrative one for retailers. Many stores now open on Thanksgiving and extend sales through the entire weekend. Small Business Saturday and Sunday promote patronizing mom-andpop stores. Cyber Monday emerged when online shopping became a popular way to grab deals, and it marks the close of the opening weekend of the holiday shopping season. In 2017, Black Friday weekend attracted 174 million shoppers who spent an average of $335.47, according to the NRF.

Christmas Day Worship - 9:00am New Year’s Eve Worship - 6:30pm Advent Worship Services Wednesday Services Dec 5th , 12th, 19th • 7:00pm

Children & Youth Christmas Program Sun, Dec 16 - 9:45am

y a d i l o H

Sunday Worship Services • 8:20 am & 11 am • 714 N. Grand Ave. • 224-2216 www.faithluth.com • Faith Lutheran Day Care 224-4748 • Preschool 224-2216

Advent Sermon Series

Happenings 2018

FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 117 North Central Ave. • Pierre 605-224-5939 Advent Sunday Sermon Series:

Blue Christmas Service

You and your family are invited to join us our Sunday Advent Worship Series - “Come, Thou Long-Expected Jesus”! Beginning Dec. 2nd, we will be looking at the various miraculous births in the Bible leading up to the birth of Jesus on Christmas Eve. Services are at 8:30 and 11:00 am, and child care is available at the 8:30 service!

Worship on Wednesdays:

All are welcome to join us each Wednesday evening for a home-cooked dinner at 5:15! Afterward, please join us for worship at 6:00 as we celebrate this holy season. On Nov. 28th we will start our “Home for Christmas” worship series and Advent study, and hear stories of hope and second chances. We hope you can join us for worship, or some of the small group studies as part of this series!

Holiday Happenings

Black Friday reinvented

Shopping weekend evolves

Christmas Eve Worship - 5 & 7:30pm

Blue Christmas Service:

Christmas Eve Services:

5 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 11 p.m. (Communion).

All services will include candlelight.

Feeling blue? Not connecting with the celebration of the season? This is a service for those who are living with the loss of a loved one, depression, broken relationships, loneliness, or just need to step away from the chaos of the season. Join us Dec. 8th at 10:00 am at Pierre First United Methodist Church as we acknowledge our pain through music, scripture, prayer and candlelight, and look forward to the hope to come.

All are welcome to come as they are!

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The term “black Friday” was originally associated with gold prices and manipulation on the part of speculators Jay Gould and James Fisk. This scandal occurred in September 1869. Commodity prices plummeted 50 percent as a result, and the term “black Friday” was coined to refer to that drop. The phrase “black Friday” also became famous for all the wrong reasons in 1966. Philadelphia police used it to refer to the Friday traffic jams and crowding in downtown stores from tourists and shoppers who flooded into the city in advance of the ArmyNavy football game held the Saturday after Thanksgiving each year. Bigger crowds and rowdiness contributed to long hours and stressful shifts for local police.

Thanksgiving Eve Worship - 6:30pm

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“Black Friday”

term “Black Friday” in the late 1980s. Spin doctors turned previously negative connotations into positive ones by associating the phrase with stores turning a profit and moving accounting ledgers from “red to black” thanks to big year-end sales. Retailers and consumers rallied around low-cost “doorbusters” and other discounted prices. Interestingly enough, according to the National Retail Federation, Black Friday really hasn’t been the most lucrative day for retailers over the years. In fact, greater profits and larger crowds are often seen on the last Saturday preceeding Christmas.

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Black Friday marks the unofficial start of the holiday shopping season. Come Black Friday, shoppers strive to get the lowest prices on gifts for their loved ones. Much of the focus of Black Friday is on finding the best deals, but it can be interesting to take a breath and learn how this phenomenon developed and how it has evolved over the years.

Capital Journal November 16, 2018

The history of Black Friday


Capital Journal November 16, 2018

What is Giving Tuesday? While Black Friday and Cyber Monday are some of the more widely known retail holidays, Giving Tuesday is becoming pretty popular in its own right. Celebrated on the Tuesday following American Thanksgiving, Giving Tuesday helps raise awareness that charity is an important component of the holiday season. The nonprofit services company Neon says nearly onethird of all annual giving occurs in December, with 12 percent happening over the final three days of the year. Giving Tuesday is positioned right in the midst of the most popular time for charitable giving. What makes Giving Tuesday unique is that it is largely fueled by the power of social media and collaboration. The day was actually created by the 92nd Street Y, a cultural center in New York City that has been instrumental in bringing diverse groups of people together with the goals of giving back through service. The 92nd Street Y and the United Nations Foundation came together in 2012 to help form a day that was focused on the generosity of giving during the holiday season. Thus, Giving Tuesday

was born. Technology and social media play a large role in uniting people for Giving Tuesday. Founding partners included Mashable, a technology website, Skype and Cisco. But the success of Giving Tuesday is thanks in large part to the general public, who have both spread the word and made their own contributions to charity. In 2017, Giving Tuesday soared to new heights when technology mogul Bill Gates and his wife, Melinda, announced their foundation would match up to $2 million in donations to Giving Tuesday fundraisers started on Facebook. Facebook similarly waived its 5 percent fee for U.S.-based nonprofits all day long. The global Giving Tuesday movement helped raise more than $300 million online across more than 150 countries in 2017 alone. This year, the Giving Tuesday organization is poised to top their numbers and continue to improve upon the more than 46,000 participating organizations involved in their charitable efforts. Learn more at www.givingtuesday. org.

Joy to the World!

Resurrection Lutheran Church will sponsor its annual Living Nativity on Sunday, December 16th at 5:30 p.m. followed by a soup supper. The Nativity will feature carol singing, live animals, angels, and shepherds, Joseph, Mary and the Baby Jesus. Please join us in celebrating Jesus’ birth!

Resurrection Lutheran Church

103 N.Taylor (corner of Capitol & Taylor Aves) 102256

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Holiday Happenings

Christmas Eve Candlelight Service Dec. 24 at 5:30 p.m.

In November 2017, Lynell Asher, a retired language arts teacher from Georgia Morse Middle School, hands out boxes of frozen turkeys to the community. Lynell was part of a small army of volunteers distributing Thanksgiving food through PARS, at the Pierre Area Boys & GIrls Club. (Stephen Lee/Capital Journal)

ADVENT & CHRISTMAS WORSHIP SERVICES

Fall Festival November 17 from 11:30 am - 1 pm Adults $10, Children ages 6-12 $5 Bake sale and sweet shoppe

December 23

Holy Eucharist @ 9 am

Christmas Eve Service

with Holy Eucharist at 5 pm followed by Jesus Christ’s birthday party

Christmas Day

Holy Eucharist @ 10 am

Trinity Episcopal Church

408 N. Jefferson Avenue • Pierre • 224-5237 101423


Capital Journal November 16, 2018

Home

2. Adapt Gift Giving - share a list of useful or needed gifts; family & friends will appreciate the help! Examples include items that make dressing or bathing easier, photo albums or videos filled with the people they love or an iPod/MP3 player loaded with his or her favorite music or even messages from family & friends.

4. Create New, Streamlined Traditions - holiday activities can be a sensory overload for almost anyone, especially those with dementia. Consider holding simpler holiday gatherings with fewer people, for shorter lengths of time. 5. Give Yourself Some Grace - the holiday season is a stressful time of year for anyone, especially those caring for someone with Alzheimer’s or dementia. Remember to be kind and patient with yourself, take breaks and ask for help when you need it. This holiday season, give yourself the gift of trying out our Adult Day Services or Short Term Stay program. For more information about these programs, give us a call! We’ll provide the helping hand you need, while you rest and rejuvenate from the holiday haze.

Holiday Happenings

1. Set Expectations - familiarize family & friends with the current condition of your loved one. Let them know the situation and protocols for visiting. The less surprised they are, the more comfortable everyone will be. On the flip-side, be sure to talk to your loved one about who’s coming to visit. In preparation, try playing familiar seasonal music, serving seasonal food, watching familiar holiday movies; anything to remind him or her of fond holiday memories and help ensure he or she is in good spirits for visitors.

3. Timing is Everything, Including Down Time - planning events for earlier in the day will help decrease the chance of your loved one being overly tired as well as decreasing the likelihood of Sundowners Syndrome (confusion, anxiety or aggression that sometimes happen later in the day). Also plan quiet activities such as listening to soft music or relaxing by a warm fireplace, to ensure your loved one doesn’t become too overwhelmed.

Assisted Living & Memory Care

103995

494.3400 | 1950 E Fourth St, Pierre | edgewoodseniorliving.com

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The holiday season is a time filled with family & friends, laughter & reminiscing, happiness & joy. Caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s or dementia during the holiday season may require some improvising.

for the holidays


Capital Journal November 16, 2018

Holiday Open House

Friday, November 23, 2018 • Noon to 4:30 p.m. Live Entertainment & Refreshments, photos with Santa Claus, shop for unique South Dakota gifts, FREE museum admission, bring a canned good for the local food pantry. November 24 - December 22 Monday – Saturday 9:00 a.m. - 6:30 p.m. • Sundays 1:00 - 4:30 p.m. Closed Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day

State Archives Open • December 1 • 9 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

S O U T H DA KOTA C U LT U R A L H E R I TAG E C E N T E R 9 0 0 G O V E R N O R S D R I V E | P I E R R E | 6 0 5 - 7 7 3 - 3 4 5 8 | H I S T O R Y. S D . G O V

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Holiday Happenings

Extended Museum Hours

Holiday Happenings 2018  

Capital Journal Special Section

Holiday Happenings 2018  

Capital Journal Special Section