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NEWS FROM WICK COMMUNICATIONS COMPANY

CHAPMAN ANNOUNCES RETIREMENT AFTER 36 YEARS WITH WICK Will Chapman, who for 28 years has served as publisher of The Daily Iberian in New Iberia, La., announced his retirement on Oct. 14. When he was appointed to the position in 1988, Chapman was the youngest publisher in the Wick Communications chain. He retires as the company’s longest-serving publisher and one of its most revered. Chapman, 61, plans to remain with the company for several weeks to help with the transition in leadership at The Daily Iberian. Wick Communications CEO Francis Wick said an immediate search was underway for the right replacement. Chapman is a universally respected newspaperman who was born into the business. His first job was a paper route he took as a 12-year-old in Bastrop, La., but in truth, his fate was sealed even before that. Both of Chapman’s grandfathers were newspapermen. His paternal grandfather was the editor of the Topeka, Kansas, newspaper; his grandfa-

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ther on his mother’s side was the publisher of The Bastrop (La.) Daily Enterprise. The newspaper’s moniker proved true as it was a daily enterprise for many in his family. Chapman’s father left his own weekly newspaper in Crossett, Ark., to join the family business and eventually retired as the co-publisher of the newspaper. Throughout those years, the ink from the Bastrop newspaper transferred onto Chapman’s hands and bled right into his veins. He recalls lugging bundles of newspapers back and forth from the press to the mailroom as a teenager. He later trained circulation directors who would subsequently make more than the Chapman boy. “There was always an odd job or two,” he recalled. Chapman went on to LSU, where he studied journalism. He was a news editor of the student newspaper in Baton Rouge, and he lined up a job as a circulation district manager at the

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now-defunct New Orleans States-Item even before he graduated. He had a line on a WILL CHAPMAN life partner, too. He and Gladys met at LSU and have now been married for 37 years. After working in New Orleans, to be nearer to Gladys, Chapman took a job with a group of weekly newspapers just north of Baton Rouge. That was just a pit stop on his way to New Iberia. May 1, 1980, was his first day after being hired as ad manager at The Daily Iberian. Thirty-six years later, he says he originally thought he would only be in New Iberia a couple of years as he thought he’d have to move on to find a publisher’s position. Continued on Page 3

BENEFITS

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WICK CORPORATE

INDEX Wick Corporate....................1-4

NEW FACES POSITION WICK FOR POSITIVE CHANGE Francis Wick, CEO

Wick Digital Media................... 5 The Argus Observer..............6-7 Arizona Range News.............8-9 Capital Journal..................10-11 The Daily Iberian................... 12 Green Valley News & Sahuarita Sun..................... 13 The Frontiersman.............14-15 The Copper Era & The Eastern Arizona Courier................16-18 The Douglas Dispatch............ 19 Sierra Vista Herald...........20-22 Central Design....................... 23 Montrose Daily Press.......24-25 Nogales International.......26-27 Wahpeton, Daily News.........................28-29 Half Moon Bay Review......30-31 The Williston Herald.........32-33 San Pedro Valley News.......... 34 Sidney Herald......................... 35 Lake Havasu, Today’s News Herald.........36-37

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Roanoke Rapids, The Daily Herald...............38-39

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As we close out 2016 and begin a new year, I’m reminded how many projects and changes have taken place within the Wick organization.

strong addition to the team, helping to train designers and communicate with the markets the various items occurring at CD.

STEPHANIE SPIESS joined the Wick team as publisher Since the beginning of in Sidney, Mont. Spiess March, the Wick executive brings great enthusiasm team has been focused on to the company on the filling key positions within digital side and underthe organization. As many stands the importance of a of you have already read, well-balanced and engagWick is very fortunate to FRANCIS WICK, CEO ing newspaper. have enlisted the leadership of some very exciting industry executives: Group publisher KEN HARTY recently took NICK MONICO joined Wick on July 11 as chief over the day-to-day publisher responsibility of operations officer. Most recently, Monico was Williston, N.D. working for Civitas Media overseeing its Ohio group. Two of the first characteristics you’ll TARA KLOSTREICH was promoted from note about Monico are his love for newspa- advertising director to general manager in Wahpeton, N.D. pering and dynamic sense of humor. Wasilla, Alaska, publisher DENNIS ANDERSON RON PARRA joined Wick on the July 5 as chief financial officer. Parra previously worked for was promoted to Alaska group publisher, having direct responsibility of the Anchorage the San Diego Union Tribune for 17 years, most Press and the Arctic Warrior. recently as controller. Parra’s understanding of forecasting of finances is as impressive as In all, Wick Communications is positioning his golf game. itself for the future with leaders who underOur very own ALESSIA ALAIMO was pro- stand how to navigate the opportunities and moted to digital supervisor. Alaimo brings a challenges that lie ahead. positive attitude and excitement around the As it relates to challenges, Wick Communiboundless digital opportunities that exist for cations has prided itself on offering best-inus moving forward. class health insurance. Over the past couple of years, this insurance has become increasCHARLES WEST, central design supervisor, ingly difficult to afford and, unfortunately, joined Wick on June 6 after a number of years we’re no longer in a position to do so. Wick at the Arizona Daily Star. West has been a


CHAPMAN Continued from Page 1

I’m looking forward to 2017; from my vantage point, 2016 has been a year of change. Wick has a lot of new faces, which creates phenomenal excitement over what’s to come. I’ve seen time and again recommendations how we can improve the value of our reach/ content/marketing from employees working day-in and day-out to make a difference.

Company CEO Francis Wick said Chapman would be missed throughout the organization. “We are grateful to Will Chapman, and the Chapman family, for their years of leadership and devotion to the New Iberia community,” Wick said. “Chapman’s oversight was second to none. He taught many employees how to think broader and manage better. “His teachings will have a lasting effect on the Wick company and on myself personally,” Wick said. The significance of Chapman’s retirement is felt well beyond the New Iberia city limits. He has been active in the Louisiana Press Association for many years and his colleagues outside of Wick Communications say he will be missed across the state. “He was instrumental in hiring me more than 20 years ago,” said Pamela Mitchell, executive director of the LPA. “He has been the advertising committee chairman forever. He was always able to see the bigger picture. “His retirement will be a tremendous loss for us,” Mitchell said. “Will has been a friend to many in the newspaper business in Louisiana,” said Garland Foreman, publisher of the Bunkie Record and president of the state press association. “He has had helpful insights that have helped all the newspapers through the years. He is a trusted champion of public records and journalism in Louisiana.” Chapman is clear that one of the things that kept him at The Daily Iberian all these years is the sense of family he felt within Wick Communications. “The Wick family and the Wick company have been great to me and my family,” he said. “They took a chance on making me the publisher of what was then their largest property.” Chapman is esteemed across the company as a man of great integrity who is both a stickler for detail and someone who can see the big picture.

“It was great to work with so many good people at the Wick office and at Wick newspapers around the country,” he said. “It was interesting how I was supposed to go into these papers and try to help them, but how routinely while I was there I’d fill up my notebook with good ideas I wanted to put to use in my own paper.” First and foremost, Chapman is a journalist. He has written more than 3,000 columns for the newspaper over the years and a like number of editorials. He notes that his newspaper has taken a stand on numerous important public issues. “The Wick family and the company have always been willing to fight for the public’s right to know and to defend issues important to a free press,” he said. “We had a few legal squabbles over the years and there was no hesitation that the company was going to defend the principles it thought important.” More often, The Daily Iberian has been engaged in the daily business of making New Iberia a better place. It has long given a Citizen of the Year award to a deserving local resident. It organizes a giving campaign each holiday season. And Chapman remembers learning years ago that there was no local harvesting mechanism in local hospitals to aid people who wished to give life by donating organs. The Daily Iberian involved local hospital administrators in a campaign to change that and held public meetings to encourage more donation. “I’ll never forget the man who stood up and announced, ‘I’m here because someone signed up to be an organ donor,’” Chapman recalled. Those are the moments Chapman says he remembers most.

“Sure, we have plenty of things that can aggravate someone, but it sure seems like the compliments and ‘thank you’ calls outnumber the complaints,” he said. WINTER 2016

My father, Robert Wick (the artist), always challenges me to recognize change takes time, making a difference takes time, and helping build a community takes time. Well, we’re all doing just that. I appreciate everything each and every one of our employees does for Wick. Have a wonderful Holiday season and here’s to a phenomenal 2017.

“I have enjoyed and really value my time at The Daily Iberian,” Chapman said. “The people with whom I have worked, the relationships I’ve made with them and others in the community (mean a lot to me).”

WICK CORPORATE

Human Resources Director, Tom Riebock, CFO Ron Parra, COO Nick Monico and myself have been evaluating what Wick Communications can afford while softening the impact on our employees’ day-to-day paycheck. These decisions are not made lightly and we understand and recognize the value the Wick insurance plan presents to our incredible employees. Thank you for understanding these decisions are an indication of the health insurance landscape and the increasing pressures a selffunded approach has taken on our company. Riebock writes further about the change in this edition of the Eagle.

As a group publisher, he provided leadership at various times for 13 newspapers in five states and recruited several current publishers and executives to the company.

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WICK CORPORATE

HEALTHCARE COSTS ARE RISING Tom Riebock, Human Resources Director

If you have followed the news, you are aware that medical insurance costs have been rising rather dramatically. Pharmacy costs are rising at double digit rates. The Affordable Care Act, Obamacare, has increased companies’ healthcare costs. Insurance companies are pulling out of the ACA marketplace because they are losing money and are looking to make up the shortfall by increasing their premiums. Individual penalties for not having insurance are increasing. This is called the Individual Shared Responsibility Payment, a fee for not having Minimum Essential Coverage. The penalty is as high as $2,085 for a family in 2016. In this difficult environment, Wick Communications has attempted to manage the medical insurance costs paid by the company and the contributions paid by the employees in fair and equitable manner.

WINTER 2016

For the past several years Wick has been self-insured. This means that the company pays actual claims costs and fixed costs for insurance administration in the same manner that it pays for all other expenses. High claims costs in 2016 have an adverse impact on the company’s bottom line. This year we have experienced claims that have cost the company hundreds of thousands of dollars. The number of employees insured by the company has become smaller over the past three years. The net result is an unreasonably high cost for medical insurance for a smaller group of employees.

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The company can no longer bear the risk of being selfinsured. We have asked Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona to quote premiums for a fully insured medical insurance plan. Fully insured means we pay a fixed premium during the year for full claims coverage. The company will know

it’s medical insurance costs through the fiscal year of 2017. We have evaluated premium costs on no less than nine plan designs. This involves evaluating plan designs that have varying deductibles, out-of-pocket expenses, coinsurTOM RIEBOCK ance (the cost sharing between the employee and the provider), and co-pays for office visits and prescriptions. We are finalizing our plan design for 2017. The plan for 2017 will increase deductibles and out-ofpocket expenses. We will attempt to keep co-pays for office visits and prescriptions at approximately the same levels as they are in 2016. Preventative medical services will remain 100% paid. The network of providers will remain Blue Cross Blue Shield. You will not have to change doctors or hospitals. Open enrollment will be held November 14 through November 23. The open enrollment announcement which will include the plan design and employee contribution requirements will be available October 31. Wick Communications is attempting to manage this expense and the expense borne by the employees in a fair and judicious manner.


WICK DIGITAL MEDIA

TYPES OF PROGRAMMATIC:

DISPLAY NETWORK: Visual ad placement appear on all times of platforms.

SEARCH NETWORK: Advertisment appears next to search results.

UNDERSTAND PROGRAMMATIC ADVERTISING

VIDEO ADS: Customer’s business comes to life in front of new customers on YouTube.

As many of you know, our advertising campaigns currently utilize DoubleClick for Publishers (DFP) to manage our online advertising throughout all Wick websites. The information necessary to set up a campaign through DFP correlates directly to the broad audience we can reach through DFP. You sell an ad campaign, you inform the digital department of the exposure and time frame, and you provide a creative ad. The ad is then made available to any user who visits that particular site. Programmatic Advertising takes this concept one step further by introducing audience demographics, allowing only specific users to be exposed to an advertiser’s ad. Advertisers will have the option to select the age, gender, and even location of their users. Additionally, advertisers can specify a schedule for their ad so it only runs during specific times of the day or even particular days of the week. Programmatic Advertising also gives advertisers the flexibility to determine their campaign objective and set up goals to maximize their return on investment. Speaking of investment, advertisers will now have the ability to not only specify their maximum budget, but have the power to to determine how quickly their budget is spent! Lastly, and maybe the most intriguing for advertisers, is that their ad will not be limited to only Wick Communication’s websites, but all websites with the potential of turning a specific user into a new customer. “How does that work?” you ask. Our Programmatic Advertising Campaign (PAC) is tied to one of the largest online search and media platforms in the world. Advertisers can determine their own keywords (or phrases), which the PAC analyzes, and determines the best placement for their ad. Any website that is determined to share similar interest to a specific user will qualify to show the advertiser’s ad.

REACHING THE RIGHT AUDIENCE

Wick Communications is growing its digital presence with a new offering for our advertisers: Programmatic Advertising! Targeting specific audiences will allow advertisers to not only reach more customers, but the right customers. Furthermore,

ANTHONY MORALES, WICK DIGITAL OPERATIONS SPECIALIST Office: 520.295.4230 Email: anthony.morales@wickcommunications.com

SUPPORT EMAIL: SUPPORT@WICKDIGITAL.ZENDESK.COM • WEB AD ORDER FORM: WICKDIGITAL.COM/WEBADS

WINTER 2016

ALESSIA ALAIMO, WICK DIGITAL MANAGER Office: 520.295.4240 • Cell: 520.730.3611 Email: alessia.alaimo@wickcommunications.com

advertisers can control the implementation format of their advertising campaign, and more importantly, have complete control over their advertising budget.

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THE ARGUS OBSERVER

FORMER PUBLISHER’S FAMILY VISITS ARGUS FACILITY WINTER 2016

Hunter Marrow | The Argus Observer

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Fran McLean brought visiting family members in July to tour The Argus Observer office where he was publisher from 1968 to 1997. Pictured, from left, are publisher John Dillon; McLean; Ed Oliver; Sonya and Robert “Bob” McLean, Fran’s brother;

Bob’s daughter Jennifer Oliver, and her son, Emmett. The family saw the press run, discovered how the newsroom makes front-page decisions and learned a little about the different papers that are part of Wick Communications.


THE ARGUS OBSERVER

STAYING INVOLVED WITH THE #MALHEURCOUNTYFAIR

Argus sales representatives, Brenton Peck and Kelly Jones, were at the Malheur County Fair this August to promote the #malheurcountyfair advertising program. PHOTO CREDIT: THE ARGUS OBSERVER

The Argus Observer

This year for the Malheur County Fair, The Argus Observer did an advertising promotion that other Oregon newspapers have done in the past and have had success with. The promotion was pretty simple. We went to our advertisers and sold ads that would run all week in the Argus, as well as in the Independent-Enterprise and the Treasure Valley Reminder during the fair. A front page story would then jump to an inside page of the paper, where all of these ads were featured.

To do that, we took three big screen TV’s to the fairgrounds that we placed in different locations. Alessia helped us partner with a web program called Zoomph that took all of the ads we posted on the Malheur County Fair’s facebook page and our Instagram feed and would show them on

all of these TV screens in rotation. The best part about this part of the promotion was that anyone who posted a picture to their own Instagram or Twitter feed or to the Malheur County Fair’s facebook page with #malheurcountyfair, would also be included in the rotation. Everyone at the fair who had a chance to be on the big screen liked this feature. We also had the zoomph set up on our website under #malheurcountyfair.

WINTER 2016

The ads were also featured on The Argus Observers Facebook and Instagram pages with #malheurcountyfair and a short quote about the business’s support for the fair.

We wanted to add another feature to this program to give our advertisers another place that their ad would be seen by fair patrons and also add an interactive feature with everyone at the fair.

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ARIZONA RANGE NEWS

Range news ARIZONA

WILLCOX • SAN SIMON • SUNSITES • BOWIE • COCHISE • DRAGOON

RANGE NEW EXCELS IN ADVERTISING CONTEST Editorial also takes second in community service Ainslee S. Wittig | Arizona Range News The Arizona Range News placed second in General Excellence at the Arizona Newspapers Association’s Excellence in Advertising contest, held Sept. 23 in Phoenix. The non-daily, circulation under 3,500 category Willcox newspaper was boosted by a first place for best paid ad series (Janet’s Shoes), a second place for best classifieds section and three third place awards for best black & white ad (Northern Cochise Community Hospital Drive Thru), most effective use of small space (Janet’s Shoes), best online ad – static (Holiday Inn Express).

WINTER 2016

Those awards went to Steve Reno and wickdesign.net for ads and DeeDee Hicks for the classifieds section.

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In the Arizona Newspapers Association’s Better Newspapers Contest, held Sept. 24 in Phoenix, the newspaper took second place in community service/journalistic achievement for stories related to cost-cutting measures to save the rural local hospital, including closing the 40-year-old nursing home, written predominantly by reporter Carol Broeder.

The Range News also won third-place awards in departmental news and copywriting excellence, as well as page design excellence. Our publisher is Monica Watson. In individual competition, Managing Editor Ainslee S. Wittig got second place for best sports story, “Parents offer input on retaining football coach.” “I am very proud of our small staff for all of the awards we received. But mostly I am proud that for many years, we have consistently received

The staff at Arizona Range News shared in receiving awards from the Arizona Newspapers Association. From left: Steve Reno, Carol Broeder, DeeDee Hicks and Ainslee Wittig. PHOTO CREDIT: ARN FILE PHOTO

an award for community service/journalist achievement,” said Wittig.

“We care about our community and it shows.” -Managing Editor Ainslee S. Wittig


ARIZONA RANGE NEWS

ARN’S RENO PRESENTS AWARDS DURING WILLCOX’S REX ALLEN DAYS Arizona Range News Advertising Representative Steve Reno presents retired 30-year City Clerk Cristina Whelan as Willcox’s Favorite Daughter for 2016, at the Willcox Cowboy Hall of Fame Dinner Sept. 29. Her granddaughter joins her on the stage. The award was sponsored by the Willcox Schools Alumni. PHOTO CREDIT: CAROL BROEDER

PHOTO CREDIT: CAROL BROEDER

PHOTO CREDIT: AINSLEE S. WITTIG

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Also during the Cowboy Hall of Fame event, singer/musician Rex Allen Jr., son of Rex Allen, for whom the three-day festival now in its 65th year is named, sings his song – and Arizona’s state song, “I Love You, Arizona.”

Reno presents the Willcox Favorite Son award, sponsored by the Arizona Range News, to restaurant owner and donor to numerous sports and ag-realated organizations, Jeff Willey.

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THE CAPITAL JOURNAL

C

The voice of central South Dakota since 1881

CAP JOURNAL STAFF RECOGNITION COMMITTEE GETS TO WORK Capital Journal Staff Capital Journal staffers have been getting out of the office together more lately thanks to the efforts of a new workplace committee aimed at recognizing the good work the newspaper’s employees do. The Staff Recognition Committee, helmed by Business Manager Eve Smith, has been hard at work planning events and organizing teams to play in bowling leagues or to shoot in sporting clay leagues in the Pierre and Fort Pierre communities.

WINTER 2016

Pictured above: Eve Smith, Capital Journal business manager gets ready to roll during the newspaper bowling team’s first night of competition.

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Pictured to the right: Kassandra Nyreen, Capital Journal advertising sales representative, takes a shot at a clay target while competing with the Capital Journal Sporting Clay shooting team.

The idea is to give the newspaper’s staff an elevated sense of community and promote teamwork, Smith said. So far, the committee has hosted an employee picnic and an employee bowling night. Smith has helped put together two bowling teams comprised of newspaper staff and four staff members including Publisher John Clark participated in a sporting clay shooting league in September.


Capital Journal Staff

THE CAPITAL JOURNAL

NEW FACES WELCOMED AT THE CAPITAL JOURNAL

JON GOLDFARB

The Capital Journal welcomed a new sports reporter in August. Jon Goldfarb came to Pierre from Livingston, New Jersey. He graduated with a degree in communications from Ramapo College last May.

He will be a valuable asset to our team as he improves his craft through the coming months. We’ve also brought, Beth Zilverberg on board as a news designer and copy editor. She too, hit the ground running and has become an invaluable member of the team.

WINTER 2016

Goldfarb was forced into the deep end in his first few days on the job with the start of the Fall high school sports season. He’s got two high schools to cover, each of which has football, volleyball and cross country teams. Pierre’s T.F. Riggs High School also has boys and girls soccer teams, golf and

there are a couple of school affiliated club softball teams to cover in Pierre too.

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THE DAILY IBERIAN WINTER 2016

IBERIAN PUBLISHES DESPITE RISING FLOODWATERS

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Daily Iberian writers were able to keep the public informed about August flooding in the area via the newspaper’s website despite not being able to get to work for days, in some cases, because of the flooding.

Daily Iberian front page on the first day of publication following August flooding in Louisiana. A follow-up front page as floodwaters continued to plague South Louisiana.


GREEN VALLEY NEWS

MARY LUNG: Mary joined the advertising department after a recent move from Ventura County, Calif. She has been in sales for 35 years and in advertising sales for over 20 years. She most recently was a district sales manager for GTE California. Mary has been married 28 years, has one son and a pug.

KIM SMITH: Kim moved to Tucson in 1983 from Michigan. She graduated from the University of Arizona with a Bachelor’s Degree in Journalism. Before joining the Green Valley News and Sahuarita Sun as a general assignment reporter, she covered cops and courts at five newspapers in three states.

NICHOLE COLEMAN: Nichole was born into an Air Force family and lived in Germany 11 years. She was born in Victorville, Calif., and moved to Utah when she was 17, and lived there until February. She worked for Hertz Car Rental for five years in Utah and then Dollar Car Rental in Tucson before coming to work at the Green Valley News/Sahuarita Sun ad department.

& THE SAHUARITA SUN

NEW IN THE OFFICE MARY LUNG

IN A PICKLE

GV News wins media celebrity match! Green Valley News/Sahuarita Sun editor Dan Shearer had been sparring with radio talk show host Chris DeSimone on the air for months. DeSimone poked fun at the communities’ love for Pickleball; Shearer defended it. Then Shearer issued a challenge: Come on down to Green Valley and we’ll settle it on the court.

PHOTO CREDIT: DAVID ROOKHUYZEN

DeSimone took him up on it, and with a crowd circling the court, they went at it, with members of the Pickleball Club rotating in as doubles partners. The Green Valley News even live streamed the faceoff onto Facebook. Host Green Valley Recreation, the newspaper and the radio station squeezed a lot of great PR out of the match, and it was recounted in the paper and on the air for weeks. Shearer won the match, but the community was the real winner, with lots of positive exposure and even more fun.

NICHOLE COLEMAN

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Green Valley News/Sahuarita Sun editor Dan Shearer (left) and radio talk host Chris DeSimone.

KIM SMITH

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MAT-SU VALLEY FRONTIERSMAN

Non-Cabbage Fairies, from left: Advertising Representative Nicole Anderson, Managing Editor Matt Hickman, Publisher Dennis Anderson, Advertising Representative Tawni Davis and Advertising Representative Petra Albecker.

WINTER 2016

FRONTIERSMAN FRONT AND CENTER AS ALASKA STATE FAIR ROLLS THROUGH 14

Matt Hickman

The Cabbage Fairies, famous as cheerleaders of the Giant Cabbage Contest at the Alaska State Fair in Palmer. - Home to the world’s largest cabbages - Take a moment to pose with Mat-Su Valley Frontiersman staff.

FRONTIERSMAN A SPONSOR OF DOGGY DAY AT LOCAL TRAINING FACILITY Mat-Su Valley Frontiersman advertising representative Petra Albecker pets a dog at the 8th annual Doggy Day in Wasilla. More than 300 attended the event, as Frontiersman staff showed off the paper’s new tall-tab format. PHOTO CREDIT: MATT HICKMAN


Mat-Su Valley Frontiersman completes relaunch

MAT-SU VALLEY FRONTIERSMAN

IT WAS HUUUUUGE! Matt Hickman After months of preparation and hype, the Mat-Su Valley Frontiersman pulled off its much-anticipated relaunch to considerable acclaim. Though not without a few hiccups in production on opening night, nearly 10,000 editions of the Sunday, Sept. 4 paper hit the streets, more than triple the previous circulation. With the relaunch of this ‘blended model’ of circulation, which delivered papers to subscribers and targeted non-subscribers alike, came a new design, as the Frontiersman switched from its traditional broadsheet page model to a tall tab. This new design allows for a more robust and colorful presentation of editorial content and advertising alike.

The first edition of the new tall tab version of the Mat-Su Valley Frontiersman hit the streets on Sept. 4. WINTER 2016

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& THE COPPER ERA EASTERN ARIZONA COURIER

COURIER RAISING FUNDS FOR READING PROJECT Eastern Arizona Courier and Copper Era Circulation Manager James Copeland said in an effort to raise funds for the Newspapers in Education program, he’s initiated a program where people can purchase “apples,” with the funds going completely to providing newspapers for schoolchildren. “Partnering with the community, we’ll be able to get newspapers into the classroom. And that’s one more tool we can give our teachers,” Copeland said. Teachers use the newspapers for a number of classroom activities, from learning basic reading skills and reading comprehension, to current events, history and even consumer education and budgeting.

WINTER 2016

Copeland initiated the apple program at the Graham County Back-to-School Fair, and a number of apples have already been purchased.

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“People can direct their donation to go to all our area schools, to a specific school or even to a specific teacher and classroom,” Copeland said. Apples can be purchased for $5, $10 or $20. All donations are tax deductible.

Anyone making a $20 donation will also be eligible for 10 percent off a new subscription to Eastern Arizona Courier or Copper Era. “We really appreciate everyone who has supported the Newspapers in Education program so far,” Copeland said. “We believe it’s important to support our schools’ reading programs, and we’re happy to see others in the community feel the same.” The Newspapers in Education apple program will continue through the end of the year. Anyone interested in making a taxdeductible donation is asked to call Copeland at 928-428-2560 or visit the Courier/Copper Era offices at 301A E. Highway 70, in Safford.

Pictured above: Eastern Arizona Courier/The Copper Era sales associate Claudia Rios hangs “apples” on the NIE tree. The apples represent tax-deductible donations to the Newspapers in Education program, supporting area schools. Pictured Below: Courier Business Manager Stephanie Jones takes a donation from Paula Craig for the Newspapers In Education program during the August Back-to-School Fair.


Eastern Arizona Courier was front and center at the Graham County Back-to-School Fair on Aug. 6, helping parents and educators get ready for the 2016-17 school year.

Courier staff also solicited donations for the Newspapers In Education program, which provides teachers with copies of the Courier to be used in daily lessons.

Pictured above: Eastern Arizona Courier Circulation Manager James Copeland helps distribute backpacks donated by the Courier.

Pictured to the right: Business Manager Stephanie Jones, Publisher Monica Watson and sales associate Claudia Rios distribute free school supplies at the Back-to-School Fair.

& THE COPPER ERA

The Courier donated hundreds of backpacks distributed free to school children, and filled the backpacks with school supplies, including notebooks, pencils, glue sticks and other essentials.

EASTERN ARIZONA COURIER

COURIER DOES ITS PART FOR EDUCATION

EAC NEW STAFF Eastern Arizona Courier and The Copper Era welcomed three new staff members in September. T. CORY HOISINGTON: joined Eastern Arizona Courier as sports writer.

REZA JAZI: is the Courier’s new general assignment reporter.

T. CORY HOISINGTON

RICKY CRISP

REZA JAZI

WINTER 2016

RICKY CRISP: is the new sports writer for The Copper Era.

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& THE COPPER ERA WINTER 2016

EASTERN ARIZONA COURIER

Eastern Arizona Courier/The Copper Era Publisher Monica Watson, left, chats with a reader about what the reader would like to see in the Classified section of the Courier, during a recent Reader Advisory Committee meeting held at the Graham County Senior Center.

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Eastern Arizona Courier/The Copper Era Managing Editor David Bell listens to suggested improvements to the two papers during the Reader Advisory Committee meeting held in June.

Eastern Arizona Courier general assignment reporter David Sowders demonstrates his dedication to election coverage, jumping on a bicycle in 100 degreeplus temperatures to follow congressional candidate Wendy Rogers when she pedaled her way around Graham County in June.

Eastern Arizona Courier sales associate Armando Avalos volunteered for the “difficult� duty of driving the grand marshal of the Graham County Fourth of July Parade in a 2016 Corvette.


Douglas Dispatch Reporter Aaliyah Montoya completed her first feature series; Women in Uniform, this past August. The series introduced readers to the professional women of the Douglas Police Department, profiling five female officers, the police dispatchers team, and the department’s longestemployed person, Lucy Perez, Supervisor of Records and Communication.

Montoya spent numerous hours learning not only about the duties and sacrifices of the department, but the personal lives of those who defend the city. She participated in multiple ridealongs, sat in on emergency phone calls, and witnessed firsthand the community’s day-to-day criminal activity. “Working on this series was entertaining, and heartwarming,” Montoya said. “I’ve never spoken with a team that is so dedicated, and in love with what they do.”

It was noted that women make up only 13 percent of all sworn in police officers nationwide, reported by the U.S. Department of Justice. Segment two; Invested in Douglas, reveals the city’s highest criminal activity involves growing drug academics, drugs in youth, and the neighboring drug cartels. Despite their cautiousness, the female officers, and dispatchers of the department agreed that they feel safe to live, and raise their families locally. “This series came during a time when law enforcement has been put under a serious spotlight by the country,” said Montoya. “I wanted to show that locally, our police department has a unique and healthy relationship with its civilians.”

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In the series’ first segment; DPD leads by example, the reporter highlighted the significance of the department’s gender diversity.

THE DOUGLAS DISPATCH

DISPATCH DOES SERIES HONORING WOMEN IN UNIFORM

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SIERRA VISTA HERALD

Herald/Review publisher Manuel Coppola displays the awards won by the advertising department at the ANA awards ceremony in September.

Herald/Review staff with their awards for advertising excellence. From left, Kandise Craig, Melanie Sagia, Becky Bjork, Julie Ramirez, Beth Hanna, Cathy Heiner and Fanny Weiland.

HERALD/REVIEW WINS STATE PRESS AWARDS

Herald/Review reporter Derek Jordan, right, accepts an editorial excellence award from Rebecca Bradner, ANA board member and publisher of Wick sister paper Green Valley News, during the ANA awards ceremony in September.

Newsroom, advertising departments net 18 industry awards

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The Sierra Vista Herald’s editorial and advertising departments earned 18 awards, including seven first-place accolades, from the Arizona Newspapers Association 2016 Better Newspapers Contest and Excellence in Advertising competition. Award winners were honored at a reception in Phoenix on Sept. 23-24.

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The Herald/Review’s newsroom earned second place in the overall General Excellence category among daily newspapers with a circulation under 25,000, as well as first place in the Departmental News and Copy Editing Excellence and Community Service/Journalistic Achievement categories.

The editorial department also received a second place award for Editorial Page Excellence and third place award for Best Use of Photography.

a circulation under 25,000, including taking first in the Best Paid Ad Series (color), Best Public Notice Section and Best Classified Section categories.

Individual winners in the newsroom included sports and entertainment editor Steve Stockmar, who took second place for Best Feature Story. Reporter Derek Jordan was awarded third place for Best Sustained Coverage or Series. Photo editor Mark Levy earned both first and second place for Best News Photograph, as well as first and second place for Best Feature Photograph.

Staff also took second in the Best Special Section, Best Online Ad (animated) and Best Pro Bono/Public Service Ad categories.

The Herald/Review’s advertising department took home eight awards among daily newspapers with

Editorial and advertising contest entries were judged by the Nevada Press Association.

Individual winners included Melanie Sagia, who earned first for Best Classified Section, and Julie Ramirez, who took second for Best Black and White Ad.


SIERRA VISTA HERALD

COPPOLA NAMED HERALD/REVIEW PUBLISHER Sierra Vista

In June, Manuel Coppola was named the new publisher of the Sierra Vista Herald/Bisbee Daily Review. Along with his new role, Coppola remains the publisher of the Nogales International.

“I’m proud to have Manuel lead our flagship paper,” said Wick Communications CEO Francis Wick, former Herald/ Review publisher. “He embodies what every good publisher exhibits: curiosity, generosity, and a will to lead.”

as the sole reflection of what that community is all about and what it has to offer.”

MANUEL COPPOLA, PUBLISHER

Coppola was born in Nogales, Ariz., and interned at the International after graduating from Northern Arizona University in 1985, eventually becoming the newspaper’s managing editor. He holds a bachelor’s degree in newspaper editorial journalism with an emphasis in political science.

He returned to the International as managing editor in 2004 and became its publisher the following year. “Over the years we have seen our industry evolve to the point where even the word ‘newspaper’ sounds archaic,” he said. “We know that nationally the number of print subscribers continues to decline but the need for good journalism and a medium for advertisers to target their local markets has never been greater. In response, we have built up an online and multi-platform presence which in most communities takes the lion’s share of web traffic.”

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“I have had some wonderful mentors who instilled how important a newspaper is to both readers and advertisers,” Coppola said. “Newspapers may not define a community, but they serve many times

In 1992, he ventured outside the newspaper world and purchased a restaurant that he ran for 14 years. Coppola said that experience provided a “clear perspective of the challenges of small business” and helped him realize “how critical it is to partner with your local newspaper for continued success.”

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SIERRA VISTA HERALD

STAFF VOLUNTEER AS SERVERS AT SIZZLE

Annual fundraiser benefits needy children in southeast Arizona Herald/Review opinions editor Eric Petermann and publisher Manuel Coppola served drinks for a good cause on Sept. 17 as volunteer waiters for the 27th annual Sizzle girls night out. The event supports Just Kids, Inc., a foundation of San Pedro Kiwanis Club. The foundation’s goal is to help needy children in Cochise County, through programs like Stocking Stuffers, Gifts from the Heart and more. San Pedro Kiwanis is an all-volunteer organization, with 99 percent of its budget spent directly on the children it helps. This year’s Sizzle was themed from the ’80s — “Girls Just Wanna Have Fun — with 250 women filling the Knights of Columbus Hall to enjoy an evening of live music and dinner, along with dancing, gaming and participating in silent auctions and raffles.

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Meanwhile, the all-male waitstaff dressed in tuxedos and pink bowties served drinks and earned tips that all went back into the foundation’s fundraiser.

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“As a first-time waiter, it was a great experience in seeing ‘the other side’ of women when they collectively let their hair down,” Petermann said. “This fundraising event generated enough to assure more than 900 kids received Christmas presents last year. Hopes are high that waiters earned enough in tips this year to beat that goal.” A recent tradition at Sizzle is a mystery celebrity special guest who makes an appearance near the

end of the evening. This year’s highlighted guest was former University of Arizona men’s basketball coach Lute Olson. Coppola said getting a photo and autograph from the legendary Olson was a highlight of the night. “It had been a long time since I had waited on tables, but it was like riding a bike,” Coppola said. “I loved that the guests were so generous with their tips, knowing their dollars would go directly to helping out the less fortunate in our community.” Coppola said he was also “blown away” by the dedication of the organizers, who work tirelessly to sell tickets and bring in sponsors for the event each year. “They never lose sight that it all benefits hundreds of children and their families, but neither do they lose sight that when the event all comes together, it’s a blast for everyone involved,” Coppola added.

Pictured above: From left, Herald/Review managing editor Liz Manring, publisher Manuel Coppola and opinions editor Eric Petermann take a selfie prior to the start of Sizzle. Pictured bellow: Herald/Review publisher Manuel Coppola has on his dancing shoes during Sizzle.


CENTRAL DESIGN

PUTTING A FACE ON

CENTRAL DESIGN

GREG WILHITE

CHARLES WEST

LEAD DESIGNER ❖ 15 YRS EXPERIENCE

JODI CEASON

DESIGNER ❖ 21 YRS EXPERIENCE

❖ 16 YRS EXPERIENCE ❖

MIGUEL CASTILLO

DESIGNER ❖ 22 YRS EXPERIENCE

SHARI CHASE

DESIGNER ❖ 20+ YRS EXPERIENCE

DENISE UTTER

LEAD DESIGNER ❖ 14 YRS EXPERIENCE

SHELLY MCGUIRE

DESIGNER ❖ 15+ YRS EXPERIENCE

JUSTIN ST. JOHN

DESIGNER ❖ 18 YRS EXPERIENCE

AL URINA

DESIGNER ❖ 15 YRS EXPERIENCE

GABE ARMENTA

DESIGNER ❖ 14 YRS EXPERIENCE

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STEVE LOPEZ

DESIGNER ❖ 7 YRS EXPERIENCE

OPERATIONS MANAGER

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MONTROSE DAILY PRESS

MANAGING EDITOR ANNOUNCED A familiar face is rejoining the Montrose Daily Press. Publisher Vincent Laboy announced the hiring of Matt Lindberg as the Daily Press’ next managing editor. “We are very happy to have Matt rejoin us,” said Laboy. “He brings experience, a creative eye, solid story writing and editing skills and a love for our community.” Lindberg worked at the Montrose Press from 2008-13, serving in many roles.

MATT LINDBERG

He started as a sports reporter, followed by education reporter/paginator and then sports editor, before transitioning to news editor. While in Montrose, Lindberg was named Employee of the Year twice and part of several award-winning newsroom staffs. For the last three years, Lindberg served as managing editor of The Daily Herald, a sister paper of the Daily Press located in Roanoke Rapids, N.C.

NEW AND IMPROVED The Montrose Daily Press is pleased to introduce our newest team members of our Editorial, Press and Advertising teams. RICHARD SEIFERD is the new business manager. He is originally from Colorado Springs, but moved to the Western Slope with his family because of the beauty and serenity of the area. Anything to do with the outdoors is his passion and is looking forward to exploring all the scenic areas of the Uncompahgre Valley. “I am looking forward to growing my professional career here at the Montrose Daily Press,” he said. PATRICIA EDEN is new to our advertising sales department. She moved to Montrose a little more than a year ago because of the rich sense of community. She enjoys building relationships. In her leisure time when she is not at her child’s soccer games, she takes advantage of the myriad of outdoor activities that encompass the beautiful area of the Western Slope.

“While I haven’t worked directly with Matt, his work is known throughout Wick. We are pleased that The Daily Herald worked with us to get Matt back to Montrose,” Laboy said. Lindberg will be joined by his family, which features his wife, Sarah; 5-yearold son, David; 1-year-old daughter, Riley; and their dog, Bella.

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He said he’s excited about coming back to Montrose and rejoining the Daily Press family.

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“Montrose is home — our son is a native, our dog is a native. The Montrose Daily Press is home,” Lindberg said. “We have a lot of great memories of Montrose and Olathe. I am eager to join the team, and look forward to help building upon the newspaper’s rich legacy of providing the best local news coverage. I appreciate Mr. Laboy for providing me the opportunity to come back and be part of the Montrose team.”

RICHARD SEIFERD

PATRICIA EDEN


MONTROSE DAILY PRESS

ELIZABETH BROWN joined the advertising department as the advertising assistant at the end of August. She moved to Montrose from Wyoming. So far she’s a little in love with the Western Slope, and is greatly looking forward to winters that aren’t 40 below zero. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in English and is a closet creative writer. Her background is in marketing and customer service, but what she really loves to do is help people become the best version of themselves. MITCH LEBER came on as our apprentice pressman. He is a Montrose native, but moved to Texas after high school. He finally made it back to Montrose as he loves the snow and not the heat of Texas. He said he is really enjoying his time here at the press. RAYLA MCSHANER is our new Insert Operator. She is originally from Grand Junction, so she has spent her entire life on the western slope of Colorado. She enjoys playing video games in her spare time as well as going hiking in the many scenic places western Colorado has to offer. BEN DARBE joined the advertising department as an advertising assistant. Two months later he stepped into the advertising representative position. He was born in Colorado Springs, but has lived most of his life on the Western Slope. He loves every chance he gets to spend time with his wife and son, whether it is going outdoors or just staying home. One thing Ben needs to let everyone know when they meet is he is a huge Carolina Panthers fan, which is very hard when living so close to the Denver Broncos.

BEN DARBE ELIZABETH BROWN

LINDSAY FLEBBE MITCH LEBER

LINDSAY FLEBBE is another of our new insert operators, she started 8/30/16 and she used to work for a company that cut stone and tile.

BETH MCCORKLE RAYLA MCSHANER

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BETH MCCORKLE is our digital marketing specialist. She was born in Denver and grew up Castle Rock before moving to Montrose in 2012, calling it the best decision she made. “I have spent my career in Information Technology much of it as an IT project manager but one of the main reasons we moved to Montrose was so we could slow down and become more involved in our community, and working at the Daily Press is giving me that opportunity,” she said. “We love to travel, work in our yard, garden and spend time with friends.”

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NOGALES INTERNATIONAL

The Nogales International was recognized for excellence in editorial content, design and advertising at Saturday’s 2016 Arizona Newspapers Association awards ceremony. From left: Advertising representative Maria Castillo, graphic designer Priscilla Bolaños, managing editor Jonathan Clark, reporter Paulina Pineda and advertising representative Carmen Ibarra. PHOTO CREDIT: KENDAL BLUST

NI WINS 21 PRIZES IN STATE NEWSPAPER CONTESTS

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Nogales International

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Nogales International Publisher Manuel C. Coppola and Designer Priscilla Bolaños display some of the awards won at the Excellence in Advertising contest. PHOTO CREDIT: DAVID BELL

The Nogales International and its staffers won 21 prizes at the Arizona Newspapers Association’s annual convention last weekend in Phoenix, including first place for general excellence in the ANA’s 2016 Excellence in Advertising competition and second place for general excellence in the 2016 Better Newspapers Contest. Page designer Priscilla Bolaños won seven first-place prizes for her work creating advertisements and special sections, while individual

reporting awards came in areas ranging from investigative to sports reporting. In the Better Newspapers Contest, the NI finished first among the state’s small newspapers in the categories of Editorial Page Excellence and Departmental News and Copywriting Excellence. The paper took second place for Reporting and Newswriting Excellence, Best Use of Photography and Page Design Excellence.


NOGALES INTERNATIONAL

In the individual categories, reporter Paulina Pineda won two awards in the Investigative Reporting competition. She took second place for “In denying harassment, Silva admits questionable conduct,” a report on scandal and lawsuit at the County Attorney’s Office, and third place for “Patagonia’s profuse ticketing of Mexicans draws scrutiny,” which highlighted a traffic enforcement practice that took advantage of a grey area in Sonoran transit regulation. Pineda and former reporters Murphy Woodhouse and Norma Gonzalez teamed up to win a first-place prize in Best Multimedia Storytelling for their “Food trucks of Santa Cruz County” series featuring stories, photos, video and an interactive map. In another collective effort, Pineda, Woodhouse and Publisher Manuel C. Coppola won third place in Best Sustained Coverage or Series for a collection of stories about the effects of the weakening Mexican peso on the local economy. Gonzalez was the first-place finisher in the Best Team, Sport or Sports Beat Coverage category for her coverage the 2015 Little League Intermediate Division West Regional Tournament in Nogales that included game stories and features. Woodhouse won third place in Enterprise Reporting with “From $300 to $50,000 per load, smuggling wages range widely,” a look at the ground-level economics of the local cross-border drug trade, and managing editor Jonathan Clark finished first in Best Column, Analysis or Commentary for “An exclusive campaign stop,” an editorial about a visit to Nogales by presidential candidate Bernie Sanders. The Arizona Newspapers Association contests included items published May 1, 2015 to April 30, 2016. The Nogales International participated in the contests’ Division 1, which includes papers with print circulations of 3,500 or less. EXCELLENT ADS In the Excellence in Advertising contest, Bolaños won first place in the Best Black & White Ad competition for an ad she designed for the Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) program, and in the Best Color Ad category for a Villa’s Market advertisement.

Bolaños also took first place for Best Special Section with the NI’s Christmas Coloring Book and for Best Newspaper Promotion Ad (“Find one here!”).

COPPOLA TO LEAD ANA Also at the ANA’s annual conference in Phoenix, Coppola was named board president of the Arizona Newspapers Association. The Phoenix-based ANA is a nonprofit trade association representing more than 115 Arizona newspapers. The successor to the Arizona Press Association of 1905 and the Arizona Daily Newspaper Association of 1922, the ANA was established in 1930 and incorporated in 1956. It is governed by an 11-member board of directors elected by the member newspapers. Coppola has actively participated in ANA’s annual battle in the Arizona ­Legislature in favor of government transparency through p­ ublished legal/public notices. “Newspapers are best positioned to provide p­rinted, unalterable legal notices that preserve for the record the business of government as well as corporations that can potentially and profoundly affect our communities,” he said. “Any attempt by elected officials to undermine this mission is an affront to the Democratic principal of open government.”

NOGALES INTERNATIONAL BANNER A Nogales International banner was prominently displayed in the main exhibit hall during the 101st annual Santa Cruz County Fair, Sept. 16-18 in Sonoita, Ariz. The NI was a sponsor of the annual event and graphic designer Priscilla Bolaños designed the fair program. PHOTO CREDIT: JONATHAN CLARK

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She also was the top finisher in the categories of Best Paid Ad Series – Color (“You Have the Power” for the County Attorney’s Office), Most Effective Use of a Small Space (Villa’s Market) and Best Online Ad (“Male victims of violence” for the County Attorney’s Office).

The Arizona Newspapers Association contests included items published May 1, 2015 to April 30, 2016. The Nogales International participated in the contests’ Division 1, which includes papers with print circulations of 3,500 or less.

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WAHPETON DAILY NEWS

Paula Gilliam, left, is the new circulation clerk for the Daily News, and Merry Bruneau is the circulation manager.

PAULA GILLIAM was recently hired as

the circulation clerk for the Daily News. She grew up in Wahpeton. After graduation, “many, many years ago,� Paula was fortunate to live in different places where she met wonderful people at various jobs. The knowledge and experience gained has helped her grow personally and professionally. Before being hired at the Daily News, Paula worked at Forum Communications in Fargo in circulation as a customer service representative. The experience gained at the Forum helped her transition into the Daily News, she said.

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Paula is blessed with a 17-year-old daughter, Maggie, who is a senior in high school.

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She is engaged to be married to Alan Wallace. A wedding date has yet to be determined.

MERRY BRUNEAU

was promoted to circulation manager for the Daily News of Wahpeton, North Dakota, and Breckenridge, Minnesota. She grew up in Minnetonka, Minnesota, and moved to Kent, Minnesota, in May 2013. She has been married to her husband, Gary, for 38 years and has two wonderful children who blessed them with three energetic grandchildren. She worked for a greenhouse in Minnetonka until they moved to Kent, at which time she worked for James M. Anderson Ltd for two years before joining the Daily News as a circulation clerk.


He brought an exciting energy and his vision of the company to the paper. He and Publisher Ken Harty address Daily News employees, helping them lay a brick to build a foundation.

WAHPETON DAILY NEWS

FRANCIS WICK VISITED THE DAILY NEWS IN WAHPETON JUNE 1

THE DAILY NEWS FORUM The Daily News candidate forum was held Thursday, Sept. 22 at Breckenridge High School. The event was for candidates in the contested races in Breckenridge and Wilkin County, Minnesota, who will be in the Nov. 8 general election. State legislative candidates for District 12 and 12A were also invited to the forum.

The public was invited to the forum. We asked our guests to submit anonymous written questions

The Wilkin County Commissioner candidates took the stage first, followed by the Breckenridge Mayoral candidates. Rep. Backer and Sen. Westrom followed and concluded the evening. Short breaks were held in between each group of candidates. The candidate forum was conducted using the guidelines from the League of Women Voters Minnesota.

Daily News publisher Ken Harty moderated a candidates forum Thursday, Sept. 22 in Breckenridge, Minn. Candidates for mayor, Wilkin County Commission and two of the state races attended. WINTER 2016

Breckenridge Mayoral candidates Stacey Hennen and Russell Wilson, Wilkin County Commissioner candidates Dan Swedlund, Eric Klindt, Dennis Larson and Bryan Van Tassel, and Minnesota District 12A Rep. Jeff Backer (R), incumbent, and District 12 Sen. Torrey Westrom (R), incumbent, took part in the forum. Democratic legislative challengers Jay McNamar and Russ Hinrichs had previously scheduled commitments and were unable to attend.

which were posed to the candidates by the moderator, publisher Ken Harty.

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HALF MOON BAY REVIEW

FEEDBACK FROM THE ADMIRAL

Magazine photos, story get noticed by Coast Guard brass

A Coast Guard source says the Pacifica magazine cover story was well received.

Clay Lambert It’s not every day that you hear that the commanding officer of one of the nation’s military branches has read – and liked – your story. We were thrilled to hear that U.S. Coast Guard Admiral Paul Zukunft appreciated a recent Pacifica magazine story and took time to email our sources at Air Station San Francisco just to say as much.

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The story was the idea of former Half Moon Bay Review photographer and current freelancer Paolo Vescia. He called editor Clay Lambert to offer photos of the Coast Guard’s regular cliff training exercises at a nearby park. Lambert couldn’t say “yes” fast enough and between the two of them, they produced a compelling cover story.

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The two main sources were Lt. Amanda Harris and rescue swimmer Corey Fix, who were very generous with their time as the story came together. After it was published, Vescia and Lambert got an email from Harris. “I just wanted to say thank you for the fantastic article on our vertical surface training at Mori Point,” Harris wrote.

“It came together beautifully, photos and text. I really appreciate your work on this to pain a complete picture. The Commandant of the Coast Guard, Admiral Zukunft, actually read the article and sent Corey and I an email to tell us how much he enjoyed it.” The Review covers Coast Guard rescues regularly and Lambert is hopeful that the story was not only educational and beautiful to look at but also builds bridges with an important federal agency at work in the area.

Former Half Moon Bay Review photographer Paolo Vescia took spectacular photos to go with a story about Coast Guard training conducted locally.


Former intern mentions Wick experience Clay Lambert The Half Moon Bay Review merited mention in a classroom setting in Karachi, Pakistan, recently. It happened at the Institute for Business Administration in that bustling international city.

Pakistani journalist Saman Khan recalls her experience in Half Moon Bay for students of her first journalism class.

Saman Khan is a native of Pakistan but, as a graduate student of journalism at Stanford, interned at the Half Moon Bay Review in 2012. She is currently a desk editor for The Herald, one of Pakistan’s most widely read monthly magazines. It is well respected among Pakistani expatriate communities around the world.

In August, she accepted a part-time job teaching journalism at Karachi’s Institute of Business Administration. We at the Review thought it was interesting that she planned to open her teaching assignment with a story from Half Moon Bay.

HALF MOON BAY REVIEW

FROM HALF MOON BAY TO KARACHI

HALF MOON BAY HOME TO HONEYMOONERS Two reporters married over summer Clay Lambert For a time in August and September, the Half Moon Bay Review was likely the only newspaper in the country that could boast that its entire news staff was out on honeymoon. Both news reporters – Carina Woudenberg and Kaitlyn Bartley – were married in August and took their honeymoons soon after. While Woudenberg’s had been on the newspaper calendar for the better part of a year, Bartley had just started work at the Review.

Pictured above: Half Moon Bay Review reporter Kaitlyn Bartley married Christopher Bartley over the summer and the couple honeymooned in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, in August.

Pictured below: Mark Noack and Carina Woudenberg enjoy a honeymoon in Europe over the summer.

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Woudenberg began as an intern at the Review nearly 10 years ago. She did some freelance in the intervening years and was hired fulltime in 2015… taking the seat vacated by her soon-to-be husband, Mark Noack. Noack worked as a reporter at the Review for about 10 years. In fact, the two met on an assignment when Noack interviewed

Woudenberg for a story years ago. Woudenberg and Noack traveled to Europe for their honeymoon, visiting sites and friends in Germany, Italy and The Netherlands. Bartley moved, got married and started a new job all in the space of a couple of weeks. She has a master’s degree in journalism from Stanford University as well as a master’s in philosophy of religion from Yale. Before coming to the Review, she worked an internship at the San Jose Mercury-News. She married Chris Bartley and the couple is living in San Francisco. They honeymooned in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, making everyone jealous in the process.

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THE WILLISTON HERALD

FOOD PANTRY PARTNERSHIP In October the Williston Herald partnered with the local Salvation Army to help bring in more food donations. People can bring in canned goods or other non-perishable items to donate to the Salvation Army’s food pantry, and those that bring in items the pantry most needs can get a discount on a classified line ad or a discount on their subscription. To announce the partnership, the Herald ran a series of ads and ran a centerpiece story on Sunday, Oct. 2 exploring the operation of the pantry. The partnership came about after a late August announcement from the Salvation Army that it desperately needed food for its pantry. As of the end of September, the pantry had served 300 more people in 2016 than it did in all of 2015.

The ad promoting the Herald’s partnership with the Salvation Army.

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PHOTO CREDIT: AARON HANSON

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JAIME KELLY

JAMIE KELLY took over as the managing editor of the Williston Herald on Aug. 15. Kelly has worked at newspapers in Pennsylvania, Maryland and Iowa, and most recently spent six years in nonprofit media relations. He and his wife, Emily Johnson, moved to Williston from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, for the position.

THE WILLISTON HERALD

NEW STAFF AND CHANGES AT THE HERALD

ELIZABETH HACKENBURG

In June, ELIZABETH HACKENBURG was promoted from reporter to assistant managing editor. She has worked for the Herald since June 2015. JEFFREY GIULIANI was hired in June as sports writer for the Herald, covering prep and Williston State College sports. RENEE JEAN

LUCAS AMUNDSON was also hired in June to be the Herald’s copy editor.

JEFFREY GIULIANI

RENÉE JEAN, who started at the Herald in January 2015 and has served in several positions at both Williston and the Sidney Herald, was made the energy and agriculture editor, a position shared by Williston and Sidney. SAMANTHA BINDER joined the Herald as circulation clerk in June. SAMANTHA BINDER

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LUCAS AMUNDSON

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SAN PEDRO VALLEY NEWS

BOOSTING CIRCULATION ONE CALL AT A TIME Michelle Garcia’s ongoing mission News-Sun receptionist Michelle Garcia on another circulation blitz call.

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PHOTO CREDIT: NEWS-SUN

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THE SIDNEY HERALD

SPIESS TAKES PUBLISHER POSITION IN MONTANA New leader brings wealth of experience Wick Communications has named a newspaper industry veteran as the next publisher of The Herald in Sidney, Mont. Stephanie Spiess starts work on Oct. 3. Working first in Portsmouth then London, Ohio, for Civitas Media properties, Spiess served as an advertising representative from 2008 to 2010, as regional online sales manager from 2010 to 2014, and as general manager from 2014 to 2016. “I am excited to start this new challenge with The Herald and feel that the newspaper is the heart of a community,” she said. “My goal is to build up the relationship between the local community and the newspaper and for the Sidney Herald to be the first place that Sidney turns to when they want to know that’s going on in Richland County.”

Spiess and her husband, Tony, have four sons, Devon, Eli, Ian and Lane. She enjoys sports and spending time with family.

Stephanie Spiess hit the ground running in Sidney, Mont.

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Spiess also hopes to leverage her digital expertise to expand the news organization’s online presence.

“Wick Communications is excited to have Stephanie Spiess join the Sidney Herald media operation family. Spiess will bring her print and digital experience to the newspaper and will become part of those community organizations that work to make Sidney a better place to live,” said Francis Wick, CEO of Wick Communications.

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TODAY’S NEWS HERALD

LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE WINS STATE NEWSPAPER AWARD WINTER 2016

News-Herald named AP member of the year

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The lifestyle magazine “Havasu… Arizona’s Coastal Life” was named the best in its category at the Arizona Newspaper Association’s annual fall convention on Saturday.

The magazine, which debuted in December 2013, is published quarterly by River City Newspapers, which also publishes the Today’s News-Herald and the Parker Pioneer.

The most recent edition of the magazine was published this month and is available at Albertsons, Campbell Cove, Max Texaco, Hampton Inn, London Bridge Resort and Book Exchange, as well as


Also at the ANA fall convention, the News-Herald won six awards and was named Associated Press Member of the Year.

NEW SECTION HIGHLIGHTS RISING STARS News-Herald focuses on young leaders

TODAY’S NEWS HERALD

the front offices of the NewsHerald and Parker Pioneer.

The News-Herald, which competes in the category of daily newspapers with circulation under 25,000, won a second-place headline award for a March story about how the Mohave County Sheriff’s Department was using boat patrols to calm traditionally rowdy holiday crowds congregating along the Bridgewater Channel. The headline was “Changing the Channel.” The News-Herald’s public notice section also won a second place award. The newspaper won third-place awards in the categories of page design excellence, best newspaper website and best sports column.

Lake Havasu City’s Vision 20/20 committee has identified a drought of young people as a potential problem for the community’s continued success – the city is a successful retirement community and a vacation destination, but there has been little focus on providing the amenities necessary to attract young people to the community. As a result, the Baby Boomers vastly outnumber

the younger demographic, which is how once-thriving cities can die on the vine. The Vision 20/20 group is working on a number of solutions to combat that scenario, and they identified the News-Herald’s “Under 40” section as an opportunity to highlight the local success stories. As a result, the group planned a gathering for all the honorees and their families, and will unveil a beer called “Bright Future,” custom brewed in coordination with Havasu’s four local microbreweries and featuring an original label with the names of each person featured in the “Under 40” section. Each person recognized in the section will get to take a case of the beer home, and the remaining 270 cases will be sold in local stores. Link to the section: www.havasunews.com /under/html_6c26ddbc-89bb-11e6-8fc367f61491a2d9.html

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The Parker Pioneer won a firstplace award for best news photograph, for an image of a wildfire taken by Kevin Baird, and a second-place award for best online static advertisement for an ad for Cardiovascular Center. The Pioneer competes in the category of non-daily under 3,500 circulation.

The News-Herald was proud to publish its first “Under 40” section at the end of September, highlighting 30 of the up-andcoming leaders who are helping to build a better Lake Havasu City. The list of people was selected by a blue-ribbon committee made up of News-Herald staff and business leaders from the community, and it included a range of folks from various fields, including the hospitality industry, education, nonprofits and small businesses.

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THE DAILY HERALD

HERALD FINDS GEM REPORTER IN ARMY RESERVES MEMBER Staff Report

A man with plenty of worldly experience joined The Daily Herald as its newest reporter over the summer.

Farrell juggles his responsibilities as a Herald staff member with his commitments to the Army Reserves, which have brought him all over the country and overseas.

Gareth Farrell, who grew up in Montana and Arizona, is a member of the U.S. Army Reserves. Farrell decided to take a break from college after his freshman year and joined the Army Reserves in June 2012. Upon returning from his training, he started back at the University of Arizona and joined Army ROTC. But writing has always been one of his interests.

GARETH FARRELL

“I’ve always had a knack for writing, but I never saw it translating into a career when I was growing up,’ Farrell said. “But, after a year in college, I realized journalism would be the best way to develop and use my skill.”

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Farrell covers various news topics, as well as local sports. He’s also learning pages design and how to handle obituaries, as well as taking photographs.

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“This is my first time working as a journalist and my first real job, so there’s been a lot to get used to,” Farrell said. “So far, my coworkers have made the experience enjoyable and relatively stress free, which I appreciate immensely. I love highlighting the great areas of our community and putting the more questionable parts of it under the microscope.”

“Balancing the two is interesting, but fortunately it hasn’t been too difficult yet. Everyone in the Reserves has to balance a full-time civilian career with their commitment to the Army, so what I’m doing is nothing new,” he said. “However, I’m fortunate The Herald has been so incredibly supportive and accommodating to me.”

Former Herald Managing Editor Matt Lindberg said Farrell has already proven to be a great asset to the news organization. “Gareth a bright young man with a bright future if he continues to apply himself,” Lindberg said. “We’ve already seen tremendous growth, and he’s contributed several great stories and photos.” Said Herald Publisher Titus Workman: “We are very pleased to have Gareth on our staff. He learns quickly and is growing while accepting new challenges every week.” For now, Farrell is getting settled in his new North Carolina community. But, he has aspirations for his career. “Once I get enough experience, I want to work as a foreign correspondent or overseas in some capacity,” he said.


THE DAILY HERALD

4TH ANNUAL COMMUNITY CHAMPION AWARDS PROVE SUCCESSFUL Staff Report

HERALD REMODELS ITS CLASSIFIEDS

The Daily Herald honored 21 residents for their philanthropy efforts in the area during August’s Roanoke Valley Community Champion Awards.

Staff Report The Daily Herald’s Classified Marketplace got a new look this August.

Williams works with young adults in Halifax County through his nonprofit organization, A Better Chance, A Better Community. ABC2 strives to improve the health and well-being of area children, and it has been helping Veale and Lloyd with their project, The HangOut.

After several weeks of planning and development, the Herald team unveiled its new Classified section to the community.

Along with their youth center project, The HangOut, Veale and Lloyd were chosen as Young Champions because of their efforts to bring the Healthy Corner Store Initiative to Halifax County.

The new-and-improved section of the paper has proven to be a hit with the community, with many residents commenting on its good use of color and easier-to-read format.

It wasn’t just about the trio, though. The Awards ceremony recognized 21 outstanding people nominated for their dedication to a variety of causes and organizations, as well as their volunteerism within the community. The finalists, along with a description of their efforts and actions, were sent to an independent, out-ofstate judging panel, which picked the overall champions. “This year’s Roanoke Valley Community Champion Awards were our best yet,” Publisher Titus Workman said. “We had a strong group of finalists, outstanding winners and tremendous community support for the program.”

WINTER 2016

“The result is so much easier to read,” Publisher Titus Workman said. “The wider columns, more color, and more photos also make it livelier more appealing to readers.”

Scotland Neck teenagers Jy’Mill Veale and Shykeem Lloyd were named the overall Young Champion, and Enfield’s Chester B. Williams was recognized as the overall Champion.

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