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AUGUST 28, 2013

HUNTING AND FISHING 2013

The Daily News


The Daily News

HUNTING AND FISHING 2013

Hunter safety class planned this weekend

with the class. Both instructors have been certified by the LDWF and are seasoned hunters, Whaley said. The 10-hour course will cover topics such as wildlife management and conservation, ethics and responsibility, understanding firearms and ammunition, safe firearms handling and personal safety in the outdoors. “The course requires classroom attendance, passing a written test with a score of 75 percent or better and completing a live-fire exercise,” Whaley said. “Upon successful comple-

tion of the course, students will receive the hunter education certificate card.” The class will be held in the fellowship hall of Centenary Methodist Church in Franklinton. Saturday’s class is from 1-6 p.m., while the class Sunday is from 1-4 p.m. After classroom instruction and testing is complete on Sunday, the group will move over to the girls’ softball fields on Boat Ramp Road to finish the class and complete the live-fire exercise. Students must attend both days. Participants are not required to pre-register for the class. Those who would like to do so can complete the online registration process by visiting www.wlf.louisiana.gov and clicking on Hunter Education link. Call Whaley at 8394468 for more details.

ing license or proof of successful completion of a hunter education course. • EXCEPT a person younger than 16 years of age may hunt without such certificate if they are accompanied by, and under the direct supervision, of a person 18 years of age or older who has a valid hunting license or proof of successful completion of a hunter education course. “Direct Supervision” means the person being supervised shall be within normal audible

voice proximity and in direct line of sight of the supervising adult at all times while hunting. • EXCEPT This requirement shall not apply to any active or veteran member of the United States armed services or any POSTcertified law enforcement officer who may be issued a hunter education exemption. Application for this exemption may be filed at the LDWF office in Baton Rouge (225-7652932) or any regional field office.

BY LUCY PARKER THE DAILY NEWS

The Washington Parish Sheriff ’s Office will hold a hunter safety class Saturday and Sunday, Aug 31 and Sept. 1. Deputy Angela Whaley, a hunter education instructor, said the class free and offered to anyone 10 years of age or older. There is a mandatory hunter education requirement for anyone born on or after Sept. 1, 1969, and those born before that day who plan to hunt out of state, Whaley said. Hunters are required to purchase a hunting license by age 16 and are eligible for certification through the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries beginning at age 10. Sgt. Chad Dorsett of the Franklinton Police Department will assist

Exceptions No person born on or after Sept. 1, 1969, shall procure a hunting license of any kind, unless that person has been issued a certificate of satisfactorily completion of a Hunter Education course approved by LDWF. • EXCEPT a person who has not completed a hunter education course may be issued a license with the restriction that they are accompanied by, and under the direct supervision of a person 18 years of age or older who has a valid hunt-

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AUGUST 28, 2013

HUNTING AND FISHING 2013

The Daily News


The Daily News

HUNTING AND FISHING 2013

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AUGUST 28, 2013

The Daily News

HUNTING AND FISHING 2013

Annual licenses available on June 1, expire following June 30 Annual hunting and fishing licenses go on sale June 1 each year and expire June 30 the following year. Hunting licenses may be purchased online or by telephone using Visa or MasterCard. Call toll free 1-888-765-2602. An authorization number for immediate use will be provided and licenses will be mailed to the licensee. A service fee will be charged. HIP CERTIFICATION All persons hunting migratory game birds (mourning doves, ducks,

geese, woodcock, rails, snipe, coots or gallinules) in Louisiana must be HIP certified in addition to their appropriate licenses. LIFETIME HUNTING AND FISHING LICENSE are available only through the Baton Rouge Office. To expedite issuance make payment in the form of cash or money order. For additional information call (225)765-2887. Duplicates: $2.00 per privilege - no duplicates are allowed for trip licenses

Resident Hunting Fees


The Daily News

HUNTING AND FISHING 2013

Deer hunting areas 2013-14

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AUGUST 28, 2013

The Daily News

HUNTING AND FISHING 2013

Resident Small Game Seasons

Hunting closure in portion of Orleans Parish repealed The Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission has approved the repeal of a ban on all hunting in a portion of Orleans Parish that had been in effect since 1991. The prohibition was enacted by the LWFC to aid the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service during establishment of the Bayou Sauvage National Wildlife Refuge, the largest urban wildlife refuge in the United States. The move, recommended by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries

and approved during the Commission’s Aug. 1 meeting, will provide for youth waterfowl hunting opportunities on the Bayou Sauvage National Wildlife Refuge, as well as continued feral hog control on the NWR by the Service to reduce wildlife habitat damage on the refuge. The Commission’s action effects that portion of Orleans Parish east of the JeffersonOrleans Parish line, northward to the southern shoreline of Lake Pontchartrain, northeast along the southern

shoreline of Lake Pontchartrain to South Point, east-southeast along the southern shoreline of Lake Pontchartrain to Chef Pass, the southern shoreline of Chef Pass eastward to the western shoreline of the Intra-Coastal Waterway, the western shoreline of the IntraCoastal Waterway southward to the Industrial Canal, the Industrial Canal south to the Mississippi River, and the Mississippi River to the Orleans-Jefferson Parish line. The action will become effective Sept. 1.


The Daily News

HUNTING AND FISHING 2013

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AUGUST 28, 2013

HUNTING AND FISHING 2013

Migratory birds hunting dates and license fees

The Daily News


The Daily News

HUNTING AND FISHING 2013

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The Daily News

HUNTING AND FISHING 2013

Free boating safety classes set locally The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries offers a free boating class that lasts between six and eight hours that is usually completed in a day. The course includes information on choosing a boat, classification, hulls, motors, legal requirements and equipment requirements, many navigation rules, navigation charts, trailering, sailboats and related subjects that include canoeing, personal watercraft and more. Completion of the course will result in the student being issued a vessel operators certification card. Boating Classes with LDWF are offered yearround but are most popular in the spring and summer. These classes are offered free of charge to the public.

Mandatory boating education All persons born after Jan. 1, 1984, must com-

plete a boating education course and carry proof of completion to operate a motorboat in excess of 10 horsepower. The person may operate the boat if accompanied by someone over 18 years of age who if required has completed the course.

Personal watercraft age It is illegal for anyone under the age of 16 years of age to operate a personal watercraft.

Local upcoming classes Upcoming classes in Region 7, which includes Washington Parish: • Saturday, Sept. 14, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tangipahoa Parish Tourism Center, 13143 Wardline Road, Hammond; • Saturday, Oct. 12, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Franklinton Fire Department, 415 11th Ave., Franklinton. To pre-register for

these or other classes call 225-765-2999 Mondays through Fridays between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.

Boating education online If a classroom course is not a convenient option, a student may take the state approved online boating course provided by BoatUS.org or Boat-Ed.com. These courses are not administered by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, but they are approved by the state to satisfy boating education requirements. BoatUS.org The course is free, while there is a fee for the online course charged by Boat-Ed. Upon successful completion the student is provided a temporary certificate from the website. The student is issued a state boating education card approximately three to four weeks later.


The Daily News

HUNTING AND FISHING 2013

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The Daily News

HUNTING AND FISHING 2013

Tips to help you stay safe when you are out on the water Keep the fun on the water coming – whether it's a fishing boat, a canoe or a personal watercraft that "floats your boat." Operator inexperience, inattention, recklessness and speeding are the four leading causes of tragic watercraft crashes and the leading cause of death is drowning. Crash statistics indicate boaters who wear life jackets and take boater safety courses are most likely to stay safe. Follow these basic safety tips and enjoy the state’s waterways with family and

friends. Leave alcohol onshore. Never use drugs or alcohol before or during boat operation. Alcohol's effects are greatly exaggerated by exposure to sun, glare, wind, noise, and vibration. Use and maintain the right safety equipment. Have a U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jacket for each person onboard and one approved throwable device for any boat 16 feet and longer. Everyone should wear their lifejackets while on the water. Have a fire extinguisher. Have operable boat lights. Always test boat lights before the boat leaves the dock and carry extra batteries. Emergency supplies. Keep on board in a floating pouch: cell phone, maps, flares, and first aid kit. Be weather wise. Regardless of the season, keep a close eye on the weather and bring a radio. Sudden wind shifts, lightning flashes

Safety items you should have on your boat.

and choppy water all can mean a storm is brewing. If bad weather is approaching, get off the water. Take these steps before getting underway. • Tell someone where you are going and when you will return. • Open all hatches and run the blower after you refuel and before getting under way. Sniff for fumes before starting the engine and if you smell fumes, do not start the engine. • Check the boat landing for any local regulations that apply. Loading and unloading your boat. Overloading a boat with gear or passen-

gers will make the boat unstable and increase the risk of capsizing or swamping. Abide by the boats capacity plate which located near the boat operators position. Follow navigation and other rules on the water. Never allow passengers to ride on gunwales or seatbacks or outside of protective railings, including the front of a pontoon boat. A sudden turn, stop or start could cause a fall overboard. After leaving the boat launch, maintain slow-no-wake speed for a safe and legal distance from the launch.


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The Daily News

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Know about the snakes in Louisiana Snakes are a fascinating part of Louisiana's natural heritage, but are also a source of much worry and fear among Louisiana residents and visitors. Most of Louisiana's snakes are harmless, and many are beneficial as predators of insects and rodents, as a source of income for reptile collectors, and as a necessary component of the food chain or “balance of nature.� The fear of snakes in general, and particularly the venomous species, can be alleviated by understanding the behavior of snakes, and the limits of the threat they may pose to humans. Snakes are an important component of the

EASTERN DIAMONDBACK RATTLESNAKE

ecosystem as predators and as prey for other wildlife. They tend to be secretive, and when not searching for food or mates will usually remain hidden. Some snakes, particularly small ones, will feed almost daily, while large snakes may feed only once every week or two. During the mating season, usually in spring or early fall, male snakes may travel extensively to search for mates. During the warmer part of the year many snakes become nocturnal and are infrequently encountered by humans. Snakes are not aggressive except when defending themselves. They do not pursue people, although they may swim or crawl toward someone they don't recognize as a threat. Venomous snakes are unable to strike a distance more than their body length, even less

for large rattlesnakes. Thus, a distance of only 5 or 6 feet can be considered "safe" for any venomous snake in Louisiana. Despite the quickness of some snakes such as racers and coachwhips, they cannot crawl faster than 5 miles per hour, and can be easily outdistanced by a person. The chief enemies of snakes are predators (hawks, owls, wild pigs, skunks, etc.), humans, automobiles and habitat destruction. Snake populations can be maintained against any of these odds except for the latter. Washington Parish Washington Parish is home to nearly every snake found within the state of Louisiana. They include: Banded Water Snake Black Pine Snake Canebrake Rattlesnake* Coachwhip

Common Garter Snake Common Water Snake Diamond-backed Water Snake Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake* Eastern Hog-nosed Snake Eastern Ribbon Snake Eastern Worm Snake Glossy Crayfish Snake Gray Rat Snake Harlequin Coral Snake* Mud Snake Prairie King Snake Pygmy Rattlesnake* Racer Rainbow Snake Red Corn Snake Red-bellied Snake Ring-necked Snake Rough Earth Snake Rough Green Snake Scarlet Kingsnake Scarlet Snake Smooth Earth Snake Southeastern Crowned Snake Speckled Kingsnake Yellow-bellied Water Snake *Denotes venomous snakes


The Daily News

HUNTING AND FISHING 2013

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Louisiana agencies aim to restore whooping crane population in state In 1941, the entire population of whooping cranes consisted of 21 birds. Of those, six remained in a non-migratory colony in southwestern Louisiana. But no documented reproduction occurred in this colony after 1939, and the state’s population ceased to exist in 1950. Many thought the species would become extinct. But the recovery of the whooping crane has become a conservation success story. The species is no longer near extinction, but the recovery story

spans the better part of a century and will continue long into the future. The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is working cooperatively with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Geological Survey, the International Crane Foundation and the Louisiana Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit to restore the whooping crane within Louisiana. Project funding is derived from LDWF species restoration dedicated funds, federal

grants and private/corporate donations. LDWF’s budget for the initial year of the project is $400,000. The project costs escalate in year two and beyond as the project expands. LDWF estimates that it will be necessary to raise $3 to 4 million private dollars to help fund a portion of this 15-year project. P r iv a t e / c o r p o r a t e donations to LDWF’s Whooping Crane Project can be made to the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Foundation. Visit www.lawff.org for more information.

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The Daily News

HUNTING AND FISHING 2013

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HUNTING AND FISHING 2013

The Daily News


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