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FOR WICHITA’S YOUNG, DIVERSE AND TALENTED

URBAN MAGNATE

VOL. 1 ISSUE 6 | AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2015 www.ictup.org

THE OPPORTUNITY PACKAGE

TAKING CHANCES, SEIZING OPPORTUNITIES AND MAKING WICHITA BETTER


Real Estate Agent Vesta Florence of Florence Realty LLC

AST! F T C A FIVE Y L N O LEFT! LOTS

can help you own a

NEW CNSTRUCTIN HME

1802 N. Hydraulic| Wichita, KS 67214 | 316.684.5574 or 316.871.2796 | vestaflorence@yahoo.com

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$95,550

For illustration purposes only

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For illustration purposes purposes only only


WICHITA URBAN PROFESSIONALS JOIN THE MOVEMENT WWW.ICTUP.ORG


I

’m sure you are familiar with the quote, “Nothing between us but air and opportunity.” What’s interesting to me about this saying is the relationship between the words “air” and “opportunity.” Even though we can’t see it, we rely on air. It’s abundant. It gives us life. Likewise, opportunity surrounds us. Some opportunities are easier to see than others but, just like the reaction from the absence of air, we can certainly feel the impact of the absence of opportunity. Interestingly, only 21 percent of air’s make up is oxygen or the vital element that our bodies need to give us the energy to function. Again, with opportunity, only about 20 percent of opportunities could be considered “great” enough to provide energy, wrote Kevin Daum in a December 2014 account that looked at differentiating great opportunities from all opportunities. Daum wrote in this listing, which I consider to be the GOAT on this matter, that great opportunities spark ideas, fit core values, carry their own moment and people discuss them legitimately. Great opportunities are the strategic wiring that tends to connect people to places. While external factors like family and quality of life are very important, much can be said about the power of connection created by opportunities.

Jonathan Long, President Wichita Urban Professionals I’m a by-product of that. There was a point where relocation was on my family’s radar. Once I found a great opportunity with Wichita Urban Professionals, and experienced the other great opportunities in other areas for myself and my family, we made a conscious decision to stay in Wichita. And we aren’t the only ones who have grown closer to the community because of great opportunities. In this issue, we look at how Jeff Fluhr was presented with a great opportunity when he took over as the head of the Wichita Downtown Development Corporation and how that blossomed into an even bigger opportunity as the new face of economic development leadership in Wichita. We learn more about a group of men who came together to be recognized for their commitment to the community and how, from that, they decided to collectively give back even more as Real Men, Real Heroes. We also recap how several smaller conversations and ideas on minority entrepreneurship provided the great opportunity that engineered the Create Campaign. There’s a feeling in the air here in Wichita; the feeling that the community is trying to move forward. And the only thing between you and being a part of the efforts is air and opportunity.


IN THIS ISSUE:

13

ON THE SCENE

18

13

9 29

26 22

16

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT

Real Men Real Heroes • 9

COVER STORY

The Opportunity Package • 12 Jeff Fluhr • 13 Adrienne Foster • 15 Micale Habtemariam • 16 Brianna Coffey • 18

SMALL BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT Abode Venue • 20

PHOTO SPREAD

15 20

8 22 10

Heartland Wichita Black Chamber of Commerce • 8 Create Campaign Kick-Off Event • 10-11

Local Customs • 22

PARTNER FEATURES

Kansas Leadership Center • 26 Urban League of Kansas • 28

ICT UPCOMING EVENT Dreamchasers • 29

URBAN MAGNATE Wichita Urban Professionals (ICT-UP) exists to develop a network of rising leaders to improve the quality of life in the urban communities of Wichita. Urban Magnate is the premier publication of Wichita Urban Professionals covering events and issues of interest to the city’s young, diverse and talented. This bi-monthly publication is available in electronic and hardcopy formats. Hardcopy editions are strategically distributed to ICT-UP members and city, civic and business organizations. Subscriptions are available for $30 annually. Checks may be made payable to the Urban League of Kansas c/o Wichita Urban Professionals’ Urban Magnate, 2418 E. Ninth Street, Wichita, KS 67214. Limited ad space is available for purchase. Contact cmlcollective@gmail.com or call 316-371-8145 for ad inquiries.

Urban Magnate Contributors

Christina M. Long of CML Collective, LLC oversees the majority of reporting, writing, editing, layout and design of this publication in partnership with ICT-UP.

Jonathan Long, Contributing Writer/Reporter Shana Stephens, Contributing Reporter David D. Wallace, Jr., Contributing Photographer Keshia Ezerendu, Contributing Photographer Michael E. Woods, Contributing Photographer

On the front cover: Kyle Filiatreault and the Wichita Flag. Courtesy photo for photo illustration. On the back cover: Jonathan Long and Jeff Fluhr. Photo credit: Christina M. Long


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HEARTLAND WICHITA BLACK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE GETS UNDERWAY; ICT-UP MEMBER NAMED TO ADVISORY BOARD

Photos by Christina M. Long

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he Heartland Wichita Black Chamber of Commerce held a meet and greet at the Mass-Ford Retail Center on 21st Street and also participated in Unity Day at McAdams Park. The group is working to advocate on behalf of businesses, create partnerships to raise capital for member businesses, lobby policymakers and provide networking opportunities, among other services. The Chamber serves a four-state region that includes Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska and Iowa. It is under the direction of Christal Watson with local leadership including Bernard Knowles, President; Kevin Andrews, Vice President; Wanda Hunt, Secretary; Bernia Williams, Assistant Secretary; Kevin Harrison, Treasurer and Karen Casey, Assistant Treasurer. ICT-UP member, Brandon Johnson, is among those serving on the Chamber’s advisory board. For more information about the chamber, call 316-210-2033, visit www. heartlandblackchamber.com, email: heartlandwichita15@gmail.com or follow their updates on Facebook.


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REAL MEN, REAL HEROES IMPACTING STUDENTS’ LIVES By Christina M. Long// Photo courtesy of PictureMan

Photo courtesy of PictureMan

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herdeill Breathett uses three words to describe the work that Real Men, Real Heroes performs: “we’re building leaders.” What began eight years ago as a philanthropic pilot project to make a difference in the lives of African-American boys has grown into a full-scale nonprofit organization that serves roughly 5,000 students annually through outreach programming that includes mentoring, tutoring and school visits. Today, Real Men, Real Heroes mentors largely fatherless boys or boys who lack male role models from various backgrounds, races and other characteristics. It ’s work that, Breathett says, can’t be done in name only. “It ’s really about trying to help these kids,” said Breathett, president of the organization’s board. “When dealing with kids, we’re looking for folks who are credible; who carry themselves professionally and have no hidden agendas because some of these kids have been hurt and disappointed. “We are reliable. We make sure we keep our word.” In addition to tutoring and mentoring, Real Men, Real Heroes has embraced the local opportunities to expose students to Science, Technology, Engineering and Math – or STEM – fields. The group has recently toured the National Center for Aviation Training at the Wichita Area Technical College, Breathett said as an example. There, they learned about available training, robotics courses and other programming opportunities. “We just want them armed with the knowledge of

what they can do and become that can take them to a different level,” he said. Another compelling and sometimes “heartbreaking ” activity that Real Men Real Heroes asks its participants to do is to write a letter to their fathers, said Buddy Shannon, an organization co-founder, board member and program committee chairperson who received a President ’s Call to Service Award in May 2008 which he accepted on behalf of all of the Heroes. By addressing the issue of fatherlessness head-on, Shannon said, the group has also been able to forge strong, positive relationships with single mothers who are wanting “a male source to turn to to help them navigate through the issues with their sons whether at home or at school.” Looking ahead, Real Men Real Heroes wants to forge more relationships with other organizations to maximize efforts. They’re also seeking to recruit more Heroes —particularly young, professional men —to join their roughly 30-member volunteer pool. “We know there are some pretty awesome young men who can really influence this community,” Shannon said. Organizers say they want to continue growing their annual recognition event and also offer additional community-based programming through the year. This year ’s recognition program, held in late July, drew roughly 360 people. The honorees were Rev. Lincoln Montgomery, pastor of Tabernacle Bible Church, and former Wichita Police Chief, Norman Williams. Dr. Gretchen Eick received a special recognition award for her book “Dissent in Wichita: The Civil Rights Movement in the Midwest.” “Our annual recognition event is a way to highlight lifetime mentors and reinforce the importance of mentoring,” said Van Williams, a Real Men, Real Heroes board member and cofounder. “ The adult Heroes are all beneficiaries of mentors, someone who touched our lives for the better.”

For more information: Online: www.realheroeswichita.org Email: realmenrealheroeswichita@gmail.com Phone: Christina Dotson, 316-303-8017


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“WHO KNOWS YOU” - CREATE CAMPAIGN ACTIVATES, INSPIRES AFRICAN-AMERICAN ENTREPRENEURS

Photo by Christina M. Long

“It’s not who you know, but who knows you.” The sound piece of advice from Curtis Whitten, president and CEO of VendTech Enterprises, was the kind of inspiration that participants attending the Create Campaign’s Kick-Off event said they appreciated. “My favorite session was social media because I wasn’t using it properly and didn’t see a need for it,” one participant wrote. “Now, I see a pressing reason.” The Create Campaign, an effort of the Wichita Leadership Council’s Entrepreneurship Task Force, is an initiative that works to raise awareness among African-American entrepreneurs, in particular, about ways to start, sustain and grow their businesses by connecting them with Wichita-area service providers. The kick-off event, coordinated by Christina Long of Wichita Urban Professionals and CML Collective, LLC, drew more than 100 entrepreneurs, service providers, presenters and volunteers to Wichita State University’s Rhatigan Student Center.

The workshop line-up was full of interactive sessions presented by SCORE, NetWork Kansas, the Kansas Small Business Development Center, Sam Foreman of Klenda Austerman and Gilbert “Gibbi” Galindo of Kiko, LLC. Participants got to hear from service providers such as the US Small Business Administration and Build Entrepreneurs, among others. They even received inspirational words from other African-American entrepreneurs such as Lamont Anderson of ALA Enterprises,


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Photo by Jonathan Long

Melody McCray-Miller of Miller’s, Inc., Michael Kinard of PictureMan, Natasha S. Houston, who is looking to launch a styling business, Rhonda Williams of Rachel’s Kitchen, Michelle Vann, of Vanntastic and others. Giveaways from Klenda Austerman, Oskie, CML Collective and the Wichita Metro Chamber of Commerce were also included in the event, which drew major sponsor support from the Center for Entrepreneurship at Wichita State University. “It was well worth my time [to attend],” One participant wrote. “I could not say how to make it better.” For more information about the entire scope of the Create Campaign, which is being co-chaired by Long and Kyle Williams of The CRWN, visit cmlcollective.com and select the “Create Campaign” link or follow the Create Campaign on Facebook and Twitter.

Photos by Jonathan Long


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THE OPPORTUNITY PACKAGE

STORIES BY CHRISTINA M. LONG AND GUEST WRITERS

Incredible opportunities await each of us. They can appear and we can seize them. Or, we can see a need and take an opportunity to find a solution. In both instances, seizing opportunities can have a tremendous impact upon our lives - and community. Here are the stories of five individuals whose lives reflect the seizing of an opportunity.

@ Jeff Fluhr, the Greater Wichita Partnership and the Wichita Downtown Development Corp.. pg. 13 @ Adrienne Foster, Wichita Hispanic Chamber of Commerce... pg. 15 @ Micale Habtemariam, Multi Business Service Corp... pg. 17 @ Brianna Coffey, Wichita's Littlest Heroes... pg. 19 @ Kyle Filiatreault, Abode Venue... pg. 20


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JEFF FLUHR

Wichita Downtown Development Corporation and the Greater Wichita Partnership Photo by Christina M. Long


Photo courtesy of Photography by Michael E. Woods, LLC

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even years ago, Jeff Fluhr had an opportunity to help resurrect a lackluster downtown in a city where he had no roots or family. He accepted the call to lead the Wichita Downtown Development Corporation with his wife and their two children in tow. Today, not only has Fluhr’s leadership been largely credited for reviving the city’s core, he’s now at the helm of an aggressive mind- and behavior shift pertaining to Wichita’s economic development efforts. The very public transition —inspired by a City-to-City visit to Des Moines, Iowa—brought business as usual to a halt and prompted personnel and organizational changes. And, while all of the pieces are still being sorted out, one thing is evident: “We all have to agree that our objective is to grow Wichita,” Fluhr said, “and we’re going to do that most effectively if we collaborate.” MILLENIALS AND THE DEVELOPING PARTNERSHIP The Greater Wichita Partnership, which Fluhr is overseeing, is at the head of the alignment of how Wichita works to increase the private sector’s commitment and investment to grow the community. It combines the efforts of the Greater Wichita Economic Development Coalition, the Wichita Metro Chamber of Commerce Leadership Council and the Wichita Downtown Development Corporation, which Fluhr will also continue overseeing. Charlie Chandler, Leadership Council Co-Chair, said in a news release about the partnership: “We already have a lot of great organizations working on different aspects of growing our community. It’s time to work together even more closely because both the challenges and

opportunities for our city and region are so great.” He went on to add, “We’ve been hearing throughout the community that the lack of economic growth in our community is of great concern and, frankly, hearing a lot of frustration from people on the community’s overall approach. While there are bright spots, including WSU’s Innovation Campus and Downtown, it’s time to create a new framework and this starts that discussion. As a community, we must determine how to ensure a bright future.” Fluhr said that working together includes connecting with millennials, who he said, are critical players. In five years, Fluhr said, millennials “will be over 50 percent of the workforce. That’s a huge change. “As we go forward, we need to be very purposeful how we engage the millennials in the conversation about how we develop a city of opportunities that they want to relocate to or stay within.” TODAY’S HAPPENINGS, TOMORROW’S RESULTS Fluhr encourages people to get connected in opportunities to make a change. He pointed to the Wichita City Council’s District Advisory Boards and the initiatives that have come as a result of the Fuel the Fire Series as examples of where to plug in. And, for those who may feel as if they have little influence or who have previously felt excluded in opportunities to improve the city, Fluhr says, “we cannot rewrite history. It’s written. But we can work on what’s happening today and change how it impacts the future.”


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ADRIENNE FOSTER Wichita Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and the Kansas Hispanic and Latino American Affairs Commission

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drienne Foster had an idea and raised her hand. At a community forum, though she felt under dressed – wearing sweats with her youngest son on her hip – she took her neighbor’s advice to state what was on her mind. She pitched the idea of getting a petition, raising some money and presenting the petition to the state legislature to save the Shawnee Indian Mission from being turned into a police station and city hall. Her idea was accepted and she found herself leading the effort. It was that spark,10-years ago, that catapulted the now 42-year-old into public service and politics including stints serving on the Roeland Park City Council beginning in 2005 and, eventually, as Mayor of the city in 2009. During her Mayoral term, she was appointed by Governor Sam Brownback as the Executive Director of the Kansas Hispanic and Latino American Affairs Commission. She has also served as Administrator of the Governor’s grants program as well as Director of Minority & Women Workforce Development Services and has, most recently, been named the new president of the Wichita Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. “I’ve always told people I have a Master’s in multitasking,” said Foster, a married mother of five sons who now range in age from to 10- to 20-years-old. She credits a supportive husband, Stephen, and an

innate passion for “getting the job done” as keys to her success. Additionally, she has the support of many throughout the state including Dominic Gauna of the Wichita Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. “Adrienne has a wealth of knowledge when it comes to working with and developing businesses of all sizes,” he said. “The Wichita Hispanic Chamber of Commerce is thrilled to have her lead us over the next year. Her state contacts will be extremely helpfully as we develop plans to continue to put the WHCC in a solid position to grow.” Foster’s achievements include administering a statewide survey of Kansas Hispanics in partnership with Puente Marketing and Advertising in Kansas City with results that helped to anchor an annual forum for Hispanic entrepreneurs, among other initiatives. In Wichita, her top goals are for the Hispanic Chamber to initiate a leadership program, in partnership with the Kansas Leadership Center, and double the chamber’s membership. “I’m very assertive,” Foster said. “People say I’m aggressive, but I’m going to get it done. There’s always naysayers out there who might say, ‘You want to try and do too much in a short time,’ but I like time constraints. “A year from now, we’re (the Wichita Hispanic Chamber) going to be a force to be reckoned with and, if I don’t [meet the goal], it will be a personal failure.”


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MULTI BUSINESS SERVICE CORP

WRITTEN BY MICALE HABTEMARIAM, GUEST WRITER

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ur story has been pretty well documented, but we entered the airport during an open request for proposal in 1991. We won the bid with a family-style ice cream and bake shop. We introduced espresso-based drinks, along with The Spice Merchant, to the Wichita community. Under extreme limitations of product, (it took seven years of negotiations before we were able to sell carbonated beverages or candy) we were able to grow Sarah’s into a mainstay, which created a sense of pride for our family and our community. One big turning point for us was in 2006. My first real opportunity to handle every aspect of the business came and we received a letter that Starbucks was taking our space and we should be ready to turn over the keys in 90 days. This came without warning. At that moment,

my Father and Mother told me we were going to fight and I was all in. Over the course of the next eight months, I finally understood what sacrifice, hard work, and humility could do. People we never met made phone calls on our behalf to their Congressman and Representatives. People from around the community stopped in just to tell us we had their support. Priests, ministers, and preachers from all areas of Kansas came to front line to stand beside us before the City Council. In the final hour of truth, as we were signing the contract to remain at Mid-Continent Airport, I realized that so long as you work hard with integrity, purpose and faith, your family, community, and even strangers will rally behind your successes and pick you up when you stumble. The next big transition was the decision to work with the (former) Mayor Brewer, Vice Mayor Williams, Director Victor White, of


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Courtesy P

the Airport Authority, and City Council to provide a multitude of services to enhance the new Dwight D. Eisenhower National Airport. We would be moving on from Sarah’s Cafe, but continue to be able to serve the great people of this community by creating a viable package of services tailored to the Airport consumers who have never wavered in their support. This was achieved June 9 when we reached a long-term agreement with the Authority. It has been a true blessing to be able to work hard and take pride in the opportunities afforded to us by this community. Looking ahead, we will be putting a full service business center in the new terminal complete with copy, fax and print options. In addition, we will providing TSA PreCheck complete registration, Prohibited item hold and

Mail services, UPS/USPS/FedEx Packaging and Shipping services including luggage, computer workstations, MoneyGram wire transfers, sundries and other miscellaneous tech supplies. We’ll provide vending, state-of-the-art massage chairs, and porter services. We will also be bringing live massage therapists grooming and shoeshine services later this year.

Pictures of the Dwight D. Eisenhower Airport used with permission from Victor White of the Wichita Airport Authority


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BRIANNA COFFEY Wichita’s Littlest Heroes

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rianna Coffey surrounds herself with heroes— Wichita’s Littlest Heroes. These heroes are Wichita-area children under the age of 18 who are battling a chronic disease, cancer or physical disabilities. Coffey launched the grassroots organization in the midst of her son, Tristan’s, battle with Juvenile Dermatomyositis, known as JDM. The rare disease causes skin rashes and muscle inflammation resulting in weak muscles and cellular tissue damage, according to Cincinnati Children’s, a nonprofit academic medical center. Coffey, who is 33, said she knew local support and resources for their family’s experience may not be as available due to the rarity of her son’s condition. “We were newly-diagnosed, scared


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and didn’t have anyone to relate,” she said. Coffey recalled watching how her son and another boy played together during a hospital stay. The two seemed to lift one another’s spirits. Her family connected with the boy’s family and they traded stories, information and support. That, Coffey said, provided the inspiration for Wichita’s Littlest Heroes. Now, the group has about 40 children and their families. It offers support online, helps to pair families whose children have similar conditions and, most recently, is expanding to offer social meet-ups for participating children and families. Coffey said she has some help, but the volunteer organization remains largely a one-woman show fueled by love and donations. “Our journeys may be different, but our kids are still kids,” she said. Tristan’s journey, for example, has had its highs and lows. In addition to JDM, Tristan is also allergic to the sun. He has had to receive more than 140 treatments as part of his care routine. The family also finds themselves traveling frequently outside of Wichita for his treatments. “These children are fighting enormous battles at such a young age,” she said. “It has taught me what a blessing life is and how short of a time we have on Earth to make an impact.”

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HOW YOU CAN HELP

Wichita’s Littlest Heroes MISSION: Supporting Wichita’s littlest fighters— Kids who are battling chronic illnesses, cancers and physical disabilities. While all donations are appreciated, the group particularly needs gift cards to local grocery stores and gas cards to help families during hospital stays and a T-shirt sponsor For more information or to donate, contact: 316-409-5848


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At 32, Kyle Filiatreault is overseeing one of Wichita’s premier event venues; bringing a wide-variety of top-notch events to downtown Wichita.

ABODE VENUE WRITTEN BY KYLE FILIATREAULT Courtesy Photo

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little over five years ago, I was the Operations Manager for a fantastic company called Unified Party Bus and Corporate Transport. Life was well and business was exceptional. Little did I know that my career trajectory was about to change. I had always admired my uncle, businessman Bill Jackson and his Transitions Group management team. They had successfully built multiple businesses here in Wichita from the ground up including ExecuStay Midwest and Furniture Options,

and expanded to over 10 cities throughout the Midwest. In 2010, Bill was determining the fate of the ABODE building he owned at 1330 E. Douglas. Formally a retail furniture store, the fate of the building was up in the air. After lengthy discussions – Bill, along with Piper Ayala (VP of Housing), and Barney Lehnherr (VP of Furniture) made the decision to enter the hospitality community

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by converting the ABODE building into a Venue. Shortly thereafter they approached me to oversee the project and become the General Manager. Working for my uncle has always been a goal of mine and I knew his staff was second to none. While the decision to leave Unified Party Bus wasn’t easy, the challenge before me —along with the learning experience ahead — was an opportunity I couldn’t pass up. I’m proud to say ABODE Venue, has become one of the most sought-after venues in Wichita averaging about 250 events annually ranging from weddings, corporate events, luncheons, breakfasts, panel discussions, concerts, conventions and fashion shows.

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Local Customs

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Wichita-area T-shirt designers talk fashion, inspiration and how it all began.

Lxst D reams

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xst Dreams (Lost Dreams) Clothing Company was established in 2013. Lxst Dreams is the product of two friends — Brittany Hill, 23, and KaCey Green, 22 — whose style is different from the average. We express ourselves through clothing, but not just any outfit. Our apparel consists of bold colors, unique designs, and stylish fabrics. Often times we would be approached and asked about our outfits, and the answer was simple; we created our own designs. This attention sparked a fire, and, thus, the new upand-coming clothing line based out of Wichita, KS was born: Lxst Dreams. Lxst Dreams provides quality urban street-wear designed for the fashion savvy urban high-flier. We feel that visualization is everything— if you can dream it you can achieve it. We

PHOTO CREDIT: JDH PHOTOGRAPHY


are taking this concept and turning it into an ambitious mind-set of making dreams turn into reality. We have made great strides in our community so far. Our first release was in 2014. Since then, we have been featured in the first Sole Purpose Sneaker Expo, now an annual event, Wichita State University’s Black Student Union Fashion Show multiple times and, our biggest accomplishment, is being sold in local Wichita-area stores. We are relentless with the progression of our brand and soon plan on expanding to create a wider variety of clothing items such as: socks, joggers, shorts, jackets and more including accessories. We have a vision in the near future to create a subdivision, which will be called the New Wave Generation, designed for the youth. At Lxst Dreams we’re precise about the finer details of our fashion and you should expect just that; high quality, urban, edgy and innovative. Lxst Dreams can be purchased at Well Done Skate shop located in the Delano district at 617 W. Douglas and Cloud9 located at 824 W. 13th St.

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Stay updated with our new designs and the Lxst Dreams lifestyle by following us on social media: Twitter: @Lxst_DreamsCo Facebook: Lxst Dreams Clothing Instagram: @LxstDreamsClothing Website: LxstDreams.bigcartel.com via email lxstdreams@gmail.com

PHOTO CREDIT: JDH PHOTOGRAPHY


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A Time for Change Creations

By Kim Wilson

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Time for Change Creations is a diverse T-shirt line for men, women and children specializing in bling apparel for everyday wear and special occasions such as birthdays, anniversaries, sporting events, church organizations, community groups, Greek organizations, school events and awareness issues. My plans are to continue expand and create shirts that uplift, empower and inspire others. My goals are to help girls and young women build their self-esteem and achieve their dreams through workshops, mentoring and conferences. Making a difference is my ultimate goal in life.

Bella Rebel

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Contact information Atimeforchangecreations@gmail.com www.facebook.com/atimeforchangecreations 316-214-8822

By Seara Crigler

eara is developing a t-shirt line called Bella Rebel for bold and edgy women who love to stand apart from the crowd. Incorporating her creole roots, she chose the word “Bella” meaning “beautiful” and combined it with “rebel” to represent the feminine side and the daring side of a woman. Seara is also starting a little girls clothing line called Bella Girls. Bella Girls is a fun and trendy clothing line. She named the line Bella Girls because all little girls are beautiful.

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Contact information BellaRebelClothing.com Email Bella_Rebel_Clothing@hotmail.com


CML Collective, LLC

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By Christina M. Long

ML Collective, LLC, and its brand, MSlady, customizes greatness. The company creates shirts for all occasions at cost-effective rates for women, men and children. Visit www.msladyapparel.com to see more looks and the Little Lady T-shirt line or contact Christina Long, 316-371-8145 or email cmlcollective@gmail.com to place your order or to create your custom look.

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Photo courtesy of the Kansas Leadership Center

CREATING A COMMUNITY OF PRACTICE

By CHRIS GREEN, Managing Editor, the Kansas Leadership Center Journal

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hey came from across Kansas, the country – even the world – as well as from just down the block. In all, nearly 150 teachers, coaches, facilitators, practitioners and consultants convened at the Kansas Leadership Center & Kansas Health Foundation Conference Center earlier this summer for the first-ever Teaching Leadership conference. The conference featured keynote presentations from Marty Linsky of Cambridge Leadership Associates, who helped pioneer the Case-inPoint teaching method at Harvard University, and Deborah Helsing, whose organization, Minds at Work, advances change in individuals and organizations through the Immunity to Change process. The conference also marked the release of a new book, “Teaching Leadership: Case-in-Point, Case Studies and Coaching” by Chris Green and Julia Fabris McBride, which provides a textbook

for using the experiential methods that KLC employs to teach leadership. The conference was designed to be a hands-on experience for participants, who actively practiced the methods they were learning during the event. The hope is that the conference will help nurture a community of practice for all levels of leadership teaching experience. A second multidisciplinary Teaching Leadership conference will be offered Oct. 7-9. It will feature an interactive keynote from Carter and Teri McNamara of Authenticity Consulting. Participants can choose from tracks covering teaching KLC principles and competencies, case teaching fundamentals, facilitating peer coaching groups and strengthening community leadership programs. For more information, visit http:// kansasleadershipcenter.org/programs/teachingleadership/conference.


INCREASE YOUR CAPACITY TO EXERCISE LEADERSHIP.

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NOVEMBER 5-7, 2014 KANSAS LEADERSHIP CENTER

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common good

Join those who share your goals and aspirations at the Kansas Community Leadership Initiative Summit Kansas Leadership Center

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KANSAS LEADERSHIP CENTER

Upcoming Session: Lead. KS Now. 325 E DOUGLAS AVEYou. WICHITA, 67202 October 12-14, 2015 Register byINFORMATION September 21, 2015 FOR MORE Call, 316-712-4950 AND TO REGISTER CONTACT: Shaun Rojas 316.712.4956, srojas@kansasleadershipcenter.org

The Kansas Leadership Center equips people to make lasting change for the common good. KLC focuses on leadership as an activity, not a role or position. Open to anyone seeking to move the needle on tough challenges in the civic arena, KLC envisions more people sharing responsibility for acting together in pursuit of the common good. or position. Open


URBAN MAGNATE • 28 URBAN MAGNATE • 28

URBAN LEAGUE SUMMER CAMP IMMERSES STUDENTS IN SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND MATH

T

he Urban League of Kansas held Camp Destination Innovation, a month-long camp experience for high school students ages 14-18. The camp focused on exposing students to careers in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) and related fields. Weekly themes included aviation, health and fitness and technology. Activities included tours and activities at Cessna Aircraft, the Wichita Area Technical College, Westar Energy, McAdams Park and the Cargill Innovation Center. Students participated in fit tests, learned about urban gardening, were able to produce a pizza concept with the help of a food scientist, and learned how to code and create apps as part of a mini hack-a-thon that was led by Shaw Scott, Chief Technology Officer of Venue Center in Dallas and Creator of Hack the Future. A professional panel of judges scored the apps the camp participants presented and awarded the grand prize of tablets to the team that created “The Help”, a free app that links people to resources such as 911, suicide and domestic violence prevention hotlines, among others. Additionally, the camp experience created an opportunity for two students to shadow Westar Engineers and a journey and lineman, according to Marquetta Atkins, Manager of Education Youth Programs and Nulites Coordinator Southeast, who coordinated the camp. “It was important that I didn’t just have people coming in and talking to them about careers but being able to actually experience things hands on,” Atkins said.


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Wichita Urban Professionals’ Inaugural Recognition Event 9.12.15 | 6 P.M. Abode VEnue 1330 E. Douglas reCOGNIZING THE FOLLOWING AWARD CATEGORIES: cIVIC lEADER eNTREPRENEUR cORPORATE mENTOR cOLLEGIATE IMPACT (PRESENTED BY WICHITA STATE UNIVERSITY’S OFFICE OF DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION)

URBAN PROFESSIONAL OF THE YEAR

Featuring guest speaker,

JUAN JOHNSON

President of Diversity Leadership in Action

TICKETS AVAILABLE STARTING AUGUST 10, 2015 CONTACT, 316-385-0518 OR VISIT ICTUP.ORG FOR SPONSORSHIP INFORMATION OR TO PLACE AN AD IN THE DREAMCHASERS’ SPECIAL EDITION PROGRAM, CONTACT 316-371-8145


WE'RE HERE; NOW IT'S TIME TO BE PRESENT www.ictup.org

Profile for Wichita Urban Professionals

Urban Magnate August/September 2015 Edition  

Urban Magnate Vol. 1 Issue 6 featuring Jeff Fluhr, Kyle Filiatreault, Micale Habtemariam, Brianna Coffey, and others, as part of the Opportu...

Urban Magnate August/September 2015 Edition  

Urban Magnate Vol. 1 Issue 6 featuring Jeff Fluhr, Kyle Filiatreault, Micale Habtemariam, Brianna Coffey, and others, as part of the Opportu...

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