Page 1

Middle School Edition

June 2017

Volume XX issue VII

The

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Students showcase talents at Spring Thing Graduation Faculty members organize special evening for Johnson community Photo/ Tanya Gupta

8th graders Lisa Jair (left) and Caroline Gerbhardt (right) play “Million Reasons.”

By Tanya Gupta and Kristina Lewis Staff Writer The Spring Thing is a Johnson Middle School talent show which occurred on May 25, 2017. At the show, 25-30 students from 6th, 7th and 8th grade performed their act in front of 237 people. Organized by social studies teacher Elizabeth Smith, chorus teacher Kim Welch, and BJ Burke, the acts included students and staff dancing, singing, music-playing and even one performer solving the Rubik’s Cube in under two minutes.

Although a lot of the middle schoolers got a chance to perform in the show, 8th grader Lisa Jair contributed to three acts this year. For instance, she was part of a jazz dance to the song “Songmaker,” along with another 8th grader Morgan Navick, and she presented two musical acts with Caroline Gebhardt (“Million Reasons”) and Renee Abbot (“Send My Love”). “I’ve had a lot of fun performing in front of everyone and doing acts with my friends, and how everyone is like nice to each other,” said Jair. “We are just like kind of family and

I’m really excited about the Spring Thing and how it’s going to end.” In contrast, 6th grader and firsttime participant Maanas Goel performed a Rubik’s Cube act. “The Rubik’s Cube act was set to music, two of the MCs mixed up the colors on the cube and then Manaas solved it in under two minutes!” said Smith. “[Spring Thing] was really fun. I get to know so many people, I talked with people, and I was a little bit nervous about it, but now I’m not,” said Goel. Math teacher Amanda Cronin choreographed the annual teacher’s act, which opened with all the lights out and the teachers entering the stage wearing glowin-the-dark suits. They danced to a total of seven songs, some of them involving “To the Right, To the Left,” “Watch Me (Whip/Nae Nae),” and “Cheap Thrills.” The hosts for the show performed skits in between the acts on a variety of interesting topics, including fidget spinners, unicorn frappucinos, the Mannequin Challenge, waterbottle-flipping, and even Tom Brady. “I think the show went really well, the Staff Act was a hit as usual and we had a good audience attendance. It was a great celebration of the JMS community,” said Smith.

Country Fair expands cultural horizons

Sixth graders at Bird Middle School present their explorations By Megan Brigham, Abigail McLaughlin and Callie Ross Staff Writers

Bird Middle School held its 15th annual Country Fair on Tuesday, May 16. Each year as a part of a unit in their history class, every sixth grader at the Bird Middle School researches and presents on a single country of his or her choice. After a month of preparation, the students spread throughout the entire school based on continental region. Friends and family then walk through the school to learn about the different cultures. Organized by David Cuzzi, sixth grade social studies teacher, the Country Fair is meant to broaden the students’ perspectives of the global community. Showcasing the home country of her distant relatives, Haley Brigham presented on Lebanon. Wearing a Lebanese soccer jersey and serving baklava (a sweet dough filled, middle eastern dessert), Brigham said, “I feel closer to my heritage after doing this project. I’m happy I got to show all of my hard work off to my friends.” Sarah Schmidt, another participant, researched and presented Uganda. Schmidt did not choose this country for purposes of her heritage, as many students do, but had a unique reason, special to only her and her family. “The reason I chose Uganda is because I sponsor a child there and I wanted

Photo/ Megan Brigham

S i x t h g r a d e r A u s t i n M c C a r t h y s h o w c a s e s h i s G e r m a n h e r i t a g e a t t h e C o u n t r y F a i r.

to learn more about how she lives, and what she does,” said Schmidt. Schmidt donates money each month to a young girl, who lives across the world in Uganda. She enjoyed being able to share new knowledge about her sponsor child with friends and family. A unique aspect to Schmidt’s project were the models she made, which represented typical homes for those living in Uganda. These huts were complete with mud walls and thatch roofs, as they are in Uganda. For one sixth grade student, this project gave her insight as to what she would

like to accomplish later in life. Lyla Tillinghast said, “After learning about Haiti and the tragic earthquake, I now know I want to help raise money or do something to help people who live there.” Tillinghast represented the Haiti as she dressed in a tribal patterned shirt along with a matching headband. Cuzzi said, “[most students] are so used to that little bubble that is Walpole, and this [event] gives them a sense of the other stuff that’s out there. It’s awesome to see kids show off their heritage, rather than just trying to blend in with their peers.”

requirements changed for Class of 2021 By Nicole St. Germain and Emily Smith Staff Writers

Beginning next school year, the Class of 2021 will be required to take a Physics class during their freshman year and a semester of physical education each year at Walpole High School. Since this change will be phased in with each grade, these changes will not affect upperclassmen. For a number of years, Walpole High School has been violation of the following Massachusetts law: Chapter 71, Section 3. The law states that “Physical education shall be taught as a required subject in all grades for all students in the public schools for the purpose of promoting the physical well-being of students.” Instead of every student taking physical education every year, the Walpole High School Handbook currently has every student only take one semester during his or her four years. The new requirements have caused differing perspectives among the class of 2021. Bird Middle School Eighth grader Cate Lightbody believes this change might impact her future schedule. “I don’t like that we have to take gym every year, because there are other electives that I’m interested in that don’t fit in my schedule,” said Lightbody. Other students like Johnson Middle School Eighth grader Shannon Jordan do see the benefits of consistent physical education. “I think that having P.E. all four years is a good idea because it helps my grade stay fit,” said Jordan. Guidance Department Head Jennifer Dolan does not think the change will affect schedules significantly during the first year. “In terms of this [coming] 201718 school year, it’s not going to have a dramatic impact because already like 96% of Freshmen are taking Phys Ed and Health,” said Dolan. As for science, Dolan said, “All 9th graders will take physics first, so Physics 1, and they’ll all take MCAS in the 9th grade as freshman for the physics exam.” Physics 1 will be the new class for freshman in place of Biology or Integrated Science. According to Science Department Head Mary Ellen O’Malley, students will still be able to take the advanced Physics class. “The Physics we currently offer that mostly upperclassmen take is still going to be there,” O’Malley said. “[Physics 1] is more of an introductory course.” As the first group with these changes, these students will pilot a new set of graduation requirements for the Walpole High School community.

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Rebellion


Opinion

Page 2

June 2017

Benefits of gamification in the classroom

The

effective

results

By Katie Hurwitz Staff Writer

of

learning

through

Graphic/ Katie Hurwitz

Walpole is renowned as a competitive town: outside of the classroom, the Rebels compete in sports; however, in school the competitive nature proves to be just as important. Applying game playing to the classroom is a notable strategy for learning. Gamification is the application of game playing to the classroom to encourage engagement with learning. The personal or classroom games enhance performance through competition, rewards, and a variety in teaching. Some teachers do not use gamification, as they think that games are a distraction to learning and that school is not an environment for childish playing. However, this process is applicable for any age, as nobody outgrows captivating and unique activities to reinforce learning. Walpole Public Schools uses gamification in different departments. In the English department, gamification is implemented through primarily Socrative and Vocabulary.com. Socrative is an application used to answer questions off the spot and play Space Race—a relay race in which students try to get the most answers correct in the least amount of time. Vocabulary.com is a website that includes courses to learn vocabulary and practice questions. With more right answers to questions comes higher levels and overall score.

Several tive

applications

(top),

Quizlet

that (right),

teacher s

use

Vo c a b u l a r y. c o m

The Foreign Language department uses creative, self-made games, such as the “fly swatter game” in which students use fly swatters to hit a correct answer out of a layout of many possible answers. Quizlet Live is also used, which involves every student answering the same questions off their phones and competing for high scores. This is the same design as Kahoot, which is used in primarily the math department. Jeopardy is a timeless game where students break into teams to work together and review material, which is predominantly used in the history department.

in

the

(bottom),

classroom: and

Socra-

Kahoot!

(left)

Gamification motivates students to further themselves. The excitement of playing a game is a factor of a student wanting to learn. Using gamification in the classroom switches up the strategy of teaching. It is important to have variety in the way one learns, and not the same, monotonous class everyday. In most cases, routine activities such as reading out of the textbook are ineffectual to proficient learning. Information is not absorbed if one is not engaged. Playing games is a clear illustration of learning for knowledge, rather than for memorization.

competition

Everyone learns differently, but games bring everyone together. When it comes to learning, one size does not fit all. There are seven types of learning: visual, aural, verbal, physical, logical, social, and solitary. Having the same lesson plan can be in fact deleterious for learning. Creativity through games can help a student explore which way they work best. Students come from different backgrounds. Team games are a way to bring students together so that they can work for a common cause. Schools should enforce games in every classroom at least once per unit. Students learn during an engaging activity and continue to learn after it is done. Different topics can be associated with the activity played in class. Teachers should rely less on the books to teach. Captivating lesson plans are the ones that resonate forever. Instead of teaching for the test, teachers should empathize and teach for the student. Overall, gamification has three major results: improves intrapersonal study skills, builds interpersonal relations, and inspirits students regarding school. Gamification has been used in Walpole Public Schools, but should be a consistent factor of the classroom. Since students enjoy playing games and school is meant for learning, educational games are the perfect way to make information be retained, as well as to make students enjoy school. Walpole can become a competitive town, inside and outside the classroom.

Should the middle school have more language choices? Johnson and Bird Middle Schools should use technology and resources to create more

options

for

By Caitlin Kahaly Staff Writer The language program at both Johnson and Bird Middle School has remained the same for countless years, offering Spanish and French as the only options. Students entering sixth grade take a year-long class called “Exploratory Language,” where they are taught the basics of both French and Spanish in different semesters. This class prepares them to choose the following year which language they will take until the end of eighth grade—regardless of if they choose to continue it in high school. As the middle school is limited in terms of language diversity, it should consider having more options for students that will accommodate those who show interests beyond Spanish or French. According to the book “In Other Words,” written by Ellen Bialystok, psychologist and professor at York University and Kenji Hakuta, professor at Stanford University, the earlier one starts studying a language, the easier and more beneficial it is. “The period of early childhood is considered an optimal time to begin learning a second language as the methods and materials used in early childhood classes appeal to a variety of learning styles and may make learning a second language

foreign

languages

easier,” said Bialystok and Hakuta. In Walpole, students are not exposed to foreign languages in elementary schools. In middle schools, students must select one of two languages to learn regardless of genuine interest. As a student enters high school, he or she already has two years of the same language under their belt; however, these students are also exposed to other options such as Mandarin, German, or Latin. However, at that point, students who wish to start a new language are at a disadvantage. Starting a new language can be difficult alone, but it can pose as an even greater difficulty when starting to learn it in your middle to late teens. In other more bilingual countries, children start English around the same time they learn how to walk. Though here, this language acquisition process is different. For example, students starting Mandarin as sophomores are not able to integrate themselves into the language and culture as fully and easily as one could with three or four years of prior experience. The addition of more language classes and teachers cultivates problematic financial issues for the district. A convenient and nonconflicting way to avoid these financial issues is to offer online language courses similar to those available at the high school. Stu-

besides

Spanish

dents at the high school can take an array of online courses published by the program Pearson that ranges from psychology to economics. Pearson offers multiple levels of Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Latin, and Spanish. Students can take their first year of an online language class early on in middle school so by the time they are freshmen, they will have already learned the basic mechanics of the language allowing them to jump right into a higher level of the class

and

French

to start off their career of studies. By offering either online or actual language classes in the middle school, students could broaden their horizon to many more opportunities. Those who take these classes can gain new knowledge and be able to apply it later on in life, for example, choosing to study abroad in college, or even starting their career based off of it. The limits and possibilities are endless when one is cultured and able to connect with the rest of the world!

REBELLION

Staff

Walpole High School’s newspaper is committed to informing the public, reflecting the students’ views, creating a public forum and serving as an educational medium.

Check out our website whstherebellion.com Send a Letter to the Editor. Letters Should be 200 Words or fewer, and can be emailed to walpolerebellion@gmail.com Editors-in-Chief Assistant Business Breanna Andreassi Kelsey Mazzocca Emily Martin Manager Brynne Bergen Katherine Mazzotta Andrea Traietti Grace Sewell Megan Brigham Abigal McLaughlin News Editor Layout Editor Emily Butler Brendan Moser Devin Mckinney Abigail Hile Aidan Chariton Delaney Murphy Assistant News Editor Social Media Craig Cieplik Molly O’Connell Tara Gordon Editor Eva Clarke Olivia O’Connell Opinion Editor Kayla Frost Lindsay Cordopatri John O’Meara Daanya Salmanullah Photo Editor Gabriella Donahue Kevin Quinn Ast. Opinion Editor Maeve O’Connor Michaela Donato Alexis Rodia Lindsey Sullivan Graphic Editor Grace Donovan Callie Ross Entertainment/ Danielle Borelli Jessica Ferguson Samantha Simons Lifestyle Editor Staff Photographers Elizabeth Foley Emily Smith Rebecca Boyajian Ciara Healy Sophia Giovaniello Katie Soule Sports Editor Lillian Hunter Tanya Gupta Nicole St. Germain David Moser Cameron Johnson Catherine Hurwitz Rachel Tetreault Lead Reporter Julia Kane Hope Jordan Mary Jane Timilty Emily Ball Caroline Pitman Caitlin Kahaly Melanie Weber Business Manager Mandy Scully Kristina Lewis Sydney Weinacht Meghan Foley Staff Writers Emily Linclon Thomas Wilber


June 2017

BMS er After says

Social Thomas 30 years goodbye

of to

News

Page 3

Studies McDonnell teaching, Thomas

Bird Middle School “TMac” McDonnell

Photo/ Breanna Andreassi

Retiring at the end of the 2016-2017 school year, McDonnell takes a break from grading end of the year papers

By Alexis Rodia, Breanna Andreassi, and Callie Ross Staff Writers One of the familiar faces at Bird Middle School for the last 30 years will not be returning in September. Thomas “T Mac” McDonnell of the Bird Middle School Social Studies department will retire at the end of this school year. During his years as a teacher, McDonnell brought his passion for history alongside his famous humor to the hallways as well as his

classroom. His aptitude for bringing personality to his job will be missed by students and faculty alike. “When someone comes along who can make you laugh… that’s worth more than anything,” said fellow Social Studies teacher Lisa Goldman. Since arriving at BMS in 1987, McDonnell has been teaching social studies to seventh and eighth graders ever since. History had always been McDonnell’s favorite subject. “I grew up in a house with books and my parents were both readers and

teachRetires

they had a lot of history,” said McDonnell. This upbringing led to one of his favorite classroom mantras that he reiterated to all of his classes: “Reading is the height of everything.” With his constant jokes and funny anecdotes, McDonnell keeps his students engaged at all times. Avoiding technology, he prefers traditional styles of instruction such as teacher-guided discussions and memorization to help students learn. Walpole High School sophomore Grace Abely, former stu-

dent of McDonnell’s for two years said, “T Mac is one of my favorite teachers. I still remember the lines from the Declaration of Independence we had to memorize.” McDonnell is looking forward to having mornings to himself. “I intend for the first six months to relax- to have two cups of coffee and read both newspapers until I’m finished,” he said. As well as indulging in these simple pleasures, McDonnell also wants to visit Italy for a stretch of time, so he can practice his Italian, a language he has been learning during recent years. A devoted educator known for friendliness and brilliance, McDonnell left a lasting impression with his students and peers. “I’m pretty confident that I must’ve done some good somewhere to someone,” he said. In fact, his replacement for the 2017-2018 school year is his own past student, Tim Clifford. Throughout his career, McDonnell has not only positively impacted students, but he has also found joy in his position himself. McDonnell said, “That if you can get a job that you like you’re going to be happy...it’s the key of loving what you do.”

Project Based Learning takes root with Seventh Grade students Middle School students and staff work together to benefit the community Photo/ Scotty Cameron

Making his way across one of the bridges that make up a part of the student made trails, Seventh Grader Scotty Cameron balances and smiles

By Hope Jordan Staff Writer In the beginning of the 20162017 school year, principals William Hahn from Eleanor N. Johnson Middle School (JMS) and Bridget Gough from Bird Middle School (BMS) established a program for seventh graders entitled “Project Based Learning.” From both schools, there are 24 advisors, comprised of staff members and teachers, and 25 seventh graders from both schools. The goal of the program is to have both staff members and students collaborate to create a project, focusing on how to better the community of Walpole. Currently, Project Based Learning is a pilot program among seventh grade student volunteers. Elizabeth Smith, a 7th and 8th grade social studies teacher at JMS, participates in the program and was paired with student Scotty Cameron, a 7th grade student at JMS. With technology, the students are able to work on a project at home as well as at school. Scotty is working on a guide that will specify which trails are good for certain groups of people and help determine which trail they should use for different purposes, such as hiking and biking. “We utilize e-mail and a variety of Google resources like Google Docs and Google Forms to communicate,” said Smith. Scotty hopes that the project will

continue to help people even after he has graduated out of the program. “[The project] doesn’t exactly end at the end of the year,” said Scotty. Scotty spoke highly of the program and hopes to improve the community of Walpole. “I enjoyed working with my advisor Ms. Smith and getting to know more about the trails and getting to meet Mr. Gary Riggott, the head of the Walpole Trails Committee, who has a similar interest as me involving the trails,” said Scotty. Technology teacher at JMS, Anne Marie Wyman, is an advisor to another student in the program. Her student is working on a project in which characters from other languages would be added to a standard United States keyboard to make it easier for bilingual students to type and easier for students who are learning a new language to type papers. “About 20% of students at Johnson Middle School are either fluent in another language or almost fluent in another language,” said Wyman based off a recent survey in her classroom. Relationships between staff and students were also strengthened as they would meet during an extension block each cycle. “Working with the kids was probably my favorite part,” said Wyman. Students, staff, and family will come together on June 13 at the Johnson Middle School Gym to see students present their projects that they have been working on throughout the year.


The Rebellion

Page 4

June 2017

Page 5

The Rebellion

Johnson Middle School Changes Environmental Education Week Location Sixth

graders

attend

Camp

Burgess

By Jessica  Ferguson  and  Molly  O’Connell Staff  Writers

    Every   year,   sixth   grade   students   from   both   Johnson   and   Bird   Middle   School   participate   in   Environmental   Education   Week.   Throughout   the   week,   students   learn   more   about   ecology,   geology,   and   evolution,   while   also   bonding   with   other   classmates.   In   past   years,   both   middle   schools   attended   W.   Alton   Jones   Campus   in   West   Greenwich,   RI.   Although   Bird   still   went   to   Alton   Jones   Monday,   June   5   to   Friday,   June   9,   Johnson   stayed   at   Camp  Burgess  this  year  in  Sandwich,  MA   from  Tuesday,  May  15  to  Friday,  May  19.         Sixth   grade   science   teacher   Dan   Col-­ chamiro   organized   Johnson’s   Environ-­ mental   Education   Week.   He   said,   “We   chose   [Camp   Burgess]   because   it   has   a   great   environmental   [education]   pro-­ gram,   but   also   because   it   can   accommo-­ date   all   of   the   sixth   graders   at   the   same   time,   which   Alton   Jones   could   not.   We  

in

Sandwich,

felt it   was   important   for   all   the   students   to  be  together.  While  the  focus  of  the  trip   is   environmental   education,   there   is   also   an   important   emotional   growth   and   grade   bonding   aspect   of   the   trip   that   can’t   be   accomplished   when   the   class   is   split.”      T his  y ear,  t he  c amp  o ffered  n ew  a ctivities   to  students,  such  as  rock  climbing,  a  ropes   course,  a nd  a  b oat  t rip  t o  l earn  a bout  p ond  l ife.       Sixth   grader   Haley   MacDonald   said,   “My  favorite  activity  at  camp  was  the  Low   Ropes  C ourse,  w here  y ou  g et  t o  c limb  a  r ock   wall   and   reach   45   feet   by   hitting   a   bell.”        “[The  experience]  is  similar  to  previous   years,  with  more  added  because  of  the  ex-­ tra   days.   Pond   study,   animal   adaptations,   geology,   forest   ecology,   whaling,   living   history,  low  ropes,  team  challenges,  and  a   couple   of   others,”   said   Colchamiro.   “Ed-­ ucationally,   it   should   be   similar,   but   en-­ hanced   because   of   the   extended   time   and   educational  o pportunities.  S ince  a ll  t he  s tu-­ dents  are  there,  it  should  be  a  much  better   experience   for   the   6th   grade   community.”

MA

for

the

first

time

   When  Johnson  attended  Alton  Jones,  the   week   was   split   amongst   the   grade:   half   of-­   the   grade   went   for   half   of   the   week.   However,   Camp   Burgess   was   able   to   host   the   entire   grade   for   three   nights   instead   of   two,   which   allowed   for   more   activi-­ ties  and  bonding  due  to  both  the  extended   week   and   the   entire   grade’s   attendance.       Although   Johnson   decided   to   change   locations,   their   experi-­ ence   provided   opportunities   for   both   educational   and   personal   growth.       Sixth   grader     Brooke   Carey   said,   “My   favorite   activity   about   camp   was   go-­ ing   on     a   boat   an   d   getting   to   see   many   different   types   of   animals   that   live   in   a   pond   that   I   have   never   heard   of.”           “I   learned   about   invertebrates   and   how   it’s   important   to   care   about   animal   and   plant   life,”   said   sixth   grader   Emily   Sulli-­ van,  who  attended  Camp  Burgess.  “Also,  I   learned  t o  t rust  i n  m yself  a nd  p eople  a round   me  from  climbing  a  rock  wall  and  getting   to   see   all   my   friends   cheering   for   me.”

Sixth grade girls enjoy a group activity by the pond.

Sixth grade girls hula hoop together during their break time.

Sixth graders take a boat ride to learn about pond life.

Sixth grader climbs the rock wall, an activity new to Environmental Education Week.

Sixth grade class gathers together by the pond.

Will Horgan interacts with the chickens at the campus. Photos/Dan Colchamiro


The Rebellion

Page 4

June 2017

Page 5

The Rebellion

Johnson Middle School Changes Environmental Education Week Location Sixth

graders

attend

Camp

Burgess

By Jessica  Ferguson  and  Molly  O’Connell Staff  Writers

    Every   year,   sixth   grade   students   from   both   Johnson   and   Bird   Middle   School   participate   in   Environmental   Education   Week.   Throughout   the   week,   students   learn   more   about   ecology,   geology,   and   evolution,   while   also   bonding   with   other   classmates.   In   past   years,   both   middle   schools   attended   W.   Alton   Jones   Campus   in   West   Greenwich,   RI.   Although   Bird   still   went   to   Alton   Jones   Monday,   June   5   to   Friday,   June   9,   Johnson   stayed   at   Camp  Burgess  this  year  in  Sandwich,  MA   from  Tuesday,  May  15  to  Friday,  May  19.         Sixth   grade   science   teacher   Dan   Col-­ chamiro   organized   Johnson’s   Environ-­ mental   Education   Week.   He   said,   “We   chose   [Camp   Burgess]   because   it   has   a   great   environmental   [education]   pro-­ gram,   but   also   because   it   can   accommo-­ date   all   of   the   sixth   graders   at   the   same   time,   which   Alton   Jones   could   not.   We  

in

Sandwich,

felt it   was   important   for   all   the   students   to  be  together.  While  the  focus  of  the  trip   is   environmental   education,   there   is   also   an   important   emotional   growth   and   grade   bonding   aspect   of   the   trip   that   can’t   be   accomplished   when   the   class   is   split.”      T his  y ear,  t he  c amp  o ffered  n ew  a ctivities   to  students,  such  as  rock  climbing,  a  ropes   course,  a nd  a  b oat  t rip  t o  l earn  a bout  p ond  l ife.       Sixth   grader   Haley   MacDonald   said,   “My  favorite  activity  at  camp  was  the  Low   Ropes  C ourse,  w here  y ou  g et  t o  c limb  a  r ock   wall   and   reach   45   feet   by   hitting   a   bell.”        “[The  experience]  is  similar  to  previous   years,  with  more  added  because  of  the  ex-­ tra   days.   Pond   study,   animal   adaptations,   geology,   forest   ecology,   whaling,   living   history,  low  ropes,  team  challenges,  and  a   couple   of   others,”   said   Colchamiro.   “Ed-­ ucationally,   it   should   be   similar,   but   en-­ hanced   because   of   the   extended   time   and   educational  o pportunities.  S ince  a ll  t he  s tu-­ dents  are  there,  it  should  be  a  much  better   experience   for   the   6th   grade   community.”

MA

for

the

first

time

   When  Johnson  attended  Alton  Jones,  the   week   was   split   amongst   the   grade:   half   of-­   the   grade   went   for   half   of   the   week.   However,   Camp   Burgess   was   able   to   host   the   entire   grade   for   three   nights   instead   of   two,   which   allowed   for   more   activi-­ ties  and  bonding  due  to  both  the  extended   week   and   the   entire   grade’s   attendance.       Although   Johnson   decided   to   change   locations,   their   experi-­ ence   provided   opportunities   for   both   educational   and   personal   growth.       Sixth   grader     Brooke   Carey   said,   “My   favorite   activity   about   camp   was   go-­ ing   on     a   boat   an   d   getting   to   see   many   different   types   of   animals   that   live   in   a   pond   that   I   have   never   heard   of.”           “I   learned   about   invertebrates   and   how   it’s   important   to   care   about   animal   and   plant   life,”   said   sixth   grader   Emily   Sulli-­ van,  who  attended  Camp  Burgess.  “Also,  I   learned  t o  t rust  i n  m yself  a nd  p eople  a round   me  from  climbing  a  rock  wall  and  getting   to   see   all   my   friends   cheering   for   me.”

Sixth grade girls enjoy a group activity by the pond.

Sixth grade girls hula hoop together during their break time.

Sixth graders take a boat ride to learn about pond life.

Sixth grader climbs the rock wall, an activity new to Environmental Education Week.

Sixth grade class gathers together by the pond.

Will Horgan interacts with the chickens at the campus. Photos/Dan Colchamiro


Lifestyle Quick healthy foods for the busy student Page 6

June 2017

Healthy

alternatives

By Katie Hurwitz, Abby McLaughlin, and Katie Soule Staff Writers

In today’s world, food is a major part of everybody’s daily lives. People chose their food based on its popularity, taste, appeal, and easiness to prepare. Most of the time, junk food is the easy way to fit all of these categories. However, although it may be difficult, the extra effort to eat healthy will result in better habits. Starting a nutritious routine at a younger age is the cornerstone for a healthy lifespan. What one does at a younger age carries on into teen and adult years. Healthy eating works to prevent certain cancers, chronic diseases, and heart problems. Most students disregard eating healthy as something they should not be concerned about. Often, they do not adhere to the nutritional guidelines they should be following. “I don’t think most people our age are concerned about what they eat. They don’t really know how important it is,” said MJ Timilty, a 7th grade student at Johnson Middle School. Healthy eating is especially vital to middle schoolers as their bodies are constantly changing. “Students are growing rapidly inside and out. They need to fuel their bodies with healthy foods in order to get the nutrients they need to grow,” said Lucia Olsen, health teacher at Bird Middle School. There are benefits of packing a healthy lunch to bring school. A student who brings food from home may expose him

How

to

or herself to hundreds of healthy options, instead of being limited to what the school serves. Bringing a lunch from home ensures that the student knows exactly what is in his or her meal. Sugar in its natural form rather than processed can be just as appetizing as junk food. Fruits like strawberries, clementines, and watermelon are great alternatives to junk food. Citrus fruits are great as they are both tasty and high in vitamin C to boost the immune system. Most students say they do not like vegetables. However, when prepared just right, vegetables such as summer squash and broccoli will surprise students. Sauteing vegetables can bring out their flavor. Baked kale chips are a popular snack choice as well, and they are a great way for kids to get their daily nutrients. Protein includes both meat and nuts. Steak and pot roast are a great source of protein through meats. Nuts such as almonds, cashews, and pistachios can be easily eaten for a snack, yet provide many health benefits. Breakfast, often the most underrated meal of the day, is crucial for maintaining the energy kids need to make it through the day. “A healthy, sustaining breakfast should include a protein, such as an egg, a fruit, and a carbohydrate, such as toast. However, having at least something is better than nothing,” said Olsen. “I remember learning about nutrition labels and the perfect plate model in 6th grade,” said Timilty, “it really taught me to be more conscious about what I eat and what’s healthy and unhealthy.”

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popular

Fruit, Yogurt, and Granola Parfait

snacks

Rainbow Mason Jar Salad

Total time: Five minutes Ingredients: Fruit of choice, such as strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, or pineapples, Yogurt, such as Stonyfield organic french vanilla yogurt, Granola

Total time: Ten minutes Ingredients: Red = tomatoes or peppers Orange = carrots Yellow = corn Green = lettuce or kale Purple = cabbage

Directions: Put half of the yogurt into a container of choice, and add granola on top. Then, add fruit(s) of choice. Place the rest of the yogurt over the fruit, and sprinkle more granola over that. Finish it off with the rest of the fruit.

Directions: Dice tomatoes or peppers and carrots. Break up the lettuce, kale, and cabbage. Place tomatoes or peppers in a mason jar, and continue to add the other vegetables in rainbow order until reaching the top.

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classes

High School students share strategies on how to remain attentive By Samantha Simons Staff Writer

“In class I usually doodle on my papers as it helps me to keep my mind and body active even in the slightest way and since I am occupied with something to do that helps keep me awake.” Freshman Emily Tomasetti

Graphic/ Freepik.com

Going into your next period class can cause a student to have very mixed feelings of stress and fatigue. Whether it is because of a major upcoming test or just another day of notes, students have a growing issue of staying awake in class. There is one thing students should always have caution against: falling asleep in class. Falling asleep can have consequences such as detention or missing information that later appears on a test. For this reason, it is important to stay focused. High school students share their experiences and advice to help you stay awake in class.

“I usually doodle in my notebook as I’m listening to lectures because it helps me focus. I end up with 7,000 swirls and flowers next to my notes, but that’s okay. I also look at the clock and keep reminding myself that I only have to get through 10 minutes 7 times.” Senior Emily Hurwitz

MUSIC

“Writing down song lyrics helps me stay awake in class because it involves a lot of memory and active thinking, and it involves songs I love.” Freshman Abby Malone

DRINK WATER

“I generally always drink water—that’s a constant, and I can’t sleep while drinking water so there’s that. I also click my pen sometimes, but people don’t like that.” Sophomore Leah Whearty

FOCUS

“Really try to find something interesting that you like in each of your classes. The more you are invested and care about what you are learning about, the easier it’ll be to pay attention and stay awake, and focused.” Senior Greg Bond “I focus in class by blocking out the noise around me and thinking [about] how I would be able to explains the topics to other people.” Sophomore Katherine Duseau

“I find taking notes helps, just the action of writing things down helps me focus on what is being said and keeps my mind from wandering/dozing. Also I am a fidgety person so if I have something to fiddle with (like a pencil or a paper clip or anything) that helps me focus and keeps me from getting restless or completely zoning out and sleeping.” Senior Haley DiMartino

lows me to look towards the end of the class instead of having it drag on.” Sophomore Jared Schmitt

“I try to focus on what the teacher is talking about, that usually works for me.” Sophomore Brendan Cormier

“Usually I draw little doodles because it stimulates my brain and gets me focused on something I want to focus on for a little bit before getting back to focusing on the class. I chew gum to stay awake too because it keeps me physically going, so I don’t fall asleep.”

“I usually divide the time I have left for the class into increments (5 seconds, 10 seconds, or 15 seconds, etc.) and it usually works since it keeps my mind focused on the time and it al-

“If I’m about to fall asleep, I just tell myself that I’ll get in trouble if I fall asleep, so I get scared and I don’t.” Sophomore Sara Stranahan

DRAWING AND DOODLING

Sophomore Aaron Suttle

FIND WHAT WORKS

Even in seemingly boring classes, it is absolutely possible to tap into your interests to keep you - and your mind- awake and alert. Methods such as drawing, drinking water, attempting to focus, or writing down song lyrics can help any student become more alert and focused in their classes. By staying alert in class, students will save their sleeping for when it is appropriate: at night. Even the activities that seem miniscule and unrelated can be a tremendous help in attempting to retain the information learnt in class. Rather than letting your mind drift off, forget about that nap and take these small steps to pay attention and there will be a big leap in staying attentive in class.


A & E Teenage classics for your Netflix watchlist Page 7

June 2017

Six movies and shows to bingewatch this summer

Friends (1994 - 2004) 10 seasons By Eva Clarke Staff Writer

and her heavy case of obsessive-compulsive disorder always keeps her busy, along with her secretive dating experiSet in Manhattan, New York, ence with Chandler. Ross, Monica’s “Friends” is an American sitcom that older brother, is a paleontologist and ran from 1994 to 2004 and generated the nerd of the group, and much of the 10 seasons that were released on NBC. show revolves around his on-again, offagain relationship The sitcom depicts with Rachel. Rachel the life of 6 friends: “Friends is a great acts as the lynch-pin Monica, Rachel, show that shows how for the friends in the Phoebe, Chandler, having such good first season. Rachel, Joey, and Ross, as friends is really imporwho is forced to live they endure both on her own after her comedic and rotant in life, and they wealthy father cuts mantic adventures, can help you through her off, struggles to along with issues all your hard times.” live independently in finding careers. -Nina Sacco, Class of and find both a job Throughout the 2019 and romance. This seasons, Joey and Phoebe act as the comic relief. Phoebe sitcom serves as a hilarious addition to writes humorous songs such as “Smelly anyone’s watchlist and can quickly turn Cat” and recounts strange stories from to an all time favorite. “Friends is a great her childhood, and Joey’s obliviousness show that shows how having such good and constant jokes provoke laughter friends is really important in life, and throughout the series. Monica is con- they can help you through all your hard stantly haunted by her overweight past times,” said sophomore Nina Sacco.

10 Things I Hate About You (1999) Drama/Teen Film

Good Burger (1997) Comedy Film

By Rachel Tetreault Staff Writer

By Eva Clarke and Mary Jane Timilty Staff Writer

“10 Things I Hate About You” is a 90’s classic centered around two teens: Kat Stratford & Patrick Verona and their relationship statuses in high school. Uninterested in most boys, Kat Stratford is a smart, prideful, feminist teen who struggles to fit into with any part of the high school. Unlike her sister, Bianca Stratford is a flirt in the high school and wants to go to prom, but here’s the twist: Bianca can only go to prom if Kat goes to prom. Patrick Verona is the only willing boy in school who is sent on a mission by two nerds to “tame the beast,” Kat Stratford, and get her to go to prom with him. This is a great movie with hysterical scenes and strong side characters that will make a perfect addition to your watchlist. “I feel like a lot of people assume that teenage girls are boy crazy and always want a boyfriend but the movie just relates to how high school really is because not everyone wants a boyfriend or wants to be in a relationship. So that isn’t really what high school is about, people have lives and have thoughts just like character (Kat Stratford),” said sophomore Katy Langenhorst.

After accidentally wrecking his high school teacher’s car, Dexter Reed (played by Kenan Thompson) has to get a summer job at the local fast food chain, Good Burger, in order to earn the massive amount of money he owes the teacher. While working there, Dexter meets Ed (played by Kel Mitchell), another naive worker who helps Dexter in his first weeks of work. Dexter and Ed struggle to save Good Burger from going out of business when a new burger franchise, Mondo Burger, moves into town. Ed creates a “secret sauce” that becomes a huge success and vastly improves their business; however, it draws the attention of Kurt Bozwell, who attempts to obtain the sauce for Mondo Burger. Ed and Dexter are soon entrapped in a hilarious conflict with the villainous big-business Mondo Burger. Seventh grader Jess Olson said, “Good Burger takes a comical approach to a struggle a lot of teenagers can relate to, having to work over the summer, and the struggle of fighting for what you believe in even if you don’t have many supporters that is still relevant today.”

Freaks and Geeks (1999 - 2000) 1 season

The Office (2005 - 2013) 9 seasons

By Eva Clarke Staff Writer

By Rachel Tetreault Staff Writer

Set in the 1980s, “Freaks and Geeks” focuses on the perspectives of two siblings in high school. Lindsay Weir, the older sister in her junior year, hangs out with the burnouts (or “freaks”), and the younger brother Sam Weir navigates his way through freshman year with his nerdy friends (the “geeks”). This show kickstarted the careers of a number of now-famous actors, such as James Franco as Daniel Desario, Seth Rogen as Ken Miller, and Jason Segel as Nick Andopolis. Despite its premature cancellation, this NBC sitcom has become a cult classic because it deals with the realistic struggles of high school—both then and now. Sophomore Katerina Konstas said, “Freaks and Geeks accurately shows the life of different kids in high school and how their experiences as well as friends shape who they become, and I think that is still very similar to what happens today.”

“The Office” takes place in modern day (2005-2013) Scranton, Pennsylvania, following employees and their daily lives at the Dunder Mifflin Paper Company. This mockumentary’s main characters are Michael Scott, Jim Halpert, Pam Beesly, and Dwight Schrute. Michael Scott, played by the notorious Steve Carell, is the charismatic, strange, and childlike manager of the Scranton branch. The cameramen uncover manager Michael Scott’s strange life as well as his interference in the lives of his employees in the office—from relationships, to office pranks, and even to field trips out of the office. The Office is a hysterical, lighthearted show that teaches the world’s life lessons in a very fun and unusual way, and is a must see for all ages. JMS seventh grader Jess Olson said that The Office was “hilarious and brightened my day every time I watched it.”

The Fundamentals of Caring (2016) Indie Drama Film By Rachel Tetreault Staff Writer

off of his strict schedule of waking up, watching TV, and eating exactly two waffles and one sausage. Ben and Trev“The Fundamentals of Caring” is a or decide, with the consent of Trevor’s heartwarming Netflix mother, to go on a original that was reroad trip and visit “The Fundamenleased in 2016, starall of Trevor’s fatals of Caring is a ring Paul Rudd, Craig vorite American Roberts and Selena roadside attracgreat movie that Gomez. This movie tions. One of Trevkind of shows that revolves around a or’s main goals on heartbroken retired the trip is to pee you can enjoy life writer, Ben Benjastanding up and and make friends min, who decides to have his first kiss. go into the caregiving Dot is a rowdy, fun no matter what profession to cope girl who advenwith a heartbreak- struggle you’re gotures by herself in ing mistake he made order to get away ing through.” in the past. He begins from her troubled -Emily Tomasetti his first job of carehome life. This giving with Trevor, new Netflix release Class of 2020 a sarcastic, anxious, is a great way to and downcast 18 year mix in a good comold with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, edy, as well as an indie romance movie. a rare disorder that requires the use of “‘The Fundamentals of Caring’ is a a motorized wheelchair and assistance great movie that kind of shows that you with simple everyday things, such as can enjoy life and make friends no matgoing to the bathroom. Although Trev- ter what struggle you’re going through,” or refutes, Ben is determined to get him said freshman Emily Tomasetti.


Sports

Page 8

June 2017

Middle School Track set records at first meet

St. George and Costa lead girls to third place finish; McLaughlin and Mahoney break records to lead boys to fifth place finish Photo/ Jack O’Meara

Caroline Uniacke takes the lead in the 100m hurdles at North Attleboro High School. By Jack O’Meara

Staff Writer

Walpole Middle School Track & Field competed on Tuesday, May 30 at North Attleboro High School against North Attleboro, Medfield, St. John’s and St. Mary’s. It was the first meet of the year for Walpole in which they not only had many athletes place, but also broke four different Middle School Track records. The boys team finished fourth overall with a score of 33 and the girls team finished

third overall with a score of 63. Eighth grader Mia Costa won the girls mile with a time of 6:05.52. Last year, Costa broke the girl’s Middle School 1-mile record with her time of 5:59.9. Costa is only the fourth Middle school 1-mile runner to break six minutes and is the first girl to do so. “She is a pretty focused runner and she has a lot of grit and determination and I think breaking six minutes again will be in her near future,” said Head Coach Fiona Murphy. In the 800m Sophie St.George won the girls 800m with her time

Fifth grader Declan Cunningham finishes second in the 800m with a time of 3:04. of 2:37.96 which is not only a personal record but also breaks the three year old Middle School Girl’s 800m record by over seven seconds. St.George is the only Middle School girl’s 800m runner to run under 2:45.00. St.George also competed in the United States of America Track and Field Middle School cross country championship last fall. Olivia Chivegato placed with a personal record of 13.74 in the 100m dash which tied her for the Walpole Middle School girl’s 100m record with Ally Saunders (2015).

Walpole Little League’s Astros

On the boys side, 7th grader Matt McLaughlin was a top finisher as he set a new personal record and broke the Walpole Middle School boy’s 100m hurdles record with his time of 16.43 seconds. “Going into the meet my goal was to run under 17 seconds so I’m happy about the time,” said McLaughlin. Brendan Mahoney doubled in both discus and shot put. Mahoney shined in as he threw 54’ feet in the discus, and threw 26’8” feet in the shot which gave him the Walpole Middle School boy’s 10lb. shot put record.

Appear on NESN

Little Leaguers win opportunity to represent Walpole on a popular television show By Olivia O’Connell Staff Writer A Walpole Little League baseball team, the Astros appeared on the NESN Clubhouse prior the Red Sox game on Sunday, May 21. The Astros won this opportunity when Tracy Black, a parent of the Walpole Astros, entered the NESN Clubhouse sweepstakes. The show is an Emmy-award winning Red Sox pre-game television show for kids, hosted by Jahmai Webster and TJ Hourigan on NESN. “The kids were very excited to hear that they were going to NESN and that they would be on live TV,” said Chuck Meredith, head coach of the Astros. The NESN Clubhouse airs 90 minutes before every Red Sox game and is aimed to attract a younger audience, such as Little Leaguers who are inspired by these athletes. At first, the team was not allowed to wear their Astros uniforms due to a restriction from NESN, as they could not wear any MLB team other than the Red Sox; however, thanks to Kevin McDonald, the whole team received new Walpole Little League shirts for the day. “This was awesome both for the kids to look like a team on camera and visually represent Walpole Little League,” said Meredith. Rocking their new shirts, the team first filmed the “Spelling Bee” seg-

Photo/ Olivia O’Connell

Astros pose with Wally at the NESN Clubhouse, along with show hosts Jahmai Webster and TJ Hourigan. ment of the NESN Clubhouse. The Astros worked together to figure out how spell the word of the day correctly. After that, they set up for the show and acted as the featured studio audience.

As audience members, the team participated in segments such as “Stump Your Parents” and “You Make the Call,” where the kids interacted with players and a variety of Fen-

way Park workers, such as reporters and Wally The Green Monster. “Overall it was a great experience individually for each kid and for the team as a whole,” said Meredith.

The Rebellion Middle School Edition 2017  
The Rebellion Middle School Edition 2017  
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