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Walpole High School

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Vape culture

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Students take part in National Walk-Out

Hundreds gather to honor the 17 lives lost in Florida shooting Photo/ Caroline Pitman

Sophomore names of

Jeni those

Atallah killed

By Emily Ball News Editor

at

raises a Stoneman

A few hundred students from Walpole High congregated outside for 17 minutes on Thursday, March 15 to peacefully protest the lives lost at the Stoneman Douglas High School shooting in Parkland, Florida. As students pooled into the front entrance of the school, organizers handed out flyers with the 17 names of the students killed in the Florida shooting. First, senior Dana DeMartino read a speech written by classmate Ellen Irmiter, who attended a speech tournament with students from the Florida school. “I remember when I learned about the shooting, I did not realize

sign that lists the Douglas High School.

for almost a week that we had competed with these students and I even follow one of the students on Instagram,” Irmiter said. “Their speech team has been so active in their message that I felt like we owed it to them to stand with their school.” Senior Lindsey Sullivan spoke, encouraging all to engage in 17 acts of kindness to honor the lives lost. Sullivan asked students to make a phone call to tell someone that they appreciate them and care for them. “We can make a change in WHS by being kinder to each other,” Sullivan said. “In times of tragedy, it’s important to come together as a school and a community.” Senior Ryan Conlon spoke

Photo/ Caroline Pitman

Senior Riley Mulroy wears a homemade hat that says “#ENOUGH,” a trending hashtag that is used to spread awareness about school shootings.

and stressed the consequences of not educating students about mental health and the need to implement safety features in school. “There are things that the students only notice and we felt as though we could come together and fix the problems in our school,” Conlon said. “It starts with us.” The National Walk-Out date was planned for Wednesday, March 14; however, due to a snow day, Walpole High School rescheduled for Thursday. Even with the change, the Walk-Out still garnered hundreds of student participants. “The turnout showed a huge response and raised awareness to the ongoing issue of gun vio-

lence” sophomore Jeni Atallah said. Although many students chose to walk out, others chose to remain inside, as they had strong views on gun control. “I chose not to walk out because I believe that guns don’t kill people—people kill people,” senior Danny O’Leary said. While some students chose not to participate in the Walk-Out, the students who organized the efforts were pleased with the turnout and the eagerness of the students involved. “I am surprised at how many people walked out,” DeMartino said. “It’s nice to see I live in a generation is not afraid to take a stand for what they believe in.”

Hurwitz rece ives Gold Award for Girl Scouts Walpole

junior

By Emily Ball News Editor

organizes

The Girl Scouts of Eastern Massachusetts (GSEM) awarded Walpole High School junior Catherine (Katie) Hurwitz the Gold Award, the highest achievement a Girl Scout can attain. Hurwitz will receive the physical award at a ceremony in June where she will be honored through a flag ceremony and recognition by representatives who will speak of her efforts: dedicating 80-100 hours to her Gold Award Project, a six-week writing program entitled “Genres of the Generations.” “I have always enjoyed writing,” Hurwitz said. “I am introverted in person, but when I write, I have a unique voice I am not afraid to express. I want to inspire the community to find their voice and share it.” The “Genre Weeks” occured from Aug. through Feb. and consisted of six writing-themed weeks including Poetry Week, Screenplay Week, Fiction/Fantasy Week, Nonfiction/ Essay/Persuasive Week, Memoir/ Narrative Week and Mystery/Thriller Week. Most weeks consisted of three events: a presentation by an accomplished writer, a workshop for students in third grade to fifth grade and an open-mic night for all students to

writing-themed

weeks

for

Photo/ Eric Hurwitz

Girl

Katie Hurwitz poses with children’s book author Peter H. Reynolds during Fiction/Fantasy Week.

share their work in that week’s genre. “The Fiction/Fantasy Week was definitely the most successful Genre Week,” Hurwitz said. “After Peter H. Reynolds’ presentation, many families bought copies of his book for him to sign. The writing workshop worked out exactly how I envisioned, as three members of my team wrote a story that stemmed into alternate possibilities, similar to the Goosebump books.” To receive this award, Girl Scout Seniors or Ambassadors must first earn a Silver Award, and then they must put a minimum of 80 hours

into the project of their choice that helps the community in some way. Prior to receiving her award, Hurwitz received the Bronze Award in fifth grade when her troop refurnished the upper level of the Walpole Scout House. Subsequently, Hurwitz received her Silver Award in eighth grade when she and a friend organized eight two-hour cooking classes promoting healthy eating to the youth. Even with the conclusion of her Gold Award Project, Hurwitz still plans to implement similar, writing-oriented events in the future.

Scout

project

“My team is planning on making this at least an annual event, as this is something we wished that we had going into high school,” Hurwitz said. “Writing is something that we do every day and knowing about all the different genres is important for school, college and the workforce.” Hurwitz also created a journal containing the writing of students from different grades as well as reviews about the submitted pieces of writing. Prominent figures such as Dan Santat, a children’s book writer, and Vincent Zhou, an Olympic figure skater who is also a poet, wrote the reviews for the journal. The journals will be located at the Walpole High Library, Johnson Middle School, Fisher Elementary School, Walpole Public Library and Blue Bunny Bookstore in Dedham. In the future, Hurwitz hopes to become an Adult Girl Scout and also a troop leader to continue her involvement with the organization. “Since the beginning of Girl Scouts, we have learned the Girl Scout Law: ‘I will do my best to be honest and fair, friendly and helpful, considerate and caring, responsible for what I say and do and be a sister to every Girl Scout,’” Hurwitz said. “I think I took these sayings to heart, and they have truly made me a better person.”

NON PROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE PAID PERMIT NO.8

Walpole’s rape agression defense course

Volume XXII, issue IV

WALPOLE, MA 02081

Model U.N. makes conference debut

March 2018


News

Page 2

March 2018

Model U.N. club makes debut at first conference

WHS

students

discuss

nuclear

disarmament

at

Northeastern

Photo/ Jenna McDonald

Model

United

Nations

Club

stands

By Jess Ferguson Assistant News Editor Marking its first official event since its debut at Walpole High School (WHS), the Model United Nations (Model U.N.) club attended the Innovated Model U.N. Conference at Northeastern University on March 2 to discuss global nuclear disarmament among several other schools from the area. Despite this year being Model U.N.’s first as an official WHS club, the students performed particularly well at the Northeastern conference, and Model U.N. President Jenna McDonald, a junior at WHS, hopes they do even better next conference. “Because we are so new to the club and conferences as a whole, I

together

after

their

first

conference

am incredibly pleased with the team’s performance,” McDonald said. “For the next conference, which I hope is more advanced in comparison to the beginner-esque one we attended, I hope the team wins some awards for best position paper or best delegate.” In Model U.N., students behave as United Nations delegates and the committees within it; certain students represent different countries and debate issues, eventually forming a resolution at the end. WHS History Teacher Matthew Kowalski, who advises the group, hopes to use the club as a platform for students to gain a broader sense of global issues. “I want to help students become internationally-minded: to be aware of and to care about global issues,” Kowalski said. “Model U.N.

at

Northeastern

University..

requires students to discuss global topics and to study the perspectives of various countries on those topics.” During a conference, each school’s delegates meet with delegates from other schools. There, they make proposals on how to ameliorate the predetermined issue—the one at the Northeastern conference being nuclear disarmament. There are two forms of debate, moderated and unmoderated caucus. Moderated caucus consists of the Chair calling on delegates one at a time and each speaker briefly addressing the committee. Unmoderated caucus is when the committee breaks for a temporary recess from formal proceedings so delegates can work in smaller groups. To hold a caucus, a delegate must make a motion, and the

University

committee must pass it. Through these caucuses, delegates begin forming resolution papers voted on at the end, with a 50% majority required to pass. “I have always enjoyed discussing current events anywhere from national to global in scale, so Model U.N. has become one of my favorite parts of the week,” McDonald said. “I feel I have been exposed to many more events happening around the world and have a broader sense of how different events affect different nations.” Although Model U.N. made its school debut this year, this conference was not their first experience meeting together. Last year, a group primarily composed of WHS seniors met at the Walpole Public Library in an informal Model U.N., where they met weekly to discuss various global issues. Model U.N. Vice President Caroline McGrath was one of the students who attended and later decided to ask Kowalski to assist in bringing it to the high school. “I’ve learned a lot about how important it is to convey your ideas clearly because it opens up new lines of communication, so you don’t have to clam up or give someone the silent treatment,” McGrath said. “I’ve also learned a lot about negotiation; in a small room where 60 people with different plans and goals are trying to come together to pass a law, it’s not just your goals that are important—it’s everyone’s.”

Javon Jackson spreads positivity with Words of Wisdom Walpole

High

junior

By Caitlin Kahaly Staff Writer The Most Interesting Man in the World—second only to those in the Dos Equis commercials—Javon Paris Jackson, anchor for Walpole High School’s Rebel Report morning news, uses his own creative spin-off of this humorous persona to bring amusement and inspiration into the daily lives of every student and faculty member with the emergence of his own news segment, “Words of Wisdom with Javon Jackson.” The brief segment features Jackson’s delivery of a daily inspirational quote. His thought for the potential segment stemmed from the inspirational quotes his TV Production teacher, Rebel Report director and close friend, Peter O’Farrell, put up to send inspiration to his students daily. “I’ve been putting quotes up in my classes to motivate my students every day. One day, Javon suggested we do something new for the morning news, a quote of the day type thing. He came up with Words of Wisdom,” O’Farrell said. Jackson’s charisma and liveliness encourages students and staff to take a greater interest in the morning news and inspires them to have a more positive start to their day. “In homeroom, we are all still waking up, but when Javon comes on, we all put our phones down, listen and laugh. He is hilarious,” junior Emerson MacMillan said. Jackson plans on finishing out the current school year doing Words of Wisdom as his signature feature on the morning news. But in terms of continuing the segment into next year, Jackson has proposed a new idea for his senior debut—a Rebel Report radio show.

shares

daily

inspiration

“I’m starting to lose a bit of interest in Words of Wisdom because I like to keep it fresh. I like to change things. I want something different and brand new. I’m thinking of a radio show for next year. Mr. O’Farrell is right on board,” Jackson said. The two started collaborating during Jackson’s freshman year when he took TV Production I, a visual arts course that teaches the basics of how to film and direct multiple platforms of television while having an interactive experience with professional technology. He began his involvement as a member of the Rebel Report his freshman year by filling in for anchors and filming the set. His sophomore year, Jackson expressed interest in anchoring behind the desk, where he did weather part-time. “If you find something interesting, especially as a high school kid, keep digging, whether it is a language, a club, etc. Find something you love,” O’Farrell said. “Javon has a talent for TV and filming, and I am extremely happy that I could be a part of it. We will continue to work together and make great productions as a team.” Throughout his junior year, Jackson has filmed every Dance Company performance with O’Farrell along with every production put on by the Drama Club. To conclude their yearlong collaboration of filming, Jackson will assist O’Farrell in filming the senior graduation in early June. Along with his heavy involvement in TV, Jackson is also a part of the Students Organized Against Racism Club, an after school club where students of all ethnicities are welcome to come together and fight the epidemic of racism and prejudice in today’s society. In his continual efforts to raise awareness regard-

on

his

Rebel

Report

segment

Photo/ Peter O’Farrell

Jackson reads over his notes before the taping of “Words of Wisdom with Javon Jackson.”

ing racism and discrimination, Jackson has written and is currently directing his own documentary for the 2018 Walpole High School Film Festival entitled “The N-word.” His goal for the documentary is to inherently raise awareness about people using the n-word. “The word itself is a very negative word, but it’s all about the weight you put behind it,” Jackson said. His involvement and passion for school affairs is not contained inside the classroom—it follows him into his community. Starting his day at 4:50 a.m., Jackson makes a 40-minute commute to school every morning from his home in Boston. After school and extracurriculars, Jackson spends his time working at a basketball club and helping out with events at a community center in Boston. “He gets up at crazy hours to get to school and comes right from the bus to shoot the Rebel Report,” O’Farrell said. “He has to do more every day than just any average kid in Walpole. His dedication is evident.”

As for his plans after high school, Jackson’s goals are driven by his idols and mentors who inspire him to make a difference in the world. Jackson’s dream job is to become the country’s next upcoming talk show host after his ultimate idol, Ellen Degeneres. “I am a people person: I love to talk to others, and I love to make people laugh. Teachers tell me I will be on Saturday Night Live one day,” Jackson said. However, if he does not pursue his dream of being a talk show host, Jackson has a backup plan. With the majority of his family being involved in law enforcement, Jackson has become interested in pursuing a career in the field. Jackson’s close family friend and chief of the Boston Police Department often takes him on rides where he experiences an average day on the job. “If I had to pick my own words of wisdom, it would have to be when life hands you lemons, you make Kool-aid and leave the world wondering how you did it. That’s basically how I live my life,” Jackson said.


March 2018

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DECEMBER WINNERS

SENIOR Jonathan Foti Jonathan goes above and beyond expectations, works well with co-workers on internships and mantains a positive attitude completing jobs within the school. JUNIOR Kayla Cofran Kayla scored a near perfect 99% on the Polynomial functions unit test, showing her mastery of how to find the zeros of a polynomial function and how to create a polynomial equation from its zeros. While many of her peers found the material challenging, Kayla made it look easy. In addition, she followed up her phenomenal test score with a score of 48/50 on the subsequent. Graphing rational functions quiz. She was able to correctly identify features of a rational function and incorporate them into a graph and write a rational function which satisfied given conditions. Kayla’s work during the month of December was outstanding. She is deserving of student of the month. SOPHOMORE Yana Khazhinskaya Yana is always wonderfully enthusiastic about French. She always tries her best, which is incredibly wonderful. I have yet to experience Yana when she is not 100% on task and engaged in her learning. She helps her classmates whenever they ask. Whenever I pose a question, she can answer it, yet waits her turn so that others may have a chance to shine also. Yana is a real “go-to” student. If she happens to get something wrong, she bounces back and redoubles her efforts. It is just lovely to see her smiling, welcoming, and supportive face and she inspires me to do my best teaching. FRESHMAN Cole Tashjian In a class full of honors students, Cole separates himself as the best in the class. He has a 99 average for term 2. He is the best in the class, but he does not brag or show off. He is extremely humble, hard working and helps others in the class. Cole always does his homework, asks great questions in class, works very well in his group when given classwork, and always participates. When I give a challenging question in class, Cole will always try to answer it and get the answer correct. He also is not afraid to make a mistake or take risks. Other students will always ask him what he got on a problem or ask him for help when we are doing class work and Cole will always help. He is a pleasure to have in class and the type of student every teacher wants to have in their class.

ACTIVITY AWARD

SANJANA BHAGAVATULA MATH TEAM Sanjana is one of the top scorers on the math team this year. She answers practice questions correctly in topics which are beyond the scope of her current math class. As a result, Sanjana has often been placed in categories which many would consider more challenging, such as trigonometry. She accepts whichever rounds I give her without complaint, always doing what is best for the team even if her individual score might suffer as a result. I can count on Sanjana to do what is asked of her, and I wish to acknowledge her commitment and dedication to the math team.

CLASS OF THE MONTH

FRESHMAN PE PERIOD 4 This class has shown great improvement through the year in all areas of physical education. They have improved their skills, their personal physical fitness and their behavior in the classroom setting. These improvements have led to excellent results in all assessments. This class has been a pleasure to teach!

COMMUNITY MEMBER OF THE MONTH

ZANA ALBADAWI MS. BUTLER Zana is always a very positive person. She is very open, friendly and inclusive. She goes out of her way to say hello to people, to smile and makes being at the school a joy. She is an awesome representation of what our school culture should be.

Page 3

JANUARY WINNERS

SENIOR Rebecca MacLellan Rebecca always comes into class with a positive attitude. She is an enthusiastic learner and is always fully engaged in class. Rebecca always approaches laboratories with a healthy dose of inquiry and curiosity and is always engaging her peers. -Mr. O’Connor JUNIOR Magdalyn Jackson Maggie comes to class every day prepared and ready to learn. She always has her homework complete and is an engaged student. She is proactive in asking questions of clarification or answering when I call on students. The students had a challenging test on Rational Functions in January. Maggie made herself a study guide and put in hours outside of school studying for the test. Her hard work paid off, with an A on the test. So, it is with pleasure that I nominate Maggie for January student of the month. -Ms. Friar SOPHOMORE Megan Canney Megan is a hard working, conscientious student. She consistently completes her homework, and she regularly stays for extra help to prepare for assessments. During the month of January, Megan’s efforts paid off with a strong performance on a transformation quiz which earned her a sticker. In addition, Megan requested work ahead of time when she was going on the speech team trip to Florida. Megan submitted her tessellation project in advance and returned from the trip with her Geometry work complete. Megan’s work ethic is exemplary. She showed significant improvement term 2. I proudly nominate her for student of the month. -Ms. Milne FRESHMAN Danielle Abril “Daniela” has made great strides in Spanish 2 Honors in the last few months. She has put in the work and seen the results of that effort. She regularly participates in class and is eager to grasp new concepts. She consistently stays in the target language (Spanish) during class. “Daniela” has received the benefits of that through her written and oral communication. -Ms. Bacon

ACTIVITY AWARD

Chris Wood SCIENCE OLYMPIAD Chris has not only done a great job with scheduling competition events for this current school year (a difficult and long task!) but he has also been training his “replacement” (although he is not replaceable!) so that they can carry on scheduling teammates time-slots and events at various competitions for next school year. He has worked to make sure each team member is scheduled for an event they can succeed in, and has been working to get more underclassman involved. This shows incredible leadership. - Mrs. Schwartz and Mr.O’Conor

CLASS OF THE MONTH

FRENCH IV/V CP1 PERIOD 5 This class is a fabulous group of students who work very well together. They are invested in French and work hard for high achievement. They are extremely independent. I know that if I ever had a situation where I wasn’t able to make it to class, I feel confident this special group could teach themselves! -Mrs. Osborne

COMMUNITY MEMBER OF THE MONTH

ABIGAIL MURRAY MADAME FRATTASIO I would like to nominate Abby because even though I do not have her as a student this year, she says hello to me every single day. She changes the way my day will go. I love that she takes time to stop whatever she is doing and stops to ask me how I am. I always want to continue our discussion but we are both getting to our classes. She has a smile on her face and she listens. Thank you Abby for making a difference. You are a kind young lady. -Mrs. Frattasio.


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March 2018


March 2018

Opinion

Page 5

Will stricter gun control make a difference? THE R E B E L L I O N YES Staff By Molly O’Connell Editorial Editor

Since the Sandy Hook shooting, there have been 239 school shootings nationwide, in which 439 were shot and 138 were killed. Yet, Congress has not drastically changed their policies. The hard truth is that the issue will continue if no significant progress is made. Children should go to school to learn; children should never go to school worried if their lives will be at risk. Subsequently, more stringent gun control will certainly make an impact. Some stores have demonstrated their support for the movement to

NO

By Aidan Chariton Sports Editor Whether it be mass shootings, gang disputes, or other criminal activity, every year there are tragedies due to gun violence all around the world. Many people believe that the solution to gun violence is stricter gun control. Although improving background checks could lower gun violence slightly, it is not the best solution. The main focus should be set on the people using the guns, not the guns themselves. These people are passed the point of this logical reasoning, and they will get their hands on guns one way or anoth-

strengthen gun control, such as Dick’s Sporting Goods and Walmart. These are the changes we need to see, and these are the changes that will make a difference. Guns are supposed to be used for self defense, but their purpose has been completely misconstrue. After all, out of the 29,618,300 violent crimes committed between 2007 and 2011, a mere 0.80% of victims used a firearm as a form of self-defense, according to ThinkProgress. Additionally, gun owners are protected by the Second Amendment; however, owners and dealers must follow state and federal laws. Those wishing to possess a firearm should have to go through a more stringent process, as the current application is fairly brief. The solution is simple: we must strengthen gun controls so that

not just anyone is capable of possessing a firearm without proper background check. If consumers’ backgrounds were more carefully checked, previous tragedies could have been prevented. Although no amount of regulations will completely eliminate mass shootings worldwide, we have to start somewhere. Any form of gun control that is in place will make a difference, as it will make it harder for anyone to access a gun. According to the Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence, states with more gun regulations have lower death rates. This is no coincidence. Restricting the means of violence will make it harder for people to access firearms, which should encourage us to believe that gun control will bring positive change that is so desperately needed.

er—whether they do it legally or not. A vast majority of gun violence is committed by people who did not legally obtain their guns. In 2008, the University of Pittsburgh released a study on gun violence: Evidence from a large U.S. City Bureau of Police revealed that 79% of perpetrators of gun crimes used guns that they did not legally own. Another common claim is that assault rifles should be banned, but statistics show that a majority of gun violence is committed with handguns; however, the incidents involving assault rifles get the most media. According to the article “Rethinking Gun Control” by William Saletan, “In 2011, handguns comprised 72.5 percent of the firearms used in murder and non-negligent manslaughter incidents.”

Ultimately, it does not matter to these unhealthily minded criminals what the laws say; they will find a way to get their hands on weapons. This unnatural urge for fatal violence is the big issue in gun violence, and that mental health aspect should be the target of those seeking to solve the issue. One approach to the mental health aspect is to identify these troubled individuals at a young age and provide them with resources. At the end of the day it is not the guns that are killing people; it is the people firing with violent intents. Would you blame a pencil for an insulting letter you received? Of course not, so do not make the same type of mistake when regarding the issue of gun violence in America.

What I learned from rape defense course Walpole P.D. teaches women self defense skills in four-week class By Tara Gordon Editor-in-Chief

When my mother told me she signed me up for a rape defense class without asking me, I experienced something similar to the grieving process: denial, anger, bargaining, depression, etc. The last thing I wanted to do on Wednesdays from 6:00 p.m. 9:00 p.m. (three hours? really?) was to learn how to punch a rapist with Walpole cops. Obviously, I tried to get out of this; naturally, I was unsuccessful. Usually on Valentines Day, people eat at fancy restaurants with their significant other. On my Valentine’s Day, I was at the Walpole Police Department, sitting in my first RAD class. Rape Aggression Defense (RAD) is a four week class that teaches realistic self-defense tactics to women. According to their website, the R.A.D. System “is a comprehensive, womenonly course that begins with awareness, prevention, risk reduction and risk avoidance, while progressing on to the basics of hands-on defense training.” As I entered into the room, I entered the acceptance phase of my grieving process, reassuring myself that my two friends (whose mothers had also forced them to go) would help me get through it. I had minimal faith, but I soon learned that going to RAD was nothing to dread. As more women entered the room, Walpole police officer Taylor Bethoney introduced herself and welcomed everyone to their first RAD class. As my eyes wandered around the room, I noticed there was a range of women in my class: there was a mother with her two daughters; there was a

night-shift nurse who wanted to have the defense skills when she left the hospital at 2:00 a.m.; and there were my friends and I, whose mothers wouldn’t let us leave for college without knowing how to defend ourselves in case of rape on a college campus. Much to my disbelief, the rest of the class was actually engaging. The officers explained that the important thing women get out of RAD is that they will become more aware of their surroundings, and take their safety more seriously. Although the class was more education focused, the officers ensured us that the following weeks would be all physical activity. Next week, I walked into Blackburn Hall in athletic gear for class. After stretching, the officers taught us three stances that we should take if we feel threatened. Next, they taught us how to scream. Yes, scream. The officers explained that every time we are instructed to practice a strike or block, or even a defensive stance, we must yell “NO”; if we weren’t loud enough, they would make us do it again at a higher volume. The reason for this extensive yelling was that in case of attack, the noise would attract attention from others and could help us escape. Full disclosure: I am one of those people who never sing, yell, or dance spontaneously in public. It makes me uncomfortable, so I was hesitant to shriek every time I punched the air. I soon realized that many women were uncomfortable with the idea as well; however, the officers helped us get rid of that fear quickly, and soon enough all of us were screaming. In the next two weeks, I was taught how to defend myself with punches, kicks, blocks, wrist grabs and more.

After we learned each skill, we practiced with the officers, who held small soft pads for us to hit. Honestly, it was fun. For someone who sticks to the elliptical and stays away from contact sports, I enjoyed hitting things for a change, even if it was members of the Walpole P.D. with red pads. Going to RAD was even something my friends and I looked forward to. The final week of RAD was a test, where each student had to go through three simulations of being attacked. We, the anxious women, were dressed in helmets and extensive pads and had to individually fight off four officers who pretended to be attackers; when one woman went into the test, we cheered her on; when she came back from the test, we applauded her. Following the simulations, we watched videos of our staged attacks, and listened to closing statements from our teachers. Initially, I did not want to take RAD because I thought it was admitting defeat; admitting that I live in a society where weak females need to know how to defend themselves because rape is so frequent, especially on college campuses. Even though this is still true, the class made me feel stronger, both physically and mentally. It was empowering to see women of all ages in our community encouraging each other to be strong. Walpole is lucky to have such a program for women, and we need to ensure its existence, whether that be by encouraging WHS female students to register, or by funding it through the town budget committee. Coming out of this class, I implore any woman to take RAD, for it has not only taught me how to defend myself, but it has brought me closer to the women in my community.

Walpole High School’s newspaper is committed to informing the public, reflecting the students’ views, creating a public forum and serving as an educational medium.

Check out our website: whstherebellion.com

Editorial Board

Editors-in-Chief

Tara Gordon Lillian Hunter Lindsey Sullivan Emily Ball

News

Assistant News Jessica Ferguson Molly O’Connell

Editorial

Entertainment Catherine Hurwitz Lifestyle

Grace Donovan

Sports

Aidan Chariton Julia Kane

Social Media

Breanna Andreassi

Business Layout

Samantha Simons

Website

Dana DeMartino

Lead Reporter

Hope Jordan

Photography

Ciara Healy Caroline Pitman

Graphics

Danielle Borelli

Staff

Photographer Sydney Weinacht Writers Giovanna Anello Megan Brigham Eva Clarke Emily Curtis Brianna Deasy Gabriella Donahue Caitlin Kahaly Ashley Kuropatkin Peter Lynch Allison Millette Brendan Moser Olivia O’Connell Bridget O’ Connor John O’Meara Kelly O’Meara Chloe Patel Deepika Pokala Alexis Rodia Callie Ross Jared Schmitt Charlotte Schoenthaler Emily Smith Sarah St. George Rachel Stanton

Send a Letter to the Editor. Letters Should be 200 Words or fewer, and can be emailed to walpolerebellion@gmail.com


Opinion

Page 6

March 2018

Living an imperfect life is the Walpole needs to provide pathway to a perfect world students with more SAT prep Wabi-sabi

finds

beauty

By Catherine Hurwitz Entertainment Editor We are each a chipped bowl. We are handmade, bare, rich with human flaws. In a society driven for perfection—perfect professional achievement, relationships, looks and health—we are conditioned to believe that success is measured by joining the bandwagon in the quest for fulfillment. Today, high school seniors are hearing back from colleges to see if their endless race of schooling defined them as perfect for their futures. In a degree, there is great value in possessing the appetite to achieve a quintessential life. Nonetheless, this drive for perfection in itself is imperfect, for it can inhibit creativity and produce unnecessary interpersonal comparisons. In order to achieve a perfect life, we must first unleash our creativity and not only accept, but also embrace our imperfections. In the western world we live in, we have always strived for perfection. I can admit to being a perfectionist myself, as I always have to ensure that everything fits in the correct spot, and nothing can be finished unless it fits my definition of being complete. I see elementary school children mastering the art of the coloring book and meticulously picking out colors for each section within the lines. Teenagers preparing for college check off their to-do lists one step at a time, before realizing that four hours of sleep at night is not sufficient. Career-driven adults take every action to appease their bosses in hopes of promotions. We see older generations gravitate toward perfection, so ev-

in

simplicity Students need more to feel truly prepared

ery action we do just follows in their footsteps. With each year added onto our lifetimes, we progressively yearn to be accepted by others and fit the goals that society has already planned for us. How can we ever be creative if every action is already predetermined? In the eastern world, there is a philosophy known as wabi-sabi. Rooted in Zen Buddhism, wabi-sabi calls for us to value imperfections. In Japanese tea ceremonies, the ceramics holding the tea would be cracked and uneven. While we may see this as ugly, the Japanese would view the rawness and simplicity as the utmost form of beauty. Our culture’s elementary philosophy is to never color outside of the lines. We work until our bodies cannot physically handle the pain, and we entreat our peers for acceptance. We are each human-made bowls pretending to come from a machine. The wabi-sabi philosophy values that each of us are different. Each of our bowls get weathered by nature, chipped by society, discolored by envy and shattered by facades. Each individual one is original—and that is okay. Unleash your creativity. For example, when given a project in class, search for ideas that will be unlike all others. In life, there is a balance between following a prompt and creating your own. Life can only be the so-called perfect if we embrace our imperfections. As long as you find your passions and accept possibilities, your bowl is beautiful. Beauty is being genuine, while coloring outside of the lines and watching your bowl widdle down into the true shape of you.

By Molly O’Connell Editorial Editor

informed students through email and flyers about two costly resources: a two-day SAT bootcamp through Catalyst and an in person Kaplan test prep. The Catalyst program costs $175, while the Kaplan prep starts at $899. The former sessions were free, which accommodated many students and families. Walpole High School should consider not only bringing back the sessions, but also offering them earlier so students can prepare for an earlier test date. As possible solution, Walpole High could charge a nominal fee to offset the expense. What Walpole High needs is more practice, more often. Several schools, such as Braintree and Bishop Feehan, have SAT practice implemented into the curriculum, whether there exists an SAT class during the school day, or simply after school where students receive credit for attending. Students who attended the sessions benefited greatly from the experience. Also, practicing in a group setting with a proctor leading is much more beneficial than practicing alone, as a group setting allows students to collaborate with your peers and ask questions. Schools assume the role of preparing their students pertaining to the college process, which includes standardized testing. Despite the movement of many schools towards the “test optional” route, the SAT and ACT are still extremely important to the college process for many students. Subsequently, students look to their high schools to help prepare them for these tests. Walpole High School, as a result, should definitely consider offering more regarding SAT preparation, as additional practice is needed for students to feel fully prepared.

Last year, Walpole High School offered an optional SAT preparatory class after school in order to prepare for the May SAT. Although this offering helped many students practice for the upcoming test, it did not provide the students with enough to feel fully prepared. However, the solution is not to eliminate the practice, but rather to expand their offerings. Walpole got rid of the shortlived sessions, and they now offer no prep through the school. During these once a week sessions, students completed various practice exercises. To some this practice was very useful, but for most, they sought additional resources in order to feel fully equipped for the test. Now that these sessions are no longer offered, students have to find alternative resources on their own. Preparing for the SAT is the student’s responsibility, and Walpole High does a great job preparing their students for the college process in general; however, when it comes to discussing and preparing students for the SAT o r ACT, more progress can be made. Augmenting the current offerings would greatly benefit the students, as they would not need to look for alternative practice elsewhere. Due to the lack of practice provided to the students, many families seek other means of preparation. Such means may include tutors or additional SAT review classes, both of which are typically very costly. As a result, those who struggle financially are at a disadvantage, and thus have limited resources. Walpole High has recently

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March 2018

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Page 7


Feature

Page 8

March 2018

The buzz about vape : By Jess Ferguson, Callie Ross, and Lindsey Sullivan Assistant News Editor, Staff Writer, and Editor-in-Chief

Vape Culture

Blueberry, watermelon, mango—these are not describing the produce aisle of Stop & Shop, but a few of the thousands of different e-juice flavors available to users. Vapes, more formally known as e-cigarettes, are devices comprised of water vapor that is inhaled and then exhaled by the user. In Walpole High School (WHS), the popularity of vaporizers has dramatically increased over the past two years. Of the 515 respondents of an anonymous survey sent out by The Rebellion, nearly half— 43.3%—admitted to vaping before. This year, WHS administration has confiscated more vaporizers than any other year, mainly taken from students who vape in the bathrooms. “ [ Va p i n g ] doesn’t seem to have any boundaries as far as the kinds of kids, no matter the class level, gender, grade level—it doesn’t seem to matter; it sort of has crossed all the divides,” Walpole High School Principal Stephen Imbusch said. “We had kids who would never have smoked before but are vaping now just because it’s a social thing to do.”

When asked why they vape, respondents answered with things such as “for fun,” “for the tricks,” “to escape the stress of life” and “it’s the new trend.” However, the most common response was “for the buzz”—the buzz received from the high levels of nicotine in the juice. “I use a Juul, and the pods have [50 mL of nicotine]. I vape because I like the buzz the nicotine gives me. It’s like a head-rush, and vaping has just become a norm in society, so it’s pretty easy to buy stuff for it,” Nick* said. Once nicotine is in the body, it is absorbed into the bloodstream and quickly reaches the brain, which releases feel-good chemicals like dopamine and serotonin, producing a headrush. Though this “buzz” does provide a calming and often euphoric effect for users, coming down from this can have negative effects such as increased heart rate and blood pressure, dulled senses and decreased appetite. “I started vaping sophomore year just to see what the hype was all about. I used my friend’s vapes for awhile, but I didn’t buy my own until junior year. I enjoy vaping because I get a nicotine buzz almost immediately after vaping. The buzz makes me feel happy, pleasant and energetic. It also doesn’t interfere with my daily life since the buzz only lasts a few minutes before it goes away,” Kelly* said. Aside from the buzz, vaping serves as a coping mechanism for students, as it has the ability to inhibit negative emo-

Photos/ Anonymous Walpole Students Graphic/ Danielle Borelli

tions like anger and anxiety. “Vaping is actually one of the only things to calm me down. I have anxiety, and before I started vaping I would get nervous for no reason and wouldn’t know what to do,” Hannah* said. While some students use vape to decrease their stress, others use it as an occasional social activity to do with friends. “Personally, vaping is just something I do with my friends—it’s nothing really more than that. I wouldn’t consider myself addicted; it’s more of a social thing to do,” Jill* said. In addition to the students who vape in social situations like parties or with friends, many begin using vapes by themselves because they like the effects they give. “At first, vaping was mostly a social thing for me,” Emily* said. “But then when I started Juuling, I could actually feel myself wanting to do it alone.” In 2015, Walpole increased the legal purchase age to buy cigarettes and e-cigarettes to 21; therefore, students who wish to buy these products must go to stores such as V&R Smoke Shop in Norton, where the legal age is 18. “We get a lot of kids from Bridgewater, Norton, Mansfield, Walpole and Norwood,” Justin, the manager at V&R Smoke Shop, said. “I was going to open up another store in Norwood, but the age [to buy vapes] is 21, and I would lose a lot of my customers.” Though the majority of those who

vape at WHS are upperclassmen (since they can access products easier once they turn 18), 41.8% are freshmen and sophomores. “Our most popular product is the Juuls. Kids really buy most of the vape stuff we have since you can’t buy the glass stuff [such as bongs and pipes] until you are 21,” Justin said. In January, Boston University School of Public Health Professor, Dr. Michael Siegel, visited Westwood High School for an informational night on vaping, specifically Juuls. “It’s difficult to understand why certain behaviors become popular among teenagers. I think part of the appeal is that the devices look cool, are new, and are an alternative to cigarettes, which young people know are extremely dangerous,” Siegel said. Despite potential health risks associated with vape usage, WHS students vape for a variety of reasons, including the buzz, social aspect and calming effect it gives.

Health Risks

Vapes were originally created as a way to curb cigarette smoking: the smoker uses juice with decreasing the nicotine levels until they are able to quit smoking altogether. Vapes, however, are not approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA); therefore, there are no ingredient guidelines. As a result, some pods and juices contain things such as metals including lead and nickel, mass amounts of nicotine and flavor chemicals, which

Page 9

Feature

S c ho o l le a d e r s an d studen ts weigh in o n in c re a sin g use of v aporiz ers

can contain respiratory irritants like benzaldehyde and vanillin. “In these flavored cartridges, they claim it’s just water, but they contain so many different metals that can really affect your lungs,” Walpole High School Nurse Rachel Jackson said. “You’re basically inhaling lead, chromium, magnesium, aluminum and nickel.” 37.5% of students who vape said that they do so many times per day. When asked if they were concerned with the health risks of vaping, 54% of vapers answered no. “Sometimes I do get concerned about the health risks because I already have trouble running from when I started vaping due to the effects on your lungs,” Emily, an athlete whose abilities to perform have decreased as a result of her vape usage, said. Though there are currently no studies confirming the long-term effects, doctors speculate some of the potential effects may include lung cancer, “popcorn lung” (scarring of the lung air sacs) and heart disease. “The government is definitely feeling the heat and knowing that they really need to amp up their efforts to regulate the vaping and do some more research as to what the real effects are,” Jackson said. Because of the nicotine in many of the pods used by students, addiction is a potential risk,

particularly for younger children. In fact, 49.6% of WHS students who vape admitted to using high levels of nicotine in their vapes. Depending on the levels of nicotine in each pod, some can contain enough to equate to a pack of cigarettes in just one hit. “I initially liked vaping because it was a good stress reliever and made me feel better. However, my vaping got to the point where I was worried about my health and even addicted to it, so that’s why I got rid of mine,” Mike* said. 53% of survey respondents from Walpole High who vape own a Juul, and 49.6% use juice containing the highest levels of nicotine possible, such as 50 mL, which is equivalent to smoking 25 packs of cigarettes per bottle of juice. Juul pods, however, are only available with high nicotine levels; therefore, users have no option but to vape with 50 mL of nicotine. “Juuls have the highest nicotine delivery of any electronic cigarette, and therefore it has the highest addictive potential,” Siegel said. “I don’t think addiction is a major problem with the other types of electronic cigarettes on the market because their nicotine delivery is quite poor, but the Juul is different. In terms of the pattern of nicotine absorption into the blood, it mimics that of a real cigarette.” Despite the addictive component of nicotine, students who only socially vape may not think they vape enough to become addicted. “Most kids will tell me that they’re not addicted and that they could quit immediately if

they had to, and my advice is to quit now because once you’re addicted, trying to get off is so much more difficult. Right now if you think you could put your vape away and never touch it again, why wouldn’t you?” Imbusch said.

Administrative Reaction

Originally, administration gave a student caught vaping a detention on the first offense; however, this year, administration decided to issue a suspension on the first offense in hopes of deterring students from doing it again. In accordance with the parent-student handbook, students are also given a chemical health violation. “I have never walked into the bathroom and not seen girls vaping,” Anna* said. 51.3% of survey respondents who admitted to vaping have vaped in the school bathrooms before; consequently, administration has increased the amount of monitoring this year to control the number of students who vape during times such as lunch and snack. “I think there are a lot more girls that are doing it than we are catching. I think it would be beneficial if we had more teachers monitoring the bathrooms because it’s hard to just have one person doing it when it’s so frequent,” WHS Vice Principal Lee Tobey said.

Within the past year, the principal and vice principals have seen a change not only in the number of students vaping while in school, but in the circumstances they do so. Unlike cigarettes, vaporizers emit small clouds of flavored scent that dissipate much more rapidly than cigarette smoke; therefore, catching students who are vaping is more difficult. “Since it’s odorless or smells like candy or fruit, it’s a lot easier for kids to go into the bathroom,” Jackson said. “They’re also a lot smaller and easier to hide than something like a pack of cigarettes, which also have a very distinctive smell.” Due to the size and discrete nature of many of the newer vapes like Juuls, students do not feel the need to hide them and often will use them in open spaces, such as the back of the classroom or in the bathroom. “The most surprising thing I’ve noticed about students vaping is the brazen nature, in which they bring it to school or use it out in the open in the bathroom. There’s no attempt to hide any of it, and I don’t understand it, but I am shocked each time,” Tobey said.

Just a Fad? Although the future of vaping remains uncertain, the trend may follow in the footsteps of cigarette smoking. Currently, there are no long term studies connect-

ing health problems to heavy vape use, but researchers are working along lawmakers to study and regulate vaping. Soon, Massachusetts and national laws could catch up with stores, such as Justin’s, to raise the age of purchase or limit the types of products sold. Similarly, much like how rules prohibiting cigarette use evolved over the years, WHS’ code of conduct has had to adapt to vaping on school grounds. These movements to restrict vape usage only characterize one half of the conflict as many students enjoy the social aspect of vaping with friends, the calming benefits for anxiety, and even the nicotine “buzz”. A vape culture has developed at WHS, but much like the decrease of cigarette smoking over the past 20 years, vape may not be here to stay. “It’s difficult to predict whether vaping is just a fad that will eventually fade out or whether it is here to stay. Based on the data from the last two years, I suspect that vaping is starting to fade a bit. However, I don’t know what’s going to happen with Juuling,” Siegel said. Vape is a topic encompassed by the current lack of regulations, the differing viewpoints between adults and teenagers and the growing issue of usage in schools. Whether the words “very berry” spur thoughts of Stop & Shop or Justin’s V&R Smoke Shop, one thing is for certain: vape culture has made its mark at Walpole High School. *Names have been changed to protect the students’ identities.


Feature

Page 8

March 2018

The buzz about vape : By Jess Ferguson, Callie Ross, and Lindsey Sullivan Assistant News Editor, Staff Writer, and Editor-in-Chief

Vape Culture

Blueberry, watermelon, mango—these are not describing the produce aisle of Stop & Shop, but a few of the thousands of different e-juice flavors available to users. Vapes, more formally known as e-cigarettes, are devices comprised of water vapor that is inhaled and then exhaled by the user. In Walpole High School (WHS), the popularity of vaporizers has dramatically increased over the past two years. Of the 515 respondents of an anonymous survey sent out by The Rebellion, nearly half— 43.3%—admitted to vaping before. This year, WHS administration has confiscated more vaporizers than any other year, mainly taken from students who vape in the bathrooms. “ [ Va p i n g ] doesn’t seem to have any boundaries as far as the kinds of kids, no matter the class level, gender, grade level—it doesn’t seem to matter; it sort of has crossed all the divides,” Walpole High School Principal Stephen Imbusch said. “We had kids who would never have smoked before but are vaping now just because it’s a social thing to do.”

When asked why they vape, respondents answered with things such as “for fun,” “for the tricks,” “to escape the stress of life” and “it’s the new trend.” However, the most common response was “for the buzz”—the buzz received from the high levels of nicotine in the juice. “I use a Juul, and the pods have [50 mL of nicotine]. I vape because I like the buzz the nicotine gives me. It’s like a head-rush, and vaping has just become a norm in society, so it’s pretty easy to buy stuff for it,” Nick* said. Once nicotine is in the body, it is absorbed into the bloodstream and quickly reaches the brain, which releases feel-good chemicals like dopamine and serotonin, producing a headrush. Though this “buzz” does provide a calming and often euphoric effect for users, coming down from this can have negative effects such as increased heart rate and blood pressure, dulled senses and decreased appetite. “I started vaping sophomore year just to see what the hype was all about. I used my friend’s vapes for awhile, but I didn’t buy my own until junior year. I enjoy vaping because I get a nicotine buzz almost immediately after vaping. The buzz makes me feel happy, pleasant and energetic. It also doesn’t interfere with my daily life since the buzz only lasts a few minutes before it goes away,” Kelly* said. Aside from the buzz, vaping serves as a coping mechanism for students, as it has the ability to inhibit negative emo-

Photos/ Anonymous Walpole Students Graphic/ Danielle Borelli

tions like anger and anxiety. “Vaping is actually one of the only things to calm me down. I have anxiety, and before I started vaping I would get nervous for no reason and wouldn’t know what to do,” Hannah* said. While some students use vape to decrease their stress, others use it as an occasional social activity to do with friends. “Personally, vaping is just something I do with my friends—it’s nothing really more than that. I wouldn’t consider myself addicted; it’s more of a social thing to do,” Jill* said. In addition to the students who vape in social situations like parties or with friends, many begin using vapes by themselves because they like the effects they give. “At first, vaping was mostly a social thing for me,” Emily* said. “But then when I started Juuling, I could actually feel myself wanting to do it alone.” In 2015, Walpole increased the legal purchase age to buy cigarettes and e-cigarettes to 21; therefore, students who wish to buy these products must go to stores such as V&R Smoke Shop in Norton, where the legal age is 18. “We get a lot of kids from Bridgewater, Norton, Mansfield, Walpole and Norwood,” Justin, the manager at V&R Smoke Shop, said. “I was going to open up another store in Norwood, but the age [to buy vapes] is 21, and I would lose a lot of my customers.” Though the majority of those who

vape at WHS are upperclassmen (since they can access products easier once they turn 18), 41.8% are freshmen and sophomores. “Our most popular product is the Juuls. Kids really buy most of the vape stuff we have since you can’t buy the glass stuff [such as bongs and pipes] until you are 21,” Justin said. In January, Boston University School of Public Health Professor, Dr. Michael Siegel, visited Westwood High School for an informational night on vaping, specifically Juuls. “It’s difficult to understand why certain behaviors become popular among teenagers. I think part of the appeal is that the devices look cool, are new, and are an alternative to cigarettes, which young people know are extremely dangerous,” Siegel said. Despite potential health risks associated with vape usage, WHS students vape for a variety of reasons, including the buzz, social aspect and calming effect it gives.

Health Risks

Vapes were originally created as a way to curb cigarette smoking: the smoker uses juice with decreasing the nicotine levels until they are able to quit smoking altogether. Vapes, however, are not approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA); therefore, there are no ingredient guidelines. As a result, some pods and juices contain things such as metals including lead and nickel, mass amounts of nicotine and flavor chemicals, which

Page 9

Feature

S c ho o l le a d e r s an d studen ts weigh in o n in c re a sin g use of v aporiz ers

can contain respiratory irritants like benzaldehyde and vanillin. “In these flavored cartridges, they claim it’s just water, but they contain so many different metals that can really affect your lungs,” Walpole High School Nurse Rachel Jackson said. “You’re basically inhaling lead, chromium, magnesium, aluminum and nickel.” 37.5% of students who vape said that they do so many times per day. When asked if they were concerned with the health risks of vaping, 54% of vapers answered no. “Sometimes I do get concerned about the health risks because I already have trouble running from when I started vaping due to the effects on your lungs,” Emily, an athlete whose abilities to perform have decreased as a result of her vape usage, said. Though there are currently no studies confirming the long-term effects, doctors speculate some of the potential effects may include lung cancer, “popcorn lung” (scarring of the lung air sacs) and heart disease. “The government is definitely feeling the heat and knowing that they really need to amp up their efforts to regulate the vaping and do some more research as to what the real effects are,” Jackson said. Because of the nicotine in many of the pods used by students, addiction is a potential risk,

particularly for younger children. In fact, 49.6% of WHS students who vape admitted to using high levels of nicotine in their vapes. Depending on the levels of nicotine in each pod, some can contain enough to equate to a pack of cigarettes in just one hit. “I initially liked vaping because it was a good stress reliever and made me feel better. However, my vaping got to the point where I was worried about my health and even addicted to it, so that’s why I got rid of mine,” Mike* said. 53% of survey respondents from Walpole High who vape own a Juul, and 49.6% use juice containing the highest levels of nicotine possible, such as 50 mL, which is equivalent to smoking 25 packs of cigarettes per bottle of juice. Juul pods, however, are only available with high nicotine levels; therefore, users have no option but to vape with 50 mL of nicotine. “Juuls have the highest nicotine delivery of any electronic cigarette, and therefore it has the highest addictive potential,” Siegel said. “I don’t think addiction is a major problem with the other types of electronic cigarettes on the market because their nicotine delivery is quite poor, but the Juul is different. In terms of the pattern of nicotine absorption into the blood, it mimics that of a real cigarette.” Despite the addictive component of nicotine, students who only socially vape may not think they vape enough to become addicted. “Most kids will tell me that they’re not addicted and that they could quit immediately if

they had to, and my advice is to quit now because once you’re addicted, trying to get off is so much more difficult. Right now if you think you could put your vape away and never touch it again, why wouldn’t you?” Imbusch said.

Administrative Reaction

Originally, administration gave a student caught vaping a detention on the first offense; however, this year, administration decided to issue a suspension on the first offense in hopes of deterring students from doing it again. In accordance with the parent-student handbook, students are also given a chemical health violation. “I have never walked into the bathroom and not seen girls vaping,” Anna* said. 51.3% of survey respondents who admitted to vaping have vaped in the school bathrooms before; consequently, administration has increased the amount of monitoring this year to control the number of students who vape during times such as lunch and snack. “I think there are a lot more girls that are doing it than we are catching. I think it would be beneficial if we had more teachers monitoring the bathrooms because it’s hard to just have one person doing it when it’s so frequent,” WHS Vice Principal Lee Tobey said.

Within the past year, the principal and vice principals have seen a change not only in the number of students vaping while in school, but in the circumstances they do so. Unlike cigarettes, vaporizers emit small clouds of flavored scent that dissipate much more rapidly than cigarette smoke; therefore, catching students who are vaping is more difficult. “Since it’s odorless or smells like candy or fruit, it’s a lot easier for kids to go into the bathroom,” Jackson said. “They’re also a lot smaller and easier to hide than something like a pack of cigarettes, which also have a very distinctive smell.” Due to the size and discrete nature of many of the newer vapes like Juuls, students do not feel the need to hide them and often will use them in open spaces, such as the back of the classroom or in the bathroom. “The most surprising thing I’ve noticed about students vaping is the brazen nature, in which they bring it to school or use it out in the open in the bathroom. There’s no attempt to hide any of it, and I don’t understand it, but I am shocked each time,” Tobey said.

Just a Fad? Although the future of vaping remains uncertain, the trend may follow in the footsteps of cigarette smoking. Currently, there are no long term studies connect-

ing health problems to heavy vape use, but researchers are working along lawmakers to study and regulate vaping. Soon, Massachusetts and national laws could catch up with stores, such as Justin’s, to raise the age of purchase or limit the types of products sold. Similarly, much like how rules prohibiting cigarette use evolved over the years, WHS’ code of conduct has had to adapt to vaping on school grounds. These movements to restrict vape usage only characterize one half of the conflict as many students enjoy the social aspect of vaping with friends, the calming benefits for anxiety, and even the nicotine “buzz”. A vape culture has developed at WHS, but much like the decrease of cigarette smoking over the past 20 years, vape may not be here to stay. “It’s difficult to predict whether vaping is just a fad that will eventually fade out or whether it is here to stay. Based on the data from the last two years, I suspect that vaping is starting to fade a bit. However, I don’t know what’s going to happen with Juuling,” Siegel said. Vape is a topic encompassed by the current lack of regulations, the differing viewpoints between adults and teenagers and the growing issue of usage in schools. Whether the words “very berry” spur thoughts of Stop & Shop or Justin’s V&R Smoke Shop, one thing is for certain: vape culture has made its mark at Walpole High School. *Names have been changed to protect the students’ identities.


Page 10

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March 2018


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March 2018

“Women House” empowers feminist artists Local Concert The Washington D.C. art exhibit rebels against traditional female roles By Eva Clarke Staff Writer

Photo/ nmwa.org

It is frustrating to think people are so quick to name a male painter, yet struggle to think of a well-represented female artist. Women create beautiful works, from Frida Kahlo’s selfportraits to Georgia O’Keeffe’s wonderous flower paintings. Yet, they still lack representation in modern day, especially in museums, as compared to the overwhelmingly male Laurie Simmon’s sculpture, “Walking House,” on display at dominated representation in the art world that continues to fill mu- er to form an all female exhibit. seums and art shows all over the world. Women in the 1970’s A revamped feminist project were frustrated with the lack of fehas landed 36 female artists an exhibit male art in museums as well as in the National Museum of Women in the troubling distinction of women the Arts (NMWA) in Washington, D.C. as housebound—and decided to The exhibit, named “Wom- take matters into their own hands. en House,” features artistic works Cofounders of the Califorfrom all female artists and in- nia Institute of the Arts Feminist Art cludes many themes of disman- Program, Judy Chicago and Miriam tling the domesticity of women. Y Schapiro, advocated for this change qet this is not the first time in society and decided to set up a women have banded togeth- project they called “Womanhouse.”

Dance April’s

Company production

Chicago and Schapiro collected the members o f the feminist program and set up their “museum” in a crumbling, rundown Hollywood mansion that would be demolished soon after the exhibit closed. The mansion was picked to exemplify and dismantle the conventional ideas of a home, previously known to be kept by a woman. Being the first female-centered art installation to be the exhibit. showcased in the West, the project made history in the art world and simultaneously gained respect for feminist movements. The feminist movement has not only inspired the gallery, but also the minds of students at WHS. Juniors Erin Mouradian and Lily Ahmed have created a new club they call the Intersectional Feminism club. If interested in visiting, the exhibit is open until May 28 at the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, D.C.

prepares of Tabula

for Rasa

A team effort transforms a blank slate into contemporary radicalism By Catherine Hurwitz Entertainment Editor

Philosopher John Locke claimed in the late 17th century that everyone is born into the world with the same blank slate, and they can only process their level in the universe through sensory experiences. Thus, intrinsic abilities do not exist, and the outside world is the determining factor for the inside self. Aside from today’s political and ethical disagreements, everyone can agree that chaos is prevalent in the world. Richard Kim, director of the Walpole High School Dance Company (Dance Co.), uses Locke’s Tabula Rasa philosophy to accent themes in this year’s production on April 6 and 7 at 7:30 p.m. “The show is a reminder to all of us that regardless of how you think, feel, how you were brought up, etc., we are all the same,” Kim said. “If you think about it, we’re all spiritual beings having a human experience. And the fact that some people are so adamant about their beliefs, ideals, even within their own labels they have for themselves, none of that is in your DNA... it is all conditioned. And sometimes those conditions could or may be wrong and that’s a hard thing for people to admit or accept regardless of what history has taught us.” Kim treats the company just as seriously as the work that he does with contemporary ballet companies from around the country, such as the MET opera dancers. In total, Dance Co. has choreographed 129 original dances. This year, Dance Co. has five choreographers, four captains (seniors Kelly Drogan and Lauren Capozzi; and juniors Katerina Konstas and Erin Parquette) and two assistant directors

Photo/ Caroline Pitman

Walpole

High

dancers

gather

together

(Alyssa Tempesta and Laura Barajas) who lead the eight seniors, fourteen juniors, six sophomores and eight freshmen in the group. In the weeks leading up to the show, they practice more than three times a week as a group. “Dance Company is definitely a team effort. We all rely on each other greatly to have a smooth season,” Drogan said. “Dedication and commitment are very important to the company, so everyone has a very important role in the making of the show.” Every production has the constants: 10 contemporary dances with voice-overs in between; however, their goal is to grow each year. “This year’s production is similar in the way that it brings the viewer to a different place in every dance. I used to watch the shows, and they always transported me into where the dances were,” Konstas said. “It is different this year because the theme of the show is unique to the rest of the shows.” By highlighting themes of the world and inspiring young girls, Dance Co. has a mission to impact the community. “I remember freshman year I was convinced I was the worst per-

on

stage

for

Tabula

Rasa.

son in the company, but [Kim] gave me a solo, and that was the first time in my life I ever felt that I was genuinely good at something,” Parquette said. “Mr. Kim always gives us little speeches of motivation, and the things he says will literally make me cry when I go home because they instill so much confidence in me. He genuinely believes in us and our capabilities.” In addition to changing the lives of the dancers themselves, they perform contemporary dances to get a reaction out of the audience. Using the ideas of Tabula Rasa, Dance Co. will shape the audience to understand the universe through their experience of watching the show. “I don’t really plan out the dances anymore; I let things happen more organically and put my instincts to the test. We are entertaining the audience but also educating them on one of the arts that is least taught in public schools today. It’s interesting to me that dance—which is somewhat gender-ized—is one of the only ‘arts’ that is not taught in schools, and one that the general public knows the least amount about,” Kim said.

Venues

Explore new music at a more affordable price By Tara Gordon Editor-in-Chief

When it comes to concert night life, it seems as if Walpole High students go to see whoever is playing at Gillette Stadium, Xfinity Center and T.D. Garden. These venues are home to large, pricey, concerts where big name bands and artists play for tens of thousands of concert-goers. Because of their price, students often only go to a few of these concerts per year. However, by checking out these small-scale, local concert venues, students will be able to enjoy themselves more at shows with unique music at an affordable price. PARADISE ROCK CLUB Right next to Boston University’s campus, Paradise Rock Club is a 900 capacity club that many top local rock and alternative performers choose to perform at, as well as American bands visiting Boston for the first time. All tickets are sold as general admission, so students can get an up close view of the performers. When looking for tickets, be sure to check the age limit. Some shows are 18+. Upcoming shows: Andy Grammar- April 13 THE SINCLAIR In the heart of Cambridge, the Sinclair doubles as an “American kitchen” and live music venue. The venue has almost daily concerts—all for a cheap price. The venue, with a 525 capacity, is pretty small, which ensures you will be able to see some local music with a good view. Upcoming shows: Bahamas - May 3 THE MIDDLE EAST Also in Cambridge, you will find the Middle East Nightclub near the MIT campus. This concert venue is home to shows of underground indie bands just starting out. The venue has three different stages: Upstairs, Downstairs and Sonia. The Upstairs and Sonia stages are tiny with a 400 or less capacity, while Downstairs is a 600 capacity nightclub and venue. The venue also hosts frequent open mic nights and local band events. Upcoming shows: Roy Wood$- April 26


March 2018

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March 2018

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Lifestyle

March 2018

Walpole

High

students

with

Page 15

YouTube

channels

Lena Astarjian, Liv Claus, and Aaron Meighan share how their channels began By Grace Donovan Lifestyle Editor

YouTube is home to many famous personalities who have garnered millions of followers from posting videos online—turning their passion into a lifestyle. For students at WHS, making YouTube videos is more of pass-time as the creators indulge in their personal interests. With channels ranging from fashion and lifestyle to vlogs and montages, WHS’ YouTubers use the platform as any other social media: a form of expression. Senior Lena Astarjian shows off her personality on her channel titled “Len & Sar,” which she created with her best friend, Sarine. “Who better to have a YouTube channel with than your best friend,” Astarjian said. The channel features more relaxed, “vlog” (video blogging) style videos of the duo such as “Drive With Us,” where the girls take viewers with them in the car—singing and dancing as they document their friendship.

Photo/ Caroline Pitman

Lena

Astarjian

watches

her

video

“Our channel is really just to make our friends laugh,” said Astarjian, “and, hopefully, we can expand our following and make more people laugh and smile through our videos.” Senior Liv Claus addresses a different audience with her fashion-based content. “I started my channel because I wanted to combine my love for fashion with my passion for filming and ed-

“Get

to

Know

Us

Tag.”

iting,” said Claus, who uses her channel to share her opinions on the latest trends. Claus proves that you do not have to spend hundreds of dollars on editing software to create interesting and engaging content as she edits all of her videos with the free application, iMovie. Freshman Aaron Meighan utilizes a unique editing style to build up his own social media brand. His content ranges from action-packed edits

of his friends flipping and wakeboarding to paid motocross promotions. The majority of his videos are posted on Instagram, where they have accumulated upwards of 2,000 views each; however, he does upload longer versions to YouTube where he has about 200 subscribers. “It all started with a camera, a few friends and just enjoying summer,” said Meighan. Meighan’s videography has allowed him to build new connections he would not have made otherwise. “I started to meet more and more people around Massachusetts… [but] I wouldn’t really call it a business, I just do what I enjoy doing.” It can be a scary thing to put yourself out there on the internet, where it is a lot easier to judge someone when you do not have to say it to their face. Claus, who has received some backlash from peers, shared some advice based on her personal experience. “Don’t let other people’s opinions affect you,” she said. “Just do what you want to do because people are going to judge you anyway, so why not let it be for something you love.”

The Fortnite Phenomenon: A look inside the game that is taking over the lives of high-schoolers everywhere Fortnite

Battle

By Gabriella Donahue Staff Writer

If you have not heard about the game that is dominating most high school boy’s lives (and their snapchat stories), you have probably been living under a rock. “Fortnite,” the “it” video game of the moment, has had a huge influence on how high school boys (and even some girls) are spending the majority of their free time. Some love it, some hate it, and some do not even know what the game is. Nonetheless, it is hard to deny that Fortnite has put a trance on high schoolers everywhere—even rivaling the “Pokémon Go” craze of 2016. Fortnite is a last-one-standing style video game in which 100 players all come together in a round until there is only one player, duo or squad remaining alive. If you are still confused about the game, just ask any Walpole High student. According to freshman Brendan Donahue, many people prefer this Hunger Games style concept. “I like Fortnite better than other games like Call of Duty,” said Donahue, “I think the concept is really cool and more competitive. It’s a nice change.” Senior Darragh Fahey admitted that the game evokes feelings of nostalgia. “Fortnite has really brought me back to my middle school days, playing Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 with my friends,” Fahey said. “I’d say it has brought me and my friends closer.” While the majority of players seem to be boys, there are also some girls who enjoy playing Fortnite. Senior Kerstin Fontanez offered her insights on the game, praising the fact that the game seems to be less violent than most other shooting video games. “In compared to classic shooters like the COD series, [Fortnite] is a

Royale

expands

for

desktop

and

mobile

users

Photo/ Epicgames.com

An

advertising

image

for

lot more vibrant and colorful, a lot less violent, and there is more variety. Between customizing characters, choosing landing spots, being a third person shooter, and fighting for weapons, which are not always guns, the game is a lot more creative and fun as well as high-stakes sometimes,” said Fontanez. While Fortnite certainly has its perks and has earned its spot as the most popular video game of the moment, there are also some cons that come along with the game, one of them being that the game is simply too addictive. Freshman Zach Fair admits that he spends his fair share of time playing the game. “I don’t feel any more tired than normal, but playing less would probably give me more time to focus on

“Fortnite

Battle

Royale”

displays

other things like homework,” said Fair. Friends and family members notice the seemingly unhealthy addiction too. “Ever since my brother started playing Fortnite I have seen him less and less around the house,” said senior Liv Claus. Senior Sami Rodia recognizes a similar situation in her household: “Out of the past two snow days I have seen my brother maybe three times because he has been downstairs playing Fortnite the whole time,” Rodia said. Relationships are being impacted as well. “Yes, I have gotten left on the couch because [my boyfriend] needed the seat closest to the TV, and I have also had to wait outside the house while he was ‘hiding in a bush,’” said

what

gameplay

looks

like.

senior Emily Curtis on how Fortnite has affected her relationship. Players are becoming so addicted that they fear in the 10 seconds they leave the couch to open the door, they will lose their spot in the game and risk their chance at winning the coveted first place finish—known in the game as a “Victory Royale.” Fortnite is undeniably a game with both pros and cons. It is trendy, addicting, and for many extremely entertaining. Despite the fact that some are annoyed by the hype of the game, the majority is all for it. “Fortnite has really revitalized my life—it’s turned it for the better,” said senior Tyler Edouard, “Fortnite is my life.”


Sports

Page 16

March 2018

Walpole Boys relay team sets new school record

The

4x800

By Jack O’Meara Staff Writer

relay

team

Photos/ David Forester

Walpole Boys Track and Field ended their season by breaking a school record. The boys 4x800 meter relay team, consisting of senior Alex Ho, senior captain Sean Corriveau, senior captain Jon Benoit and sophomore Shane Grant, broke the school record of 8:24.64 during the Division III Championships with their time of 8:21.0. The group of boys went on to break it again the next week, with a time of 8:19.10 during the MIAA Auerbach All-State Meet. “Everything came together at the right moment. In many ways, it was the culmination of 9 months of training,” assistant coach Timothy Giblin said. “One of the most impressive things is that the kids who raced show that you don’t have to choose between athletic success and academic excellence.” The old record of 8:24.64 was set back in 2016 by Eamon McCarthy, Andrew Wheeler, Luke Berardinelli and Christian Carr-Locke. The 4x800 meter team entered the Division III Championship with a season best of 8:34.49. Not only did the 4x800 meter team set a new school record, but they also came in 4th place at the Division lll

breaks

record

twice

in

two

weeks

Photo/ David Forester

Senior captain Jonathan Benoit prepares to start his race.

Championships, which qualified them for the MIAA Auerbach All-State Meet. The MIAA Auerbach All State Meet is a competitive meet that is filled with the best runners from across Massachusetts. “After narrowly missing the state meet in XC, it was really great to qualify in winter,” senior captain Jon Benoit said. “Breaking the school record in a relay event was a great way to come back as a group.” In order to qualify for this meet, a runner or team must either place in the

Sophomore Shane Grant battles during the second leg of the relay.

top three during their division championships, or be one of the next nine selected from all remaining athletes. “At the [Division III] meet, Alex Ho had a great lead off leg to put us in great position and that set the tone,” Giblin said. “Shane Grant came off his 5th place finish in the 1000m to move us into contention. By the time Jon Benoit got the baton, we were where we wanted to be and he ran a PR-split and Sean Corriveau brought it home.” During the MIAA Auerbach All State Meet the 4x800 meter team

placed 15th with a new school record of 8:19.10. Ho started off the race with a time of 2:07 and handed off to Grant, who ran the best split with 1:59 and handed off to Benoit. Benoit ran a 2:07 before passing the baton to Corriveau who finished the race with a 2:06 split. “The second time around was really exciting since we ran in a meet that we never expected to get into,” Corriveau said. “I think part of that excitement and relaxed feeling coming into the meet was what helped us break the record again.”

Rebel Baseball and Girls Lacrosse hope to continue success

Both

Bay

state

By Aidan Chariton

Sports Editor

Returning from a 14-10 season that ended in the second round of the Massachusetts Division I State Tournament, Rebel Baseball has high aspirations for the 2018 season. After losing only five seniors from last year and just one pitcher—Brian Gaughan— they hope to further their name as a Bay state baseball powerhouse. “Last season was great,” senior captain and catcher Tyler Page said. “We competed in almost every game against some of the best teams in the state. Hopefully we can build off of last year’s season.” In addition to their stellar overall 2017 record, Walpole’s 9-2 league record won them first place in the Herget Division. They are looking to achieve another successful record against a difficult schedule this year. “Our expectations for this year are the same as every year,” senior captain and first baseman Bryan Kraus said. “We want to win the Herget, win the Bay state, get into the playoffs with a high seed or get into the Super 8.” Walpole is returning all but five players from last year, including sophomores Jack Magane and Chris McLean,

powerhouses

return

who made substantial impacts during their freshman seasons. Magane will play shortstop for the Rebels this year. “Jack is coming off an incredible freshman year,” Page said. “We expect him to do even better [this year].” McLean on the other hand will switch off between right fielder and first baseman; however, his biggest strength is at bat, so he will also function as a designated hitter. “McLean should be one of our big hitters in the middle of the order,” Page said. As a team, the Rebels are known for having a solid line of pitchers in their arsenal, and this year is no exception. Although they are losing Brian Gaughan—their ace from last season—Walpole will have juniors Cam Schlittler, Matt Donato, and Matt Chamoun, along with senior captain Ryan Murphy on the mound this year. “I think we lost a great senior in Brain ‘Larry’ Gaughan,” Murphy said. “But the rest of us have only gotten better, [and] Schlittler will fill Brian’s shoes.” With a sound group of experienced seniors, talented underclassmen, and strong pitchers in their repertoire, the Rebels look to advance their reputation as a baseball powerhouse in the Bay state this 2018 season.

Photo/ Caroline Pitman

Senior Tyler Paige steps up to bat in the Bird Middle School gym during the second day of tryouts.

hungry

for

post-season

wins

Photo/ Dana Dimartino

Seniors

work

out

in

the

weight

By Megan Brigham Staff Writer

room

Walpole Girls Lacrosse returns this spring after two historic seasons. In Walpole’s 2017 and 2016 seasons they won the Herget Title, Bay State Title, and the Division II East Sectional Championship; additionally, the team became the runner up in the D2 State Championship in 2017. This upcoming season, the Walpole Rebels hope to continue their success while moving up to Division I, and replacing three-year starting goalie, Morgan Fontana. “We’ve had experience playing against some of the best teams in the state every year so I think we are ready for the challenge of Division I,” senior captain Libby Foley said. Walpole is now moving into the D1 Eastern Massachusetts league, which is loaded with competitive teams including Westwood, Notre Dame Academy, Needham, and Franklin. Their shift into a new division means Walpole will have to fight through more teams to make the postseason tournament.

preparing

for

the

start

of

the

season.

Walpole recently graduated eight of their starters including, goalie Morgan Fontana. Sophomore Laura Giovaniello, has some experience playing goalie for the junior varsity team. “In terms of varsity competition, there is a quantum leap, but I’m confident [Laura] will figure it out. There are a couple of other girls who have been dabbling in the off season, and like anything else, the best person will get the job,” head coach Michael Tosone said. Throughout the Winter, Tosone implemented weight room training in the Rebels’ program. “In general female athletes don’t lift enough, the fact that our [athletes do] I feel gives at least a minimal competitive advantage,” Tosone said. Goals for Walpole’s season include being a competitive and hard working team, winning games, and challenging their side of the Herget. “Replicating last year’s success is an ambitious goal, and I’d never sell us short but there are more question marks this year than there has been in the past couple of years. However, I still expect us to be a certain level of good,” Tosone said.

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