Page 1

Walpole High School

Pages 8-9

Page 15

Page 16

The

Rebellion facebook.com/therebellion

whstherebellion.com

twitter.com/whstherebellion

snapchat: whstherebellion

Speech and Debate Team competes in Fort Lauderdale Walpole students place in the quarterfinals and semifinals of regional tournament By Jess Ferguson Assistant News Editor

Photo/ Nicole Waters

Walpole High School’s Speech and Debate Team traveled to Fort Lauderdale, from Jan. 12-14 for Sunvitationals, a competition for speech teams across the country. Walpole competed with states including Minnesota and North Carolina, making it their biggest tournament. Three members of the team—freshman Mahoney Cyr, junior Josh Bubly and senior Ellen Irmiter—broke into quarterfinals, and junior Ava Straccia broke into semifinals. “The team did a fabulous job, as four students were finalists,” Speech and Debate Team Coach Emily Murray said. “The students who did not break still learned so much from seeing other competitors from across the country and enjoyed this experience.” Placing 12th out of 66 students Straccia broke into the semifinals in the Humorous Interpretation event, Cyr broke into the top 24 in the same event. “I think the team did really well. Because it was our first regional tournament, we didn’t go in with any expectations. It was a really great bonding experience,” Straccia said. Irmiter and Bubly broke into the

Walpole’s speech and debate competitors, judges, and chaperones get ready to attend the annual Sunvitationals at Nova Southeastern University.

top 24 out of 75 students in the quarterfinals of the Impromptu event. “We had so much fun, and competing was a great learning experience. I would love to see us competing in more events,” Irmiter said. Walpole alumni and former team members were also involved; Mia Straccia, Bobby Waters and Greg Bond attended as judges. “As a judge, I got to see kids from all over perform, which was really amazing,” Bond said. “I defi-

nitely missed everyone on the team and speech in general, so it was so nice being back and cheering on my friends who were able to compete.” Sunvitationals differed from the team’s typical tournaments because it was not in the state league; rather, it was a regional tournament according to National Speech and Debate, so the rules are different and fewer events are offered. The team’s next tournament is at Harvard University on Feb. 17-19. “I honestly went into this tournament

thinking it would be incredibly hard for any students to move on since I’ve never been to this tournament and did not know the competition or size, so I’m really proud of everyone,” Murray said. “I’ve always been of the mentality that students should do this activity to improve their public speaking skills and have fun, and if they do place and earn a trophy, then it’s just icing on the cake. I will say that the results have motivated me and my students to attend more, bigger tournaments in the future.”

School Resource Officer engages the school community Hart

enters

the

school

community Photo/ Julia Kane

Har t poses with Rebel the golden r etriever for the Humans of Walpole’s Instagr am account @humansofwalpole. Receiving 222 likes, it was the account’s most popular post of the year.

By Ashley Kuropatkin and Bridget O’Connor Staff Writers The Golden Opportunities for Independence Organization awarded School Resource Officer Thomas Hart with a Community Service Award on Nov. 25 for his involve-

ment in the program. This organization trains dogs to become either physical or visual aids for their owners, or trains them to be therapy dogs. As a school resource officer, Hart participates by bringing therapy dogs— most recently a puppy named Rebel— to Walpole Public Schools to provide experience for the dogs and stress-re-

one

icebreaker

lief for students; these dogs also help Hart to engage the school community. “One of the reasons I started working with the service dogs was to use it as an icebreaker because I’m just trying to show a friendly face around the school,” Hart said. Hart uses icebreakers to interact with students and break down barriers between the police and the community. His engaging personality allows him to be a familiar and friendly face for students at school, so they can come to him with any problems or concerns they may have. “Hart can be easy-going and goofy but step up and be strict when needed,” Deputy Chief Chris Mackenzie said. As a school resource officer, Hart visits the Walpole Public Schools on a daily basis—a school system with which he already has experience. Growing up in Walpole, Hart graduated from Walpole High School in 2003. He then went to Bridgewater State University to receive his bachelor’s degree and Fitchburg State University for his master’s degree. Afterwards, he was a special education teacher for five years at both Bird and Johnson Middle School, as well as half a year at Elm Street Elementary School. “Hart hit the ground running with the new position and is involved with more than the officers know,” Walpole

at

a

time

Police Chief John Carmichael said. Last summer, the Walpole Police Department held their first-ever Junior Police Academy, which Hart orchestrated along with several other officers. He was an instrumental figure within the new program, according to Carmichael. Just as he was an asset within the new program, Hart also plays a key role in the police department because he opens up gateways of communication between students, staff and parents. “Hart acts as a conduit between the police department and families because he is a good communicator who is able to convey lots of messages,” Carmichael said. Hart’s favorite part about working within the school system is getting to see the children. Outside of school, he interacts with the community as a coach for both freshman and fourth grade E1 football teams. His personality proves how he is both selfless and invested in the community within a variety of different projects and organizations. Some officers may struggle communicating with adolescents; however, Hart’s unique personality allows him to unify members of the community. “Seeing [the kids] grow up and succeed at something they have been working hard on over and over is one of the best parts,” Hart said.

NON PROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE PAID PERMIT NO.8

What is Bitcoin?

Page 5

Volume XXII, issue III Wrestling continues to dominate

WALPOLE, MA 02081

Net Neutrality

January 2018 Healthy Spots for 2018


News

Page 2

January 2018

Breen receives Walpole’s Good Citizen Award

The Daughters of the American Revolution recognize John Henry Breen with their scholastic recognition By Emily Ball News Editor

The Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) honored senior John Henry Breen as Walpole High School’s recipient of the Good Citizen Award. “I like to think of myself as a good person, and apparently a couple other kids in our grade [do] too,” Breen said. “Patriotism is a big part of the award, and being someone who takes a lot of pride in their country, I think I was qualified for the award.” Breen was recognized at the George H. Morse Historic House in Norwood along with four other selected student leaders from the same district. At the ceremony, Breen read the essay he submitted for the scholarship competition and received a certificate, a pin and a flag that flew over the Capitol Building in Washington D.C. Walpole High School’s staff and senior class selected Breen because of his exemplification of qualities including leadership, service and patriotism. Breen had to meet a certain level of criteria and also participate in an essaywriting competition, where he produced an essay about the United States Government and a personal piece on his own benevolence to receive the award.

“I am not the best writer, especially under a time constraint,” Breen said. “But the essay contest prompt about America’s role in the preservation of Democracy and freedom in foreign countries was a question I had no problem answering, since I was able to write about a topic I was interested in and had been learning about the two previous years in U.S. History.” Breen’s award is a community-wide recognition to start with; however, he can be acknowledged statewide if he receives a scholarship associated with the Good Citizen Award. The members of the Norwood Chapter of the DAR review the essays that each participant submits in order to make a decision regarding who they will award scholarship money to. “I believe it is a statewide scholarship contest that I became eligible for, but it is a nationally recognized award with recipients in high schools across the country,” Breen said. “In May, I will receive word on the status of my essay to see if I won a scholarship.” In school, Breen keeps himself busy through his involvement in the National Honor Society, Robotics Club, as well as the varsity lacrosse team. Outside of school, Breen volunteers as a lector at Saint Mary’s Parish and works

Photo/ John Henry Breen

John Henry Breen poses with the certificate and flag that he received from the DAR ceremony.

a part-time job at Monkey Sports. “Sports are very important to me, and having many different roles on many teams in and out of school has helped mold me into the person I am today,” Breen said. In the past, the DAR honored Paul Heffernan as Walpole’s 2016 recipient of the Good Citizen Award. Additionally, Heffernan received a scholarship of $100. “Winning that award was a great honor for me—especially knowing that it was my teachers who chose me as the recipient—and I was proud to represent Walpole at the DAR Meet-

ing,” Heffernan said. “Congratulations to [Breen]; I am sure he fully deserves the award and represents the values of the scholarship well.” While Breen waits until May to be notified of the final status of his scholarship essay, he plans to continue to embody the qualities that the DAR embraces with the Good Citizen Award. “I think the best way to uphold an honor like the one I have won is to keep being a good person,” Breen said. “It doesn’t take hours of community service to create positive impact in a community, so I plan on continuing to do the little things in life that make a difference.”

M a r g a r e t Wa l l g e t s a c c e p t e d i n t o t h e Southeastern Senior District Ensemble

Sophomore at Walpole High sings her way into the district’s mixed choir Photo/ Alex Rodia

Wall rehearses the finale of the winter musical Pippin with the rest of the ensemble.

By Alex Rodia Staff Writer The Southeastern Senior District Ensemble accepted Walpole High School sophomore, Margaret “Maggie” Wall, who will be a part of the district’s mixed choir. The ensemble is open for all high school students to audition for, but since Wall scored high enough in her audition, she also earned a spot to audition for the Massachusetts All-State Chorus on Jan. 19. “I was thrilled to be accepted into districts,” Wall said. “I felt so grateful for all who helped me along the way, and being accepted made me feel more self-confident.” Aside from Wall, freshman Renee Abbott, junior Aaron Suttle and senior Matt Robin were also recommended to audition for the All-State Ensembles. Wall will perform in the Southeastern District Musical Festival along with Robin, who was also accepted into the mixed choir. The festival is two days long, and they must learn the music sent to them beforehand to perform. This year, the songs were “Veni Sanctus Spri

tus,” “Shout Glory,” “I Carry Your Heart With Me,” “Rosas Pandan” and “Mata Del Anima Sola.” The first day is spent rehearsing with the other 215 students in the choir, and the second day is the performance. Preparation played a key role in Wall’s successful audition. Wall constantly sang along to the music track or sang the piece acapella-style, played the piano to better internalize the notes and rhythm and practiced with other students auditioning and the Walpole High School Choral Director, Ashley Prickel. “[Wall] is inquisitive and takes full advantage of the musical opportunities here at WHS,” Prickel said. “I was thrilled when [Wall] was accepted into the Southeastern Senior District Ensemble.” Music has always been a part of Wall’s life. Throughout elementary and middle school, she took piano and guitar lessons and later learned how to play the alto saxophone. In regards to singing, Wall loves a variety of music types. This year, Walpole’s repertoire included a wide variety of these music types: from powerful love songs to Mozart to spontaneous gospel and even to songs in foreign languages.

“Music has been at the core of my life for as long as I can remember,” Wall said. “All of my siblings are musically-inclined and I like to think I took after them in many ways.” Wall’s musical interests also drove her to join the Walpole High Drama Club during her freshman year and she has been in the productions of “The Somewhat True Tale of Robin Hood,” “The Addams Family,” “Mission Improvable” and “A Christmas Carol.” She is currently in the ensemble and the understudy for the character Catherine for this year’s musical, Pippin. “There’s nothing more special than to be able to evoke raw emotion from

an audience, like when they cry after a song, or to hear a young kid say how they’d like to get involved with theater after a performance,” Wall said. Wall’s dedication to the arts since a young age has brought her to where she is today and has developed from just playing instruments to singing and becoming part of Walpole High School’s musicals. “Singing is something I have always enjoyed, and I got more serious about it when I was old enough to audition for festival ensembles like Districts,” Wall said. “I know even as an adult, music will continue to be an important outlet in my life.”

REBELLION

Staff

Walpole High School’s newspaper is committed to informing the public, reflecting the students’ views, creating a public forum and serving as an educational medium. Send a Letter to the Editor. Letters should be 200 words or fewer and can be emailed to walpolerebellion@gmail.com.

Editors-in-Chief Tara Gordon Lillian Hunter Lindsey Sullivan Social Media Director Julia Kane Business Manager Breanna Andreassi News Editor Emily Ball Assistant News Editor Jessica Ferguson Editorial Editor Molly O’Connell

Entertainment Editor Catherine Hurwitz Lifestyle Editor Grace Donovan Sports Editor Aidan Chariton Layout Editor Samantha Simons Website Editor Dana DeMartino Lead Reporter Hope Jordan Photo Editors Ciara Healy Caroline Pitman

Graphics Editor Bridget O’Connor Danielle Borelli John O’Meara Staff Writers Kelly O’Meara Giovanna Anello Chloe Patel Megan Brigham Deepika Pokala Eva Clarke Alexis Rodia Emily Curtis Callie Ross Brianna Deasy Jared Schmitt Gabriella Donahue Charlotte Caitlin Kahaly Ashley Kuropatkin Schoenthaler Emily Smitth Peter Lynch Allison Millette Sarah St. George Rachel Stanton Brendan Moser Olivia O’Connell Sydney Weinacht


January 2018

Advertisements

OCTOBER NOMINEES SENIOR NOMINEES Wishnaida Benoit/ Geometry/ K Milne Jennifer Houser/ Genetics & Biotechnology/ Ms Reichheld WINNER: Jennifer Houser/ Genetics & Biotechnology/ Ms Reichheld JUNIOR NOMINEES Don Noel/ French 4 Honors/ Ms Pierce George Jdey/ Anatomy and Physiology/ Ms L Milne WINNER: Don Noel/ French 4 Honors/ Ms Pierce SOPHOMORE NOMINEES Brendan Carlin/ French 3 Honors/ Ms. Frattasio Sabrina Mann/ Geometry/ Ms. C. Sullivan Abigail Malone/ Geometry/ Mr. St. Martin WINNER: Brendan Carlin/ French 3 Honors/ Ms. Frattasio FRESHMAN NOMINEES Joshua Castillo/ Freshman English/ Mr. Morgan WINNER: Joshua Castillo/ Freshman English/ Mr. Morgan Community Member of the Month: NOMINEE AND WINNER Ian Hollister/ Lunch/ Ms. Hugueley

Page 3

OCTOBER WINNERS SENIOR Jennifer Houser Jen has overcome significant obstacles and continues to stay on top of her work. She is a diligent, conscientious student who has shown strength of will and grit that I wish every student had. She has maintained her standing as one of the top students in class! -Ms Reichheld JUNIOR Don Noel Don speaks beautiful French. He hails from Haiti, where he went to a school and he learned the language from a young age. He always comes into my classroom smiling and open to whatever task may be in store for him. I can depend upon him to correct me when I falter and to help his classmates. He could easily just sit in class and never work, but Don works to improve his written French and his grammar. He is a joyous student who consistently exudes a positive, generous and calm aura. He is a treasure to all of his teachers and classmates. -Ms Pierce SOPHOMORE Brendan Carlin I nominate Brendan Carlin because he is the first one to arrive to my French 3 Honors class with a smile on his face and a silly joke to make me laugh. Brendan has a way about him that makes us relax. Brendan will work with everyone in the class and he respects the French only rule.I had Brendan in class last year and I like his effort and enthusiasm this year. He checks his work and participates as much as he can. He is fun to listen to when he speaks French because he uses fun expressions to make sure that we understand. I am grateful to have Brendan in my class this year. I am proud of you, Brendan -Ms Frattasio

Extracurricular Member of the Month NOMINEES: Jonathan Benoit/ Math Team/ Ms. K. Milne Lindsay Navick/ Speech & Debate/ Ms. Murray

FRESHMAN Joshua Castillo Josh is a diligent student, and a tone setter in the classroom. He leads by example, is enthusiastic, and when he is on his game, serves as example to the rest of the class on how to persevere and focus on the task at hand. Josh takes copious notes in class, and is able to make real world connections to material we have read. Sometimes Josh is so focused, you have to prompt him to get up and go to lunch, as he either wants to finish his thought or complete an assignment before moving on. Josh has been challenged many times in this class, and has responded well to the challenge. Going forward, he is now tasked with meeting the high expectations that he is setting for himself. -Mr Morgan

ACTIVITY AWARD

COMMUNITY MEMBER OF THE MONTH

JONATHAN BENOIT MATH TEAM Jon earned a near perfect 17 out of 18 points in our first SMML competition of the season. He answered all three questions correctly in both the Algebra 1 and Algegra 2 rounds and missed only the one point question in Geometry. Jon was recognized as a high scoring senior in our division the day of the competition and is currently the second highest scoring senior out of 39 teams in the entire league. A four year member of the team, Jon’s experience combined with his excellent problem solving and analytical reasoning skills are proving to be valuable assets to the team. We look to Jon for continued leadership throughout the rest of the season.

IAN HOLLISTER MS HUGUELEY After a table of Junior boys refused to throw away their lunch trash after being directly asked, Ian picked up the trash that wasn’t his without being asked.

CLASS OF THE MONTH PHYSICS CP1 PERIOD 5 My physics class during period 5 has been full of improving and inquirical students. While in the process of building cars powered by just balloons, they worked together to help better each others’ engineering.


Page 4

Advertisements

January 2018


Opinion

January 2018

Page 5

Pulling the plug on Net Neutrality needs to be repealed

Despite

public

outcry,

the

free

Graphic/ Breanna Andreassi

By Breanna Andreassi Business Manager President Obama fought the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to keep the internet free of interference in 2015 under the Open Internet Order, an order that mandated Net Neutrality for internet users. Net Neutrality is the concept that the businesses connecting users to the internet—such as Verizon and Comcast­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­—cannot have the ability to restrict or shape by slowing down or speeding up a user’s connectivity to a specific website. On Dec. 14, 2017, the FCC voted against Net Neutrality. FCC chairman and former Verizon lawyer Ajit Pai argued that the FCC should be nimble in its control in order to al-

low investment to rocket and innovation to thrive. Under the assumption that broadband companies will compete to improve for a higher payoff, Pai and his supporters removed limitations of the internet market. “[With] Ajit Pai’s plan, there would be nothing preventing Comcast from simply blocking sites that are critical of their corporate policies,” campaign director of Fight for the Future Evan Greer said. Censorship of opposing opinions is a direct block of freedom of speech, which allows for the protected distribution of thought and opinion. Under the Trump administration, the free and open internet is at risk. Nationwide, citizens supporting Net Neutrality have reached out to the government through email, letters,

and

open

internet

phone calls and even text. To participate, contact an official of your choosing with details of their contact information found on www.usa.gov. For users, this change means that corporate broadband companies may now slow down, block or charge websites. This change in power could lead to users’ choices being taken away, as companies may change what users can and cannot see, as well as control how slow their connection is. The effect of this regulation will be monumental on less popular sites that lose internet traffic, as they will be forced to lose their domain in response to a lack of profit. Should access to the internet become more costly and difficult to procure, the appeal of business conducted online may be lost completely. Online businesses—such as Ivory Ella and Redbubble—that use social media will struggle to hold roots when there is a lack of marketing possibilities. Affecting our modern economy, entrepreneurs and solid businesses alike will scramble for commerce when so few users may see their content. For students, this vote to repeal the rules of net neutrality affects scholastic achievement. The millions who will graduate high school striving to succeed will struggle with the inability to afford what was once provided: diligence and fairness.

is

dissolving

Additionally, tuition prices will increase if institutions choose to pay subscription costs to providers in order to remain connected to resources. Students grappling with insufficient educational resources and a lack of funds to afford inflation will lead to less internet usage. Thousands of struggling college students will be forced to withdraw if they are unable to pay these costs, affecting the rate of graduation, employment and on, leading to a country straining to connect the bridge between the educated and uneducated. There is still hope for this repeal to be disapproved. Congress may pass a resolution of disapproval to overturn the vote, and a multitude of Americans insist they do so. Numerous members of political parties have called for new legislation after the repeal of Obama-era regulations. Alongside government figureheads arguing the creation of new rules, groups such as Public Knowledge have threatened lawsuits, joined by several state attorney generals including Massachusetts’ Maura Healey. To get involved in the active fight against the FCC’s decision, users should search their congress representatives and contact them via e-mail or voice message in order to publicly denounce the decision and provide citizen input.

Tobey’s internship program pro- Letter to the editor vides essential career experiences Walpole High School P.E. Department WHS Assistant Principal Lee Tobey’s responds to “Monitoring from commmuprogram should expand to all seniors nity needed for senior night” editorial By Lindsey Sullivan Editor-in-Chief

Lee Tobey, one of WHS’s assistant principals, has taken steps over the past two years to implement a work-study program for seniors who have interests beyond academics. A handful of students each year participate in internships of their interest, including the Marine Recruiter and Army Recruiter in Westwood, while still fulfilling credit requirements at WHS. This program creates important and admirable opportunities to allow students to pursue career or military experience, especially if they do not have plans to attend college. This program marks a success at WHS; however, the internship opportunity should be extended and advertised in upcoming years to all WHS seniors. While these students are in the midst of applying to college, experience in a field can make applicants more competitive. In a 2014 survey conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management, 300 employers across the U.S. were asked of the importance of high school internships and experience—to which 60% of which agreed that students should narrow in on career options during high school through internships. 90% agreed that high school internships can help students get into a better college. Furthermore, 89% of employers stated that high school internships will provide students

with a more competitive resume while they apply for college internships, and eventually, full-time jobs. By expanding the senior internship program, WHS students will be set up for college and future success. The internship opportunity should be treated as a privilege for students who qualify. To participate, students complete all of their course and credit requirements. Secondly, each participating senior will be required to submit portfolio items displaying the work they have been engaged in throughout their time at their internship. Dependent on possible schedule changes next year, the internship program can be integrated throughout the year or in the fourth quarter of senior year. In some high schools, such as Middleboro High School and Carver Middle High School, seniors have the ability to leave class for a designated number of periods in the rotation to attend their internship. In others, such as Needham High School, seniors with an internship would not take classes in the fourth quarter, but would instead go to their internship each day. While Walpole High School may not have the means to implement this program immediately, the school should take steps in order to further internship opportunities for students and eventually, open the program up to more seniors. By doing so, WHS students would be better equipped for college and on, as they would now hold a new competitive edge—experience beyond the classroom.

In the November issue of The Rebellion, Editorial Editor Molly O’Connell wrote about the potential risks of athletes participating in senior night. In response to the article, the editors of The Rebellion received an article expressing similar concern over the issue. Here is the letter: “Senior Night” is a well written article highlighting a serious issue. In my experience teaching about hazing in the health curriculum, there is a population of people who don’t view hazing as a serious issue. Ideally, hazing is conducted with an altruistic intent; as a way to create unity and camaraderie. However, most often hazing fosters a culture of revenge. Hazers use the hazing acts as a way to get back at those who hazed them. “If I had to wear ridiculous makeup/clothes etc, then they have to do it too.” The precedent that senior night activities are a “tradition” supports the reality that hazing is occurring. There is an expectation to participate when you join these teams. Hazing gives power to one athlete over another. In many cases, the hazer is in that position of power because of the length of time on

the team, not because they earned any authority. Hazing is an abuse of power. Additionally, the acts the victims are forced to endure are unrelated to the sport. They don’t improve performance or skill. The only purpose of these acts is for the entertainment of the hazers. Athletes join teams because they want to play a sport they enjoy and be a part of something positive, not to be embarrassed. The decision athletes are forced to make to participate or not is an extremely stressful no-win situation. If they participate, they have to deal with the embarrassing outfits/makeup/hair etc, comments from other students, and consequences from teachers/administration. If they don’t participate, they deal with the pressure from their teammates, including underclassmen who participated. All the while, the teammates enforcing the “tradition” suffer no penalties. Finally, Massachusetts hazing law states “consent shall not be available as a defense to any prosecution.” Just because someone agrees to participate does not negate the occurrence of hazing. - Walpole High P.E. Department


Opinion

Page 6

January 2018

All high school clubs should be able to wear honor cords

Stoles and honor cords allow students to display their accomplishments on graduation day By Tara Gordon Editor-in-Chief Currently, only two of Walpole High’s extracurricular groups wear formal accessories on graduation day: National Honors Society (NHS) wears stoles, while seniors in student council wear “leadership” cords. Graduation cords consist of twisted ropes with tassels on each end, while stoles and sashes are a wide ribbon that is worn around a graduate’s shoulders. There is no official policy that outlines which clubs can and cannot wear cords and sashes; however, some clubs have been turned down after asking administration to implement them. Now, as graduation approaches this year, there is a possibility that graduation organizers will not allow any students to wear these vestments, as some believe they lack inclusivity since the majority of the senior class is in neither NHS nor student council. Despite claims that honor cords and stoles are exclusive to various graduates, these accessories should be worn because they award students for their dedication to an activity and add more meaning to the high school graduation ceremony. These celebrative decorations are not meant to exclude others. Rather than only two organizations wearing special vestments, students of any schoolaffiliated club should have the opportunity to wear a cord over their robe at Walpole High’s graduation. Whether it be speech and debate team, drama club, mock trial or science olympiad, students in all of Walpole High’s various clubs should be able to display their achievements on graduation day. For example, former high school senior Claudia Lambert of Palos Verde High School was able to decorate her cap and gown with various honor cords. Like many students, Lambert was a part of many clubs, such as the literary magazine, yearbook committee, and school newspaper.

Graduation at its simplicity is meant to reflect students’ high school careers and yes, high school, at its simplicity, is education and academics. However, for most students, high school is more than going to class every day. Most Walpole high students can be involved in at least one, if not more, of the dozens of extracurricular activities offered. Being a part of these clubs often requires countless hours of work, and maybe even require more work than one’s academic classes at times. Just as a diploma is awarded to a student at graduation for passing their classes throughout their four years, an honor cord awards students for putting in time and effort to a specific organization. Therefore, Walpole High commencement should be more than just handing out a diploma; rather, the ceremony should recognize the highlights of all involved students’ high school careers, rather than only giving out a few scholarships to the clubs’ officers. Giving clubs the opportunity to wear a specific cord along with the traditional cap and gown allows graduates to be recognized for both their accomplishments in academia and their accomplishments in extracurricular activities, thus reflecting the student’s entire high school career. Graduation is not only a time to award students for their hard work. Graduation is also a time for reflecting on the many memories spent with classmates and faculty throughout seniors’ four years. For most, many of these memories are spent outside the classroom and within their extracurriculars. Decorating the graduation cap and gown with cords and stoles from all clubs will allow students to carry their memories from high school with them as they graduate from Walpole High School. If all clubs implemented an honor cord on graduation, some might argue that this still excludes, since there are students who are not a part of any extra curricular clubs. However, although

Photo/Claudia Lambert

Students at Palos Verde High School in California wear honor cords and other accessories on graduation day. Senior Claudia Lambert wore cords for her involvement in the school’s literary magazine. yearbook, newspaper and sailing team.

some clubs are exclusive (i.e. NHS and student council), there are still a variety of activities offered at Walpole High that are open to all students. A student’s decision to refrain from joining any of these programs should not prohibit others from displaying their accomplishments outside academics at graduation. By abstaining from inclusive extracurricular activities, one chooses to not be recognized for accomplishments in such clubs at graduation. Therefore, students who choose to participate in these activities should be able to display their membership

through honor cords without criticism. It is completely justified that WHS has decided to wear gender-neutral gowns at graduation every year. Walpole High students, whether they are male, female, transgender or other, may not be comfortable wearing the assigned color of their sex if it is not their true identity. However, joining extracurriculars are inclusive to everyone; therefore, wearing stoles and honor cords does not exclude others. Even so, allowing clubs to implement their own cords is more inclusive than sole two clubs wearing them now.

Students must accept the inevitability of change

How to prepare for the final semester in Walpole Schools and starting the next chapter By Lillie Hunter Editor-in-Chief

At the start of middle school, I received my first google username - HunterL18@ wpsma.org, the 18 a reference to my graduation year, a year that seemed decades away to my sixth grade self in 2011. Around that same time in sixth grade, we learned about our changing growing bodies and the horrible topic of puberty that is universally dreaded. Thinking back on it, I am not sure why we were all so apprehensive to speak on the subject during health class, but I bet it has something to do with the fear of change. Fast-forward 7 years and here we are in 2018, thousands of google classroom updates and hundreds of enotes later. The bombardment of emails from colleges I have never heard of (Misericordia University?) are starting to stack up along with the constant reminders from my teachers, parents and fellow students that col-

lege is approaching. There is no escaping the end of my academic career in Walpole—an end to vocabulary.com updates and shared google documents. In all stages of life, people go through changes whether it be growing up, changing schools, finding new friend groups or starting or ending a relationship. Every year, people vow to change something in their

lives whether it be going to the gym more often or finally cleaning out your spam mailbox (mine is currently at 6,478 unread) but just a few

weeks into the new year and the #NewYearNewMe trend is already starting to dwindle. The fresh snow that

rang in the New Year is now dirty, and the resolutions people made are melting away like the piles of snow that surround the seniors’ parking spots. Even still, everything is changing all the time, and no one is more aware of this change than high school seniors who are making preparations for the rest of our lives. I have always felt that safe is better than sorry, and to quote a cinematic

masterpiece (a.k.a. High School Musical), “don’t mess with the status quo.” I have spent seventeen years in East Walpole, sixteen years in the same house and thirteen years of my life with the now very familiar faces of my classmates. But the world is ever changing. We will all move on from high school at some point, and even if that seems far in the distance, I promise it will sneak up on you as it did me. I am beginning to come to terms with the belief that nothing lasts forever. It used to bother me because I believed my friends would always be the same people, my family will always be with me, and Walpole will still be my home, but now I look at it in a different light. Yes, I am terrified to leave my friends, my family, my school, and my town; how will everything go on without me? Though, I am sure that everything will be just fine because that is just the way things work and missing something is part of moving on. Change is inevitable: soon enough HunterL18@wpsma.org will be deactivated, and the spam college emails will end, but all of us seniors will move on to new and exciting chapters of our lives.


January 2018

Advertisements

Page 7


Page 8

Feature

January 2018

Bitcoin By Lindsey Sullivan, Aidan Chariton, and Dana DeMartino Editor-in-Chief, Sports Editor, and Website Editor Welcome to 2018. Reality star and real estate mogul Donald Trump is President, Rob Gronkowski is discouraging people from eating Tide Pods, and Bitcoin has become an international buzzword and the treasure behind a digital gold rush. Bitcoin’s value has skyrocketed over the last six months—shooting from $1,992.32 on Jun. 16, 2017 to $19,205.11 on Dec. 14. Currently, a single Bitcoin is worth $13,407.54 on Dec. 31. To learn more about Bitcoin, staff writers contacted Walpole alumni who focused on technology during their four years at WHS and have moved on to invest and profit from this money of the future post-graduation. Mike Demarais, a 2010 Walpole High School graduate, opted out of college and now works as a senior software engineer at Zipdrug, a healthcare technology company based in New York City. He owns some Bitcoin, along with nine other cryptocurrencies. Another alumni, Shane Kelly, a 2015 Walpole High School graduate, also owns Bitcoin and Ardor, another form of cryptocurrency. He is currently majoring in computer science at Rhodes College. Behind Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies is a key element: blockchain technology. These virtual building blocks create a secure and independent network that could change the world’s financial system—and government organizations—indefinitely. “This is still the beginning, [but] cryptocurrencies are here to stay. I think they will grow in value and adoption over time. I think cryptocurrencies will seriously compete with incumbent solutions like the banking network, or even gold as the world’s favorite store of value,” said Demarais.

What is Bitcoin?

Graphic/ Julia Kane Graphic/ Danielle Borelli

Bitcoin marks the original form of cryptocurrency, crypto meaning the art of writing or solving codes, created in 2009 by Satoshi Nakamoto in reaction to the 2008 financial crisis. The true identity of the creator of Bitcoin remains unknown, as Satoshi Nakamoto is an alias, and any programmer who worked with him did so anonymously. Today, there are over 1000 types of cryptocurrency, with new ones constantly being created through a process called forking. Forking occurs when a developer does not agree with the direction a cryptocurrency is moving in and changes the code slightly to fit his or her vision. Truly any individual who possesses adequate coding skills and understands the copyright laws can create a new cryptocurrency. Forking and other improvements in programming point to the constantly developing system of cryptocurrency. “We are years away from seeing a decentralized blockchain currency that can actually handle/compete with the daily transaction volume of Visa, let alone like all currency,” Demarais said. “The technology simply isn’t there yet, but all this money flowing into the industry is bringing in top engineering talent.” The network for Bitcoin contains a fixed number of coins—by 2140, there will be 21 million Bitcoins and no more Bitcoins will be released. This fixed system discourages inflation. One Bitcoin, however, can be divided into pieces. The value of each piece is determined by the free market system of supply and demand. Major companies are beginning to accept Bitcoin in place of fiat currency, including Overstock.com. The potential shift in payment methods could majorly affect the way banks and businesses run their finances. Most recently, Mark Cuban, Shark Tank Investor, decided to bring Bitcoin to the Dallas Mavericks, the NBA team that he owns. Cuban promises that the Mavericks will accept Bitcoin for their NBA tickets. “We will be adding a crypto payment ability,” said Cuban. Cuban tweeted to a fan that the crypto payment sys-

tem will be up and running next season. As more businesses accept cryptocurrency for payment, its demand rises—as does its supply. The crypto-market continuously expands, changes, spikes and divets. While speculation still surrounds cryptocurrencies, the transfer of money without banks promises lasting effects on the economy.

Who is Bitcoining in Walpole? Bitcoin has its critics due to the unpredictable nature of its value. Even Cuban, who plans to accept Bitcoin as payment, cautions to only invest what users can afford to lose. “You’ve got to pretend you’ve already lost your money,” said Cuban. Despite the critics, Walpole High School students and alumni are getting involved in cryptocurrencies. Cryptocurrencies are available to anyone with a bank account. More people in Walpole are buying and selling virtual money because of the increased publicity that the spike in value of Bitcoin has granted cryptocurrencies. Henry Elmhurst, a Walpole High School senior and Robotics Team member, owns Bitcoin Cash, Ether and Ardor. “I’d like to believe that at least some portion of circulating money in the future will be cryptocurrency,” said Elmhurst. Other students at Walpole High School invest in cryptocurrencies with the hope of making a profit as well. Danny O’Leary, a Walpole High School senior, owns a small portion of Bitcoin and about 45% of an Ethereum. “I see particular cryptocurrencies definitely being worth lots of money in about five to ten years,” said O’Leary. Both students made the money they used for their initial investments through their summer jobs. “I heard about [Bitcoin] years ago but only recently got involved because of a coworker,” Elmhurst said.

the money of the future

Those investing in cryptocurrencies continue to speculate as to which currencies will promise the most profit. Although Bitcoin is the original and currently the most popular cryptocurrency with the most users, other forms of cryptocurrency—such as Ethereum, which was pennies two years ago, but is now worth 1,025.91 on Jan. 17—are on the rise. Different methods of mining and storage develop daily, as do coin exchanges.

How do you get started? In order to buy a Bitcoin (or any cryptocurrency) the buyer must have a bank account. Then, users must link their bank account to a digital currency exchange. Although there are thousands of platforms, Coinbase is the easiest place for beginners to purchase. Coinbase offers four cryptocurrencies: Bitcoin, Bitcoin Cash, Ethereum, and Litecoin. When deciding what cryptocurrency to initially invest in, Demarais suggests doing research on the coin’s background and technology. “I always approach new coins as a skeptic,” Demarais said. “The most important metric that affects a coins value is its adoption. Prices will go up if more people are using it.” New buyers need to create a wallet to contain their cryptocurrency safely, which they can create initially through Coinbase. Bitcoin can be stored in a desktop wallet, a mobile wallet, or a paper wallet. Users can choose their preferred wallet to store currency. Mobile and desktop wallets are digital, while paper wallets are printed private keys. “Safest place to keep your coins is offline. Either print out the private keys on paper or buy a dedicated hardware wallet,” Demarais said. To send and receive Bitcoins, the user needs to have their public key (not their private) to supply to the sender of the Bitcoin. The user

should note that Bitcoin transactions are irreversible. Once the user has hit the “Send” feature in their wallet, the blockchain will take some time to confirm the transaction. Through purchasing cryptocurrency, an individual enters the unpredictable world of investment, but also creates opportunities for financial gain. “I have owned/sold/bought/spent/ lost so much Bitcoin over the years I could have probably bought Walpole High School,” said Demarais.

What does this mean moving forward? The increase in Bitcoin’s popularity, as well as the number of cryptocurrency transactions, marks a movement towards digital currency—and major economic changes on an international scale. Bitcoin, along with other forms of virtual money, represents an international currency that is not tied to any government or country. “The pros for a decentralized currency are that no one group or individual has complete control over it and it is easy to transfer money to anywhere in the world,” said Kelly. This flexibility benefits those making international payments or those transferring money overseas, especially families living in different countries. The fee for Bitcoin transactions is not dependent on where in the world the money is transferred, opposed to transaction fees through banks such as Western Credit Union. This difference makes international transactions more accessible and less expensive for the future. Additionally, the free market aspect of cryptocurrency attracts an audience that prefers minimal outside intervention in their finances and investments. “The biggest benefit is that you have

Page 9

Feature

total control over your cryptocurrencies. No one can prevent you from spending it. No one can lock your account. You don’t need to trust anybody or any organization,” said Demarais. Bitcoin is currently not regulated by any government agencies. The freedom of cryptocurrencies from a trusted third party opens the door to downfalls as well. “The cons of a decentralized currency are that because it’s anonymous, it facilitates illegal activities such as tax evasion and money laundering,” Kelly said. The federal government seized proceeds from the sale of Bitcoins on the infamous online drug market Silk Road in 2013. Silk Road is a platform for selling illegal drugs on the dark web, which means it is hidden from regular internet browsers. The Silk Road scandal demonstrated the advantage criminals can reap through the anonymity of cryptocurrencies. Regardless of the cons, the creation and implementation of virtual currencies speaks volumes to the future of money. Michael Demarais said, “I see cryptocurrencies slowly chipping away at the existing financial system, the same way internet companies chipped away at IBM.”

Building the Future Although the blockchain is constantly being improved, Demarais believes the theory behind blockchain technology is here to stay. The blockchain could replace all IDs, like passports and driver’s licenses; the blockchain could bring transparency to elections; the blockchain could replace insurance companies. The public and permanent nature of this network adds reliability and accountability. Jay Neubauer, the computer technology teacher at Walpole High School who taught both Demarais and Kelly, said, “You can’t beat the security of blockchain technology.” It’s 2018. Bitcoin is only the beginning.

DECODING DEFINITIONS: Cryptocurrency: A digital currency in which encryption techniques are used to regulate the amount of currency and verify the transfer of funds, operating independently of a central bank. Fiat Curency:

A currency declared by a country’s government to be a legal tender, but that is not backed by a tangible item. The value of the money is derived from supply and demand rather than the material the money is made of (i.e. U.S. Dollar).

Trusted Third Party:

The “middle-man” of financial transactions— i.e. the bank—that cryptocurrencies eliminate.

Public Ledger:

The principal book or computer file for recording economic transactions. Bitcoin displays a public ledger, meaning that all transaction history is viewable by the internet community.

Miner:

A computer that solves algorithms that verify Bitcoin transactions and enable the blockchain system to work.

Blockchain:

The technology that fuels Bitcoin transactions. Every time a transaction is verified, a new block of data is added to the existing blockchain in a way that is permanent and inalterable, yet public.

Wallet:

The device for storing your cryptocurrency. A wallet can be mobile, desktop, or paper.

Public Key:

The identification number of an individual’s wallet. The public key is what identifies a transaction on the public ledger.

Private Key:

Similar to a pin number for a debit card. The private key is connected to one’s wallet and is accessed by the blockchain during a transaction to verify the user.

Decentralized:

Unaffiliated with any country’s government or fi-

nancial system.

Proof Of Work (POW):

Miners are paid based off the amount of work and energy they contribute to computing and the blockchain.


Page 8

Feature

January 2018

Bitcoin By Lindsey Sullivan, Aidan Chariton, and Dana DeMartino Editor-in-Chief, Sports Editor, and Website Editor Welcome to 2018. Reality star and real estate mogul Donald Trump is President, Rob Gronkowski is discouraging people from eating Tide Pods, and Bitcoin has become an international buzzword and the treasure behind a digital gold rush. Bitcoin’s value has skyrocketed over the last six months—shooting from $1,992.32 on Jun. 16, 2017 to $19,205.11 on Dec. 14. Currently, a single Bitcoin is worth $13,407.54 on Dec. 31. To learn more about Bitcoin, staff writers contacted Walpole alumni who focused on technology during their four years at WHS and have moved on to invest and profit from this money of the future post-graduation. Mike Demarais, a 2010 Walpole High School graduate, opted out of college and now works as a senior software engineer at Zipdrug, a healthcare technology company based in New York City. He owns some Bitcoin, along with nine other cryptocurrencies. Another alumni, Shane Kelly, a 2015 Walpole High School graduate, also owns Bitcoin and Ardor, another form of cryptocurrency. He is currently majoring in computer science at Rhodes College. Behind Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies is a key element: blockchain technology. These virtual building blocks create a secure and independent network that could change the world’s financial system—and government organizations—indefinitely. “This is still the beginning, [but] cryptocurrencies are here to stay. I think they will grow in value and adoption over time. I think cryptocurrencies will seriously compete with incumbent solutions like the banking network, or even gold as the world’s favorite store of value,” said Demarais.

What is Bitcoin?

Graphic/ Julia Kane Graphic/ Danielle Borelli

Bitcoin marks the original form of cryptocurrency, crypto meaning the art of writing or solving codes, created in 2009 by Satoshi Nakamoto in reaction to the 2008 financial crisis. The true identity of the creator of Bitcoin remains unknown, as Satoshi Nakamoto is an alias, and any programmer who worked with him did so anonymously. Today, there are over 1000 types of cryptocurrency, with new ones constantly being created through a process called forking. Forking occurs when a developer does not agree with the direction a cryptocurrency is moving in and changes the code slightly to fit his or her vision. Truly any individual who possesses adequate coding skills and understands the copyright laws can create a new cryptocurrency. Forking and other improvements in programming point to the constantly developing system of cryptocurrency. “We are years away from seeing a decentralized blockchain currency that can actually handle/compete with the daily transaction volume of Visa, let alone like all currency,” Demarais said. “The technology simply isn’t there yet, but all this money flowing into the industry is bringing in top engineering talent.” The network for Bitcoin contains a fixed number of coins—by 2140, there will be 21 million Bitcoins and no more Bitcoins will be released. This fixed system discourages inflation. One Bitcoin, however, can be divided into pieces. The value of each piece is determined by the free market system of supply and demand. Major companies are beginning to accept Bitcoin in place of fiat currency, including Overstock.com. The potential shift in payment methods could majorly affect the way banks and businesses run their finances. Most recently, Mark Cuban, Shark Tank Investor, decided to bring Bitcoin to the Dallas Mavericks, the NBA team that he owns. Cuban promises that the Mavericks will accept Bitcoin for their NBA tickets. “We will be adding a crypto payment ability,” said Cuban. Cuban tweeted to a fan that the crypto payment sys-

tem will be up and running next season. As more businesses accept cryptocurrency for payment, its demand rises—as does its supply. The crypto-market continuously expands, changes, spikes and divets. While speculation still surrounds cryptocurrencies, the transfer of money without banks promises lasting effects on the economy.

Who is Bitcoining in Walpole? Bitcoin has its critics due to the unpredictable nature of its value. Even Cuban, who plans to accept Bitcoin as payment, cautions to only invest what users can afford to lose. “You’ve got to pretend you’ve already lost your money,” said Cuban. Despite the critics, Walpole High School students and alumni are getting involved in cryptocurrencies. Cryptocurrencies are available to anyone with a bank account. More people in Walpole are buying and selling virtual money because of the increased publicity that the spike in value of Bitcoin has granted cryptocurrencies. Henry Elmhurst, a Walpole High School senior and Robotics Team member, owns Bitcoin Cash, Ether and Ardor. “I’d like to believe that at least some portion of circulating money in the future will be cryptocurrency,” said Elmhurst. Other students at Walpole High School invest in cryptocurrencies with the hope of making a profit as well. Danny O’Leary, a Walpole High School senior, owns a small portion of Bitcoin and about 45% of an Ethereum. “I see particular cryptocurrencies definitely being worth lots of money in about five to ten years,” said O’Leary. Both students made the money they used for their initial investments through their summer jobs. “I heard about [Bitcoin] years ago but only recently got involved because of a coworker,” Elmhurst said.

the money of the future

Those investing in cryptocurrencies continue to speculate as to which currencies will promise the most profit. Although Bitcoin is the original and currently the most popular cryptocurrency with the most users, other forms of cryptocurrency—such as Ethereum, which was pennies two years ago, but is now worth 1,025.91 on Jan. 17—are on the rise. Different methods of mining and storage develop daily, as do coin exchanges.

How do you get started? In order to buy a Bitcoin (or any cryptocurrency) the buyer must have a bank account. Then, users must link their bank account to a digital currency exchange. Although there are thousands of platforms, Coinbase is the easiest place for beginners to purchase. Coinbase offers four cryptocurrencies: Bitcoin, Bitcoin Cash, Ethereum, and Litecoin. When deciding what cryptocurrency to initially invest in, Demarais suggests doing research on the coin’s background and technology. “I always approach new coins as a skeptic,” Demarais said. “The most important metric that affects a coins value is its adoption. Prices will go up if more people are using it.” New buyers need to create a wallet to contain their cryptocurrency safely, which they can create initially through Coinbase. Bitcoin can be stored in a desktop wallet, a mobile wallet, or a paper wallet. Users can choose their preferred wallet to store currency. Mobile and desktop wallets are digital, while paper wallets are printed private keys. “Safest place to keep your coins is offline. Either print out the private keys on paper or buy a dedicated hardware wallet,” Demarais said. To send and receive Bitcoins, the user needs to have their public key (not their private) to supply to the sender of the Bitcoin. The user

should note that Bitcoin transactions are irreversible. Once the user has hit the “Send” feature in their wallet, the blockchain will take some time to confirm the transaction. Through purchasing cryptocurrency, an individual enters the unpredictable world of investment, but also creates opportunities for financial gain. “I have owned/sold/bought/spent/ lost so much Bitcoin over the years I could have probably bought Walpole High School,” said Demarais.

What does this mean moving forward? The increase in Bitcoin’s popularity, as well as the number of cryptocurrency transactions, marks a movement towards digital currency—and major economic changes on an international scale. Bitcoin, along with other forms of virtual money, represents an international currency that is not tied to any government or country. “The pros for a decentralized currency are that no one group or individual has complete control over it and it is easy to transfer money to anywhere in the world,” said Kelly. This flexibility benefits those making international payments or those transferring money overseas, especially families living in different countries. The fee for Bitcoin transactions is not dependent on where in the world the money is transferred, opposed to transaction fees through banks such as Western Credit Union. This difference makes international transactions more accessible and less expensive for the future. Additionally, the free market aspect of cryptocurrency attracts an audience that prefers minimal outside intervention in their finances and investments. “The biggest benefit is that you have

Page 9

Feature

total control over your cryptocurrencies. No one can prevent you from spending it. No one can lock your account. You don’t need to trust anybody or any organization,” said Demarais. Bitcoin is currently not regulated by any government agencies. The freedom of cryptocurrencies from a trusted third party opens the door to downfalls as well. “The cons of a decentralized currency are that because it’s anonymous, it facilitates illegal activities such as tax evasion and money laundering,” Kelly said. The federal government seized proceeds from the sale of Bitcoins on the infamous online drug market Silk Road in 2013. Silk Road is a platform for selling illegal drugs on the dark web, which means it is hidden from regular internet browsers. The Silk Road scandal demonstrated the advantage criminals can reap through the anonymity of cryptocurrencies. Regardless of the cons, the creation and implementation of virtual currencies speaks volumes to the future of money. Michael Demarais said, “I see cryptocurrencies slowly chipping away at the existing financial system, the same way internet companies chipped away at IBM.”

Building the Future Although the blockchain is constantly being improved, Demarais believes the theory behind blockchain technology is here to stay. The blockchain could replace all IDs, like passports and driver’s licenses; the blockchain could bring transparency to elections; the blockchain could replace insurance companies. The public and permanent nature of this network adds reliability and accountability. Jay Neubauer, the computer technology teacher at Walpole High School who taught both Demarais and Kelly, said, “You can’t beat the security of blockchain technology.” It’s 2018. Bitcoin is only the beginning.

DECODING DEFINITIONS: Cryptocurrency: A digital currency in which encryption techniques are used to regulate the amount of currency and verify the transfer of funds, operating independently of a central bank. Fiat Curency:

A currency declared by a country’s government to be a legal tender, but that is not backed by a tangible item. The value of the money is derived from supply and demand rather than the material the money is made of (i.e. U.S. Dollar).

Trusted Third Party:

The “middle-man” of financial transactions— i.e. the bank—that cryptocurrencies eliminate.

Public Ledger:

The principal book or computer file for recording economic transactions. Bitcoin displays a public ledger, meaning that all transaction history is viewable by the internet community.

Miner:

A computer that solves algorithms that verify Bitcoin transactions and enable the blockchain system to work.

Blockchain:

The technology that fuels Bitcoin transactions. Every time a transaction is verified, a new block of data is added to the existing blockchain in a way that is permanent and inalterable, yet public.

Wallet:

The device for storing your cryptocurrency. A wallet can be mobile, desktop, or paper.

Public Key:

The identification number of an individual’s wallet. The public key is what identifies a transaction on the public ledger.

Private Key:

Similar to a pin number for a debit card. The private key is connected to one’s wallet and is accessed by the blockchain during a transaction to verify the user.

Decentralized:

Unaffiliated with any country’s government or fi-

nancial system.

Proof Of Work (POW):

Miners are paid based off the amount of work and energy they contribute to computing and the blockchain.


Page 10

Advertisements

January 2018

✓​​ ​Book​ ​driving​ ​lessons​ ​easily​​ ​online! ✓​ ​Plenty​​ ​of​ ​road​ ​tests​ ​readily​ ​available in​ ​Norwood! ✓​​ ​Students​ ​Convenience​ ​always​​ ​a priority! ✓​​ ​Easy​ ​lesson​ ​and​ ​class​ ​Make​ ​Ups! • he​ ​Classroom​ ​is​ ​Always​ ​Free! • ​T • ots​ ​of​ ​Time​ ​Slots​ ​for​ ​Road​ ​Lessons! • ​L • arent​ ​Class​ ​Last​ ​Monday​ ​of​ ​Month! • ​P • ​•​Call​ ​now​ ​for​ ​School​ ​Vacation Express​ ​Classes!


January 2018

Advertisements

Page 11

BUSINESS CARD DIRECTORY Phone: (508) 668-0700

Boylston-Schul-Verein German American Club 8 County St. (rt. 109) P.O. Box 207

Walpole, MA 02081 (508) 660-2018

German Language Classes for Adults and Children

Octoberfest, Summerfest

Event and Wedding Rentals

Website: www.germanclub.org

James & John Turco Insurance Agency, Inc. “Born in the Community, to serve the Community”

23 Stone Street Walpole, MA 02081 (508) 668-1700

757 Main St, Walpole, MA —(508) 660-9762


A&E

Page 12

Feel-good movies to kick off the new year Important themes of fulfillment conveyed in films By Catherine Hurwitz Entertainment Editor

Sports “The Blind Side” In times of hopelessness and trauma, perseverance through personal talents and familial support can shine a light at the end of the tunnel. For Michael Oher (Quinton Aaron) in the 2009 film “The Blind Side,” the life that he was given was rocky. With a drug addict Comedy “Big”

Romantic “Serendipity” Every intricate detail in life happens for a reason; thus, the nostalgia from the past can align with the happiness in the future. Sara Thomas (Kate Beckinsale) in the 2001 film “Serendipity” knows that her destiny will overcome the 10 years, engagements and 3,000

Animated “The Little Prince” Everybody has the chance to have a special relationship when believing in the impossible. The Netflix original film “The Little Prince,” based on Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s 1943 novella conveys both themes. The movie is a story within a story, where a disciplined, overscheduled

little girl (Mackenzie Foy) befriends an aviator (Jeff Bridges), who tells her the story of his encounter with the Little Prince. The aviator and the little girl have a budding friendship, which reflects the friendships that the Little Prince has with his rose, a fox and the aviator himself. A simple children’s story turns philosophical, which is why “The Little Prince” is the ideal movie to reevaluate faith and friendships.

as a mother, the streets of Memphis as a home and 0.6 as a grade point average, Oher’s only hope of success was his football talent. His life all changed when the strict but charismatic Leigh Anne Tuohy (Sandra Bullock) took him into her family; thus, he learns of the power of family and passions. Found on Amazon Video, the “The Blind Side” is Childhood is in the soul of anybody. Appreciating one’s place in the world helps him or her come to be thankful. Josh Baskin (David Moscow) in the 1988 film “Big” is ashamed of his small stature and wishes to the carnival machine Zoltar to be big. To his surprise, Baskin wakes up a grown man (Tom Hanks). Making the most of

powerful, for there is always a chance at a vicissitude for a rewarding life.

miles apart from Jonathan Trager (John Cusack). After one idyllic night together—starting by grabbing the same pair of black cashmere gloves at Bloomingdale’s—Thomas and Trager test their love. They leave their names and numbers in a book, promising each other that if they find the book, then fate says they are meant to be together. “Seren-

dipity” takes the viewer on a journey of chance and hope in a convoluted world.

his new lifestyle, he works for the toy store F.A.O Schwarz, embraces his inner child by jumping on a floor piano and lives in a toy-filled apartment. Due to being a kid-at-heart in the middle of grown ups, Baskin remembers to appreciate the life he had. “Big,” found on Amazon Video, reminds the viewers to be careful for what they wish.

Graphics/ Catherine Hurwitz

Golden Globes fueled by politics and feminism

Time’s

Oprah Winfrey tance of the

Up

during Cecil B

Movement

Photo/ ABC News

her DeMille

By Gabriella Donahue Staff Writer

accepaward

This 75th Golden Globe Awards was certainly more than just an awards show; it was a compelling night fueled by not only historic award recipients but also powerful speeches. With both outfit choices and acceptance speeches revolving around prevention and awareness of sexual harassment in the workplace, both the “Time’s Up” and “#MeToo” movements took center stage. The night began with a sea of black on the red carpet. In support of the anti-sexual harassment group “Time’s Up,” most women—and men—sported all black attire to raise awareness for the social issue. Some, however, chose to go against the blackout, but certainly did not get away without critiques. Actress Blanca Blanco, specifically, wore a rather revealing red dress on the carpet that night and definitely turned heads, and not in a good way.

takes

Most winners of the various awards seemed to center their speeches around social awareness and sexual harassment prevention, specifically paying tribute to the women who have found the courage and bravery to speak out while also addressing gender inequality. Nicole Kidman, winner of best actress in a Mini-series for her performance in “Big Little Lies,” did not shy away from the topic. The actress steered away from a typical acceptance speech and did not thank her family or children. Instead, she seemed to only praise her female co-stars such as Reeth Witherspoon and Shailene Woodley. “Wow! The power of women!,” said Kidman of her co-stars. Natalie Portman also highlighted the gender gap in the film industry during her presentation of the Best Director Award. She used her time on stage to call out the gender inequality in Hollywood, firmly stating, “And here are all the male nominees,” which was followed by an awkward laugh from her co-presenter Ron Howard. There were some highlights however that did not include a hashtag. Sterling K. Brown, who won “Best Actor in a TV Series (Drama)” for his performance in “This Is Us,” also took the stage to voice his feelings. He was the first black man ever to win the award in the 75-year history of the Golden Globes. “What I appreciate so much about this thing is that I am being seen for who I am and being appreciated for who I am. And that makes it that much more difficult to dismiss me, or dismiss anybody who looks like me,” said Brown. Oprah Winfrey, the first black woman to be presented with the Cecil B. DeMille award, arguably gave the

over

the

night

most notable speech of the night. It was expected that Winfrey speak with passion about feminism and social justice, and her speech did not fall short of that expectation. Oprah made Time’s Up more than a hashtag by weaving it through part of her speech denouncing abusive men in the workplace. “Their time is up. Their time is up! Their time is up,” said Winfrey on the subject of power-abusive men, “So I want all the girls watching here now to know that a new day is on the horizon...And when that new day finally dawns, it will be because of a lot of magnificent women...and some pretty phenomenal men, fighting hard to make sure that they become the leaders who take us to the time when nobody ever has to say ‘Me too’ again.” While the mix of awards and politics have been unprecedented, it cannot be disregarded that there were many memorable award winners. “Lady Bird,” won both Best Motion Picture (Musical or Comedy), as well as Best Actress (Saoirse Ronan), and “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri,” ended the night on a high note and took home a whopping four awards: Best Motion Picture (Drama), Best Actress (Frances McDormand), Best Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture (Sam Rockwell) and Best Screenplay in a Motion Picture (Martin McDonagh). The 2018 Golden Globes was definitely one that will not be forgotten. The awards show certainly did not fail to recognize all that Hollywood has to offer, especially with the historical award recipients. The night however may be most remembered by the presidential rumor that has spread through social media and beyond: Oprah 2020.

January 2018

Greta Van Fleet embodies the return of classic rockand-roll

A quartet reviving an unforgettable music genre for a new generation By Dana DeMartino Website Editor

Greta Van Fleet brings hard rock and blues rock together in young packaging with their new EP album, “From the Fires,” which they released this November. Although the band has only released two EP albums, the first being “Black Smoke Rising,” their success seems inevitable. The quartet’s angry yet melodic songs bring Led Zeppelin to mind, but a younger generation than Zeppelin’s composes the majority of Greta van Fleet’s fan base. Greta Van Fleet has been charged with saving rock and roll—and they have already proved themselves up to the task. Their debut single “Highway Tune,” released Mar. 31, rose to number 1 on Billboard’s Mainstream Rock Songs airplay chart. “Highway Tune”’s music video has over six million views, and their popularity continues to increase. Danny Wagner, Sam Kiszka, Jake Kiszka and Josh Kiszka formed the band in Frankenmuth, Michigan in 2012. The three brothers play bass guitar, lead guitar and lead vocals, respectively. Wagner plays the drums. Together, the musicians produce a unique rock sound that listeners cannot ignore. While some critics find the songs on “Black Smoke Rising” to be repetitive and simple, Josh Kiszka’s memorable voice sets the EP apart from other recent rock releases. Greta Van Fleet is bringing attention back to the rock and roll genre that laid dormant amongst teenage listeners for years, and they are doing so with an abundance of talent and skill. Their presence in the music industry justifies hope for rock and roll fans around the U.S. The members’ ages attribute to their young fanbase as Josh, the eldest, is 21 years old. “Highway Tune” was also featured on the Showtime series “Shameless,” which is immensely popular amongst the teenage audience. Greta Van Fleet is reopening the rock and roll platform for teenagers. The band is projected to release a full length album in 2018, and their fans wait impatiently for the next showcase of Greta Van Fleet’s musical prowess. Photo/ Wikimedia Commons

Greta Van Fleet performs onstage at the Red River Valley Fair in Nor th Dakota on July 14, 2017


January 2018

Advertisements

Page 13


Advertisements

Page 14

january 2018

No Wait List • Choose Physical Therapy 1st You have a choice where you get your Physical Therapy PHYSICAL THERAPISTS

• Pre and Post Surgical Joint Replacement Rehabilitation— Schedule an appointment with one of our experts. • All Injuries— If you are in pain, schedule an appointment. • Complete Sports Rehab Center— MSS has treated over 75 NFL and NHL Pros plus over 150 D1 college athletes. LOCATIONS: WALPOLE - 655 Main Street Phone: (508) 668-8900 • Fax: (508) 668-8901

CHIROPRACTORS

WESTWOOD - 940 High Street Phone: (781) 708-9056 • Fax: (781) 708-9058 FOXBORO - 10 East Belcher Road Foxboro Sports Center/Edge Performance Systems Phone: (508) 668-8900 • Fax: (508 )668-8901

MASSAGE THERAPIST

MEDICAL GYM DIRECTOR

NORWOOD - 576 Pleasant Street Compete Indoor Sports Facility Phone: (781) 708-9056 • Fax: (781)708-9058

www.masportspine.com

www.masportspinechiro.com


January 2018

Achieve

your

Lifestyle 2018

nutrition

Page 15

goals

Check out these unique food places to kick-start a new year of healthy eating By Tara Gordon Editor-in-Chief

Big Bear Cafe & Espresso Bar: On the corner of Dedham Center, you will find Big Bear Cafe & Espresso Bar: a cozy coffee shop that offers fresh treats to start the day. Big Bear’s specialty? Toast. Yes, toast. However, this is not like the avocado toast recipe you can find on Pinterest. Big Bear offers a different take on the simple breakfast food, with combinations of artisan breads, fresh fruits, and tasty spreads that will make for a healthy breakfast. Upgrade the standard peanut butter toast with Big Bear’s “Mama Bear,” which consists of Vermont made peanut butter, homemade apple sauce, and sweet cinnamon sugar all on a toasted baguette. Whatever breakfast you may choose, it must be paired with one of Big Bear’s beautifully crafted lattes. Although you can’t go wrong with a hot cafe latte, Big Bear’s seasonal drinks will do more than satisfy your taste buds. With a healthy breakfast and tasty latte, Big Bear Cafe will make your New Year’s resolution a bit easier to stick to. Bowl Boyz: It may be hard to believe the next favorite breakfast stop is an orange food truck that resides behind a Staples in Norwood–but think again. On 10 In-

Top

five

dustrial Way, just beyond the WalpoleNorwood town line, lies Bowl Boyz: the healthiest food truck in our community. Bowl Boyz offers state-of-the-art smoothie bowls, which each customer can design to their liking. The first step is to choose the smoothie itself: a flavorful acai bowl or a bright pink pitaya (better known as the dragon fruit) bowl. Next, add granola for a source of protein. Finally, select the toppings; first, from all of Bowl Boyz fresh grown fruits. The final touch is the sweetest: choose from nutella, peanut butter, agave nectar, and coconut flakes to be drizzled over your bowl. The best part of Bowl Boyz? The sky is the limit. Not only are there dozens of options to choose from, but you can add as many fruits and sweet spreads as you want. Don’t be afraid to break the bank when filling up a bowl with dozens of different fruits: for a small ($8.00) or a large ($10.00), you can get all the tastiest toppings without any extra charges. Bowl Boyz’s orange truck does not run on a routine schedule; however, they are typically open for business 5 days a week. The best way to know Bowl Boyz’s hours is through their Instagram account: @bowl_boyz. Follow them, and you are one step closer to creating the healthy snack of your dreams. Organic Buzz: Non-GMO, vegan, gluten free, 100%

fashion

Photo/Tara Gordon

Acai bowls make for the perfect healthy snack—combining just the right amount of that satisfying sweet flavor to calm your cravings with the protein and nutrients your body needs.

organic: these are the natural ingredients used in all of Organiz Buzz’s healthy eats. Organic Buzz, located within River’s Edge Village in Norfolk, is a recently opened cafe that is sure to boost your new health kick. As stated in their slogan, they will help you recognize that “yes, healthy food can be delicious.” Organic Buzz’s menu is extensive. From coffee to a unique juice bar, the drink options are endless. Not only are the smoothies and juices already packed with vitamins, minerals, amino

trends

acids and enzymes, but you can even add a wellness shot (Flu Shot, AntiInflammatory, Energy, Digestion), each made of different fruits and veggies. For an Instagram worthy picture, choose one of Organic Buzz’s smoothie bowls, like the Apple Pie Breakfast Bowl, which includes apple, banana, coconut milk, oats, flax, chia, apple pie spice. When eating at Organic Buzz, be sure to stay and eat in their calming and quaint atmosphere. With a tasty menu and ambience, Organic Buzz is a hangout spot that can help achieve your 2018 goals.

of

2017

A look back on the trends WHS students chose to incorporate into their school-style

Fur

By Gabby Donahue Staff Writer

Photos/ Grace Donovan, Gabby Donahue & Eva Clarke

Velvet

Students incorporate velvet details into simple accessories such as headbands.

Nearly three decades later, the ‘90s velvet trend appeared in the wardrobes of high school students across the country. At Walpole High School, students showed off both velvet sneakers and outerwear throughout 2017 to create a comfy yet fashion-forward look. Rather than sporting an athletic headband, students pulled hair back with velvetdetailed headbands—a more dressed up take on the popular “athleisure” style. While this material may seem very outthere, it is easier than it looks to dress up any casual outfit with a pop of velvet.

Platform Shoes

Platform shoes are an easy shoe to slide on in the morning while running out the door to school.

From sneakers to slip-ons, platform shoes were a staple throughout 2017. No matter short or tall, most girls here at Walpole High did not hesitate to add a couple inches of height to their outfit. Platform sneakers are super simple to transition from runway to hallway, as they are certainly easier to pull off than a pair of designer heels. Walpole High students were found wearing platform sneakers from many brands—notably Vans and Superga among others.

Supreme

From fluffy sandals to tiny sunglasses, 2017 was full of a variety of standout trends, and Walpole High did not fail to make them their own. Transforming looks sported on the runway and by most of fashion’s elite, WHS students incorporated the year’s biggest fashion trends into their school wardrobes. As trends of the ‘80’s and ‘90’s such as velvet and tracksuits swung back around, some students ended up styling accessories their parents may have worn in high school. Still, many new trends from Supreme to platform sneakers surfaced as front runners. Here are the top 5 trends of 2017 and how WHS students chose to style them:

Supreme backpacks allow students to show off their style while still remaining prepped for school.

Formerly worn exclusively by the elite, Supreme has found new buyers amongst high school students. The timeless sweatshirts and t-shirts found their place in the wardrobes of WHS students, and some even rep accessories like backpacks and phone stickers. However, living on a high school student’s budget means most students buy the designer items second-hand, through dealers or on sites such as eBay.

Senior Oliva Claus completes look with a classic black

her fur

trendy jacket.

During the colder months of 2017, fur surfaced as the go-to fashion accessory. From coats and jackets to the details in a shirt, Walpole High students welcomed the trend to the halls. The gaudy jackets and vests seen in high fashion settings were toned down at WHS with more casual fur vests and winter coats accented with fur hoods from brands like Canada Goose and North Face. Senior Olivia Claus explains how she incorporates the fur trend into her own style. “I think jackets are a cool way to accessorize and add to an outfit,” said Claus, “My fur jacket keeps me warm, but it is also super stylish. I’ve seen a lot of celebrities like Kendall Jenner wearing similar coats, which inspired me to get one for myself.”

Tracksuits

Junior Lily Ahmed shows some personality posing in her vibrant tracksuit.

This 1980’s trend definitely made a name for itself in 2017, especially on the likes of celebrities such as the Kardashians. WHS students certainly were not afraid to try out the trend either. Tracksuits are a more fashion-forward take on the classic leggings and sweatshirt. Brands like Nike and Adidas sell the classic suits, but stores such as Urban Outfitters and the newly popularized I.AM.GIA label offer more trendy sets. Combining the velvet trend with the tracksuit movement, junior Lily Ahmed pulls off two trends in one look whenever she sports her head-turning tracksuit through the halls. “I have seen people on Instagram wearing tracksuits, so I wanted to get both the top and bottom,” Ahmed said, “It was an easy outfit to pick out because it is made to go together.”


Sports

Page 16

January 2018

Don’t mock the rock: an inside scoop on American Curling

Rebellion staff member explores the world of a lesser known Olympic sport By Megan Brigham Staff Writer

With the Winter Olympics approaching on Feb. 9, Americans are eager to watch figure skating and ice hockey and skiers and snowboarders, especially athletes such as Lindsey Vonn and Shaun White and Maddie Bowman. However, few people know John Shuster. Despite his participation in the last three Olympics and his bronze medal in 2006 (the only American medal in his sport), few people know Shuster or his sport of curling, an Olympic sport since 1998. In contrast, Canada has received 10 medals in that time. As a sports reporter in a town known for sports I know little to nothing about the sport of curling. Therefore, I took it upon myself to research this unpopular American sport, and try it out for myself. I found a club in Falmouth, Massachusetts called the “Cape Cod Curling Club.” Their staff members were generous enough to let me learn not only how to play the game, but also to watch members of the club’s U18 (players under 18) practice. Coach of the U18 team, John Murray, showed me around his facility and introduced me to the team. Members included four Falmouth residents: William Gerlach (14), Caleb Jartaer (15), Nicolas Cenzalli (13) and Anna Cenzalli (16). “[In] first grade, the school had a family fun night, and it was curling,” Anna said. “Anybody could come if they wanted, but nobody knew what it was so they weren’t interested. I got one on one time with the coach and

Photo/ Courtney Brigham

Standing in the house, Rebellion staff writer Megan Brigham (on left) poses with the U18 Curling Club Team—Caleb Jartar, Nicolas Cenzalli, William Gerloch, and Anna Cenzalli—after a practice game.

loved it from the first time I started it.” After introductions, Murray taught me the basics of a match prior stepping onto the ice. In a regulation game, two teams of four face against one another. Each team tries to accumulate the most points over 10 rounds by throwing or sliding their 40-pound granite rocks into a zone, or the house: a 12-foot bullseye at the end of the sheet of ice. Teams alternate throwing every two rocks—with each team getting eight throws in a round. At the end of a round, the team with the rock or rocks closest to the center of the house (also known as the button) scores points. Before the competition begins, a curling team must present their lineup. Once a lineup is created, it cannot be changed. “At the beginning we all talked about what we wanted to do, we all have something that we are re-

ally good at,” Nicolas Cenzalli said. The lead throws the first two rocks (and sweeps for others), the second throws the next two rocks (and also sweeps), the vice skip throws the next two (and sweeps and stands in the house), and the skip throws the last two rocks (after standing in the house). While the team warmed up to practice, Murray showed me how to throw and release the rock. I practiced the technique and feet positioning off the ice first, so I had an idea of how to position myself when stepping onto the ice. My dominant foot was used to push against the hack (a device similar to sprinting blocks in track) while my sliding foot was placed behind me, and my shoulders were squared. As a rookie, I found the release of the stone very difficult. Although it appears

as someone is simply letting go of the curling stone, slight movements of the wrist are large indicators as to where the rock will travel. Turning one’s wrist clockwise curls the rock to the right; counterclockwise curls the rock to the left. “Weight control is probably one the hardest skills. For any level curler it’s very difficult being able to control how hard you release the rock,” Murray said. The ice in curling texture consists of small bumps, and are the main reason sweepers are required in the first place. A skilled sweeper can allow the curling rock to move forward as much 10 feet. Also, viewers may take note of all the yelling that occurs after the rock is released. This is done for communication purposes, the skip, who does not sweep, is in the house to alert sweepers of what their speed should be as well as when players are to sweep. Although I never got to try out being the skip, I found sweeping to be my favorite aspect of the game: it gave me a scope of the skill and talent sweepers need to positively impact the match. As for the 2018 Winter Olympics, the U.S. Men’s Curling will attempt to earn their second Olympic medal, and Women’s Curling will play to win their first Olympic medal. Viewers can tune into broadcasting sites as such NBC and NBCSN. Curling events between men and women will be a daily occurence from Feb. 8 to Feb. 25. If you are in the Falmouth area and are looking for a more hands-on experience, rookies are always welcome at the Cape Cod Curling Club. Tell them Megan Brigham sent you.

Wrestling continues to dominate their competition Rebels

are

on

By Aidan Chariton Sports Editor Starting their season with a 13-1 record, Walpole Wrestling showed they are a force to be reckoned with in both the Bay State Conference and Massachusetts. Leading their historic success are senior captains Tyler Splaine and Luke Wassel, who both reached their 100th career wins this season. In addition, head coach Sean Petrosino also notched his 100th victory as a coach at the Nashoba Regional Duals Tournament where the boys took 1st place out of eight teams—with a dramatic 36-35 victory over state powerhouse Central Catholic. At the Marshfield Holiday Tournament, the Rebels placed 8th out of 38 teams in the tournament, but for Splaine, he achieved his triple digit goal. “It felt really good to hit 100 wins, and for all the hard work to pay off,” said Splaine. “Now my focus is on getting to 123.”

track

to

Splaine is referring to former WHS wrestler Matt Wassel—Luke Wassel’s uncle—and his program record of 122 individual career wins. Currently trailing the record by 10 wins, Splaine wants to achieve his next goal of surpassing Wassel to claim the title of most victorious Rebel wrestler ever. “The Marshfield Tournament is not easy, but we had 4 kids place in the top 6 of their weight class,” senior captain Paul Kauranen said. “Everybody wrestled tough, which made us very successful.” On Jan. 6, the Rebels went to the Nashoba Regional Duals Tournament, where they competed amongst seven other teams. Walpole was placed in a pool with Milford, Dracut and Marlboro, all of which Walpole defeated. The victory over Dracut marked Walpole head coach Sean Petrosino’s 100th career win. Then the Rebels met the Central Catholic Red Raiders in the championship of

set

Photo/ Ciara Healy

a

new

school

record

Senior Paul Kauranen attempts to pin opponent during match against High School. Kauranen has yet to be pinned this

the tournament. The competition was intense, as the two teams traded leads multiple times. With only two weight classes left—160 and 170—Central Catholic held the lead, 35-24. The only way that Walpole could surpass Central Catholic, would be to score a pin in both of the remaining matches. Senior Aidan Fitzgerald was up first, and within the first 2 rounds, he managed to pin his opponent. With the Rebels trailing the Red Raiders 35-30, the result came down to the final match. Walpole’s undefeated record was now in the hands of Rebel freshman Mike Gordon. Central Catholic dominated almost all of the match, as Gordon fell behind 7-0 with only 30 seconds remaining in the final period. Suddenly, Gordon busted out of the bottom position and flipped his opponent onto his back. The two wrestlers struggled for position, knowing that their teams’ fates would be decided in these last seconds. With only six seconds left Gordon won the match with a pin. Walpole squeezed out the win against

Needham season.

Central Catholic 36-35; consequently, they won the tournament as a whole. “Winning the Nashoba Duals Tournament the same day as getting my 100th career win was special,” Petrosino said. “Especially because we beat Central Catholic, which is a state power house every year.” Two weeks after their trip to Nashoba, Walpole faced off against Wellesley on the road. The Rebels defeated Wellesley, and Wassel joined Splaine by also collecting his 100th career win. “It was a hard fought win against a good kid,” said Wassel. “It’s nice to achieve a big accomplishment that not many wrestlers get to achieve.” Going forward the Rebels have set the bar high for themselves, with their ultimate goal being a state championship. “Winning a league championship, a sectional championship, and then a state championship are some of our goals,” said Petrosino. “We need to continue to ask ourselves, ‘how can we get better each day?’”

January 2018  
January 2018  
Advertisement