Page 1

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the

Hoofprint

Walnut High School Walnut, CA Volume 49, Issue 3 December 15, 2016 www.whshoofprint.com

Riding on the shoulders of team member senior Keisha Lugito, varsity golf player sophomore Akira Romyanond celebrates Girls’ Golf’s state championship win in the Parade of Champions Tuesday, Dec. 6. “I was trying to get Girls’ Golf recognized and show our spirit. Being able to highlight our accomplishments definitely made an impact on our pride,” Romyanond said. “I was really proud about how much we achieved this year, so my energy skyrocketed during the parade.”

PHOTO BY BY JEFFREY PHOTO JEFFREYTRAN TRAN


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02

7

Mission We, the Hoofprint staff, strive to inform the student body in an accurate, timely and objective manner.

Feature

While we take responsibility for the legitimacy of our

Junior Johnathan Chiu works with his team to build an underwater robot.

reporting, we also recognize the freedom of the press and speech given to us under California Education Code 48907. We seek to reflect the diversity of the school and to be an open forum that encourages student expression and discussion. Through our coverage, we hope to represent the distinct character of the Walnut community.

Staff Print Editors-in-Chief: Cherie Chu, Sabrina Wan

table of contents

3

13

Investigative reporting

Arts

Students and staff members address issues regarding the recent decline of school cleanliness.

Retiring music director Buddy Clements recounts his entire teaching career.

Online Editors-in-Chief: Lisa Shen, Jo Ann Sun Media Manager: Brian Wu Managers: Olivia Chiang, Vivian Lee Business Managers: Airi Gonzalez, Jeffrey Tran Photo Lead: Jeffrey Tran Photo Manager: Airi Gonzalez News Editors: Jessica Huang, Melissa Kim

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Opinion Editors: Brian Chen, Phillip Leung Feature Editors: Natalie Jiang, Albert Law In-Depth Editor: Angela Zhang Scene Editor: Sophia Ding Arts Editors: Kevin Arifin, Angela Cao

In-depth

Sports Editors: Haixin Guo, Julie Lee

This holiday season, examine the different culinary traditions on campus.

Video Manager: Eunice Lin Social Media Editor: Samuel Compolongo Online Media Editor: Caroline Huang Photographers: Jamie Chen, Samuel Compolongo, Sara Corona, Richard Zhang

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Staff Writers: Sarah Aie, Andre Alvarez, Florence Ao, Anabelle Chang, Erica Chang, Amber Chen, Emily Chen, Jamie Chen, Kelly Chen, Nicole Chiang, Jocelyn Chow, Jason Corpin, Sara Corona, Tristan Gonzalez, Brian Honng, Jeremy Hsiao, Justin Jiang, Brandon Lai, Austin Lam, Isaac Le, Samantha Lee, Isabella Leung, Annie Li, Ashley Liang, Ashley Lin, Kyle Lin, Elaine Liu, Cynthia Lu, Jason Luna, Amy Lo, Emily Ng, Bella Pan, Isabella Pollalis, Uniss Tan, Athena Tang, Emmeline Tantry, Sean Wang, Brandon Win, Sherman Wu, Anna Yu, Irene Zhou Adviser: Rebecca Chai

Contact & Media For business/ad inquiries, email business@whshoofprint.com Walnut High School 400 N. Pierre Rd. Walnut, CA 91789 (909) 594-1333 www.whshoofprint.com @WalnutHS_News @WalnutHS_Sports @whspublications @whspublications

5

Sports

Following his parents and grandmother’s footsteps, senior Eric Song continues his family’s tradition of playing basketball.

Opinion

Foreign language classes provide a variety of benefits, but what are some detriments?

11 Scene

Le Pain Quotidien offers a taste of Paris with its simple delicacies and rustic decor.


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december 2016

03 PHOTO BY AUSTIN LAM

Decline in school cleanliness raises concerns A recent rise in littering and vandalism on campus has brought attention to the issue of school cleanliness. Jessica Huang and Melissa Kim

initiative in maintaining a clean

News editors

campus by hosting recycling drives

Recent notice of the decline of cleanliness has prompted students and custodians to initiate change on campus. Some students have taken steps to ensure that the campus remains a suitable learning environment by improving issues with sanitation. “When parents come in to check out the school, the first thing they do is to look at the campus, see how it looks, how the campus is kept up,” custodian Cecil Harris said. “[When] it’s a good environment, it makes the students happy, it makes parents happy and [it] makes me happy.” Several

clubs

and watering plants. “There’s a natural inclination around campus to do the right thing and make our school as clean as possible, and [students] do a good job making sure everything is thrown away in proper places,” junior Adam Ng said. “Personally, it is distracting seeing waste on the ground that hasn’t been thrown away and [has been] left behind.” Despite efforts to preserve a sanitary environment, a recent increase in vandalism around campus has led to restroom restrictions, and has cost the school to replace damaged school materials.

$4,443

including

Environmental Care and Global Awareness (ECGA) and National Honor Society (NHS) have taken

How clean are we?

Students express opinions about their stance in mantaining a better learning environment. COMPILED BY ASHLEY LIANG AND SHERMAN WU

was spent to replace damaged books this year.

SOURCES: ANDREA DELIGIO AND JACQUELINE ROJAS

Alvin Yu, 9

“I do not think that students do a good job cleaning up after themselves. Having an unclean environment can seem unsettling and discouraging. It affects me because it shows that students on this campus do not care enough to clean up after themselves.”

800

estimated books with an average cost of

$100+

will be repaired for damages this year. The C, E and Y Building facilities have been set to close immediately after the school day ends because of the graffiti outbreak in stalls and misconduct of restroom supplies. “This year, [the vandalism rate] has been higher than previous years in general. There have been a number of things, not just in bathrooms,” custodian Patrick McConnell said. Textbooks are also being replaced because of the extensive amount of damage and writing. Likewise, students are writing on desks and causing harm to its surfaces.

“I think that [our school is] pretty clean compared to other schools. We should encourage students to pick up after themselves by promoting environmental Phoebe Cao, 10 awareness, like putting up posters around the school and remembering to keep the world green.”

Although custodians aim to wipe

it’s like that?” operations manager

off any marks, carvings and below-

Jacqueline Rojas said. “That’s just a

surface scratches created by students

known fact. You need to have a clean,

have rendered desks unrepairable

safe [and] healthy environment for

and now require replacement.

kids to be able to learn.”

12 student desks and 5 tables have been

replaced this semester.

$82

Desks cost each, and tables cost

$100 each.

Custodians who have witnessed the deterioration of cleanliness are consistently running eight-hour shifts to address these issues and perform duties such as emptying trash cans and attending to each classroom.

11

There are total custodians in school. “I think there’s a sense of pride

“If you don’t have a clean and

in knowing that your campus is well

safe campus, the kids are not going

taken care of,” McConnell said.

to learn. You don’t want to be in a

“[Walnut] is known in the district as

classroom that’s dirty, or has desks that

one of the cleanest campuses, and it

are sticky, or has food on the floor. How

would be nice for it to continue to be

can you concentrate on your work if

known as that.” Ω

“I think that a majority of students take care of their own trash, but there are people who don’t care and just leave it for other people to pick up. There have been times when I’ve gone to the Alex Tsai, 11 restroom after lunch, and it’s just filthy because people don’t care about picking up after themselves.”

“I think students do a pretty good job of cleaning up after themselves, but there’s a long way to go. We should still be more proactive in doing the Helen Zhou, 12 right thing and cleaning up after ourselves, because the janitors already have a lot of work to do.”


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04

Student statistics

Survey statistics reveal students’ opinions on the tidiness of the school. BASED ON A SURVEY OF 337 STUDENTS

investigative reporting

Q&A: Student initiative

COMPILED BY ANDRE ALVAREZ AND NICOLE CHIANG

Student organizations discuss methods to promote a cleaner environment.

Environmental Care and Global Awareness Audrey Lau

30% strongly agree that the cleanliness 9 in 10 students of our school needs improvement

of students feel uncomfortable using restrooms

70%

students feel that students adequately fulfill

3 in 10 their roles to keep the school clean

Where do you see students litter the most in school?

of students feel uncomfortable using water fountains

82% lunch tables

Co-president

How does your club specifically promote cleanliness? “[ECGA] promotes cleanliness by gathering paper from teachers, recycling bottles, doing park cleanups in our community, raising environmental awareness, promoting eco-friendly activities like hikes and demonstrating simple DIYs to reuse things we would assume had no use.” In what ways do you think students can take better care of our campus? “I think that if students actively participate in the paper donations we have going on at our school, donate bottles, practice throwing away our trash and not walk over the plants, our campus [can be better taken care of].” How does an unclean campus personally affect students such as yourself? “Students may have this false idea that we can continue to litter since it’s so ‘clean.’ But in reality, generating so much trash and leaving it all over the place is still a huge problem for the students of Walnut High School.”

5% of students always throw away litter when they see it

10% classrooms

3%

3%

2%

restrooms

locker rooms

gym

When do you see students litter the most in school? 89%

84%

59% 7% class/tutorial

2%

2%

passing period

after school

Inez Zung

Co-president

students believe a school is judged based on its cleanliness

lunch

National Honor Society

students believe an unclean environment distracts students from learning

How does your club specifically promote cleanliness? “Our purpose is to make sure that the campus looks a little bit more lively. We have Waterworks on Tuesdays and Campus Beautification on Fridays. Waterworks is generally just watering plants. Campus Beautification is watering plus weeding. I hope that what our members get from this is that they’re helping improve our school community. ” In what ways do you think students can take better care of our campus? “I think in general [throwing away trash] keeps everything clean so that people don’t have to walk in messes, and I think it makes the [custodians’] jobs a little bit easier as well.” How does an unclean campus personally affect students such as yourself? “In extreme conditions, if we had a really messy campus that was just not very clean, I think students would tend to have a more careless attitude that would reflect in their work.”

A day in the life of a custodian

Explore the 10 hour schedule of a custodian and the daily duties they fulfill to maintain the school’s appearance.

Day shift

6:00 a.m. Night shift

2:45 p.m.

Unlocking gates

Tidying and vacuuming classrooms

Responding to maintainence calls

Emptying trash bins

Cleaning and locking C, E and Y restrooms

Locking gates

2:45 p.m. 10:30 p.m.


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december 2016

05 EDITORIAL CARTOON BY ERICA CHANG

Editorial Solidarity As homogeneous as we are within the Walnut Bubble, we have varying backgrounds, circumstances and opinions. The diversity of America is reflected in our own. But this issue isn’t a matter of red or blue, or black or white. It is a matter of humanity, of citizenship and of solidarity as we embrace our differences. In light of the election results, it is virtually impossible to dismiss the rising tensions that have permeated the nation. Riots erupted immediately on the streets, #NotMyPresident trended on Twitter and sided arguments have arisen on social media. In our short time alive, we have seen the legalization of marijuana in seven states, the Supreme Court decision to enable gay marriage and increased rights for minority groups. We pride ourselves, as millennials, on our open-mindedness; yet, we throw hate at each other in every way possible. From toxic Youtube and Facebook comments to radical blogs and news sources, people, especially the so-called “accepting” millennials, are suppressing and rejecting ideas that differ from their own. While we have every right to publish our thoughts and speak our minds, we must remind ourselves to concede to our peers in varying degrees: acknowledging, understanding, respecting or even accepting the perspectives they offer. Scornful reactions to ideas unfamiliar to our own cause misunderstanding and division, and the attitude with which we carry ourselves before others is the deciding factor in either mitigating or inflaming disagreement. We, at the Hoofprint, recognize that everyone possesses differing values and viewpoints that should be considered rather than shunned. Attempts to align others’ opinions with ours prevent effective communication that is crucial for cooperation and progress. We must learn to see through the eyes of those around us and overcome differences in order to achieve unity. In the end, all our efforts are expended for the betterment of our friends, peers and communities. Though we may hold strong and sometimes conflicting opinions, we are united in this common goal. And we need to maintain considerate, responsible conversations on campus in order for us to enact the positive changes we want to see. Only through open-mindedness and compromise will our different voices become impactful.

Practicality of foreign languages Though foreign language classes are mandated by UCs and other universities, they generally lack pragmatism in terms of real-world usage. Jamie Chen

is more intriguing or relevant to a

leaves little time for verbal practice. I,

Photographer

future career path? Many say yes,

and presumably many others struggle

but ACT studies show that taking

when the language becomes more

foreign language classes increases

complex than just basic greetings.

linguistic awareness and leads to

We are taught to memorize sentences

higher academic achievements on

rather than understanding the process

standardized testing.

behind them. The low amount

When I walk into language class, I greet my teacher with a greeting and a hearty handshake. It’s a routine now, but I’m starting to wonder if it’s actually teaching me how to greet someone or if I’m just going through the motions. Currently, students are required to take two years of either fine arts or foreign language, but as a requirement for UC schools, many feel obligated to take at least three years of the latter. Though there are clear benefits to learning a second language, the students at Walnut tend to go through the motions and, most likely will never use that language outside of the classroom. Do foreign language classes simply

teach

students

different

languages or do they serve a greater purpose? Could the class spot be

HOW TO GET YOUR OPINIONS PUBLISHED: 1. If you’re interested in getting your work published, type a reply to an article or situation on campus and email it to letter@whshoofprint. com, or draw a comic or political cartoon in black ink and turn it in to Ms. Chai in D-1. 2. Include your name, grade, first period class and phone number. (Anonymous letters will not be published.)

used to take a different class that

The benefits of learning foreign

of verbal practice is what prevents

languages have been evident for

students from truly understanding

quite some time. Reading different

a foreign language, leading some to

languages challenges one to recognize

complain that four years of a foreign

completely

language teaches nothing applicable

different

words

and

meanings, which also raises cultural

to the real world.

awareness. In addition, being bilingual

If we are to address the problem

can also make one more marketable

of students just going through the

when searching for jobs, as it enables

motions of foreign language classes,

individuals to communicate with

we should first look at the classes

more people.

themselves. Foreign language classes

Currently,

the

way

foreign

could be improved greatly with a

languages are taught in school does

different approach in teaching that

not set one up to learn a language

does not focus so much on vocabulary

practically, which does not translate

and basic sentence structure. It is

well into the real world. From the start,

clear that foreign languages are here

students are encouraged to memorize

to stay, but students and teachers

vocabulary and phrases; emphasis on

should consider more organic and

vocabulary and grammar, however,

applicable methods of learning. Ω

Foreign language statistics

28% of students take Spanish 5.6% of people in the world speak Spanish

This graph shows the percentage of Walnut High students who take foreign language classes compared to the percentage of primary language speakers in the world.

4.4% of students take Chinese 14% of people in the world speak Chinese

SOURCES: DUJUAN JOHNSON, VISTAWORLD.ORG

10% of students take French 1.7% of people in the world speak French

4.1% of students take German 3.1% of people in the world speak German


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06

opinion PHOTO BY JEFFREY TRAN

Generation gap Students share their parents’ opinions on the differences between the two generations. COMPILED BY TRISTAN GONZALEZ, ISAAC LE AND SHERMAN WU

“Our parents say that our technology is helping us to have a not only lazy life, but an easier one too. They mention phones, computers, T.V.—all

those

things,

according to them, make our life much

Patrick Dandan, 9

Ω Phon

e

easier than it was merely 20 years ago.”

“When my parents were in school, they had to walk miles from home and back. They were poor so they didn’t have a car that they could use to drive. They see our generation as that one kid who

Yaisha Torres, 9

is privileged, but still does the work. We, in their eyes, are the people who are handed the tools and the equipment and the instructions, but also the ones who are arrogant and headstrong and confident with the legacy that they, we, are building.”

“I feel like [parents] say that because they want to discipline their children so in the future, kids could be independent.

Ashdon LuTran, 10

Katherine Hwang, 12

Comparing the education of two different generations Parents often claim younger generations have an easier school life because of new technological sources, but comparing the education of the two is illogical.

They’re not doing it to annoy their

Sara Corona

walked several miles to school or

Amazon, but according to White

children but really they are teaching their

Photographer

how they had to stay after school

House statistics, we as millennials

and clean the classroom.

have also been handed the worst

children to be more responsible in the future. My parents said that they also

Whether

The comparison between

economy in 80 years. In fact, it

wanted to do their responsibilities chores

it be a teacher,

the two generations is still not

is much harder to make money

because they wanted to lift off the load

a

or

valid when it comes time to see

this generation than the previous

relative,

parent,

off their parents so they could help out

another

older

which had it “harder” in terms

generation,

the family and wouldn’t have to make

generation tends to think that

the

of education or work. With new

between 18 and 34 are earning

their parents to do it.”

the younger generation have life

technological

come

less today in the workplace.

easier. It’s understandable that

elevated standards of education

This is why our parents should

standards

as

Americans

they believe we are the most

and perhaps even a harder

not shun us for having new

“My parents came from a different

privileged generation to date—

curriculum. New resources such

technology

country. They were impoverished and

smartphones, GPS systems and

as laptops and tablets yield a

life”—new eras of living bring

consider the struggles we face today

other surpluses of technology are

higher expectation for quality

new challenges that may not

a distraction. My dad had no shoes

readily convenient. Despite these

work, thus making it perpetually

necessarily be comprehensible by

when he walked to school, or barely

new advancements, however, the

more difficult for students to

different generations.

had enough to nourish everyone. He

two generations should not be

succeed. Online essays turn-

If our parents understand us

thinks that we should be grateful for

compared in terms of difficulty

ins and tutorial videos may be

and we understand them, then

all the luxuries we have. [My parents

in the classroom or in the

different from the old-school

it leads to tolerance rather than

have] taught me to see the world in a

workplace.

chalk and board style of teaching,

mindlessly

but that does not make school any

each other. We as teenagers

easier.

should appreciate the hardships

and

an

competing

“easier

against

different perspective to really appreciate

At some point, teenagers

my life right now. I try not to be as selfish

have heard the classic “When I

with my time as it is disrespectful. They

was a kid I didn’t have this” or

along

our parents went through and

moved to the States for me to get a

“You have it easier than I did when

with education, also presents

likewise, adults should grasp

better education.”

I was your age.” Parents also note,

various differences. Sure, we

the new and developing age of

for example, how some of them

have something like eBooks and

education and work. Ω

The

workplace,


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december 2016

07 PHOTO BY JEFFREY TRAN

My second language is code Junior Johnathan Chiu incorporates his passion for engineering and programming into his robotics competitions. Irene Zhou Staff writer

CALCULATED TO WORK | Junior Johnathan Chiu works with acute accuracy to ensure that his robot will work.

Two years ago, the Hydromechs

hard work has paid off. A lot of teams

team switched from building land to

underwater robots just fall apart in the

underwater robotics.. When building

water because the water gets into the

Robot takeover of the human

underwater robots, Chiu has to use a

system, so it’s a pretty big achievement

race? He likely would have played

cable for communication because Wi-

that ours was so successful,” Chiu said.

a role in that. Junior Jonathan Chiu

Fi and radio frequencies cannot be

The Hydromechs team not only

pursues his passion in engineering by

transmitted under water. Underwater

focuses on competitions, but has started

building underwater robots with the

robotics plays a large role in marine

a new community outreach program

Walnut Hydromechs team.

biology and is very different from

this year. Chiu and other members

normal robotics.

go to the Maryvale Orphanage once

Chiu

developed

an

early

fascination with engineering through

“It’s important to make sure that

a month to teach the children about

helping his dad with projects around

the electricity component of the robot

engineering and to give them some

the house, such as putting up the solar

does not get penetrated by water.

hands-on experience. They teach the

panels for their house. Chiu then

We won second place in state last

girls about robots, build robots from a

joined the Hydromechs team last year

year with our underwater robot and

kit and play a soccer game with them.

to fuel his interest in engineering.

this year we’re hoping to make it to

“I invest a lot of my time in it to

internationals,” Chiu said. Chiu is the engineering focal

“The kids have been through some

in the team and handles all the

traumatizing experiences so we try to

Chiu said. “Robotics is my passion

programming

controls,

account for that when we’re interact

and it’s something that I want to do in

mechanical work, electronics, and

with them. It also helps me develop my

the future.”

wires of the robots. The team works

communication skills and also improve

Chiu gained his first experience

on their robots every Saturday and

my leadership ability.”

with robotics by joining First Robotics

practices driving them. They build

In the future, Chiu wants to build

Competition

Diamond

and test the robots, and if a part does

artificial intelligence systems with his

Bar and building large robots and

not work well, they then redesign and

programming skills, which he is unable

computing them. He then joined

rebuild that part.

to do currently because of a lack of

in

Hydromechs after watching the movie

With previous robots, Chiu has

“Iron Man” and being inspired by all

faced problems with programming,

“Right now, I have a lot of

the robotic elements.

flooding, and electricity components.

science project ideas that I usually

“I joined Hydromechs because I

He and his team were able to solve

enter in competitions but I can only

had an interest in changing the world,

most of these issues this year this year

test with my ideas on the surface. So

and Hydromechs seemed like the

because they were more experienced

I would like to implement my current

perfect opportunity to do so. I feel like

and had a better understanding of

ideas with my skills in the future,”

robotics is the future of the world and

underwater robotics.

Chiu said. “I want to use my skills

I want to be the one to build the most high-tech robot,” Chiu said.

First prototype “We just wanted a working robot, like a drivable one. There were alot of trial and error but we did get [the basis] of the body complete”

“A lot of the kids are really

because I have a lot of interest in it,”

(FRC)

Chiu describes the work in progress he and his crew needed to do in order to finish his robot.

interested in engineering,” Chiu said.

become better at engineering concepts

system,

From start to finish

“I feel really proud when I see that the robot works, because all of our

Intermediate stage “We created our own capsule caps which requiered extreme precision. [The use] of the caps were to tighten the rings on the robot itself”

resources.

to create robots and inventions to improve mankind.” Ω

Final product “[After the body], we moved on to the two arms of the robot. Our robot worked pretty well but there were just a few leaks here and there that we fixed with sponges” COMPILED BY ALBERT LAW


Ω

8 Vegetable oil 3/4 cup cornstarch 1/4 cup yucca flour 1 cup grated feta cheese 1/2 cup grated Queso fresco 2 eggs 1/4 teaspoon baking powder 2 tablespoons sugar

Place all the ingredients, in a medium bowl and mix with hands until dough is soft. Form small balls.

3 cups shredded potato

In a deep pot, heat the vegetable oil to 300°F. Carefully drop the balls in the oil. Cover the pot and after about 3 to 4 minutes, turn the heat up and fry until golden brown.

2 eggs beaten

1/4 cup grated onion

6 saltine crackers crushed

Remove from the oil and drain on a plate lined with paper towels. Serve.

1 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper 1/2 cup vegetable oil

Mix ingredients in a large bowl

4 oz semi-sweet chocolate

Pour enough vegetable oil into a skillet to 1/2-inch deep; heat over mediumhigh heat.

4 cloves

Drop spoonfuls of mixture, first pressing potato mixture against the side of the bowl to remove excess liquid, into the hot oil; slightly flatten the latkes into the oil with the back of the spoon.

Colombian Buñuelos

2 sticks cinnamon 1 can unsweetened evaporated milk 2 teaspons vanilla extract 1/2 teaspoon grated nutmeg

Latkes

Reminiscent of donut holes in appearance, Buñuelos are doughy and savory.

3 recipes in 30 minutes

3 cups water

Cook until browned and crisp, 3 to 5 minutes per side. Drain on paper towel and serve.

1 tablespoon milk

Ω

in-depth

A staple food in Jewish culinary tradition, latkes are enjoyed during Hanukkah.

To get in the spirit of communal cooking during the holidays, here are three simple recipes too try out with family or friends. SOURCES: PERUDELIGHTS.COM | ALLRECIPES. COM | MYCOLOMBIANRECIPIES.COM

Food & tradition

Sugar to taste

In a heavy saucepan bring the water to boil with cinnamon and cloves, for 10 minutes.

Student Statistics

Add the chopped chocolate, stirring until melted. Add evaporated milk, sugar to taste, nutmeg, and vanilla essence.

Kirsten Carlos, 9 “I don’t celebrate religious holidays in December; I don’t even really celebrate Christmas. It might seem surprising, but I mostly eat American food over the break. I’ll have some ethnic food like this dish called Keema, which is shredded beef. My mom also makes different kinds of curry and a lot of meat stew dishes.” “I come from a Salvadoran family so for Christmas we usually cook tamales. It’s just always been part of our custom. Our cooking is a representation of where we come from and ties [us] together. I feel like it represents us because it’s food from our native country brought here with us.”

Kareem Majeed, 10

Vivian Corona, 12

“It’s really fun to just make all these meals. I don’t know when this tradition started, but we’ve always just enjoyed these desserts. My favorite part of celebrating is just being able to get together, and also the food. It helps me better understand where I come from.”

“There isn’t really a reason why I like to eat the things I do, but if I had to choose one, I think eating these dishes is just a reminder of my family’s past and my heritage. I’m pretty sure it’s the only Pakistani thing that my family does, really, so it’s one of my only ways to get in touch with my Pakistani culture.” “Cooking with my family just shows that we’re really connected and that we really value family. When we make make our meals together it just gives us more time to spend together and enjoy. I like cooking, it’s really fun and it’s great that I get to experience with my family.”

The best part about the holidays

What types of food do you eat?

Why do we celebrate ?

Cultural 66%

Serve immediately with a dollop of whipped cream if desired, and a sprinkling of ground cinnamon or grated chocolate.

48%

Peruvian Hot Chocolate

Traditional

Thicker than typical hot chocolate, Peruvian hot chocolate is made from rich ingredients and spices.

Tamales are a North American and Central American dish. The process of making tamales is seen as a ritual and done communally. “We only make them during holiday season, so the whole process of preparing everything, cooking and eating them is fun. Our family makes them out of tradition, and it’s just a fun way to bring us all together.” Tamales Tiffany Casillas, 12

Food

Family time

Gifts

Festive mood

26%

22%

21%

24%

Who we celebrate with

Laddu is typically eaten during muslim and hindu holidays or weddings. During these celebrations, people customarily feed each other the dessert. “My first time eating Laddu was when I was five years old at a friends wedding. I saw eating Laddu as a rite of passage from childhood to youth.” Farhan Baig, 12

Laddu

21% 11%

What we celebrate

of students celebrate the

33%

52%

holidays with distant family

96%

2%

of students celebrate Christmas Tradition

Who prepares the meals? 56%

33%

9%

0%

Religion

Adults

Other

The whole family

I don’t celebrate the holidays

Restaurants Do not eat on holidays

Food for thought In many cultures, there is a tradition of food and eating (or not eating – fasting) associated with the holidays.

Many cultural cuisines are closely tied with traditions within that culture. In America, many immigrant families or families with ethnic backgrounds bring these customs as a way to reconnect to their roots. COMPILED BY ISAAC LE, KYLE LIN AND EMMELINE TANTRY “I usually just have a Filipino dish called lechon, and it’s just a whole pig. A drink that we have is Sago Gulaman. That’s like a filipino boba drink. We usually buy these foods or we make it as a family.”

9

Parts to a Plate

The all encompassing term “happy holidays,” overlooks the interesting factors within each religious or cultural holiday. It’s important to not only be respectful of others’ traditions, but also to understand the cultures or religions that are contained in this one saying. Where traditions come from? How people who have different cultures have brought these traditions to America and made them their own?

Dumplings In Chinese culture, dumplings are customarily eaten during the holidays as well as in daily life. Their dome-like shapes are meant to mimic the shape of gold and they represent prosperity and luck. “There are many kinds of dumplings that originate from different places. They probably have different meanings to different people. For me, dumplings remind me how thankful I should be for a family to have good times with and good food to eat.” Megan Chan, 11

There are staple foods in almost every culinary tradition. Without these key dishes, a holiday meal would be incomplete, so here are staple foods from three different culinary traditions. COMPILED BY NICOLE CHIANG AND SHERMAN WU

Many of us are children of immigrant parents, and as a result, holiday dinners aren’t always made the “all-American” way. Our Thanksgiving dinners may not be decked with a 30-pound turkey, but that doesn’t mean they’re anything short of delicious. Where dishes such as mashed potatoes and candied yams are considered traditional foods in America, cultural dishes signify the initiation of new culinary traditions. The food we eat during the holidays brings us back to our roots. Whether it’s simply getting the entire family together or bringing a piece of your parents’ culture to the dinner table, food unites us or introduces us to other cultures. Angela Zhang, In-depth editor


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10

Boxing inside of the ring

feature

Inspired by his father at a young age, senior Elisha Torreyson hopes to use his boxing to get into the U.S. Navy Boxing team for their special boxing programs. SQUARE UP | Torreyson trains for two hours ever week to perfect his combos and punches

Jeremy Hsiao

Boxing Club, the Jerry Ortiz Boxing Gym or the Chino

Staff writer

Hills Boxing Club. Torreyson currently has a record of 12-4. He uses each match and opponent as a way to

Analyze, fight and never underestimate your

cope with pent up emotions.

opponent. Senior Elisha Torreyson has devoted hours

of his life to boxing, beginning at 10 years old while

seeing [my opponent] getting hit or when he hits me

watching boxing on television.

feeds into me to keep going harder and harder. It taught

me to control my [temper] and be patient as well,”

“[Boxing] is an art. It’s not just ‘you learn how

“The straight adrenaline rush I get from me

to fight someone.’ It’s a lot more than that. You learn

Torreyson said.

patience, self-control, and how to never underestimate

With two years of boxing, countless hours of training,

people,” Torreyson said. “There’s a lot of skill required

and 16 intense matches since 2014, Torreyson has faced

to be a great boxer, [including] the ability to not get

many intimidating opponents within the ring. Although

mad and just go crazy punching on your opponent.”

not all of them ended in victory, they were all fights to

Torreyson began boxing at age 15. Although greatly

inspired

remember.

“[In one match], my opponent had a fourinch reach advantage over me and was huge. He had about one year worth of experience on me as well, which scared me,” Torreyson said. “During this match, he split open a gash

by

well

known

boxers such as Mike Tyson and Saul ‘Canelo’ Alvarez, his biggest

under my eye and it was bleeding a lot too. Unfortunately, [I lost].”

Torreyson hopes to join the United States

role model is his father, a former boxer and black

Naval Academy Boxing Club or the U.S. Navy

belt in Okinawan-style karate. He sets up circuits for

Boxing Team in the future for their prestigious boxing

Torreyson to train on and provides tips in each match

programs.

to combat the opponent.

“My dad motivated me throughout this

me express how I feel. You should be humble and not

“Boxing means a lot to me because it helps

passion of mine. He [has] trained me and was there

flamboyant or else that could hurt the way you fight,”

at all my fights. He was almost like my own cutman. I

Torreyson said. “The ability to just take a breath even

loved it,” Torreyson said.

though you got hit and focus on what you’re going to

do next is a big skill I believe is needed to become a

Torreyson goes two to three times a week

practicing for one to two hours a day at the La Habra

great boxer.” Ω

Corner talk Torreyson gives analysis on his training and the process he goes through to become better. COMPILED BY JEREMY HSIAO PHOTO BY JEFFREY TRAN

SHADOW BOXING TIME: 30 MINUTES

SPEED BAG TIME: 30 MINUTES

HEAVY BAG TIME: 30 MINUTES

SPARRING TIME: 30 MINUTES

“You stand in front of a mirror and throw different combos and jabs to see if everything looks good.”

“This [technique] is for practicing different and various combos to improve speed and hand-eye coordination. It’s a rubber, inflatable bag that hangs from a free hook.”

“This [training] is for practicing power and to practice how you face an opponent. It’s filled with sand and made with same materials as the speed bag.”

“I try to pair up with someone that’s better than me so I can have a challenge. I usually compare based on height and wingspan.”


Ω

11

scene PHOTOS BY JAMIE CHEN

A TASTE OF EUROPE | A long communal table allows customers to sit together or alone while enjoying refreshments. The cafe and restaurant are delicately adorned with homey decorations that contribute to its European cultural vibes. | A classic chickpea soup paired with an American styled smoked mozzarella tartine with a slice of baguette makes for the perfect combination.

Everyday delights at Le Pain Quotidien With its use of simple, organic ingredients, expertly crafted sandwiches and touches of decor, Le Pain Quotidien gives its customers a refreshing taste of Paris. 88 W. Colorado Blvd, Pasadena

accommodates those looking for a

Classical music played faintly in

Captivated by the sweet, rustic

break from the bustling city.

the background, mixing with the

design of the cafe, I expected the

chicken and smoked mozzarella melt and a raspberry lemonade.

The French styled design and

inaudible chatter to create an air

food to be of similar culture. Le Pain

After a brief wait, the raspberry

decor of the exterior invite customers

of relaxation. With the welcoming

Quotidien prides itself on its quality

lemonade arrived first with a separate

inside for a look at the various foods

atmosphere, customers have the

organic food, as noted on the menu,

glass of the leftovers, coming as a

Jamie Chen

for sale. The cafe provides a small

freedom to either mingle or enjoy

so I was unsurprised by the higher

delightful surprise to me as I was

Staff writer

seating area both outside and inside,

time alone. The walls are a simple,

prices. Looking through a selection

expecting only a glass. The drink

with a communal table that stretches

warm maple color and are sparsely

of drinks, salads and hot dishes, I

was a pink, fruity color with bits of

Nestled in the streets of the

throughout the length of the room.

decorated with striped tapestries.

decided on the Baker’s Lunch. This

raspberry pulp. Taste of the raspberry

Old Pasadena shopping district, Le

Pastries, breads and jams are sold in

Oversized salt and pepper shakers sat

would score me a bowl of soup and

in the lemonade was distinctly natural

Pain Quotidien is a combination

displays in the bakery up front while

on each table while several squashes

a Tartine, an open faced sandwich,

and gave the tartness of the lemon a

of a European styled bakery and

the restaurant is farther inside.

sit along the communal table, adding

at the combined price of $12.95—

fragrant twist. Sweetened with agave

countryside cafe with its specialties

Walking in, I was met with the

to the cafe’s unusual appeal. I sat

cheaper than the two if purchased

sugar and diluted with just the right

in organic, homemade breads and

comforting smell of coffee and a

myself at a small wooden table and

individually. Disregarding my usual

amount of water, the drink was not

dishes. Having both refreshments

soothing coffeehouse bumble of

was given a menu not long after by a

thriftiness, I also treated myself to

cloying but rather refreshing. Ω

and meals, Le Pain Quotidien

customers talking among themselves.

waitress with a friendly smile.

a feast of chickpea soup, a grilled

Places to visit this holiday season Here are a few of our favorite places to visit this winter season.

COMPILED BY ASHLEY LIANG PHOTO COURTESY OF UNIVERSALSTUDIOS.COM AND LAZOOLIGHTS.ORG

Los Angeles Zoo Lights

Continued at whshoofprint.com

Universal Studios L.A. County Grinchmas Holiday Celebration

Nov. 18-Jan. 8

Dec. 3-Jan. 1

Dec. 24

Celebrate the new year with an invigorting experience during the Family New Year’s Eve event at L.A. Zoo Lights. The one-night festivity features and extensive buffet dinner and access to the Zoo’s famous light attractions. Guests also have the chance to view the broadcasting of the Time Square ball drop. The alluring glow of the lights also gives a mystical energy to put a unique twist on the equally remarkable occasion.

When deciding on which of the dozens of theme parks in Southern California to visit during the holidays, be sure to stop by Universal Studios, where festive winter and holiday decor line the streets. The iconic 60-foot Grinch Christmas tree that towers over visitors is a must-see. The grand tree and the elaborate Christmas decorations give a sense of actually being in the whimsical world of Dr. Seuss.

To kick off the holiday season, a celebration will be held on Christmas Eve at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in L.A. It showcases the exceptionally diverse cultures prevalent in the L.A. region through contemporary dance routines and over 20 choral performances. As L.A.’s biggest holiday show, this event will definitely captivate and leave a lasting impression on the audience.


Ω

december 2016

12

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas It’s the season to bundle up and enjoy a Christmas movie marathon with this collection of holiday classics. From comedies to fantasies, there is sure to be a favorite for everyone.

COMPILED BY BRIAN HONNG, ISABELLA LEUNG, AMY LO, EMILY NG AND EMMELINE TANTRY PHOTO COURTESY OF IMBD.COM

Arthur Christmas

Elf

A Christmas Carol

Home Alone

The Polar Express

Adventure/Drama

Fantasy/Romance

Drama/Fantasy

Adventure/Comedy

Drama/Fantasy

This comedic drama is set during

A hilarious comedy about a human

A rendition of Charles Dicken’s classic

Home Alone is an adventurous

This 3D animated film tells a fictional

Christmas

Santa

elf finding his father, Elf subtly infuses

book, Disney’s A Christmas Carol

and hilarious series that tells the

story, but its scenic portrayals give it

miraculously forgets to deliver one

Eve,

witty banter and Christmas spirit

features the life of a stingy man—

story of a young child left “home

a realistic feel. The Polar Express

present. Arthur, Santa’s youngest

with a meet-cute romantic storyline.

Ebenezer Scrooge— who meets three

alone”

Through

transports people of all ages back

son, sets foot on an adventure

Its

and

ghosts one night, warning him to

the trilogy,

a young boy uses his

to their childhoods in which they

to make sure that presents are

vibrant scenes are accompanied by

change his ways. This fanciful tale is

spunky

tackle

remember the joys of the holidays

delivered to children everywhere.

colorful commentary and characters,

brought to life by the stylistic choices

challenges during in the middle of

and the excitement of Santa coming

The movie sends a heartfelt message

which will keep viewers laughing

in color and the meticulous details in

the busiest day of the year. Each

on Christmas Day. The viewers are

that everyone should receive a

through the entirety of the film.

the animations. While not as light-

movie compares the reckless actions

able to follow the main character on

Christmas

lighthearted

backdrop

on

Christmas.

imagination

to

Arthur’s

goofy,

Elf ’s candy-crazed characters and

hearted as most Christmas movies,

of adults with the intelligence a kid.

an epic journey to the North Pole on

personality

helps

outright silly humor will be a definite

it conveys a heartwarming message

It is a comedic must-watch movie

a train filled with occurrences only

illustrate the joys of Christmas.

favorite among friends and family.

perfect for the holiday season.

and guaranteed to make you laugh.

one’s imagination can configure.

yet

gift.

where

charming

The Hamilton Mixtape stars a modern twist The Hamilton Mixtape features a compilation of covers and remixes from the original Hamilton Broadway play from today’s hottest artists. PHOTO COURTESY OF GENIUS.COM

Released Dec. 2, 2016

new lyrics and heavy beats on original

One thing the album does really

samplings and melodies from the

well is that it matches individual

musical.

styles with the subject matter and

The album begins with a rap song

essence of the song they’re singing.

made up of an entirely novel track and

John Legend’s rendition of “History

Angela Zhang

lyrics. It alludes to John Trumbull’s

Has Its Eyes On You” has a soulful

In-depth editor

“Declaration of Independence,” a

tune with his characteristic piano

painting depicting the historic signing

accompaniment and minimal ... The

Hamilton the Musical pioneered

of the document it is named for. This

reflective, hopeful tone of this song

this year as the first rap-musical,

intro song sets up significant thematic

itself complements Legend’s powerful,

a tale “about America then, told

and stylistic motifs in the mixtape.

meaning-fraught vocals.

by America now” starring a cast

For example, it notes that the reality

The comedian Jimmy Fallon

predominantly made up of people

is always “messier and richer, kids,

brings humor to the tape in his

of color. After Hamilton’s debut and

the reality is not a pretty picture,

depiction

meteoric rise to fame, playwright

kids” with a basic cadence and rhyme

-- an extremely ostentatious and

Lin Manuel Miranda organized a

scheme.

flamboyant character -- in his cover

of

King

George

III

23-track album featuring old school

In anticipation of this album, I

of “You’ll Be Back,” a message from

rap, pop and alternative artists titled

searched up artists who might appear

the British empire to the rebelling

“The Hamilton Mixtape.”

on the track and was impressed by the

colonies.

It is important to keep in mind

variety both in terms of genres and

Many themes explored in the

that this is a mixtape, meaning

age groups. Now, actually listening

album are especially relevant to

the songs are meant to be different

to the album, it’s baffling to see artists

recent events. In “Who Tells Your

stylistically. Some songs are so similar

such as Alicia Keys, Nas, Queen

Story,” The Roots rap about racial

to the original versions that they can

Latifah, Common, John Legend, Sia,

profiling and the attack on blacks in

be classified as covers while some

and Chance the Rapper on the same

America. Ω

artists took the liberty of laying down

collection.

Continued at whshoofprint.com


Ω

december 2016

13

A doctor, a teacher, a Buddy For the past 33 years, Band and Orchestra Director Buddy Clements has led the music program toward growth and achievement.. PHOTO BY KEVIN ARIFIN

Growth.

a senior, it was a stronger and a better

better,” Wicks said. “I don’t think

program. Every year, we see that

you’ll find two people who work more

When he first began working

there’s been a steady improvement

effectively and closely than we do. We

His last Orchestra concert. His

in the music department, he had a

in the quality of our programs. The

have a pretty unique relationship that

last homecoming football game

developing vision and a band class of

musicianship of kids at Walnut High

you won’t hardly find anywhere else.

performance. His last Marching

23 students huddled inside a regular

School is just phenomenal.”

And we always finish each others—”

Friendship.

from the room adjacent to Wicks’.

Kevin Arifin and Angela Cao Arts editors

Band

Thinking

classroom. Leading the growth of the

about the “lasts” has never been

competition.

program, Clements, along with co-

easy, especially for retiring

director Corey Wicks, now manages

Band

and

“—sandwiches,” Clements yelled

Even before Clements invited

In addition to a friend and

Orchestra

over 240 Band students and over

Wicks to work with him, they were

working partner, Clements has been a

director

160 Orchestra students throughout

close family friends who played gigs

teacher to Wicks. From teaching him

Buddy

several periods. Years of experience,

together since Wicks was in high

basic director skills such as ensuring

Clements.

supportive staff and an undeterrable

school. But after 21 years of co-

showmanship to showing him the

A f t e r

passion have elevated the music

directing, the pair describe themselves

mentoring abilities to connect with

33 years, not only

department to the prestige it claims

as brothers.

and motivate the students, Clements

has the long chain of

today.

“I would say we are really good

has helped prepare Wicks to educate

school award tags—both

“When I look at where we

friends, but it’s more than that. We’re

the next generation of musicians. Ω

silly and honorable—under

started and I think of where it is now,

more like brothers, and we know each

Continued at whshoofprint.com

his Golden Mustang plaque

I honestly think about all the students

other just as well as two people can

reached the floor of his office,

who built on them,” Clements said. “I

know each other. And we know how

but also thousands of students

always tell our current students that

to use his strengths and my strengths

passing through the band room

they’re standing on the shoulders of

together. We’re able to be a lot more

doors have been impacted by

the kids the year before them that

honest with each other than most

the music that Clements has

took the program when they came in

other colleagues, and that makes

brought into their lives.

as a freshman. By the time they left as

it harder in some ways, but mostly

Year by year: A life full of musical memories PHOTOS COURTESY OF JENNIFER DAVID AND BUDDY CLEMENTS

LEADING THE BAND I Director Clements conducts the band during first period to practice for its winter concert.

1976

1984

1995

2010

During the Bicentennial Special at Disneyworld, Clements gathers with musicians from around the world.

Clements conducts a rehearsal with his students during his first year of teaching at Walnut High School.

After playing a few songs together, Clements poses for a photo with his childhood idol, guitar player Glenn Campbell.

Clements reunites with band directors Dr. Bartner and Dr. Dye during the Disney All-American Band Concert.

Alumni Q&A How has Dr. Clements impacted your life? Before performing for Dr. Clements at his last homecoming game, alumni looked back on the role he has played in their lives. COMPILED BY ISAAC LE, ISABELLA LEUNG AND SHERMAN WU

Andre Beltan Class of 1996

“Dr. Clements had a major impact my life. I’m an elementary music teacher now, so my experience here inspired me to go into music education. Coming from a professional perspective, I know he’s still probably going to be teaching a lot [because] the music educator part never goes out of you.”

Sandy Cheung Class of 1998

“It’s important to have people that we admire and respect to give you guidance. He’s an inspiration. He instilled in me what it was to be a leader. He’s worked so many years and I’m so happy he’s found something else now to add to his list of passions and dreams and I’m so excited for him.”

Susan Muljana Class of 2001

“He taught us to enjoy music because no matter how hard you work, you should still enjoy it because it is a form of self-expression. We were all so different and he was really good at being very positive and encouraging but was still able to discipline kids when he needed to.”


Ω

14 PHOTOS BY SAMUEL COMPOLONGO

arts

Choir hosts Winter Concert Choirs showcase their winter ensembles at the annual concert Dec. 8-9.

HOLIDAY HARMONIES (TOP TO BOTTOM) I Singing a classical song, Men’s Ensemble practices at its third dress rehearsal. I Sophomores Lauren Lim and Rianna Mercado play the tambourine along with Treble Choir as they sing “Gatatumba.”

Nicole Chiang

myself to keep smiling, have the right

to the fact that I could utilize more

Staff writer

facial expressions, stay on my toes

stage performance but because I got

and don’t get too nervous,” Treble

to develop my artistry and take it one

Mustang Singers, Treble Choir,

sophomore Danae Lee said. “ I think

step further too,” Rhapsody in Blue

Rhapsody in Blue, Men’s Ensemble

we did pretty well. I was proud of how

senior Quintero said.

and Chamber Singers performed at

we worked together as a choir and I

Near the end of the concert, the

their annual Winter Choir Concert

hope the audience was able to get into

choirs performed “Peace Peace/Silent

Thursday, Dec. 8 and Friday, Dec. 9 in

the christmas spirit and realize that we

Night,” the only song sung by all of

the Performing Arts Center.

really are a special program.”

the choirs collectively. Treble Choir,

The choirs first sang classical

Five singers were featured during

Mustang Singers and Rhapsody non-

pieces, such as “Cantante Domino,”

the concert. Rhapsody in Blue senior

seniors held candles to contribute

“Belo Que Bonito” and “Sing Dem

Mariah Quintero sang a solo, “Merry

to the tranquil atmosphere. After,

Hern” during Act 1 to emphasize

Christmas Baby.” There were also

Chamber Singers, as an annual

their musicality and aptitude at

two duets, one from Chamber seniors

tradition, ended the concert with “We

learning foreign languages. Classical

Christian

Wish You a Merry Christmas.”

vocal techniques also improve diction,

Maramba, “Baby It’s Cold Outside”

“The coolest thing about singing

vocals and blend of voices. They

and another sung by Chamber senior

‘Silent Night’ is hearing 180 voices in

then performed to more well-known

Adrienne Caparaz and junior Eugene

unison singing a beautiful song,” Men’s

Christmas songs such as “Santa Claus

Lo, “Let it Snow/White Christmas.”

Ensemble junior Dylan Campos said.

Fontejon

and

Janavie

Is Coming to Town” and “Jingle Bell

“Performing “Merry Christmas

“Also, our audience is always full of

Rock,” placing more emphasis on

Baby” was a dream come true.

people and to have them show you

Christmas spirit and joy.

Because I’ve been wanting to sing

how good you did, having at least a

“There was a lot of anxiety about

this song that I had grown up with, it

hundred people clapping and cheering

not messing up, but I kept telling

was personally satisfying not only due

for you feels great.” Ω

PHOTOS BY JAMIE CHEN

SEASONAL SYMPHONIES (LEFT TO RIGHT) I Flutist freshman Yue Zhai plays “Let It Snow” during practice. “I think that the audience will be very pleased to listen, and it really brings the holiday spirit up,” Zhai said. I Cellist sophomore Audrey Heng sightreads her new piece of music. “The concert is after finals so I’m feeling a little nervous. It’s a new song so it’s fun to play,” Heng said.

Band and Orchestra to perform in holiday concert Band and Orchestra have been practicing during and after school in preparation for their annual winter concert Thursday, Dec. 15. Sarah Aie

utilizes a software called Smart

better orchestra as a whole, and

Ride” and “Carol of the Bells.”

ensembles

Staff writer

Music, in which students play their

[can]

In addition, Orchestra plans to

specific areas in their playing, such

incorporate several stunts.

as volume, coordination and sound

hopefully

good

part through a microphone and the

performance

music directors can listen to them

violinist sophomore Tiffany Yeh said.

performing in their annual Home

individually. Orchestra also brings in

For The Holidays Christmas Concert

specialists that teach and refine certain

Thursday, Dec. 15 in the Performing

skills.

Band and Orchestra practice

the

a

Band and Orchestra will be

Arts Center.

to

deliver

audience,”

“I’m

looking

forward

have

been

improving

to

quality. With the guidance of directors

“Before performances, we do like

performing these songs. Christmas

Buddy Clements and Corey Wicks, this

to get together and just play to have

songs are also just really fun to play as

concert will allow Band and Orchestra to showcase their techniques.

fun and loosen up. When you make

an entire orchestra because they’re so

“Listening to each other while

relationships with a lot of people in

high-spirited and joyful. It’ll certainly

“[This concert is] normally more

focusing on our own part and being

Orchestra, it’s definitely more fun to

relieve some of my stress and take

cheerful and gets people into that

period,

able to follow the conductor’s lead

practice.”

my mind off of school for a while,”

holiday spirit,” saxophonist junior

respectively, to improve on execution,

is definitely a difficult thing to do,

They will play a selection of

violinist junior Derek Wang said.

Brandon Bui said. Ω

technique and overall sound. Band

but it really helps us become a

Christmas music, including “Sleigh

every

zero

and

sixth

Throughout the year, the two

Continued at whshoofprint.com


Ω

december 2016

Carrying on a family legacy

15 PHOTO BY JEFFREY TRAN

Senior Eric Song strives to follow in the footsteps of his parents and grandmother. Sherman Wu

relationships of

Staff writer

a high schooler.

whatever I do, and she will be there for

Song has been playing on the

me no matter what. Everytime I’m on

varsity boys’ basketball team since

the court to play, she’s always cheering

From the Olympics to the Walnut

freshman year. Head Coach Joe

me on, and when I do a move, she’s

boys’ varsity team, the spirit of

Khouzam has mentored Song and

always like, ‘Good job Eric.’ It [gives

basketball has persisted through three

helped him mature with pep talks

me] emotional support and it shows

generations of senior Eric Song’s family.

during practice throughout his high

that she cares about me, which really

Song’s grandmother played for

school years. He has played center

makes me happy. It lets me be myself

the Women’s Chinese Basketball

for all four years of high school

on the court and lets me know people

Association from 1960 to 1970, and

and enjoys it as an opportunity

love me for who I am,” Song said.

his mother played college basketball

to showcase his leadership skills.

As the center for the boys’

at Hei Long Jiang University. Song’s

anchor

varsity basketball team, Song has

father was a basketball player and the

of the team. I want to be able to

made lasting friendships with his

flag-bearer for the Chinese National

lead the team and make our team

teammates in order to strengthen their

Team during the 1988 Seoul and

successful. I want to be that guy who

teamwork and cooperation. He views

1992 Barcelona Olympic Games.

others count on. In the team you

his team as a family built on trust.

“I started playing basketball

have to be a leader or else the team

“Bonding with my teammates

because I saw [my dad] and thought

will be dysfunctional,” Song said.

just makes us feel closer to each other

he was a very influential character. There were pictures around the wall with my dad playing basketball so I would see how cool it was to play,” Song said. “When I was little, he would always tell me that I had to

“The

center

is

the

“I had to develop good communication skills and learn to trust the people I play with,”

work hard and that inspired me to

- Eric Song, 12

play basketball. As I got older, he

and the more open you are, the more things we can talk about. I trust them very much because of how we are on and off the court,” Song said. “I don’t need to worry about them because I know we are on the same page.” For Song, basketball serves as a form of self-expression as well as an

just pushed me more and more and

His father occasionally takes

escape from the stress of school and

I started training for basketball.”

breaks from his work in China to

society. It is a way for him to channel

of

view his progress and attends several

his emotions in a productive way.

family outings when they would

of his games. Song’s grandparents

“The sport gave me confidence

bond while shooting baskets and

frequently communicate with him

because I can be myself on the

dribbling on the park courts. As

over text messaging to see how he is

court, and I don’t have to let

basketball

doing, and his mother has attended all

society’s pressure take control,” Song

He

cherishes

memories

encouraged

a

healthy

relationship in his family through communication, basketball currently helps Song with the challenging

the games he has played in high school. “My mom is very supportive of

EASY POINTS | Senior Eric Song perfects his layups through practice. PHOTOS COURTESY OF ERIC SONG

said. “I don’t have to be anyone else. I’m just me. I’m Eric.” Ω Continued at whshoofprint.com

A family born to play on the court All of Song’s family members have national and international accomplishments.

Bao Zhu Li

Ligang Song

Grandmother

Father

Played on WCBA (Women’s Chinese Basketball Association) Team placed third place nationally in the country

Played in 1988 Seoul and 1992 Barcelona Olympic games The first person to score more than 20 points against the US National Team in China Won title of Asia’s Best Athlete

Maria Jiang

Eric Song

Mother

Son

Played for Hei Long Jiang University team Placed second place in a national tournament for Chinese colleges

Plays for Walnut High School boys’ varsity basketball Awarded the most improved player sophomore and junior year

FAMILY MEMORIES (TOP TO BOTTOM) | Song poses with his mother and father for a family picture. | Song’s father carries the China flag for the 1990 Asian Games in Beijing.


Ω

16

Winter Season Scoreboard girls’ soccer 11/29 vs. Rowland 1-3 L 12/06 vs. Azusa 0-8 L

boys’ soccer 11/28 vs. Ayala 1-2 L 11/30 @ Rowland 0-1 L 12/06 @ Azusa 1-3 L

girls’ basketball 12/06 @ Bellflower 12/08 @ Banning 12/09 vs. Rowland 12/10 vs. Upland

71-39 W 63-27 W 50-51 L 54-40 W

boys’ basketball 12/01 vs. Sierra Vista 12/02 vs. Verdugo Hills 12/03 vs. El Rancho 12/07 vs. Upland

67-48 W 55-43 W 54-51 L 63-66 L

girls’ water polo

wrestling

11/22 vs. Bonita 7-14 L 11/29 vs. Wilson 14-10 W 12/01 vs. Ayala 6-10 L 12/06 vs. Rowland 20-9 W

(b) 12/03 Carter Individual Tournament 1. Colin Hayes, 9 (g) 12/06 vs. Montclair 24-54 L (b) 12/08 vs. Diamond Bar 36-38 L (g) 12/10 @ Diamond Ranch 200-80 W

sports

Winter Break Games girls’ soccer

boys’ soccer

12/17-23 Claremont Turnament 01/04 vs. South Hills

12/21 Don Lugo Tournament

girls’ basketball

boys’ basketball

12/27-30 Ayala Tournament

12/20 @ Salesian 12/26-30 Covina Tournament

girls’ wrestling

boys’wrestling

12/29-30 Santa Ana Tournament 12/16-17 Tournament 12/29 Lady Warrior Tournament

December 2016  
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