Page 1

late fall 2013

NO 0 09


FEATURES

46 06 20

In Season: Apples

22

Top 5: Savory Pies

28

Stone Soup: Glamgaiting

Portrait of a Chef: Lars Kronmark

48

58

2

High Spirits

CONTENTS

Sugar Plum Dreams

The Art of the Wine Pour


NO 0 09

CONTENTS

60

72

The Cow and the Turkey

4

Contributors

5

Letter from Steve

6

In Season: Apples

20

Portrait of a Chef

22

Top 5: Savory Pies

28

Stone Soup: Glamgating

46

High Spirits

48

Sugar Plum Dreams

58

The Art of the Wine Pour

60

The Cow and the Turkey

72

Eat Your Kale

78

How We Did It

80

Recipe Index

Eat Your Kale

CONTACTS

78

How We Did It

media inquiries Judith Mara | marabeach@sbcglobal.net Deirdre O’Shea | deirdre@stephenhamilton.com

sponsorship opportunities Deirdre O’Shea | deirdre@stephenhamilton.com

representation Schumann & Company | www.schumannco.com patti@schumannco.com | 312.432.1702

stephen hamilton 1520 W. Fulton | Chicago, IL 60607 www.stephenhamilton.com

CONTENTS

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contributors

kathryn o’malley |

NO 0 09

deirdre o’shea | Production Director

Editor and Writer

Kathryn’s love of food is matched only by her

If you have worked with Stephen Hamilton,

passion for writing about it; as part of the Who’s

you’ve worked with Deirdre. Drawing on 15 years

Hungry?™ editorial team, she indulges in a bit of

of experience in managing photography studios,

both. Her popular food blog, dramaticpancake.com,

Deirdre has a hand in nearly every aspect of

garners more than 40,000 unique viewers per month and highlights the people and stories behind great recipes.

Stephen’s business. She’s been instrumental in organizing the magazine’s shoots, sourcing ingredients, and always keeping production on schedule.

judith mara | Editor and Writer

ian law | Design

Judith has worked with Stephen for almost

Ian designed every aspect of Who’s Hungry?™

seven years and helps to lead the editorial concept

magazine with meticulous attention to detail and

and execution of Who’s Hungry?™ magazine. An

typography, and helped turn static images into an

award-winning former creative director for major

interactive experience. His award-winning design

ad agencies such as Leo Burnett and J. Walter Thompson, Judith sweats the details, pens Weather Permitting and

work has been featured in the pages of Print, Creativity, How, PDN and Graphic Design USA.

literally hand writes How We Did It.

dannielle kyrillos |

audarshia townsend |

Writer and Television Commentator

Fueled by an obsession with Chicago’s vibrant

A series judge on Bravo’s Top Chef Just Desserts, Dannielle is an expert on stylish entertaining, food, fashion, and travel. She appears regularly on NBC’s Today and The Nate Berkus Show, as well as on E! News, BetterTV, CNBC, CNN, and local morning programming in New York and Philadelphia. For Who’s Hungry?™ magazine, Danielle sought out the top five savory pies from around the country.

Writer

culinary scene, Audarshia Townsend was one of the first two editors at metromix.com. And while she continues to write lifestyle features for the Chicago Tribune, Essence, Los Angeles Times, The Huffington Post and more, she also connects with readers through her dining and drinking blog, 312diningdiva.com. For Who’s Hungry?™ magazine, Audarshia shares a sexy, celebratory cocktail rooted in the Roaring Twenties.

david sedaris | Humorist, Writer and Radio Commentator One of America’s greatest humorists, David Sedaris is a master of satire and the bestselling author of Barrel Fever, Me Talk Pretty One Day, Holidays on Ice, and many more. He is also a playwright and regular commentator for National Public Radio. For Who’s Hungry?™ magazine, David treats us to a holiday fable in which barnyard animals take on suspiciously human traits. Portrait by Hugh Hamrick

a special thanks to:

Bryan Kendall and Airstream of Chicago, Tim Burton, Paula Walters, Buffalo Trace Bourbon, Ashley Mastroianni,

Tricia Schiffmacher, Ina Pinkney, Cece Campise, Ruth Siegel, Michael Anthony, Rick Bayless, Brent Ridge, Josh Kilmer-Purcell, Chad Robertson, Eric Ripert, John-Gustin Birkitt, Justin Brunson, Lars Kronmark, Tim Havidic, Molly Glackin, Johnny Costello, Benjamin Schiller, Mindy Segal, Elizabeth Falkner, Della Gossett, Paula Haney, Tom Hamilton, Juan Palomino, Andrew Burkle, Justin Paris, Raymond Barrera, William Smith, David Raine, Josephine Orba, Walter Moeller

4

CONTRIBUTORS


LETTER FROM STEVE As a kid, holiday surprises came wrapped as gifts, but now I see them as sharing fun and funny moments. That’s why I am particularly excited by humorist David Sedaris’s tale, The Cow and the Turkey. It’s a quirky tale that challenges the Thanksgiving turkey. Plus, we took a creative leap and illustrated his story with photographs and recipes for holiday leftovers from some great chefs. It has also been fun to give “sugar plums” a whole new meaning. Sugar plums will still dance in children’s heads, but Tim Burton’s sugar plum persimmon purée is delicious and healthier than any candy we can think of. In “Sugar Plum Dreams,” four famous pastry chefs share exclusive sugar plum holiday desserts. Speaking of famous chefs, we are refocusing on the fantastic ideas that they bring to our magazine readers. We invited chefs Eric

Once the leaves start falling and the

Ripert, Michael Anthony, Rick Bayless and the

weather gets cold, I start gearing up for

apple recipes. In “Apples” you’ll relish classic

the holidays–all of the festive food, the

Guacamole and more.

Beekman Boys to share with us their best-loved Caramel Apples, a Fine Apple Tart, Apple-Fennel

comfort of family and all the unexpected

You’ve heard of glamping…we had some genuine

surprises that come with the season.

in “Glamgating”––our latest twist on Stone Soup.

fall fun by adding a dash of glamour to tailgating With a gleaming Airstream RV trailer, Buffalo Trace Bourbon, a roasted pig infused with aged maple syrup and a guest list including eight of Chicago’s finest chefs, no one even thought of asking, Who’s Hungry? Happiest of holidays from the Who’s Hungry?™ crew. See you in 2014! STEVE, DEIRDRE, IAN, JUDITH, KATHRYN AND CECE

LETTER FROM STEVE

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The season’s most seductive fruit is ripe for the picking, dangling from the treetops like so many colorful, shining ornaments. But what to do with all that bounty? For answers both sweet and savory, we turned to six of the country’s most inspiring chefs, who served up everything from comforting caramel apples to unconventional—yet nonetheless incredible—guacamole.

IN SEASON by K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

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IN SEASON: APPLES


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caramel apples View recipe on page 80 Âť

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IN SEASON: APPLES


Caramel Apples No one does modern vintage quite like the Beekman Boys, Josh Kilmer-Purcell and Brent Ridge—and for proof, look no further than their latest cookbook, The Beekman 1802 Heirloom Dessert Cookbook. The beautiful nod to nostalgia is brimming with decadent recipes for old-time favorites like lemon meringue

Josh Kilmer-Purcell & Brent Ridge

pie, blackberry betty and, of course, caramel apples. We can’t get enough of the salted peanuts set against the sweet caramel coating.

The apple is the most diverse food plant in the world, with over 2,500 varieties grown in the United States. They come in all different sizes, textures and flavors, with a range of colors including red, green, yellow and russet (meaning they’re covered in a slightly rough, brownish skin). Russet types may not be the prettiest, but they often have excellent flavor.

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The best baking apples offer a nice balance of sweet and tart flavors as well as flesh that won’t break down as they cook. For a dessert with more complex flavor and texture, try mixing a few varieties—Granny Smith, Honeycrisp, Pink Lady (Cripps Pink), Mutsu (Crispin), Golden Delicious and Gala are all great choices.

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IN SEASON: APPLES


gramercy tavern apple pie View recipe on page 82 Âť

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Bohemian Apple Layer Cake The co-owner of San Francisco’s Tartine Bakery with his wife Elisabeth Prueitt, Chad Robertson makes some of the best—if not the best—bread in America. But he also crafts some pretty insane desserts. Try this fragrant, autumnal beauty (from Robertson’s new cookbook, Tartine Book No. 3) that’s sweetened with prunes and raisins; spiced with cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg; layered with apple butter and prune compote; and finished with a smooth cider frosting.

Chad Robertson

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IN SEASON: APPLES


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Fine Apple Tart You know that any recipe from four-star Le Bernardin chef Eric Ripert is going to be a good one, but if it brings together butter, sugar, apples and pastry dough—all the better. This elegant apple tart is made even more special with the addition of a small amount of apple brandy, called Calvados, in the glaze.

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IN SEASON: APPLES

Eric Ripert


eric ripert’s fine apple tart View recipe on page 81 

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Apple picking season begins in late August and lasts through November. But because they keep well in cold storage, locally grown apples can be found well into winter. Of note, the fruit will ripen six to 10 times faster at room temperature than if stored in the refrigerator.

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IN SEASON: APPLES


apple-fennel guacamole View recipe by Rick Bayless on page 84 »

Rick Bayless

Apple-Fennel Guacamole Wholly guacamole! That’s all we could say about this adventurous twist on a dip that subs apple for tomato, fennel for onion, and thyme for cilantro. Grab a bag of chips and prepare to have your mind blown—from chef Rick Bayless, we’d expect no less.

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Executive Chef Michael Anthony is the driving force behind the iconic Gramercy Tavern, and with the release of The Gramercy Tavern Cookbook, his simple yet striking dishes are now even more accessible. In this one, a garnish of diced apples lends a perfectly crisp finish to a vibrant seasonal soup.

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IN SEASON: APPLES

Michael Anthony


red kuri squash soup with brussels sprouts and apples View recipe on page 85 Âť

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Lars Kronmark PORTRAIT OF A

CHEF b y K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

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PORTRAIT OF A CHEF: LARS KRONMARK


Despite straddling two challenging

Festival; traveled extensively for

worlds as chef and teacher, Lars

international education projects;

Kronmark has proven adept at

and, of course, continued to make

handling both. In August of 1995,

exceptional food.

he was selected from among the finest culinary educators in

As a teacher, Chef Kronmark may

the United States to open the

be used to asking questions—but

Culinary Institute of America at

today the tables are turned as

Greystone. Since then, he has

our previously featured chef,

spearheaded new programs for

Justin Brunson, quizzes him on

industry professionals; contributed

his evolving career, favorite food

annually to the Worlds for Flavors

towns, the country’s greatest

International Conference and

chefs and more.

from the beginning of your career to the present, what would you say has changed most about working in a kitchen?

what are your favorite new food towns in america? I kind of love southern Mississippi, New Orleans and Memphis.

I think the technology, for sure. In the past, I must have made a thousand things the hard way. Certain

what is your earliest food memory?

things were done simply because that’s how it

My dad was a hunter back in Denmark, and my mum

always was. But today there are a lot of tools and

cooked pheasant in a sauce made with mushrooms,

resources available to make things a little bit easier.

bacon and red currants. It was to die for.

who do you consider to be the top 5 chefs in america?

what will be served at your last meal?

It seems hard to give five names when we are so

with tons of lemon juice, olive oil and garlic. I’d eat it

saturated with great chefs in an era of amazing

wearing nothing more than my swim pants, and a glass

food. I believe there are talented chefs in every state,

of cold white wine from the north of Venice in my hand.

Coastal Italian seafood like mussels, clams and raw tuna,

many of whom never get the exposure they deserve. Go find them!

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TOP 5

savory pies by DA N N I E L L E K Y R I L L O S

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T O P 5 : S AV O R Y P I E S


Dannielle Kyrillos, a series judge on Bravo’s Top Chef Just Desserts and expert on all things food and entertaining, shares her five favorite Savory Pies from around the country. Portrait by Peter Hurley

1

escargots de bourgogne en croûte

One of the innumerable reasons potpie is so beloved by so many is that by definition, it can encompass almost anything. It is a stew of leftovers, of vegetables and often meat, with crust. Anything needing saving from waste gets thrown under the lid. Which is why a slight twist

CHURCH AND STATE

on a traditional escargot preparation becomes

1850 INDUSTRIAL ST., #100

like six tiny potpies, fancifully fit for forest

LOS ANGELES, CA 90021

gnomes and brunch-lovers alike. The butter and

212.405.1434

garlic are the broth, and the escargots definitely

WWW.CHURCHANDSTATEBISTRO.COM

prefer these hats to their old shells. Church and State is one of the best American iterations of the French bistro, a pioneer in downtown Los Angeles. It is somehow industrial, airy, cozy and convivial, and by giving each snail in an order its own pot and piecrust, it makes two antique peasant dishes fresh and frisky.

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2

lancaster-style “sticky” pot pie PLAIN & FANCY FARM RESTAURANT 3121 OLD PHILADELPHIA PIKE BIRD-IN-HAND, PA 17505 WWW.PLAINANDFANCYFARM.COM 1.800.669.3568

Anyone from anywhere near Central

simmers for hours on end with shreds and

Pennsylvania will describe the horror they felt

chunks of chicken, carrots, corn and celery. It

upon learning that most of the country thinks

might be where the phrases “stick to your ribs”

“potpie” has a light, flaky crust. In our minds,

and “cure what ails you” originated. The charming

potpie has no light or crust-related aspects, and

and old-school Plain and Fancy is in the heart

its defining characteristic is thick, wet, dumpling-

of Amish country and its potpie exemplifies this

esque noodles that are like kisses from a very

style. Fair warning: It is hard to recalibrate potpie

snuggly Labrador. These doughy ribbons swim

perspective after tasting this kind.

in a very yellow, gravy-like chicken broth that

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T O P 5 : S AV O R Y P I E S


3 Classic. Crusty. Colonial. Fitting descriptors of

that evening, but it is now, and it’s everything

both chicken potpie and perhaps the very best

the category should be: flaky, creamy and hearty.

setting in which to enjoy it, Fraunces Tavern.

The very traditional version stands on its own

Potpie is one of America’s oldest culinary

merit, but taken in these woody, fireplace-strewn

marvels, and it’s rumored to have been George

environs it is an archetype. Food snobs might

Washington’s favorite dish. In this very spot, one

care that a Dublin-based mini-chain runs the

of New York City’s longest-standing structures,

restaurant, but that in no way detracts from an

the founding father bid his loyal officers farewell

authenticity every new restaurant seems to try so

in 1783. It’s debatable whether potpie was served

hard to create from whole cloth.

fraunces tavern pot pie FRAUNCES TAVERN

|

54 PEARL ST.

|

NEW YORK, NY 10004

|

212.968.1776

WWW.FRAUNCESTAVERN.COM

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SMOG (steak, onion, mushroom, gruyère) DANGEROUSLY DELICIOUS PIES

|

1339 H ST. NE

|

WASHINGTON, DC 20002

|

202.398.7437

WWW.DANGEROUSPIESDC.COM

If, like front man and head baker Rodney Henry,

and it is. It is toothsome crust perfection. SMOG

you toured with a rock band and also knew how

envelopes you and gets stuck in your head and

to make extremely choice piecrust, SMOG is

is what you crave on a cold or sad day, catchy

precisely what you’d whip up after a long stretch

but substantial like a good song—not surprising

on the road. It tastes like home: sweet roasted

coming from a musician such as Henry. His pie

onions, earthy mushrooms, soothing cream,

empire has grown to include outlets around DC

meaty steak, melty Gruyère. To work with that

and in Baltimore and he’s taken a spin on TV, but

lineup, the crust has to be substantial but giving,

everything he sells is still made by hand.

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T O P 5 : S AV O R Y P I E S

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5

shepherd’s pie THE FAMILY WASH 2038 GREENWOOD AVE. NASHVILLE, TN 37206 615.226.6070 WWW.FAMILYWASH.COM

Kind of like the musicians who play

shepherd’s pies turn the dive-y setting

every night at The Family Wash in uber-

and accompanying tunes into the spirit-

hip East Nashville, savory pies are the

nourishing backdrop for a really good

underappreciated heroes of supper. There’s

alt-country movie. Especially on Tuesdays,

nothing flashy about them, they haven’t

when a pint of good beer and a pie are ten

brought anyone riches or fame (Marie

bucks. There’s a lamb and beef version

Callender does NOT count!) and their guts

and a lentil-based vegetarian pie that has

are a hodgepodge of yesterday’s glory, but

turned more than one carnivore, and like

they make your soul warm. Served in those

every other situation in life where roasted

crinkly tin pans and hatted with luscious

garlic is an option, “yes” is the right answer

mashed potatoes and an endearing

to that one.

amount of really sharp cheddar, these

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STONE SOUP 28

S T O N E S O U P | G L A M G AT I N G

glamgating

by JUDITH MARA


Glamgating is what happens when you add a dash of glamour to your traditional tailgate—with sensational results. It is also the latest twist on our Stone Soup feature, a semi-regular series based on the iconic tale of villagers coming together to create a grand meal that feeds the entire town.

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Rain and chilly weather was predicted,

some planning to get that “glam” part

but the Midwest likes its curveballs: The

in place—we wanted to make sure this

sun came piercing through the skyline

tailgate was unlike anything our guests

at the very last minute, and it turned out

had ever experienced. To that end, all

to be the kind of autumn afternoon that

the stops were pulled: a gleaming new

Chicagoans can’t resist. It was a great day

Airsteam trailer; a roasted pig infused with

for sporting newbies and football fans alike

aged maple syrup; an amazing guest list

to mingle together and enjoy the outdoors.

including eight of Chicago’s finest chefs; over twenty side dishes and desserts

Because it’s tailgating season, a

contributed by the chefs and other guests;

“glamgating” party seemed to be the

hot apple cider spiked with Buffalo Trace

perfect way to mix things up at our latest

Bourbon; and a surprise guest of honor––

Stone Soup gathering. Of course, it took

the venerable TV anchor, Bill Kurtis.

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1. Stephen Hamilton | 2. Tim Burton – Maple Wood Farm | 3. Giuseppe Tentori – Executive Chef GT Oyster & Boka Chicago | 4. Michael Shenfeld – Real Estate Consultant | 5. Kate Bernot – Nightlife Reporter Red Eye | 6. Mike Mech – The Bungalow Chef | 7. Carol Mackey – Living60010 Website | 8. Joe Campise | 9. Ashley Mastroianni – Buffalo Trace Brand Ambassador | 10. Chef Dale Levitski | 11. Linda Levy | 12.Yervant Chalkagian | 13. JuneElise Marsigan – Room 1520 Venue Manager | 14. Greg Burton – son of Tim Burton | 15. Chris Bishop | 16. Dave Mackey – Former Blackhawk Player | 17. Chrissie Mena | 18. Haley Lertola – Room 1520 Venue Manager | 19. Bryan Kendall – Airstream Repsentative | 20. Stan Revas | 21. Ina Pinkney – “Breakfast Queen”, Owner and Chef of Ina’s | 22. Doug Wilson | 23. Judith Dunbar-Hines | 24. Michael Fiddler – Executive Chef Trump | 25. Maggie Revas | 26. Deirdre O’Shea – Producer for Stephen Hamilton | 27. George Campise | 28. Rodelio Aglibot – The Food Buddha & Chef-Owner E+O Food and Drink | 29. Cliff Etters | 30. Ray Anguiani – Mixologist Atwood Cafe | 31. Derek Simcik – Executive Chef Atwood Cafe | 32. Bill Kurtis – Tall Grass Beef | 33. Karl Helfrich – Pastry Chef European Imports

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Friends of WH? came from far and near. First to arrive was Tim Burton of Burton’s Maplewood Farm. Tim came all the way from Medora, Indiana, bearing the gift of a 45-pound pig and his La Caja China (pronounced la caha cheena) pig roaster. With a three-hour head start on smoking the pig, Tim filled the parking lot with the warm, smoky scent of maple and pork. Meanwhile, Bryan Kendall of Airstream of Chicago in Joliet, Illinois, hitched up a new International Serenity RV trailer—a gorgeous silver backdrop for the feast that was about to unfold.

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We love to see the magic that happens when chefs, food ambassadors and regular cooks contribute a dish to the same table. As always, the results were astonishing: bulgur wheat and Brussels sprouts salads, fresh spinach and artichoke dip, hot beef and vegetable stews, red wine caramel glazed apples, oatmeal cookies, banana bread, baklava and a glorious apple, persimmon and cranberry crisp. Slowly, a fall food theme emerged that had nothing to do with typical football fare.

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S T O N E S O U P | G L A M G AT I N G


Introductions were made as soon as dishes were handed off and cocktails were poured. Chefs enjoyed reconnecting with other chefs they don’t see very often. Everyone was happy to see chef Rodelio Aglibot (TLC, Food Buddha) and congratulate him on his newest restaurant. It was also fun to see chef Dale Levitski (Top Chef alum) the day after he returned from a cooking-filled summer in Montana. Plus, he brought the most gorgeous vegetable market salad ever seen in a concrete parking lot.

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Chef Ina Pinkney (Ina’s, Taste Memories) reigned over the crowd and treated everyone to pumpkin cheesecake and heirloom tomato bruschetta. New dad, chef Giuseppe Tentori (GT Fish & Oyster, BOKA), went super-casual with a creamy and very cheesy shrimp mac and cheese that appealed to the child in all of us. Chef Michael Mech (Bungalow Chef) outdid himself with his grandmother’s German potato salad.

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But the real showstopper—even in the eyes of the seasoned professionals—was the moment when Tim Burton and his son pulled the golden, glistening whole pig from its roasting box and carried it ceremoniously to the carving table. The pig was moist and juicy, the salted meat blending flawlessly with sweet maple syrup. Thirty pounds of tender pork disappeared fast––snout, cheeks, ears and all. We can’t do it every year—and at some point we’ll have to settle for beer and chicken wings—but that’s exactly what made this glamgate so special.

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S T O N E S O U P | G L A M G AT I N G


GLAMGATING MENU WHOLE ROAST PIG Tim Burton (Burton’s Maplewood Farms) CHINESE ALMOND COOKIES Sam Jorden (graphic designer) MARKET VEGETABLE SALAD Chef Dale Levitski (Sprout, Frog & Tail, Top Chef runner up) BULGUR WHEAT SALAD Carol Hojem Mackey (The Suburban Epicurean, food editor Living60010) BUFFALO TRACE HOT CIDER Ashley Mastroianni (Buffalo Trace Bourbon) and Taylor Ortiz GERMAN POTATO SALAD RED WINE CARAMEL GLAZED APPLES Chef Michael Mech (Bungalow Chef) OATMEAL COOKIES Chrissie Mena (founder/president of Living60010) HEIRLOOM TOMATO BRUSCHETTA PUMPKIN CHEESECAKES Ina Pinkney (Ina’s Restaurant, Taste Memories) MINI BANANA BREADS Meg Saherlie (owner of In Stitches) MAC AND CHEESE WITH SHRIMP Chef Giuseppe Tentori (BOKA, GT Fish & Oyster) BEEF STEW & VEGETABLE STEW Doug Wilson (foodie groupie and HR professional) SPINACH AND ARTICHOKE DIP BRUSSELS SPROUT SALAD APPLE PERSIMMON AND CRANBERRY CRISP The Who’s Hungry? Kitchens

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HIGH SPIRITS

BEGINNING to END by AU DA R S H I A TOW N S E N D

With this year’s reboot of The Great Gatsby and the continuing popularity of HBO’s Boardwalk Empire, Americans remain fascinated with the Roaring Twenties. The romanticizing of a colorful era filled with images of flirty flappers, dangerously dapper gangsters and Prohibition never seems to go away—especially when it comes to cocktails. At Chicago’s Berkshire Room, located in

According to Berkshire Room partner

the trendy River North neighborhood,

Benjamin Schiller, Costello came

the craft cocktail lounge pays homage to

up with the name of the cocktail as

the 1920’s in décor and drinks. The bar’s

he traced the travels of a barrel’s

interior boasts its predecessor’s original

“beginning to end.” In the United States

terrazzo composite flooring as well as

it’s illegal to use barrels more than once

steel shutters from a Kentucky bourbon

to age spirits (e.g., gin, vodka, whiskey),

distillery. And the menu, of course,

but bartenders skirt around the law by

effortlessly dances between classic and

aging cocktails in used casks.

contemporary elixirs, with the “barrel finished” cocktail list offering up some

The time Beginning to End spent in

satisfying gems.

the Atlantico rum barrels produces richer, heavier nuances, says Schiller.

Of note is the newest addition, Beginning

The finished product arrives to the

to End, made with rum, scotch and rye

customer in a coupe, showcasing a

and aged approximately four to seven

deep, mahogany hue.

months in Atlantico rum barrels. Created by Berkshire bartender Johnny Costello, the celebratory sipper boasts the type of back story that would put a smile on Al Capone’s face.

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HIGH SPIRITS: BEGINNING TO END


BERKSHIRE ROOM | JOHNNY COSTELLO 15 E. OHIO ST. | CHICAGO, IL 60611 LOBBY LEVEL OF ACME HOTEL WWW.THEBERKSHIREROOM.COM 312.894.0800

beginning to end Amended recipe by Johnny Costello on page 86 »

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EXCERP T F ROM

The Sugar-Plum Tree by Eugene Field 1850 ‑1895

SUGAR PLUM DREAMS

on th es

...

...

48

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What are Sugar Plums?

For almost two hundred years, children have anticipated the night before Christmas with visions of sugar plums dancing in their heads. The Sugar Plum Fairy, ruler of the Land of Sweets in Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker Ballet, dances with sweets from all over the world. And Chicago writer Eugene Field wrote a famous children’s poem The Sugar-Plum Tree during the same era. Sugar plums were obviously something outstanding, but nobody really knows exactly what they are.

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Children from long ago dreamt about

The children were nestled all snug in their beds,

sugar plums like today’s kids dream about Nerds and Skittles. So, many

While visions of sugar-plums danced in their heads.

people have assumed that sugar plums

And mamma in her ‘kerchief, and I in my cap,

were a type of candy or dragée. Others

Had just settled our brains for a long winter’s nap. ... EXCERP T F ROM

A Visit from St. Nicholas by Clement Clark Moore 1822

have concluded that they were a dried plum rolled in sugar. Then it was recognized that historically all sweet dried fruits were referred to as plums (plum pudding anyone?). In England, as far back as the 17th century, the word “plum” was thought to comprehensively mean sweet, delectable or delightful.

50

SUGAR PLUM DREAMS


sugar plum and smoked almond linzer squares with spiced butterscotch cream View recipe by Mindy Segal on page 88 Âť

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52

SUGAR PLUM DREAMS


American Persimmon Basics

There are many words people use to describe the flavor of a persimmon. Pastry Chef Mindy Segal sums it up this way, “[A persimmon] tastes like a cross between a quince and a under ripe pear”. Grower Tim Burton says, “I’ve had two people say the flavor takes them back to the flavor of a Creamsicle”. We’ve also heard they taste like apricots and mangos or both. All this means is they have a mild flavor of their own and are very sweet––a lot like what you’d think a sugar plum would taste like. American persimmons are related to Hachiya persimmons, the heart-shaped variety that is common in grocery stores, and should be handled in the same way. The fruit needs to be super ripe and extremely soft to the touch before extracting the pulp. If all you can get are firm persimmons you must let them undergo the bletting (sit until they are over ripe) process for a few days. Some people remove the skins, others only remove the seeds before puréeing. To Purchase Burton’s Sugar Plum Pureé online visit: www.burtonsmaplewoodfarm.com

sticky toffee sugar plum pudding and sugar plum gelato View recipe by Elizabeth Falkner on page 90 »

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53


Jumping across the Atlantic Ocean,

“They have a plomb (plum) which they call

Strachey very accurately described

American colonists were introduced

pessemmins (persimmon), like to a medler

this mysterious fruit, even though

to new varieties of “plums” by Native

(fruit) ... they grow on a most high tree.

through time American persimmons

Americans. William Strachey, the first

When they are not fully ripe, they are harsh

have evolved into a bigger, sweeter

Secretary of The Colony, was the first to

and choakie, and furre (fur) in a man’s

cultivar. And, between being a “plum”

connect American persimmons grown

mouth ... howbeit, being taken fully ripe, yt

(sweet) and a “plomp” (plum), it is

on our soil to “plombs” (plums) in his

is a reasonable pleasant fruict, somewhat

understandable how today’s growers

manuscript titled Historie of Travaile

lushious. I have seene our people put them

such as Tim Burton of Maplewoods

into Virginia Britania, written in 1612.

into their baked and sodden puddings; there

Farm in Medora, Indiana fondly call

be whose taste that allows them to be as

American persimmons sugar plums.

pretious (precious) as the English apricock; I confesse it is a good kind of horse plomb.”

54

SUGAR PLUM DREAMS


sugar plum panna cotta with bourbon barrel aged maple syrup View recipe by Della Gossett on page 87 Âť

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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Not even knowing the complete history, Tim and his family have always thought

“We forgo the traditional pumpkin

of the persimmons that grow on their

pie for my wife Angie’s sugar plum

farm as sugar plums for very good

pie or pudding; everyone can’t wait

reasons.

for the holidays because of these,” says Tim.

Their sugar plums are harvested from October through December. It is no accident that this fruit is harvested around the holidays when they plop to the ground, because persimmons cannot be eaten unripe. If you do, you’ll never forget the experience. The acute astringency of a persimmon will wick all the moisture from your mouth in just one bite. But don’t let that intimidate you. If you can get ahold of tree-fallen persimmons, store-bought persimmons that you have bletted (let sit) until crinkled and overripe, or frozen persimmon purée, you will have sugar plums dancing in your head with sugary pleasure.

56

SUGAR PLUM DREAMS

Replace our pumpkin pie at Thanksgiving? Some think that is sacrilegious. Others think persimmon purée is the best thing that happened to holiday desserts since pumpkin. To find out what expert chefs think, Tim sent four famous pastry chefs some of his sugar plum purée to create holiday desserts. For all four chefs this was the first time using American persimmon purée in a recipe, and all four were more than pleased that sugar plums really do grow on trees.


persimmon pie Amended recipe by Paula Haney on page 92 Âť

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Wine Pour The Art of the

by

K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

Everyone knows that there’s an art to making wine—but what about capturing it on camera? How do you turn the wine pour itself into a piece of art? To portray the magic of wine in a single shot, you need to stimulate the viewer’s senses and most importantly, convey a sense of movement. Here’s how.

BACKLIGHTING

SPECIAL EFFECTS

Lighting directed towards

A custom rig, created by Geoff Binns-

the camera, from behind the

Calvey, pumps wine continuously through

glass, gives the wine a lovely,

the bottom of a wine bottle and into a

glowing hue.

special wine glass. Although you can’t see it, there’s a small tube connected to

58

FLAVOR CUES

the bottom of the glass that lets Geoff

A barrel in the background of

control how high—or how low—the wine

the photo grounds the scene and

flows. This, of course, makes timing the

suggests rich notes of oak.

photo much easier.

THE ART OF THE WINE POUR


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The Cow and the Turkey b y D AV I D S E D A R I S intro and captions by Kathryn O’Malley

In this allegorical tale from famed humorist David Sedaris, an innocent turkey has the last laugh over the selfish, greedy cow who didn’t get him anything for Christmas. But as most of us (hopefully) know, the holiday season is less about taking and more about sharing, connection and generosity. That means if you’re serving dinner for family and friends, you’re probably going to plan for too much food. And that, of course, means plenty of leftovers just waiting to be reinvented.

60

T H E C OW A N D T H E T U R K E Y B Y DAV I D S E DA R I S


P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

61


The cow was notoriously cheap. So it

“First you ask me to give someone a

“The point is that I’m a little tired of being

surprised everyone when she voted, yes,

Christmas present,” the cow continued,

pushed around,” the cow said. “I think a lot

for the secret Santa program. It was the

“And then you tell me it has to be done

of us are.” This was her all over. So rather

horse’s suggestion and she backed it

your way. Like, oh, I have four legs so I’m

than spending the next week listening to

immediately saying, “I choose the turkey.”

better than everyone else.”

her complain, it was decided that the cow

“That’s not exactly the way it works,”

“Don’t you have four legs?” the pig asked.

the pig explained. “It’s secret, see? So we each draw a name and keep it to ourselves until Christmas morning.” “Why do you have to be like that?” the cow asked. And the duck sighed, “Here we go.”

“All right, just because you have a curly tail,” the cow said. The pig tried looking behind him. But all he could see were his sides.

would give to the turkey and that everyone else would keep their name a secret. There were, of course, no shops in the barnyard, which was a shame as all of the animals had money—coins mainly, dropped by the farmer and his children as

“Is it curly, curly?” he asked the rooster,

they went about their chores. The cow once

“Or curly, kinky?”

had close to $3 and gave it to a calf the farmer planned on taking into town.

62

T H E C OW A N D T H E T U R K E Y B Y DAV I D S E DA R I S


“I want you to buy me a knapsack,”

that would belong only to her. When it no

she told him, “Just like the one that the

longer made sense to hope, she turned

farmer’s daughter has, only bigger and

to self-pity then rage. The calf had taken

blue instead of green. Can you remember

advantage of her, had spent her precious

that?” The calf had tucked the money

money on a bus ticket and boarded

into his cheek before being led out of the

thinking, so long, sucker.

barn. “And wouldn’t you know it,” the cow later complained, “Isn’t it just my luck that he never came back?”

It was a consolation then to overhear the farmer talking to his wife and learn that taking an animal into town was a

She’d spent the first few days of his

euphemism for hitting him in the head

absence in a constant, almost giddy,

with an electric hammer. So long, sucker.

state of anticipation. Watching the barn door, listening for the sound of the truck, waiting for that knapsack, something

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63


Milking put the cow in close proximity to humans, much closer than any of the other animals. And she learned a lot by keeping her ears open—local gossip, the rising cost of fuel oil, and countless little things, the menu for Christmas dinner, for instance. The family had spent Thanksgiving visiting the farmer’s mother in her retirement home and had eaten what tasted like potato chips soaked in chicken fat. Now they were going to make up for it. “Big time,” the farmer’s wife said. And with all the trimmings.

64

T H E C OW A N D T H E T U R K E Y B Y DAV I D S E DA R I S


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The turkey didn’t know that he would be killed on Christmas Eve. No one did, except for the cow. That’s why she’d specifically chosen his name for the secret Santa program. It got her off the hook and made it more fun to watch his pointless, fidgety enthusiasm. “You’ll never in a million years guess what I got you,” she said to him a day after the names were drawn. “Is it a bath mat?” the turkey asked. He’d seen one hanging on the clothesline and was obsessed with it for some reason. “It’s a towel for the floor,” he kept telling everyone. “I mean really, isn’t that just the greatest idea you ever heard in your life?” “Oh, this is a lot better than a bath mat,” the cow said, chuckling as the turkey sputtered, “No way,” and “What could possibly be better than a bath mat?” “You’ll see come Christmas morning,” she told him.

twice baked potatoes View recipe by John-Gustin Birkitt on page 93 »

66

T H E C OW A N D T H E T U R K E Y B Y DAV I D S E DA R I S


TWICE BAKED POTATOES This isn’t your mother’s baked potato. Chef John-Gustin Birkitt incorporates everything good into these stellar, twice-baked spuds: crème fraîche, ricotta, eggs, bacon and freshly grated Parmesan cheese.

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new mexico green chile turkey NEW MEXICAN GREEN CHILE TURKEY Justin Brunson drew on flavors like chile, cumin and lime to create this Southwestern spin on turkey, perfect for nestling into warm tortillas and topping with cheddar, sour cream and cilantro.

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T H E C OW A N D T H E T U R K E Y B Y DAV I D S E DA R I S

View recipe by Justin Brunson on page 94 Âť


Most of the animals were giving food

anything. How could they be so corny? She

with the axe.” The turkey laughed, thinking

as their secret Santa gift. No one came

looked at the pig who sat smiling in his pen

it was a joke. But then he saw the pleasure

out and actually said it, but the cow had

and then at the turkey who’d hung a sprig

in the cow’s face and knew that she was

noticed them setting a little aside. Not

of mistletoe from the end of his waddle

telling the truth.

just scraps, but the best parts—oats from

and was waltzing across the floor saying,

the horse, thick crusts of bread from

“Any takers?” Even to other guys. It was his

the pig. Even the rooster—who was the

cheerfulness that irritated her the most.

“A few weeks,” the cow told him. “I meant

biggest glutton of all—had managed to

And so, on the morning of Christmas Eve

to tell you earlier, but what with all the

sacrifice and had stockpiled a fistful of

she pulled him aside for a little talk about

excitement, I guess I forgot.”

grain behind an empty gas can in the far

the future.

corner of the barn.

“How long have you known?” he asked.

“Kill me and eat me?” The cow nodded. The “The farmer will be cutting your head

turkey removed the mistletoe from the end

He and the others were surely hungry,

off at around noon,” she said. “His son

of his waddle. “Well, golly,” he said, “Don’t I

yet none of them complained about it.

wanted him to use a chainsaw, but he’s a

feel stupid?”

And this bothered the cow more than

traditionalist so we’ll probably be sticking

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Not wanting to spoil anyone’s Christmas,

goodbye except for the cow, who lowered

the turkey announced that he would be

her head toward her empty trough. She

spending the holiday with relatives, “The

was just thinking that a little extra food

wild side of the family,” he said, “Just flew in

might be nice when a horrible thought

last night from Kentucky.”

occurred to her.

When noon arrived and the farmer showed

The rooster was standing in the doorway

up, he followed him out of the barn without

and she almost trampled him on her

complaint saying, “So long everyone,” and

way outside shouting, “Wait, come back.

“See you in a few days.” They all waved

Whose name did you draw?”

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T H E C OW A N D T H E T U R K E Y B Y DAV I D S E DA R I S

“Say, what?” the turkey said. “I said, whose name did you get? Who’s supposed to receive your secret Santa present?” “You’ll see,” the turkey said, his voice a little song that hung in the air long after he disappeared.


THANKSGIVING PUDDING Chef Tim Havidic is used to pushing the boundaries at Chicago’s renowned restaurant iNG—short for “imagining new gastronomy.” But when it comes to Thanksgiving comfort food, his approach is a bit more relaxed; all you need are a few simple ingredients to totally transform your leftover turkey and dinner rolls.

thanksgiving pudding View recipe by Tim Havidic on page 95 »

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71


WEATHER PERMITTING

EAT KALE your

by JUDITH MARA

72

E AT YO U R K A L E


TEN YEARS AGO you never heard much

Now kale is loved, revered and cooked

about kale. Yes, it was chopped and tossed

in every conceivable way. Scores of

into some Asian dishes, soups and sautĂŠed

American chefs, bloggers, farmers,

greens, but I for one certainly didn’t know

cooks and health gurus have turned us

it was kale. And it was not something

into believers, making kale almost as

mothers nagged kids into eating by saying,

common as lettuce. Kale, the antioxidant,

eat your kale, it will make you big and

anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, anti-

strong. Actually, the first time I recall

cholesterol superfood is everything we

recognizing kale, it was planted next to fall

want in a vegetable. Plus, it tastes good.

mums in a flower box.

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73


W I T H A M I L D F L AVO R

Kale is a humble vegetable that is

Our favorite is the tender cavolo nero, or

when raw and a gentle cabbage taste

related to cabbage and broccoli. It’s not

Tuscan kale (aka dinosaur kale, black kale).

when cooked, kale is versatile and easy to

like heirloom tomatoes (yet), where there

Its long, slender, green-black leaves are

prepare, which is possibly another reason

are suddenly a multitude of varieties

more delicate and have less bitterness

it has taken off to the extreme. When you

with cute names. There are only a few

than curly kale. At farmer’s markets you

see kale piled high next to squash and

varieties of kale readily available. Most

can also find Siberian or Russian kale,

pumpkins, it is prime kale harvest time at

common is curly kale (aka green kale),

which (no surprise) is the most cold hardy

the farmer’s markets and green grocers.

which you can find almost anywhere

and has a cabbage-pepper taste. Flowering

Once the frost hits, kale still in the ground

vegetables are sold. It is a sturdy variety

kale (aka Kamome kale) is very pretty

gets sweeter and milder. If you are a first-

with the strongest flavor when cooked.

with white to purple center leaves. While

time kale eater, this is the time to try it.

it is edible, it is also very bitter and is best used as a floral accent.

74

E AT YO U R K A L E


SOME KALE

BA S I C S

When buying kale, choose bunches with

Before cooking, strip the center ribs

Kale also freezes well. Strip the center ribs out

small to medium, deep green leaves, because

out of the larger leaves and discard.

of the larger leaves and discard. Cut the leaves

small leaves will be more tender and milder-

Wash leaves thoroughly in cold

crosswise into strips and blanch in salted

tasting than large ones. Store in a plastic bag

water and then pat dry. Tear into

boiling water for 30 seconds. Drain and refresh

in the coldest part of the fridge for three to

pieces, cut into strips or chop as

in cold water, then squeeze the water out and

five days. Don’t wash until ready to use.

directed by your recipe.

freeze the leaves in quart-size freezer bags.

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76

E AT YO U R K A L E


KALE

I N T H E K I TC H E N

It’s often served in soups, pasta, gratins and stews. It can be added to eggs, pizza,

There are copious amounts of kale recipes

casseroles, salads, potatoes, quiche,

on the web, and hundreds of ways to

mac and cheese and stir-fries, and it’s

search for them. Kale is one of the few

a perfect choice when trying to sneak a

leafy greens that you can eat raw, sautéed,

little something healthy into a dish. And

steamed, boiled, baked, fried and even

we want to thank whoever came up with

drink in a smoothie.

making kale chips.

kale focused recipes View recipes on page 96 »

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78

HOW WE DID IT


HOW WE

DID IT

Deconstructing a shot from Stephen Hamilton’s The Restaurant Project by JUDITH MARA

favorite dish

Scallops Restaurant

Restaurant: Hubbard Inn Chicago, IL food stylist

Josephine Orba prop stylist

Tom Hamilton

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

79


caramel apples by Josh Kilmer-Purcell and Brent Ridge, Authors and TV Personalities You’ll need a candy thermometer for these classic autumn treats.

serves 4 ingredients:

Line a baking sheet with foil and lightly

brush to prevent any crystals from forming.

butter the foil. Poke a hole in the stem end

Add the butter and cook the caramel,

·· Softened butter for the foil

of each apple and insert a cinnamon stick or

without stirring, until a candy thermometer

·· 4 small apples

lollipop stick.

registers 300°F.

Bring a large saucepan with a couple of

Set the caramel pan into the larger pan of

inches of water to a simmer. Keep at the

simmering water to keep the caramel warm

ready for after the caramel is made.

so it won’t harden. Quickly, but very carefully,

·· 4 long cinnamon sticks or lollipop sticks ·· 1cup granulated sugar ·· 1/4 cup maple syrup or honey ·· 1/3 cup water ·· 1/2 teaspoon salt

In a medium saucepan, combine the sugar,

·· 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon

maple syrup, water, salt, and cinnamon and

·· 2 tablespoons unsalted butter

bring to a boil over medium heat, brushing

·· 1 cup salted peanuts, coarsely chopped

the sides of the pan with a damp pastry

··

80

RECIPE INDEX

dip each apple into the caramel, leaving the area around the stem uncoated. Roll the apples in the nuts to coat. Set the apples on the buttered foil to cool.


fine apple tart

First, make the apple compote. Peel and finely dice the

by Eric Ripert, Le Bernardin Executive Chef

bean. Place in a small pot and cook on a medium heat

apple, then mix with the sugar, lemon juice and vanilla until the apple has softened. Reserve in a bowl covered with plastic wrap and chill. Next, make the glaze. Place all ingredients in a small

makes 1 tart serving 4 people ingredients for apple compote :

pot, bring to a boil and pour into a bowl. Let chill.

ingredients for tart:

Finally, assemble the tart. Prick the disk of frozen puff pastry all over with a fork and place on a cookie sheet

·· 2 granny smith apples ·· 2 tablespoons sugar

·· 1 10-inch disk of frozen store-bought puff pastry

lined with parchment paper or a silicone non-stick baking sheet. Evenly spread the apple compote over

·· 1/2 tablespoon lemon juice

·· 4 granny smith apples

the tart. Peel the remaining 4 granny smith apples

·· 1 vanilla bean

·· 1 stick of butter, melted

and cut into 1/8-thick slices. Neatly cover the compote

·· 1 tablespoon sugar

with shingled apple slices. Brush the apples with

ingredients for glaze: ·· 1/2 cup sugar ·· 1/4 cup water ·· 1/4 cup Calvados

melted butter and sprinkle with the sugar. Bake in a 350-degree oven for about 40 minutes, until the puff pastry is cooked and the apples are golden at the edges. Gently brush the apple tart with a little of the Calvados glaze to give it a nice sheen. Serve with whipped cream or vanilla ice cream.

RECIPE INDEX

81


gramercy tavern apple pie by Michael Anthony, Gramercy Tavern Executive Chef

makes 1 pie

Apple Pie – Gramercy Tavern’s apple pie is an annual favorite. They make it with a bunch of different kinds of apples (Winesap, Honeycrisp, Fuji, Granny Smith, and more..) but the recipe allows for using just one kind – or however many you have. It’s a warm, rustic, and classically festive dish for Fall and for the holidays.

82

RECIPE INDEX


ingredients for pie dough:

ingredients for pie:

·· 3 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for rolling

·· 3⁄4 cup sugar, plus more for sprinkling

·· 1 teaspoon salt

·· 3 tablespoons cornstarch

·· 10 tablespoons (1 1⁄4 sticks) unsalted butter, cut into

·· 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, plus more for sprinkling

small cubes and chilled

·· 1⁄2 teaspoon salt

·· 1⁄2 cup plus 2 tablespoons vegetable shortening, chilled

·· Pie Dough

·· Up to 1 cup ice water

·· All-purpose flour for rolling ·· 8 medium apples (about 31⁄2 pounds), peeled, cored, and cut into 1⁄4-inch slices

to make the pie dough:

to make the pie:

In a large bowl, stir together the flour and salt. Add

Preheat the oven to 400˚F, with a rack in the bottom

the butter and toss to coat with the flour, then flatten

position.

the bits of butter between your fingertips. Add the vegetable shortening, toss to coat with the flour mixture, and then flatten into pieces a little bigger than

In a large bowl, whisk together the sugar, cornstarch, cinnamon, and salt.

the butter. (Using just the tips of your fingers helps

On a lightly floured surface, roll one disk of dough into

produce a flaky crust.)

a 13-inch circle, then fit it into a 9-inch pie dish. Roll

Sprinkle ¾ cup of the ice water over the flour mixture

the other disk into a 13-inch circle.

and gently toss to incorporate. Use a rubber spatula to

Add the apples to the sugar mixture and toss

push the dry flour into the liquid, but do not stir the

thoroughly. (We combine the apples with the sugar at

mixture. This gentle process of “hydrating” the flour

the last minute so the mixture stays drier and doesn’t

without stirring makes all the difference. If the mixture

weight down the dough.) Pour the apple mixture into

is too dry and won’t come together when you gently

the dish. We call for just the right amount of apples.

squeeze a handful, sprinkle with another tablespoon of water and toss again. Continue the process until

Don’t be afraid if you see them piled high. Cover with

the dough just holds together, adding as little water

the remaining dough circle, then trim the excess

and handling the dough as little as possible. Some dry

dough, and crimp the edges.

patches and crumbs are okay— they will moisten as

Cut about a dozen slits all over the pie. Sprinkle

the dough rests.

liberally with sugar and cinnamon and place on a

Divide the dough into 2 balls, flatten into disks, and

baking sheet lined with aluminum foil. (This way you

wrap well in plastic. Refrigerate for at least 2 hours, or

needn’t worry about any juices that may bubble over.)

overnight. The dough can be frozen for up to a month;

Bake until the crust is golden and the filling is bubbly,

thaw overnight in the refrigerator.

65 to 75 minutes. Transfer the pie to a rack and serve warm or at room temperature.

RECIPE INDEX

83


recipe: apple fennel guacamole by Rick Bayless, Frontera Grill Executive Chef

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Cut the fennel bulb in half, then cut each half into three wedges. Arrange in a small baking dish and drizzle with the olive oil. Measure in 1/4 cup water, sprinkle with 1/2 teaspoon

serves 8

salt, cover with foil, and bake until tender (about one hour). Cool. Move the fennel to a cutting board and pull off any

ingredients: ·· 1 medium fennel bulb, stalks and fronds cut off

fibrous outer layers, cut out and discard the pieces of core holding each wedge together, then chop the remainder into small pieces.

·· 1 tablespoon olive oil

While the fennel is cooking, scoop the apple pieces into a bowl

·· salt, to taste

and sprinkle them with the lime juice. Toss to combine, and

·· 1/2 medium apple (a crisp-textured one like Granny Smith

refrigerate until ready to use. Cut the avocado into halves and

works well here), peeled, cored and cut into 1/4-inch pieces

scoop the flesh from each into a large bowl. With a large fork,

·· 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice

the back of a large spoon, or an old-fashioned potato masher,

·· 3 ripe medium-large avocados

coarsely mash the avocado.

·· 1 generous teaspoon chopped fresh thyme ·· 1 large fresh serrano or 1 small jalapeño, stemmed, seeded if you wish and finely chopped

Add the thyme, chopped pepper, apples (including all of the lime juice) and the chopped fennel to the avocado and stir to combine. Taste and season with salt. Serve with Kohlrabi spears or your favorite tortilla chips.

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Tie up the bay leaf, thyme, cloves, and coriander in a piece of cheesecloth to make a sachet. In a large pot, heat 2 tablespoons of the oil over medium-low heat. Add the leeks, shallots, and garlic and cook, stirring occasionally, until the leeks are softened, 5 to 7 minutes. Add the cubed squash and carrots, season with salt and pepper, and cook, stirring, for a few minutes. Increase the heat to high, add the orange juice, and simmer until reduced by half. Add the broth, allspice, cinnamon, and sachet, bring to a simmer, and cook until the squash and carrots are very tender, about 35 minutes. Remove from the heat. In a small saucepan, cook 3 tablespoons of the butter over medium heat until it melts and the milk solids turn golden brown, about 2 minutes. Stir the browned butter into the soup, along with the honey. Discard the sachet and set aside 1½ cups of the soup broth. Process the remaining soup in batches in a blender until very smooth and creamy, then pass through a fine-mesh strainer back into the pot. Thin the soup as needed with the reserved liquid; I prefer a thin consistency. Season with salt, pepper, and lemon juice, cover, and keep hot. In a very small saucepan, cover the finely diced squash with an inch of water, bring to a simmer, and cook until just tender, about 3 minutes. Drain the squash, toss with the remaining ½ tablespoon butter, and season with salt.

red kuri squash soup with brussels sprouts and apples

Meanwhile, in a small skillet, heat the remaining 1 tablespoon oil over

by Michael Anthony, Gramercy Tavern Executive Chef

Drain and season with salt.

medium-high heat, then add the Brussels sprout leaves and toss for a minute. Add a splash of water and continue to cook for 1 to 2 minutes.

Ladle the soup into bowls, then top with the diced squash, apples, and

serves 6

Brussels sprout leaves.

ingredients: ·· 1 bay leaf

·· 1⁄2 cup orange juice

·· 1 sprig thyme

·· 6 cups Vegetable Broth (page 118) or water

·· 2 cloves

·· 1⁄8 teaspoon ground allspice

·· 1 teaspoon coriander seeds

·· 1⁄8 teaspoon ground cinnamon

·· 3 tablespoons olive oil

·· 31⁄2 tablespoons unsalted butter

·· 2 medium leeks (white parts), halved lengthwise and thinly sliced

·· 1 tablespoon honey

·· 5 shallots, thinly sliced

·· Fresh lemon juice

·· 1 garlic clove, minced

·· Large leaves from 6 Brussels sprouts

·· 6 cups peeled, seeded, and cubed red kuri squash,

·· 1⁄2 cup peeled, cored, and finely diced sweet firm apple,

plus 1⁄2 cup finely diced ·· 2 medium carrots, sliced

such as Honeycrisp, tossed with a little ·· lemon juice

·· Salt and pepper

RECIPE INDEX

85


berkshire room’s beginning to end (abbreviated version) by Johnny Costello

serves 4 ingredients: ·· 1 ½ oz. Atlantico Private Cask Rum

Combine all ingredients in a mixing

·· ½ oz. Famous Grouse

glass, add ice, stir and pour into

·· .75 oz. Wild Turkey Rye

coupe. Express oils of lemon swath,

·· ½ oz. Cocchi Americano

discard swath and enjoy.

·· ¼ oz. Benedictine

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sugar plum panna cotta with bourbon barrel aged maple syrup by Della Gossett, Wolfgang Puck’s Spago Beverly Hills

makes 4

Pastry chef Della Gossett, the medal-winning former pastry chef at Charlie Trotter’s, is now the executive pastry chef at Wolfgang Puck’s Spago Beverly Hills. Her Sugar Plum Panna Cotta is simple to make, delicious and turns a classic recipe into world class holiday fare.

ingredients:

Blend sugar plum puree and maple syrup together,

·· 1 c. sugar plum puree

Whisk cream, half and half, brown sugar, agar agar

·· 3 Tbs. Maple Syrup

and salt together.

set aside.

·· ¼ c. light brown sugar ·· 1 c. half and half

Bring cream mixture to a boil. Whisk sugar plum

·· ½ c. cream

puree and maple syrup into the hot cream mixture.

·· ½ tsp agar agar (available at gourmet stores or online) ·· Pinch of salt

Immediately pour into molds or cups. Chill until cold and set. When set, invert the panna cotta onto a plate. Serve with a drizzle of maple syrup, fresh persimmon and gingersnap crumbs.

RECIPE INDEX

87


sugar plum & smoked almond linzer squares with spiced butterscotch cream by Mindy Segal, Mindy’s Hot Chocolate

makes 24 bars

James Beard Best Pastry Chef 2012, and restaurateur, Mindy Segal, created Sugar Plum & Smoked Almond Linzer Squares with Spiced Butterscotch Cream. She added almond paste and a touch of whiskey to compliment the sweetness of the persimmons.

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ingredients for linzer squares:

ingredients for butterscoth cream:

·· 12 oz butter (room temperature)

·· 1/2 cup light brown sugar

·· 1 cup granulated sugar

·· 1/2 cup dark brown sugar

·· 1 ½ cups smoked almonds

·· 1/2 cup butter

·· 3 eggs (separated)

·· 1 tsp. salt

·· 3 cups of all purpose flour

·· 2 cups heavy cream + 2 cups for whipping

·· ½ tbsp. baking powder

·· 2 each cinnamon whole

·· 1 tsp. kosher salt or sea salt

·· ½ whole nutmeg

·· ½ tsp. cinnamon

·· 1 tsp. whole black pepper

·· Pinch nutmeg

·· 1 each vanilla bean

·· ½ cup “sugar plum” or persimmon pulp ·· ½ cup apple butter ·· ¼ tsp. vanilla extract ·· Zest of 1 orange

to make linzer squares:

to make butterscoth cream:

In a Cuisinart or grinder, combine almonds & 1 cup

In a heavy duty sauce pot, heat cream until hot

of flour. Grind until almonds are powder. Combine

While heating, toast all spices until hot and crush

with rest of dry ingredients and set aside.

into a powder. Steep with the vanilla bean in hot cream. In another heavy duty sauce pot, over

In a mixer, with a paddle attachment, cream batter

medium heat, melt sugars, salt and butter just until

and sugar until light and fluffy. Add yolks one at a

melted. Add hot spiced cream slowly, reducing a

time and mix until combined. Scrape bowl and make

little before adding more. Strain spices out from

homogeneous. Add all dry ingredients and vanilla

butterscotch. Taste sauce and adjust seasoning.

extract and orange zest Mix on low until combined.

Should taste slightly salty. Let cool to room temp.

Scrape bowl and bring together completely. Spray a half sheet pan with vegetable spray and line with

Whip remaining cups of cream to soft peaks. Add

parchment paper. Spray again.Spread evenly on

cooled butterscotch to taste. Preserve leftover

sheet pan (approx. 2/3 of batter). Combine sugar

butterscotch for later use. Can be stored in

plum puree and apple butter thoroughly. Spread

refrigerator for two weeks

evenly on top of linzer batter. Combine rest of batter with the 3 egg whites and mix thoroughly until combined. With a pastry bag and a pastry tip (approx. ¼ in. diameter) fill the bag with batter. Pipe horizontal line from one end of sheet pan to the other about ½ in. apart. Then, do the same thing vertically to create a lattice pattern. Bake in a 350° oven for approx. 25-30 minutes. Let Cool. When cool, remove pastry from sheet pan and put onto a cutting board. Cut lattice square into 1 inch squares. Serve warm with a dollop of Spiced Butterscotch Cream.

RECIPE INDEX

89


sticky toffee sugar plum pudding and sugar plum gelato by Elizabeth Falkner, Consulting Chef, Iron Chef America, Top Chef Masters

serves 4 to 6

Chef Elizabeth Falkner has competed on Iron Chef America, been a judge on Top Chef and Top Chefs Masters and has had many other TV appearances. Already a lover of fuyu and hachiya persimmons, Elizabeth created Sugar Plum Pudding and Sugar Plum Gelato with Burton’s Sugar Plum PureÊ.

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ingredients for pudding:

ingredients for sauce:

ingredients for gelato:

·· 1/2 cup persimmon purée

·· 1/4 cup butter

·· 1 quart milk

·· 1 (8 g.) teaspoon baking soda

·· 8 oz heavy cream

·· 8 oz heavy cream

·· 1/2 cup water

·· 5/8 cup (5 oz) brown sugar

·· 4 egg yolks

·· 1/4 cup butter

·· 1/4 cup maple syrup

·· 3/4 cup sugar

·· 1/2 cup brown sugar

·· 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract

·· 1 cup persimmon puree

·· 1/2 cup maple syrup

·· 1/4 teaspoon salt

·· 1/2 teaspoon salt

to make puddin:

to make sauce:

to make gelato:

Preheat oven to 325˚. Bring water

Combine the butter, cream, sugar

Combine the milk and cream in a

to boil and add baking soda. Stir in

and syrup in a medium saucepan and

saucepan and bring just to a boil,

persimmon puree and set aside to

bring to a boil. Reduce temperature

remove from heat. Meanwhile, whisk

cool. Cream butter, brown sugar and

and simmer about 5 minutes or until

the yolks and sugar together. Temper

maple syrup together in a mixer. Mix

slightly thicker. Add vanilla and salt.

the milk (add a small portion) into

·· 2 eggs ·· 7/8 cup (7 oz.) all purpose flour ·· 1 1/2 (12 g.) teaspoons baking powder ·· 1/4 teaspoon salt

in eggs, one at a time. Stir in flour,

the yolks and sugar and whisk. Add

baking powder and salt, add the

all the milk to the egg mixture. Pour it

persimmon mixture and stir until

back into the saucepan and cook over

smooth. Pour into a loaf pan, cover

medium heat until it thickens slightly.

with foil and place in a water bath.

Add the persimmon puree and salt.

Bake for 35 to 40 minutes or until set

Pour into a freezer proof container, cover with plastic wrap and freeze until solid.

to serve: Slice or spoon some of the pudding onto each plate. Spoon toffee sauce over and garnish with a little more maple syrup, slash of bourbon (optional) and fresh pecans or walnuts. Finish with scoop of Sugar Plum Gelato.

RECIPE INDEX

91


persimmon pie by Paula Haney, Hoosier Mama Pie Company (from The Hoosier Mama Book of Pie: Recipes, Techniques, and Wisdom from the Hoosier Mama Pie Company)

Indiana native, Paula Haney, is a pastry chef, author and owner of Hoosier Mama Pie Company. She also is no stranger to persimmons and gives classic pumpkin pie some stiff competition with her Persimmon Pie recipe from her new book, Hoosier Mama Book of Pie.

ingredients: Preheat the oven to 350F (180C). Using a spatula or the back of a serving ·· 1 single-crust blind-baked pie dough shell

spoon, press the pulp through a tami or fine-mesh strainer. Place the

·· 1 cup strained American persimmon pulp

persimmon pulp in a medium bowl and sprinkle the orange zest over

·· zest of 1/2 orange

it. Whisk in the eggs, cream, butter, and vanilla paste, stirring well after

·· 3 large eggs

each addition. In a separate bowl, combine the granulated sugar, brown

·· 1 cup (237 ml) heavy cream

sugar, cinnamon, mace and salt. Whisk or mix with your hands to break

·· 1 Tablespoon unsalted butter, melted

up the brown sugar until thoroughly combined. Add the dry ingredients

·· 1 teaspoon vanilla paste

to the persimmon mixture and whisk until just combined. Pour the

·· 2/3 cup granulated sugar

filling into the pie shell and bake for 45 minutes to 1 hour, or until the

·· 2 Tablespoons dark brown sugar

edge of the pie is slightly puffed and the center of the pie is dry to the

·· 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

touch. The top of the pie will color slightly. Cool to room temperature

·· 1/4 teaspoon ground mace

and then chill in the refrigerator for at least 2 hours, up to overnight,

·· 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

before slicing. The baked pie can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. Do not store the pie at room temperature.

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twice baked potatoes by John-Gustin Birkitt, The French Hound Chef and Owner makes 6 ingredients: ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ··

6 large Russet baking potatoes 1/4 cup crème fraîche 1/2 cup ricotta cheese 2 egg yolks 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese 2 teaspoons garlic salt 1/4 teaspoon ground white pepper Juice of half a lemon

garniture: ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ··

6 scallions, sliced 6 strips of bacon, cooked and chopped 2 ounces grated cheddar cheese, divided 1 tablespoon lemon confit, minced 2 tablespoons chopped fresh tarragon 1/2 teaspoon garlic salt

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Wash potatoes

bag fitted with a large star tip. Add all

well and pierce several times with a fork.

remaining ingredients: bacon, cheddar

Season with salt and freshly ground black

(reserving half an ounce), scallions,

pepper. Wrap in foil and place directly onto

tarragon, lemon confit & garlic salt. Fold to

oven rack for approximately 1 hour. When

combine.

potatoes are cooked through, you should be able to easily pass a pairing knife into the centers. Cut the top third off the potatoes, scooping out approximately 80% of the “flesh” and set aside. You should now have canoe-shaped potato shells. Pass potato flesh through a food mill into a mixing bowl.

Using a spoon, fill each cavity of potato shells a little past full. Now using the piping bag with reserved potato mixture, pipe the top of each potato. Sprinkle reserved grated cheddar cheese on top of each potato.

Add all ingredients from the crème fraîche

Baked stuffed potatoes for 15-18 minutes

to the lemon juice. Fold together until well

or until a thermometer inserted into the

combined but without over-mixing. Reserve

center reaches 155 degrees. Garnish with a

one third of mixture and place in piping

sprinkle of chives.

RECIPE INDEX

93


new mexican green chile turkey

optional toppings:

by Justin Brunson, Old Major Executive Chef

·· 8 eggs, poached, over-easy or sous vide ·· 16 ounces grated cheddar or pepper jack cheese ·· 3 limes, quartered

makes 8

·· 1 cup cilantro, chopped ·· 3 jalapeño peppers, thinly sliced

ingredients:

·· 12 each corn and flour tortillas, warmed ·· 8 ounces sour cream

·· 1 ½ pounds New Mexico green chile peppers, roasted, peeled, seeded and diced ·· 2 tablespoons grape seed oil or other clean-flavored cooking oil ·· 4 pounds leftover turkey meat (dark meat is preferable)   ·· 3 cups yellow onion, peeled and diced ·· 8 cloves fresh garlic, peeled and sliced ·· 2 tablespoons ancho or other dried chile powder ·· 1½ tablespoons ground cumin ·· 12 ounces green tomatillos, husks removed and finely diced ·· 4 cups turkey or low-sodium chicken broth ·· 1 cup canned tomatoes, drained ·· 1/2 cup cilantro leaves, roughly chopped ·· 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice

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RECIPE INDEX

Shred turkey into bite-sized pieces. Pour the oil in a large, heavy pot; over medium heat sweat the garlic and onions until translucent. Add the tomatillos and continue to cook an additional 5 minutes before adding all remaining ingredients except the turkey and lime juice. Cook at a low simmer for 1½ hours. During the last ten minutes, add the leftover turkey and lime juice. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Place your favorite toppings in small bowls and serve alongside the turkey.


thanksgiving pudding

Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Make the custard base: In a

by Tim Havidic, iNG Executive Chef

yolks, eggs, and salt. Set aside.

large mixing bowl, whisk together the half and half, egg

In a small sauté pan, add the butter, onion, garlic and

makes 4

sage, and cook over medium-low heat until the onion softens and becomes translucent. Remove from heat and add the shredded turkey and cubed dinner rolls. Mix

ingredients: ·· 2 cups half and half ·· 4 egg yolks ·· 2 whole eggs ·· 1 tablespoon salt ·· 1 tablespoon butter ·· 1 small onion, diced ·· 4 cloves garlic, minced ·· 2 large sage leaves ·· 1 cup turkey leg meat, shredded

together and divide into tall ramekins (for individual portions) or a small hotel pan (for one large bread pudding). Pour the custard base over the bread pudding and press down. Let sit at least one hour, but preferably overnight. Cover with foil and bake in a water bath for 30 minutes. Remove foil and glaze the pudding with cranberry sauce. Return to oven and bake for an additional 10-15 minutes, until slightly browned. Serve with leftover gravy, if desired.

·· 4-5 small dinner rolls, cut into 1-inch cubes

RECIPE INDEX

95


kale recipes

sautéed kale

grilled kale

by Judith Mara

For the best results when sautéing, use Cavolo

Try this to accompany grilled steaks

Nero or young, tender curly kale leaves.

or sausages.

For 4 side dish servings use about 1 1/2 - 2

Heat grill to medium high. Wash and dry

pounds of kale, 3 tablespoons olive oil, 2 cloves

a bunch of kale. In a big bowl, add about

of garlic––sliced thin crosswise, some chicken

2 tablespoons of olive oil. Season the olive

broth or water, salt and 2 tablespoons fresh

oil with any combination of crushed or

lemon juice or red wine vinegar.

minced garlic, red pepper flakes, fresh

kale chips Preheat oven to 300 degrees F. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper. Place 2 cups torn kale leaves in a large bowl and toss with 1 tablespoon olive oil. Transfer to the prepared baking sheet,

Wash kale, remove any tough ribs and tear or

laying all the leaves flat. Sprinkle with 1/4

cut leaves into pieces. Slice garlic and measure

teaspoon salt or other seasonings. Bake

out 1/2 cup of broth. In a large sauté or sauce

for 20 to 25 minutes or until crisp. Serve

pan (with a cover) heat the olive oil over

right away.

medium-high heat. Add the garlic, stir but do

Note: The lower the temperature kale chips are baked at, the longer they will keep. You can bake them at 170˚ to 200˚, just increase the baking time to 1 to 2 hours. Check for doneness every 30 minutes.

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RECIPE INDEX

not brown. Add the broth and the kale then

pepper, fresh lemon juice and/or red wine or balsamic vinegar. (Short cut: use leftover vinaigrette as the base.) Whisk the olive oil mixture and taste for balance and adjust. Toss the kale leaves in the bowl to evenly coat. Sprinkle with sea salt.

toss (a tong works best) to combine. Cover

Position kale leaves on a portable grill pan

and cook for about 5 to 6 minutes. Remove

and place on grill. They will cook fast. Grill

the cover, and cook until the broth has

kale for 2 minutes and turn. Check to see

evaporated. Turn the heat down, sprinkle on

of they are crisp. If not, grill 1 to 2 minutes

some salt and add the lemon juice or vinegar.

longer. You can cut any tough stems from

Toss and serve.

the leaves before serving or just serve as is.


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RECIPE INDEX

97


L AT E FA L L 2 0 1 3

NO 0 09

98

Who's Hungry? Magazine | Late Fall 2013 | No 9  

Blending the worlds of food and photography, the magazine features travel stories and recipes from top food writers, as well as styling tips...

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