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late summer 2013

NO 0 08


FEATURES

06

Top 5: Summer Classics

12

2

20

Portrait of a Chef: Justin Brunson

22

High Spirits: Fine & Shandy

24

In Season: Sweet Shades of Gold

38

Weather Permitting: Bright Green

The Making of Ina’s Cookbook

CONTENTS


NO 0 08

48

The Art of the Ice Cube

50

62

A Day in the Life

Hidden Gems: Hot Doug’s

64

CONTENTS 4

Contributors

5

Letter from Steve

6

Top 5: Summer Classics

12

Ina’s Cookbook

20

Portrait of a Chef

22

High Spirits

24

In Season: Sweet Shades of Gold

38

Bright Green

48

The Art of the Ice Cube

50

A Day in the Life

62

Hidden Gems: Hot Doug’s

64

Bison is Back

76

Food Porn Continued

82

How We Did It

84

Recipe Index

Bison is Back

CONTACTS media inquiries

76

Judith Mara | marabeach@sbcglobal.net

Food Porn Continued

Deirdre O’Shea | deirdre@stephenhamilton.com

sponsorship opportunities Deirdre O’Shea | deirdre@stephenhamilton.com

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How We Did It

representation Schumann & Company | www.schumannco.com patti@schumannco.com | 312.432.1702

stephen hamilton 1520 W. Fulton | Chicago, IL 60607 www.stephenhamilton.com

CONTENTS

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contributors

NO 0 08

kathryn o’malley |

deirdre o’shea | Production Director

Editor and Writer

Kathryn’s love of food is matched only by her

If you have worked with Stephen Hamilton,

passion for writing about it; as part of the Who’s

you’ve worked with Deirdre. Drawing on 15 years

Hungry?™ editorial team, she indulges in a bit of

of experience in managing photography studios,

both. Her popular food blog, dramaticpancake.com,

Deirdre has a hand in nearly every aspect of

garners more than 40,000 unique viewers per month and highlights the people and stories behind great recipes.

Stephen’s business. She’s been instrumental in organizing the magazine’s shoots, sourcing ingredients, and always keeping production on schedule.

judith mara | Editor and Writer

ian law | Design

Judith has worked with Stephen for almost

Ian designed every aspect of Who’s Hungry?™

seven years and helps to lead the editorial concept

magazine with meticulous attention to detail and

and execution of Who’s Hungry?™ magazine. An

typography, and helped turn static images into an

award-winning former creative director for major

interactive experience. His award-winning design

ad agencies such as Leo Burnett and J. Walter Thompson, Judith sweats the details, pens Weather Permitting and

work has been featured in the pages of Print, Creativity, How, PDN and Graphic Design USA.

literally hand writes How We Did It.

dannielle kyrillos |

heather sperling | Chicago Editor of

Writer and Television Commentator

Tasting Table and Co-founder of Fête

A series judge on Bravo’s Top Chef Just Desserts,

Heather is the Chicago editor of Tasting Table, a

Dannielle is an expert on stylish entertaining, food,

free daily email publication about the country’s

fashion, and travel. She appears regularly on NBC’s

best food, drink, chefs and more. A co-founder of

Today and The Nate Berkus Show, as well as on E!

Fête (a pop-up night market and cultural festival

News, BetterTV, CNBC, CNN, and local morning programming in New York

celebrating the finest in Chicago’s food and design) and food editor of The

and Philadelphia. For Who’s Hungry?™ magazine, Dannielle scouts out the

Chicagoan, her work has appeared in Plate magazine, TheAtlantic.com, and Planet

season’s summer classics.

Green. For Who’s Hungry?™ magazine, Heather explores some of the best— and most colorful—drinks of the season.

ina pinkney |

inga witscher |

Chef and Owner of INA’S Ina has been satisfying Chicago’s appetite since

Dairy Farmer and Host of Around The Farm Table

1991, when she founded her namesake restaurant

As a fourth generation dairy farmer, Inga isn’t afraid

and turned it into one of the city’s most beloved

to get her hands dirty. Tending cattle, plucking

breakfast spots. A frequent guest on local news and

vegetables from the garden, baking bread, and

cable TV, the acclaimed chef has also been featured in publications such as

making cheese: Inga does it all, and makes it all look easy. Her new PBS

The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Gourmet, Vogue, and many more. For

series, Around the Farm Table, focuses on the work of local farmers, seasonal

Who’s Hungry?™ magazine, Ina opens her kitchen doors and lets us peak

ingredients and what to do with them. For Who’s Hungry?™ magazine, Inga

into the process behind her upcoming cookbook—an exciting collaboration

shares her daily adventures from a bustling farm, where the sound of cows

with Stephen Hamilton.

in the morning is the only alarm clock she needs.

todd womack |

Comedian and Writer

Todd Womack is a Brooklyn-based comedian who

Bryan Olsen is a writer and performer for Barely

has been a writer/performer on the gigantic YouTube

Political’s “The Key of Awesome.” Additionally, he

series The Key of Awesome, since 2010. The series has over 1 billion views to date, and can be found on the YouTube channel “Barely Political.” His credits include Good Morning America, 20/20, Chappelle’s Show; and appearances on Bravo, VH-1, TNT, and in Esquire magazine. For Who’s Hungry?™ magazine, Todd gets dirty with some tantalizing food porn.

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CONTRIBUTORS

bryan olsen | Writer and Performer

wrote for Comedy Central’s Roast of David Hasselhoff, and sold a screenplay to Paramount Pictures and Ivan Reitman. As an actor, Mr. Olsen has appeared on several episodes of Comedy Central’s Chappelle’s Show. For Who’s Hungry?™ magazine, Bryan gets dirty with some tantalizing food porn.


LETTER FROM STEVE Food doesn’t spend its life sitting on a plate. At some point it was growing, blooming, mooing, clucking, snorting, buzzing or whatever comes naturally. That’s a fascinating connection I continually appreciate. Which is what brought my crew and I to Joe Ricketts’ Double T Bison Ranch in Wyoming. In “Bison is Back” we visit this great American animal and explore why bison is finding its rightful place––once again––on our tables. We’ve wanted to do a story on honeybees for a while, but had to wait for the right season. In “Sweet Shades of Gold” I get up close and personal to thousands of honeybees at Heritage Prairie Farm in Illinois. And top pastry chefs share creative dessert recipes from Honey

I have the best job on earth. And it just keeps getting

Ganache to Honey Nougatine.

more interesting and exciting every year. Pushing the

At St. Isidore’s Mead Dairy Farm in

boundaries of food photography is a thrilling challenge.

Wisconsin we get a first person glimpse of the routine of a sustainable dairy farm

And that is what’s important about this issue––capturing

in “A Day in the Life”. The dairy herd

food related “experiences” to bring an increased dimension

considering that dawn was just breaking

was sweet, gentle and very cooperative over the pastures. I couldn’t wait to taste

to our stories.

Hannah, Jenny and Mae’s fresh milk in my coffee at breakfast. Who’s Hungry?™ STEPHEN HAMILTON

a special thanks to:

Geovanna Salas, Sarah Kosokowski, Meg Galus, CeCe Campise, Art Smith, Justin Brunson, Joe Ricketts, Ruth Siegel,

Nate Summer, Jen Straus, Doug Sohn, Jackie Doran, Raymond Barrera, Justin Paris, Josephine Orba, Vanessa Dubiel, Geoff Binns-Calvey, Sara Cruz, Melissa Schwister, Tom Hamilton, Juan Palomino, Paula Walters, Kaitlyn McQuaid, Bryan Olsen, Todd Womack, Seana Monahan,and Fausto Jara, Hans early-Nelson (Primitive Precision)

LETTER FROM STEVE

|

PORTRAITS BY ANDREW BURKLE

5


Dannielle Kyrillos, a series judge on Bravo’s Top Chef Just Desserts and expert on all things food and entertaining, shares her five favorite Summer Classics from around the country. Portrait by Peter Hurley

Paella JALEO 480 7TH ST., NW WASHINGTON, DC 20004 202.628.7949 WWW.JALEO.COM

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TOP 5: SUMMER CLASSICS

1

To us Americans, a campfire in summer

approximation of this fiery camaraderie

probably means grilled meats and

is to be had at Jaleo, Spanish national

toasted marshmallows. Our Spanish

treasure Jose Andres’s tapas spot. You

friends see it a bit differently: The

can be sure the chef once questioned

quintessential summer experience

by the FBI for importing a paella pan so

involving an open fire is friends

big it looked like a satellite, and who as

gathered around a giant paella pan,

a boy yearned for his father to let him

simmering a lusty broth and rice

tend the paella fire (it’s a very manly

and seafood and vegetables, all of it

job), captures the essence of Spanish

infused with the smoke of whatever

summer: intoxicating herbs and spices,

wood is fueling the fire. A close indoor

rich shrimp flavors and rice-just-so.


TOP 5

Summer Classics by DA N N I E L L E K Y R I L L O S

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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2

Tacos Pescados (Fish Tacos) LA CONDESA 400A WEST 2ND ST. AUSTIN, TX 78701 512.499.0300 WWW.LACONDESA.COM/AUSTIN

Texans have the recipe for staying happy in the heat down pat: tequila, cocktails and tacos. It’s a recipe perfect in its simplicity, and at Austin’s La Condesa, chef Rene Ortiz and Food & Wine’s Best New Pastry Chef Laura Sawicki elevate it by using majestically fresh ingredients and layering flavors and textures like modern Mexican wizards. La Condesa is in super-hip Austin’s hippest district, and eating there makes you feel cool by association, but everything about the place feels genuine and real. The griddled Texas redfish tacos, crunchy with green cabbage, punchy with chipotle aioli and pico de gallo, and nestled in crispy, corn-y tortillas, are miniature masterpieces—summer in three bites.

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TOP 5: SUMMER CLASSICS


lobster shortcake View recipe on page 84 »

3

Lobster Shortcake ARROWS RESTAURANT BERWICK ROAD, PO BOX 803 OGUNQUIT, ME 03907 207.361.1100 WWW.ARROWSRESTAURANT.COM When Summer picked a mascot, Lobster won,

rugged goodness that is Maine for more than

hands—er, claws—down. And while that kooky

twenty years. “The…lobster…comes from the

crustacean most often appears in summer casual

chilly, rough seas right nearby, brought to us

garb, just thrown on a buttery roll, he embodies

by the people who caught it…” the chefs have

the finest summer splendor when dressed to

explained. Gaier and Frasier are true to the old

the nines in Clark Frasier and Marc Gaier’s

New England ways and the purest ingredients

elegant and exotic lobster shortcake at Arrows

while adding their own Southeast Asian-inspired

Restaurant. The James Beard Best Chefs of the

tweaks, giving lobster the tastiest summer

Northeast have been pioneers of sustainable

costume imaginable.

sourcing and cooking, enveloping diners in the

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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Ice Cream Cones ODDFELLOWS ICE CREAM CO. 175 KENT AVE. BROOKLYN, NY 11249 347.599.0556 WWW.ODDFELLOWSNYC.COM

Famed chef Sam Mason has partnered with husband-and-wife team Mohan and Holiday Kumar to craft what might be the most outrageously addictive, ridiculously creamy, perfectly savory version of the most classic summer dish of all: ice cream. Licking a cone of ice cream slowly enough to savor it but quickly enough so it doesn’t melt is the ultimate and often only way to cool off in summer in the city, and the gang’s new Brooklyn shop captures the childlike wonder we all feel with a cone in hand with scrumptious sophistication. Using locally sourced milk from Battenkill Valley Creamery in flavors such as blueberry buttermilk, toasted almond coffee bean and manchego pineapple, Mason crafts irresistible combinations that are silky, pure and unforgettable. OddFellows also serves milkshakes, craft sodas and sorbets.

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TOP 5: SUMMER CLASSICS

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5

Blueberry Crostata HUCKLEBERRY 1014 WILSHIRE BLVD. SANTA MONICA, CA 90401 310.451.2311 WWW.HUCKLEBERRYCAFE.COM

There are those hazy, lazy beach days etched

Cruising by the sweet little café (part of chef-baker

into our memories like old movies, with the

Zoe Nathan and her husband Josh Loeb’s growing

light so perfect and the salty waves so frisky

empire of beautiful rusticity) and selecting pastries

and the wind so gentle that they could only take

and sandwiches bursting with farmer’s market

place in Southern California. And along with the

produce is as much a part of the ritual as the

seagull soundtrack and golden hue is the distinct

ocean swim. It’s almost as if the crostata’s recipe

sensation of breaking apart and biting into a

includes the luscious fruit dribbling onto your skin

crumbly, juicy peach or berry crostata you picked

and mixing with the saltwater dried on your chin.

up that morning at Huckleberry in Santa Monica.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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heavenly hots View recipe on page 86 Âť

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T H E M A K I N G O F I N A’ S C O O K B O O K


THE MAKING OF

ina’s Cookbook

They’re everywhere. In every

Writing a cookbook was always on

room. On my counter. On my

my mind but seemed too daunting a

nightstand. Overflowing my bookcases. COOKBOOKS!

task when running a restaurant and not having an office staff to help. But that all changed when Steve Hamilton encouraged me to think about it and

I read them like novels,

promised to take the photographs.

because, in a sense, they

It was that magnificent offer that

are. The time, effort and

propelled me to start writing down

expertise that produces each

the stories I wanted to share to go

one is to be honored...revered.

along with the recipes.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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When Steve showed up at Ina’s with a carful of equipment and the best staff in the food photography business to set up shop upstairs, my terrific kitchen crew went into high gear to produce all the food you’ve come to expect and love.

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T H E M A K I N G O F I N A’ S C O O K B O O K


crisp topping View recipe on page 87 »

Steve’s Note: Our plan was to shoot a single dessert straight on, as shown at the top of this page. But when I saw how great the ramekins looked when they came out of the kitchen, I shot all four of them from a straight-down angle, then three (pictured), then two, then one. To keep up the pace of shooting a cookbook, we built two side-by-side sets. One straight down and another 3/4-angle “beauty” set. This allowed us to be shooting on one set while setting up for another shot on the other set. (Check out Raymond’s set diagram.) P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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ina’s vegetable hash View recipe on page 88 »

Does it matter that sometimes a recipe doesn’t work? Or that the print is too small to read? Or that the photographs are bunched up and nowhere near the recipe?  You bet it does!

Steve’s Note: There is always collaboration between a client and myself. Here, I am discussing a test shot with Ina before we shoot the final shot.

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T H E M A K I N G O F I N A’ S C O O K B O O K


ina’s award-winning fried chicken View recipe on page 89 

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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gingerbread pancakes View recipe on page 90 Âť

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T H E M A K I N G O F I N A’ S C O O K B O O K


The images created reminded us that we do serve delicious and beautiful food every day and now we’ll be able to share it with all of you. This book will be my love letter to everyone I’ve fed and to all of you who make breakfast.

Steve’s Note: Collaboration of the crew is important as well. It takes an entire team to accomplish a great shot. It’s not only about lighting, props, angles, etc.; it’s about directing all of these talents. The gingerbread pancakes look like they are being eaten. After I shot the whole pancakes, I took a fork and dipped it in whipped cream and removed a piece as if a bite was taken. Then I repeated removing bites until I got the look I wanted. We shot it that way, then added the syrup for the final shot.

P HOTO G R A P HY B Y ST E P H E N H A M I LTO N

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Justin Brunson’s PORTRAIT OF A

CHEF b y K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

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PORTRAIT OF A CHEF: JUSTIN BRUNSON


Justin Brunson has a penchant for pork. At his popular Denver eatery, Old Major,

honey, what began your love affair with pigs? I think back when I was a child and remember the cool time in the fall and spending time with my grandparents, and it seems like they

two or three humanely raised hogs are

were always preparing for winter. But thats is when I remember

butchered in house every Wednesday,

my first love affair with that sweet smell of pork chops cooking in

and then ground, cured, seasoned, cooked and incorporated into dishes across the menu. Fancy ingredients abound (think fois gras and Lillet gelée), but the restaurant maintains a down-to-earth charm that keeps the place cozy. For a more casual—but just as enticing—option, head a few blocks over to Masterpiece Delicatessen, Brunson’s highly acclaimed deli with a second outpost set to launch this fall. Sandwiches here are built with superior skill and exceptional ingredients, from twelve-hour braised brisket to white truffle egg salad. Dry-cured, peachwood-smoked maple bacon from Brunson’s own Denver Bacon Company can be purchased at the counter and and will soon be available online.

my grandmother’s cast iron skillet, in the fat rendered from that morning’s bacon. So that’s what started it, I’m sure, but learning about cooking and how one animal can be used for so many different things is what pushed me over the edge to be such a pork fan.

name three adjectives that define your cuisine. Traditional, whimsical, delectable.

diners are taking a special interest in nose-totail eating right now. why do you think that is? I think people are really into where their food is coming from right now, and the idea of nose-to-tail starts with farming, I think. I don’t know any guys doing this that don’t know their farmers directly. It’s also the most responsible way to bring product into the restaurant— my pigs are raised about an hour and twenty minutes away from the restaurant and live on a great diet of grasses, grains and vegetables. They live a good life and have a proper death,

Ready to pig out? Dig into our interview with Chef Brunson, led by the King of Comfort Food and our previously featured chef, Art Smith.

which is the most important part of an animal’s life. Also, using the whole animal, not wasting any of it is important to people who are conscious of what they feed themselves.

what would you say is unique about the denver culinary scene? Denver is a culinarily young town that is just getting ready to take off and put itself on the map. We have many great young chefs and this great pride of localness here. The farmers and chefs are working together now and we all know that will make a brighter future for the food scene here. One thing that makes us unique here is that we get along for the most part—not too many haters here which makes for some great events together.

any new projects in the works? what can we look forward to in the future? Well, in October my team and I will be opening another Masterpiece Delicatessen in the Uptown neighborhood here in Denver so the sandwich lovers on the other side of town will be satisfied. I also have several other concepts I would love to do, including a fried chicken shack because Denver deserves my grandmother’s fried chicken.

Brunson’s perfectly seasoned Tasso Ham takes the humble sandwich from ordinary to extraordinary.

what do you like to do when you’re off-duty? any trashy television we should know about? Day off? What’s that? I have 3 businesses! But on the chance I get

tasso ham View recipe on page 91»

one, I like to get up to the mountains and fly fish whenever possible. Hopefully there will be more of that time off stuff in the future. And as far as trashy TV, Breaking Bad in my mind is the best tv show ever written.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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tamarind shandy View recipe on page 92 »

HIGH SPIRITS

FINE & SHANDY by

H E AT H E R S P E R L I N G

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H I G H S P I R I T S : F I N E & S H A N DY


Many will argue that it’s hard to top the satisfaction of an ice-cold beer on a sweltering summer day. That hasn’t stopped bartenders from

exciting, unusual results. “We sat down

trying. Beer-based cocktails are in

with a bunch of Thai ingredients, and this

season, spurring creativity and slaking

is what happened.”

thirst across the country.

Tamarind, lime and palm sugar lend

The most familiar forms are the

flavor to the drink. They’re ingredients

Michelada, based on the trinity of hot

essential to traditional pad Thai,

sauce, lime and beer, and the Shandy,

and to Uncle Boon’s version of mee

classically a combination of beer

krob, crispy noodles in tamarind

and lemonade. These templates have

sauce, there embellished with fried

inspired legions of clever riffs, from a

sweetbreads. Tamarind-palm sugar

Roman Michelada at San Francisco’s

syrup and lime juice are topped with

Locanda (Campari, lime juice, Italian

beer—currently Goose Island’s Sofie

beer) to an Eastern Shore Shandy at Wit

saison—and a hearty dose of house-

& Wisdom in Baltimore, where pilsner

made pomelo bitters, made with the

is spiked with lemon juice, vodka and

fruit’s juice and rind.

Old Bay simple syrup.

Use any citrus bitters when making

At the new Uncle Boon’s in New York, fiery

this drink at home—and do make

Thai dishes demand a cool, refreshing

it at home. Complex, gently sweet

counterpoint. Enter the Tamarind Shandy,

and superbly refreshing, it’s a

a refreshing, sophisticated drink that’s

simple showstopper at a summer

designed to battle heat, both on the plate

cookout, as comfortable next to a

and in the air. “In Thailand, you’re drinking

chile-and fish-sauce-laden salad

beer,” says Thai-born chef and owner Ann

as a beer-can chicken or smoky,

Redding, whose Nolita restaurant matches

low-and-slow barbecue.

traditionalism with gentle innovation, with

It’s summer satisfaction, improved.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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IN SEASON

SWEET SHADES

OF GOLD B Y K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

My mom’s brother was an accountant by day and a mad scientist by night. He and his son conducted chemistry experiments as entertainment, and their small Oklahoma garage doubled as a sewing room for my uncle’s most prized invention, a ventilated beekeeping suit. He was relentlessly curious and endearingly quirky, and after years of backyard beekeeping, he created and marketed the kind of bee suit he himself wanted to wear: one that was durable, protective, and breathable—even at the height of an Oklahoma summer. When my uncle passed away unexpectedly,

I realized how little I knew of their secret,

my mother took over the bee suit business

mysterious lives—and the remarkable

and has been running it ever since. Thanks to

effort involved in creating just a single

a gift from my uncle, I also grew up sharing a

spoonful of honey.

backyard with some 30,000 Italian bees. And

24

though the yellow-streaked stunners have

Stock your pantry with different varieties,

been circling my family for a while now, it

and let the following recipes help guide you

wasn’t until I set out to write about them that

to your favorites.

IN SEASON: SWEET SHADES OF GOLD


P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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IN SEASON: SWEET SHADES OF GOLD


HUMBLE WORKERS Bees work hard. Really hard. To make just one pound of honey, bees must visit some 2 million flowers. We depend on them for one of our favorite sweeteners, but they are also responsible for over $16 billion worth of agricultural product through pollination. Our supermarkets would look much different had honeybees not appeared on the scene more than 100 million years ago.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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IN SEASON: SWEET SHADES OF GOLD


Raw comb honey, courtesy of Heritage Prairie Farm in Elburn, Illinois

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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FROM NECTAR TO HONEY

A forager honeybee stores nectar in a special region of its gut called a crop. When fully loaded, the bee returns to the hive and transfers the nectar to the aptly named receiver bees that are waiting on the front porch for delivery. The receiver bees take the nectar, now mixed with enzymes from the forager’s special stomach, to the honeycomb, where they complete the process of transforming nectar to honey.

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IN SEASON: SWEET SHADES OF GOLD


honey nougatine by geovanna salas View recipe on page 93 Âť

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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milk honey pudding by meg galus View recipe on page 94 Âť

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IN SEASON: SWEET SHADES OF GOLD


A Seasonal TREAT

It’s easy to forget that honey is a seasonal food since it lasts indefinitely. But honey is entirely dependent on local climate and the nectar of blossoming flowers, which influence the color, flavor and aroma of honey much like the sea shapes an oyster or a barrel impacts wine. As a general rule of thumb, light honeys are faintly sweet (clover), amber honeys are richly mellow (blueberry), and dark honeys are bold and robust (buckwheat).

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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honey mandeleines by sarah kosokowski View recipe on page 95 Âť

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IN SEASON: SWEET SHADES OF GOLD


honey vanilla ice cream by sarah kosokowski View recipe on page 96 Âť

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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milk chocolate honey ganache by sarah kosokowski View recipe on page 97 »

endless applications

One of the simplest and easiest ways to enjoy honey is on its own—scooped up by the spoonful—or stirred into a hot cup of tea. The sweet, molten gold can also be spread over buttered toast, drizzled atop oatmeal and baked into breads. Or it can be used to more decadent effect, as evidenced in these desserts.

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IN SEASON: SWEET SHADES OF GOLD


P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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BRIGHT GREEN


Almost everywhere, farmer’s markets are sporting tables piled with basil, mint, thyme, arugula, rosemary, parsley and many other types of fresh culinary herbs. Nothing smells as heavenly and few edibles pack a bigger punch of raw flavor. There is hardly a cuisine in the world

But with the popularity of diverse ethnic

that doesn’t use fresh herbs to brighten

cuisines in this country, a great variety of

the flavors of a dish. For many, herbs are

culinary herbs are available to everyone,

used in traditional dishes without much

everywhere. Many farmers we’ve spoken to

thought as to why. It’s just been done that

say that people ask them all the time about

way for hundreds of years. This is because

how to use, store, cut and grow herbs.

many herbs have become indigenous to

Maybe we can help.

certain climates and soils.

WEATHER PERMITTING

Bright Green by JUDITH MARA

mint P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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roasted potatoes with rosemary & sage View recipe on page 98 Âť

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BRIGHT GREEN


A dozen things you may or may not know about culinary herb s arugula, fennel, chicory and hops are herbs

herbs aren’t savory or sweet You often hear people describe herbs as

many herb stems are great for cooking

Many people don’t know that some of our

sweet, savory or spicy. But herbs are flavor

The leaves of herbs such as cilantro, parsley

common greens are actually herbs. This is

neutral. Herbs do not contain sugar. Nor do

and dill weed are too fragile to cook for long

important because it opens your mind to

they contain sodium. Their flavor comes

periods of time. But their hardier stems pack

thinking of herbs in a broader way. Arugula

from oils. So don’t be hesitant to use herbs

a lot of flavor and can be cooked for hours in

and fennel can both be made into center-of-

with fruit, in desserts or in baking. Or to use

a broth, bouquet garni, braise or with beans.

the-plate dishes rather than being relegated

herbs like mint in savory dishes. You’ll be

You can also use whole stems of thyme and

to the side as a garnish. Both also make

delighted with how flexible herbs are in

fennel in the same way. Rosemary, mint

great pesto sauces to toss with pasta or use

the kitchen.

and tarragon stems are woody and are

as a pizza topping. And what would beer

better thrown onto the fire of a hot grill

taste like without the bitter slap of hops?

for extra flavor.

rosemary

sage

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basil if i buy basil on wednesday will it still be fresh on saturday?

the best way to store fresh herbs is to grow them yourself

More than likely the answer to that question is yes, if

That’s right, the best way to keep fresh herbs

you store herbs properly. The easiest way to store them

longer is to grow them yourself. Which is

is to wrap them in a barely damp paper towel and put

pretty easy because most pests don’t like

them in a plastic bag in the refrigerator. Then wash them

herbs and you don’t need to fertilize them.

and pat them dry just before using. It’s also trendy now

It’s best to buy herb plants from a local farmer

to store basil upright (like a bunch of flowers) in a glass

because you know they will grow in your area.

with an inch or two of water, cover with a plastic bag and

Also, they shouldn’t be overwatered but never

put in the refrigerator.

let the roots dry out, especially rosemary. And always pinch off any flowers the minute you see them.

42

BRIGHT GREEN


thyme

Never buy herb s with flowers on them

marjorum don’t buy culinary herbs with flowers (basil, oregano, sage, parsley, cilantro, thyme, mint, tarragon) Once an herb plant starts to flower it puts all its effort into flowering, decreasing the flavor in the leaves. So never buy herbs with flowers on them unless you’re going to make tea with the blossoms. If that is that is the only plant available, then taste a

it’s not hard to learn the difference between herbs Identifying the look or taste of various herbs seems to puzzle many cooks, but this is easy to fix. Next time you’re at the farmer’s market, pull a small piece of leaf off an herb and taste it. (You may want to ask if you can do this.) If you do this often enough, you’ll quickly become familiar with herbs.

leaf to make sure it still has lots of flavor.

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cilantro is mexican. basil is italian. That’s not the whole truth. We know many Italian chefs that cook with thyme and sage as much or more than basil. Cilantro, the most widely used herb in the world, is predominantly used in Asian cooking. Basil is also a popular herb used in Asian cooking and mint is used in almost every cuisine. We make this point to encourage cooks to be open to a broader understanding of how to use these magic morsels when cooking. The famous Italian fish dish, branzino, wouldn’t be same without fresh thyme. Green curry without basil is unthinkable.

parsley mix them up We wish more farmers would sell mixed bouquets of herbs that you could just chop up and add to a potato or bean salad or sprinkle over a filet or bruschetta. Until they do, mix up your own bouquets from leftover herbs. Start with flat leaf parsley and add basil, chives, oregano, dill, thyme and/or tarragon in any quantity and chop together. For a topping, add a little olive oil.

chop them up. throw them in. but when? Fresh herb leaves range from sturdy (rosemary, thyme, sage, fresh bay) to soft (basil, cilantro, chervil, tarragon, sorrel) to somewhere in-between (oregano, chives, parsley, marjoram). A rule of thumb is that sturdier herbs can take a little heat.

oregano

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BRIGHT GREEN

Soft herbs are always added at the end of cooking. If not, the flavor will just melt away.


farm market vegetable cheese tart View recipe on page 99 Âť

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herbs are edible garnishes We use a lot of fresh herbs for garnish in our photography. They lend freshness to a photograph. But we never garnish a dish without considering if the herb(s) we select will also add fresh flavor to the dish in real life. Gone are the days of the tasteless curly parsley garnishes. To stay are the days of making everything you put in and on a dish matter.

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BRIGHT GREEN


herb stuffed tomatoes View recipe on page 100 »

cut, rock and roll

chef’s knife and cut by pressing down

The last word on cutting is how to cut

We find vegetable cleavers are the best

and rocking forward in one motion.

basil julienne style. Luckily it’s simple:

tool for a home cook to chop herbs.

We also recommend cutting on a wood

Stack basil leaves on top of each other,

Their long straight edge gives a clean

board as opposed to plastic, as the

largest to smallest. Roll them up

cut to herbs with minimal bruising. If

blade can push deeper into wood and

lengthwise and cut crosswise into 1/8-

you don’t have a cleaver, use a sharp

make a cleaner cut.

to 1/4-inch pieces.

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THE ART of the

ICE CUBE by

K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

48

THE ART OF THE ICE CUBE


SILICONE CUBES

ACRYLIC OR PLASTIC ICE

REAL ICE

Silicone cubes, concocted

Photographers and stylists can

Don’t forget about frozen water!

by special effects man Geoff

make ice cubes out of acrylic or

For casual shoots that don’t

Binns-Calvey, have a texture

plastic, or purchase pre-made

require many adjustments, real

similar to Jell-O but look

cubes online. But with many cubes

ice works perfectly well. You

perfectly real in a still photo.

costing as much as $50 a piece,

can make your ice with an ice

The squishy material makes it

these can add up quickly.

cube tray, of course, or you can

easy to manipulate and break

source it from an ice provider

into different shapes and sizes.

in all different shapes, textures and sizes. In need of a 400-pound iceberg-sized hunk? They’ve got you covered.

It’s a glorious moment in The Wizard of Oz

refreshing, and it’s important that they

when the Wicked Witch of the West utters the

remain solid, or at least partially solid, over

now infamous lines, “I’m melting, I’m melting!”

the course of an hours-long shoot. Thankfully,

But ice cubes melting on a photography set?

when real ice just won’t cut it, there are a

Well, not quite so glorious. These sparkling little

number of convincing alternatives ready to

cubes help make a cold beverage look positively

stand in its place.

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50

A D AY I N T H E L I F E


ORE’S M

EAD

ST. IS I

D

Wisconsin

A Day in the Life by INGA WITSCHER

“Red Sky in the morning sailors takes warning”…. That’s ok! We need the rain. This time of year our pastures can benefit from all the moisture they can absorb. With my overalls tucked into my barn

There’s clover and plantain, crows foot

boots, I head out into the field as the sun

trefoil and a few pesky thistles ready to

rises over Wisconsin. Dragging my feet

bloom. Overall it looks good. We will be

through the morning dew, I take a mental

able to move the cows into this pasture

note of what’s growing in the pasture.

after the weekend.

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On our farm, St. Isidore’s Mead, we

They spend that time eating a diverse diet

practice Managed Intensive Grazing,

of native grasses and wild herbs which

which means we move the cows to a

give their milk a clean, grassy flavor. The

fresh strip of grass every 12 hours. The

cows in turn fertilize the ground behind

cows are turned into a new pasture

them, improving the soils for the future.

after the morning and evening milkings.

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A D AY I N T H E L I F E


St. Isidore’s Mead P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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“Ca-boss, Ca-boss, come on ladies, let’s go,”

“Ca-boss, Ca-boss, come on ladies, let’s go”

I call out to our 15 Jersey cows as, one by one, they begin to rise. First is Hannah; she stands up and immediately whips her long brown tail across her back before going into a downward dog-like stretch and then heads off to the water tank. Next Jenny and Mae stand up, arch their backs and file into the line of cows heading towards the barn.

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A D AY I N T H E L I F E


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A D AY I N T H E L I F E


Back at the barn, my husband Joe sanitizes

gentler on the cows’ udders, and also on

all the milking equipment. Producing high

the milk. In a conventional/factory farm

quality milk is extremely important to

system, milk is pumped dozens of times.

us. We will never produce a large amount

That pumping shatters the fat globules

of milk, but we work to produce the best

of the milk. When handled gently, the

quality. To ensure that high quality, we

milk stays in its truest form, creating a

milk the old-fashioned way, using a bucket

fuller flavored milk, perfect for making St. Isidore’s cheese.

milking system. The bucket milkers are

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A D AY I N T H E L I F E


At the age of 61, my father, a third generation dairy farmer, became a licensed Wisconsin State cheese maker. Now, when the cows are eating grass as the seasons allow, we transform our grass-fed, organic, high quality milk into a farmstead raw milk cheese. Today is one of those days when we can deliver the milk to him, still warm from the morning’s milking.  

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After 8 hours of stirring, then adding

guarantees even moisture throughout

the rennet and cultures, the curd comes

the truckle. Mold will grow on the cheese

together. The cheese is then pressed and

which will provide flavor.

wrapped in butter-soaked cheesecloth,

then pressed again to form 20-pound

After the evening milking, Joe follows the

round truckles. A label is sewn into the

cows to the field and I make a pit stop

cheesecloth with the date, the name of

to make martinis and grab some curds

the pasture the cows were grazing in,

out of the fridge from this morning’s

a description of the weather and the

cheese make. Sitting with Joe in the clover,

names of the cows who produced the

cocktails in hand, we listen to the cows

milk. The cheese is then moved into a

graze—this is a tradition my father started

cave with the correct temperature and

when we first moved to St. Isidore’s Mead.

humidity. The truckles are turned and

With the last sip of gin, the rain starts

brushed continuously throughout a

to sprinkle, and we head for home.

one-year hibernation in the cave. This

60

A D AY I N T H E L I F E


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<

HIDDEN Gems

>

The best dishes that no one knows about…yet

by JUDITH MARA

You could argue that Hot Doug’s

After he finishes, he’s working as a

is not a hidden gem because any

cookbook editor and eats a bad hot

food-focused person in Chicago

dog. Two and a half years later he

has heard of this encased meat

opens Hot Doug’s to bring back the

emporium. After all, Hot Doug’s is

hot dog the way it should be done.

what local legends are made of: Doug

“People weren’t doing it justice and

Sohn avoids a career path but loves

I wanted to restore respectability to

to cook so he goes to chef’s school.

the sausage,” he explains.

Hidden Gem

We gave Doug carte blanche to choose

with foie gras mousse, truffles and a

HOT DOUG’S

his favorite “gem” to feature. He chose

sprinkle of fluer de sel and thought it

two, giving the persuasive reason that

would be funny to offer it on his menu,

they represent the two sides of his

never thinking it would take off.

“THE DOG” AND “FOIE GRAS AND SAUTERNES DUCK SAUSAGE”

menu––classic and creative. His picks were a Chicago–style hot dog with

Technically (according to our strict

mustard, sport peppers, tomatoes,

requirements), Hot Doug’s is a hidden

pickle, relish and celery salt, and a

gem. It’s off the beaten path and you

playful Foie Gras and Sauternes Duck

have to seek out the neighborhood

Sausage with Truffle Aioli, Foie Gras

and the restaurant. What makes the

Mousse and Fleur de Sel.

place easy to find is when the line of hungry humanity curls around the block. Once inside, choosing a sausage from the menu is surprisingly daunting considering Hot Doug’s serves one thing and serves it to perfection—sausages. Yes there are fries, but no burgers, no wraps and certainly no pizza.

HIDDEN GEMS: HOT DOUG’S

Doug’s for the first time, here are a few newbie tips. Hot Doug’s only accepts cash. They are hard-core about closing at 4:00 p.m., however if you are in line by 4:00 p.m. you will get served. And the real inside scoop is that on

Chicago-style hot dogs have a long

Fridays and Saturdays they serve Duck

history as a cheap meal dating back to

Fat Fries, iconic fries cooked in duck

the Depression. It still is today at Hot

fat. Just another reason why a humble

Doug’s for only $2 per dog. The Foie

neighborhood sausage shop is stuff

Gras and Sauternes Duck Sausage is

legends are made of.

pure Doug at his creative best. Using an existing high quality duck sausage and playing around, Doug concocted this fan favorite. He paired the sausage

62

For those who will be discovering Hot

Be sure to check out Doug’s colorful and irreverent new book Hot Doug’s: The Book, at www.shopbenchmark.com/hotdougs.


HOT DOUG’S Monday–Saturday: 10:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Closed Sundays 773.279.9550 3324 N. California Ave. Chicago, IL 60618 www.hotdougs.com

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b y K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

BISON is back

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BISON IS BACK


“This scenery already rich pleasing and beautiful was still farther heightened by immense herds of buffalo, deer, elk and antelopes which we saw in every direction feeding on the hills and plains. I do not think I exaggerate when I estimate the number of buffalo which could be comprehended at one view to amount to 3000.”

— Meriwether Lewis, September 17, 1804, near present-day Chamerlain, South Dakota

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66

BISON IS BACK


Once upon a time, the great American bisonâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;often mistakenly called buffaloâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;flourished in the tens of millions and covered the Great Plains in a blanket of shaggy brown. By the late 19th century, however, settlers had killed some 50 million bison for food, sport and to deprive Native Americans of their most valuable natural resource. Enormous herds were reduced to near extinction.

BISON FACT Bison are the heaviest land animals in North America, often weighing a ton or more and standing 5 to 6 feet tall at the shoulders. They have large heads, massive humps and sharp curved horns that can grow up to 2 feet long. Despite their formidable size and bulk, bison can sprint at speeds up to 40 miles per hour.

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68

BISON IS BACK


Propelled by the efforts of early

has only quickened their resurgence.

conservationists, the bison population

Today, bison can be found at parks,

began a slow bounce back in 1905.

reserves and ranches around the

Recent interest in the animals as a

country, as well as on the plates of

healthy, sustainable alternative to beef

adventurous eaters.

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Joe Ricketts, entrepreneur and philanthropist, has played a powerful role in returning the meat to our menus. In 2003, Ricketts founded High Plains Bison, a retailer of natural bison meat and the official bison vendor at Chicagoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wrigley Field. At Rickettsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quiet Wyoming ranch, his bison graze in lumbering herds, heads bowed, with shoulders as broad and jagged as the mountains that stand in the distance. Though much has changed since the days of Lewis and Clark, one thing remains the same: the undeniable thrill at seeing these majestic creatures at home in their natural habitat.

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BISON IS BACK


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72

BISON IS BACK


BISON FACT Bison has a delicious, delicate flavorâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;lighter and somewhat sweeter than beefâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and an impressive nutritional profile. Bison-industry regulations require that bison raised for their meat are never treated with artificialgrowth hormones, chemicals or unnecessary antibiotics. Moreover, bison meat contains far less fat, calories and cholesterol than beef, but higher levels of iron, omega-3â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and other nutrients.

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BISON FACT Because bison is so lean, its preparation requires a little extra care to ensure it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t dry out. This means that steaks should never be cooked beyond medium, and tougher cuts (such as chuck, brisket and short ribs) are best cooked low and slow for the most tender and flavorful results.

74

BISON IS BACK


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FOOD PORN continued

76

FOOD PORN CONTINUED


Captions by Bryan Olsen and Todd Womack of the amazing web series The Key of Awesome. Find it at www.youtube.com/barelypolitical.

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78

FOOD PORN CONTINUED


ICED ASPARAGUS Why would some sick bastard ice their asparagus? Did the asparagus sprain its ankle or something? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m contacting the authorities. Who has Padmaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s number?

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squished tomatoes These tomatoes saw what was in the Ark at the end of Raiders of the Lost Ark.

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FOOD PORN CONTINUED


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HOW WE

DID IT

Deconstructing a shot from Stephen Hamilton’s The Restaurant Project by JUDITH MARA

favorite dish

Led Zepplin Burger Restaurant

Restaurant: Kuma’s Corner Chicago, IL food stylist

Jen Straus prop stylist

Paula Walters

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HOW WE DID IT


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butter poached maine lobster

(from Arrows Restaurant in Ogunquit, Maine)

ingredients ·· 6- 1 1/4 pound lobsters, cooked and picked from the shell ·· 1/2 pound unsalted butter

cooking the lobster

reheating the lobster

In a saucepan, boil milk, water, butter, sugar and sea salt together.

Melt one pound butter in a small stainless steel pot and have it hot,

Add the flour and cook until dry.

but not so warm that it is boiling or turning color, medium heat should

Bring a very large pot of salted water to a rapid boil. Drop the

work well on most stoves.

live lobsters into the water and cook for nine minutes.

Using a basket or a slotted spoon place the lobster in the butter for a

Drain into a sink and cool with ice and running cold water.

minute or until it feels warm to the touch. Do not overheat the lobster as the tails will begin to curl and become tough.

Pick off the tails and the claws and knuckles, discard the bodies. Crack the shells gently with a heavy knife or cleaver and remove

Remove the lobster from the butter and place in a warm bowl with

the meat from the shell. (Using scissors will help remove the

just enough rum sauce to coat it lightly.

knuckle meat easier).

Assemble shortcakes with curried shallots, butter poached lobster

Squeezing the tail firmly until it cracks will also allow you to

and lime vanilla rum sauce. Garnish with small sprigs of cilantro,

then remove the tail meat by pulling the shell apart. Split the

basil, and mint finish with a brunoise of shaved green papaya,

tails in half lengthwise.

mango and pineapple.

Be certain the cartilage inside the claw is removed by making a small slit and sliding it out. This can be done the morning of the dinner and refrigerated until ready for dinner.

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RECIPE INDEX


mark’s shortcake ingredients

method

·· 1½ cups all purpose flour

Combine dry ingredients. Cut in butter.

·· 1 ½ teaspoons baking powder

Add buttermilk until a soft dough is

·· ½ teaspoons baking soda

formed. Roll out to a ½ inch thickness and

·· 1 teaspoons salt

cut with a 3 inch cutter. Brush with cream

·· 1 ½ sticks butter cubed then frozen

and bake at 325F.

·· ¾ to 1 cup buttermilk ·· ¼ cup heavy cream ·· 1/8 tsp ground clove

curried shallots ingredients ·· 8 shallots thinly sliced ·· 1 tablespoon ginger finely chopped ·· 1 serrano chili

method

Put all ingredients into a stainless pot and bring to a boil, turn off and allow to cool.

·· 1 teaspoon tumeric ·· 1 tablespoon Madras curry powder ·· 1 teaspoon kosher salt ·· 1 cup rice wine vinegar

lime vanilla rum sauce ingredients ·· ½ cup lime juice ·· ½ cup rice wine vinegar ·· ¼ cup dark rum ·· 1 serrano chili ·· ½ vanilla bean split ·· ¼ cup shallots ·· 1 tablespoon ginger peeled and thinly sliced ·· ½ pound unsalted butter ·· Kosher salt ·· Fresh ground pepper

method Place the first seven ingredients into a stainless sauce pan over medium heat and reduce the liquids by 2/3 rd. Then whisk in softened butter, season with salt and pepper, add lime juice and rum. Strain through a fine sieve discarding solid ingredients. Serve at once or hold in a warm place for up to one hour.

·· 1 teaspoon lime juice ·· 1 teaspoon rum

RECIPE INDEX

85


heavenly hots by Ina Pinkney When I tasted these light-as-air packed-with-flavor little pancakes, I was hooked.

ingredients:

In a mixing bowl (or blender or processor) beat the eggs. Add the remaining ingredients and blend until smooth.

·· 4 eggs ·· 2 cups sour cream ·· 1/4 cup cakeflour ·· 2 Tbsp. potato starch ·· 3 Tbsp. sugar ·· 1/2 tsp. baking soda ·· 1/2 tsp. salt

Heat a griddle or fry pan on medium high heat. Coat with a thin film of oil. Carefully ‘drop’ a large spoonful of batter until it makes a circle of about 3 inches. When a few bubbles appear on the top, turn them over very carefully and cook until lightly browned. We serve them with a peach, raspberry, blueberry compote. I personally think maple syrup is too strong a flavor for them.

86

RECIPE INDEX


crisp topping by Ina Pinkney

ingredients:

Put all dry ingredients into a food processor and combine. Add butter and ‘pulse’ 7-10 times until the butter pieces are

·· 7oz. flour ·· 4oz. sugar, white ·· 4oz. sugar, light brown ·· 1/2 tsp. cinnamon

quite small - about the size of rice. Fill an 8 oz. ramekin with blueberries and put 1/4 cup of topping on each.

·· 1/2 tsp. nutmeg

Store the topping in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

·· 6 oz. butter, unsalted, cut into small pieces

Bake the Crisps at 375 degrees for 15-17 minutes.

RECIPE INDEX

87


ina’s vegetable hash by Ina Pinkney ingredients: ·· Butter | 1440g ·· 1 ½ lb. Sweet potatoes, peeled and diced ·· 1 lb. Red potatoes, peeled and diced

Bring 6 qt. of lightly salted water to a boil. Using a perforated pasta basket, cook sweet potatoes in boiling water until tender. Remove to an ice bath. Drain thoroughly when chilled. Using the same method, cook the red potatoes and then cook Brussels sprouts until tender.

·· ½ lb. Brussels sprouts, fresh or frozen

Heat a large sauté pan to medium high. Add 1 Tbsp. canola oil to pan. Sauté

·· 4 Tbsp. Canola oil

onions until lightly browned. Remove from pan to cool. Add 2 Tbsp. canola oil

·· 2 Spanish onion, medium, sliced

to pan. Sauté mushrooms until lightly browned. Remove from pan to cool.

·· 1 Eggplant, medium ·· 2 tsp. Kosher salt ·· 1 lb. Corn, frozen kernels ·· 1 c. Cream, heavy ·· 2 tsp. Oregano, dried

Split eggplant in half lengthwise. Score skin and rub with 1Tbsp. canola oil. Season lightly with Kosher salt and place on a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper. Roast at 400 F for 15-20 minutes until very tender. Cool, peel and coarsely chop flesh.

·· 2 tsp. Thyme, dried

To assemble hash, mix all vegetables thoroughly. Into heavy cream, mix

·· 1 Tbsp. Garlic, minced

all additional ingredients. Pour heavy cream mixture over vegetables, mix

·· 2 Tbsp. Lea and Perrins Worsctershire sauce

thoroughly and refrigerate overnight to allow flavors to develop.

·· 4 tsp. Tamari, gluten free ·· 2 tsp. Black pepper, freshly ground

To serve, heat a sauté pan to medium and film with canola oil. Add desired

·· 2 tsp. Kosher salt (plus additional)

amount of hash and cook until steaming hot. Serve with poached eggs.

·· 1 Tbsp. Ina’s Dirty Spice Mix (recipe, page )

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RECIPE INDEX


Wash the chicken and trim any visible fat. Mix the garlic powder, salt, and pepper into the buttermilk. Put the chicken into a 1 gallon self-closing plastic bag and pour in the buttermilk. Close the bag, place on a cookie sheet or into a bowl and refrigerate for 2 hours or overnight. Into a large, heavy 6 quart pot, put the oil and heat over medium heat until it reaches 275°F, using a thermometer. While the oil is heating, remove the chicken from the bag and place on a rack to drain. For coating, combine flour, garlic powder, salt and pepper into a large mixing bowl and combine.

ina’s award-winning fried chicken by Ina Pinkney

Dredge and press the chicken into the flour mixture. Shake off any excess flour. Re-dredge if any

ingredients:

part is missing coverage. CAREFULLY AND SLOWLY put the

·· 2/3 cup sugar

chicken into the hot oil SKIN SIDE

·· 2 1/2- 3 pounds chicken- natural or organic cut into 8 pieces

DOWN.

·· 1/2 gallon Buttermilk ·· 1 tsp. Garlic powder ·· 1 tsp. Kosher salt ·· 1 tsp. Black pepper, freshly ground

Leave it alone (I’m not kidding!) for 10 minutes. Then you can gently turn the pieces to keep them separate.

·· 3 quarts Trans fat-free oil (we use Canola)

coating:

cooking times: Wings: 13-15 minutes, Legs: 15-17 minutes,

·· 4 cups Flour, all purpose

Thighs: 18-20 minutes,

·· 2 tsp. Garlic powder

Breasts: 20-25 minutes

·· 1 tsp. Kosher salt ·· 1 tsp. Black pepper, freshly ground

If you’re not sure the chicken is done, use the tip of a sharp knife and poke to see if the juices run clear or use an instant-read thermometer, which should read 160°F.

RECIPE INDEX

89


gingerbread pancakes by Ina Pinkney ingredients: ·· 5 oz. flour ·· 1/2 cup each - sugar, potato starch * see

Yield: about 20 (3 inch) pancakes Preheat oven to 200. Sift all dry ingredients together in a large mixing bowl and stir vigorously.

note at bottom

Combine all wet ingredients and mix until well blended. Stir into

·· 1/4 cup whole wheat flour

flour mixture and blend well without over mixing.

·· 1 tsp. each - baking soda, ground ginger, ground cloves, dry mustard ·· 1/4 tsp. pumpkin pie spice ·· 1/2 tsp. salt ·· 16 oz. buttermilk

Heat non-stick pan or griddle over medium-high heat and brush with oil. Pour 1/4 cup of batter onto the griddle for each pancake. Cook until bubbles appear on the tops - about 3 minutes. Turn over and cook about 1 minute more.

·· 1/2 cup sour cream ·· 2 eggs ·· 1/4 cup vegetable oil ·· 2 Tbsp. molasses

Place pancakes, uncovered, on a oven-safe platter in the oven until all pancakes are made. NOTE: You can find potato starch (not flour) in a box in the Jewish Food Section of your supermarket. It might also be in the natural food area.

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RECIPE INDEX


tasso ham by Justin Brunson ingredients:

rub

·· Pork Ham Cuts (roughly 5#/20#) | 1ea | 4ea

·· 1c Black Pepper (rough grind)

·· Kosher Salt | 53g | 212g

·· 1T Cayenne Pepper

·· Onion Powder | 25g | 100g

·· 2T Garlic Powder

·· Brown Sugar | 22g | 88g ·· Black Pepper | 15g | 60g ·· White Pepper | 15g | 60g

- Rub meat evenly with cure and let sit for 9 days wrapped, preferably in cryo-vac

·· Garlic Powder | 10g | 40g

- Rinse in cold water

·· Pink Salt #1 | 7g | 24g

- Rub with rub and smoke at 225 degrees to internal

·· Hot Paprika | 4g | 16g ·· Cayenne Pepper | 5g | 20g

temp of 160 degrees - Cool completely

·· .Allspice | 5g | 2g

RECIPE INDEX

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tamarind shandy From Uncle Boon’s, New York, NY serves 1 ingredients:

tamarind simple syrup:

·· 1 1/2 oz. Tamarind Simple Syrup

·· 8 tsp. tamarind paste

·· 1 oz. fresh lime juice ·· 5 dashes of house-made pomelo bitters (substitute grapefruit or any citrus bitters) ·· Top with Goose Island Sofie

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·· 2 cups palm sugar

·· Add 3 cups boiling water


honey nougatine by Geovanna Salas, Pastry Chef at Table Fifty-Two

ingredients:

Combine sugar and honey in a heavy sauce pot and bring to a boil, stirring constantly. Stop stirring and bring syrup

·· 2/3 cup sugar

to 360°F. Remove from heat and stir in butter and nuts.

·· 1/2 cup honey

Scrape the mixture onto baking sheet lined with lightly oiled

·· 1 tablespoon butter

parchment paper. Spread evenly with an oiled spatula, or

·· 1 cup toasted almonds or pistachios

press into the pan with a lightly oiled piece of foil. Be careful, it’s hot! Let cool until set. Chop coarsely.

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milk honey pudding by Meg Galus, Executive Pastry Chef at Park Hyatt Chicago and NoMI restaurant

ingredients:

To bloom gelatin: Completely submerge gelatin sheets in ice water and wait until they soften, about 5 minutes.

·· Egg yolks | 120g ·· Local raw honey | 100g ·· Cream | 500g ·· Nonfat milk powder | 50g ·· Gelatin sheets | 8g

Bring the cream, honey and milk powder to a boil over high heat. Using a whisk, slowly temper the hot liquid into the egg yolks, making sure not to curdle the yolks in the process. Add to the cream mixture and cook until it reaches 82°C or nappe, when the liquid is thick enough that when you run your finger down the back of the spatula it holds a line. Remove from heat and strain the mixture into an ice bath (an empty bowl set over a bowl of ice). Add the bloomed gelatin after about a minute, and whisk. Chill in the fridge until set. Mix lightly and portion into cups.

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honey madeleines by Sarah Kosokowski, Corporate Pastry Chef at Valrhona, Inc, Eastern Region

ingredients:

Cream butter, sugars and honey until light and fluffy. Add eggs, one at a time, until incorporated. Mix in all sifted dry

·· Butter | 1440g

ingredients until just combined. Pipe into Madeleine molds

·· Sugar | 1200g

and freeze until ready to bake. Bake at 325°F for 10 minutes,

·· Light brown sugar | 160g

turn, then bake 4 more minutes until golden brown. Unmold

·· Honey | 240g

and dust with confectioners’ sugar.

·· Salt | 16g ·· Eggs | 1600g ·· Cake flour | 720g ·· All-purpose flour | 720g ·· Baking powder | 40g

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honey vanilla ice cream by Sarah Kosokowski, Corporate Pastry Chef at Valrhona, Inc, Eastern Region

ingredients:

Combine milk, cream, vanilla extract, vanilla bean, and honey in a heavy saucepan over high heat and bring to a boil. Combine sugar, glucose powder, milk

·· Milk | 2700g

powder, salt and stabilizer in a mixing bowl. Add yolks to the powdery mixture

·· Cream | 1430g

and temper into hot liquid. Over medium heat and stirring frequently with a

·· Vanilla extract | 25g

spatula, cook to nappe or until mixture thickens enough that when you run your

·· Vanilla beans | 3ea.

finger down the back of the spatula it holds a line. Remove from heat and whisk

·· Honey | 550g

in butter until melted. Strain with a fine strainer to catch any bits. Allow to chill.

·· Sugar | 200g ·· Glucose powder | 310g

*For orange ginger ice cream, to 3 liters of honey vanilla ice cream base, add:

·· Milk powder | 170g

·· 1 teaspoon orange extract

·· Salt | 8g

·· Ginger puree | 50g

·· Stabilizer | 12g

·· Fabbri mandarin delipaste | 170g

·· Egg yolks | 840g ·· Butter | 225g

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milk chocolate honey ganache by Sarah Kosokowski, Corporate Pastry Chef at Valrhona, Inc, Eastern Region

ingredients:

Boil cream, vanilla, and honey in a heavy saucepan over medium-high heat. Remove from heat and pour over milk

·· 1 cup sliced rhubarb

chocolate and mix until smooth. Add softened butter and

·· Cream | 1400g

burr ??? and mix again until smooth. Pour into two ½ sheet

·· Vanilla bean | 1 ea.

pans lined with silpat or aluminum foil, shiny side up; let set

·· Honey | 200g

overnight before cutting into small pieces.

·· Milk chocolate | 2kg ·· Butter, room temperature | 400g

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roasted potatoes with rosemary & sage by Judith Mara

serves 4

Use any type of red, yellow white or purple (boiling) potatoes you find at the farmer’s market. Rosemary and sage are sturdier types of herbs and

ingredients: ·· 1 1/2 pounds potatoes (see note above) scrubbed and cut into 1 1/2-inch chunks ·· 2-3 Rosemary sprigs, cut into smaller sprigs and smashed with the flat side of a knife ·· 10 very small sage leaves or large leaves cut into 1/2-inch pieces

can hold up to baking. This is a great side dish to accompany pork, beef or grilled fish. Preheat oven to 400˚ Toss the potatoes, herbs, and garlic together in a baking dish large enough to hold them in one layer. Drizzle the olive oil over the potatoes and give them another toss. Sprinkle a little salt and pepper over the potatoes (you can always add more later).

·· 5 garlic cloves (optional) smashed with the flat

Roast for 20 minutes, turn over, then roast another 10-15 minutes or

side of a knife

until browned and soft. Taste for seasoning. Serve piping hot.

·· 4 Tablespoons olive oil ·· Kosher salt and fresh ground pepper

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ingredients: ·· 2 sheets all-butter puff pastry* (Dufour or Trader Joes are preferred, unless you make your own) ·· 1 egg, whisked ·· 1 tablespoon whole grain or Dijon mustard ·· 1 1/2 cups (give or take a little) grated Gruyere, sliced Taleggio or 1 cup crumbled goat cheese ·· 1 pint small tomatoes such as Sun Gold, cherry or grape, halved and sprinkled with a touch of salt. ·· 1 medium red onion, cut in 1/4-inch slices ·· Olive oil ·· 1 bunch of arugula or rocket

Thaw pastry according to instructions. With a rolling pin, roll out both pastry sheets on a lightly floured surface. Roll into 10” x 14” rectangles or 12” x 12” squares. Transfer one sheet to a large baking sheet. Cut remaining pastry into 4, 13” long x 2-inch wide strips. Brush an 1-inch perimeter around the pastry on the baking sheet with egg wash. Twist one of the pastry strips and place on an edge of the pastry flush with the bottom but leaving about 1-inch of space on the top. Lightly press ends down. Repeat all around the pastry until an edge is formed. Brush top with remaining egg wash. (Use leftover pastry to make cheese or cinnamon

farm market vegetable cheese tart

straws.) Prick the bottom of the pastry with a fork about a dozen times

by Judith Mara This tart is a real show stopper dish with fresh vegetables and arugula (yes, arugula,

and spread the mustard across the bottom. Refrigerate at least 15 minutes. Place oven rack in the middle and preheat oven to 400˚.

sometimes called rocket, is an herb) from the farmer’s market.

While dough is resting, add 1 tablespoon olive oil to a sauté pan and heat on medium-high. Sauté onion slices until they are

serves 8

slightly browned, remove from heat. Top the pastry with the cheese, the tomatoes and the onions. Bake until golden and crisp and cheese is soft, about 20 minutes. When pastry is done, remove from oven and top with arugula. Lift some of the tomatoes and onions up over the arugula. Tart can be served warm or at room temperature. * You can also make this with one sheet of puff pastry but it will be smaller. Instructions: Roll out pastry as instructed above. Using a sharp knife, lightly score a line around the pastry, 1-inch in from the edge to create a rim, then prick the inner rectangle with a fork. Continue as instructed reducing the amount of toppings. RECIPE INDEX

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herb stuffed tomatoes by Judith Mara serves 2, per tomato

Pre heat oven to 375˚ or heat grill.

ingredients:

Slice tomato in half. With the cut side up, sprinkle with salt and pepper.

·· 1 beefsteak tomato ·· Sea salt and fresh ground pepper ·· Handful of fresh, chopped herbs: any combination of basil, oregano, Italian parsley,

Let sit for at least 5 minutes. Meanwhile, chop the herbs, and mix grated cheese and bread crumbs together in a small bowl. Place tomato halves on a doubled sheet of foil. Sprinkle tomatoes with chopped herbs (reserve a small amount for garnish) and then the cheese mixture, drizzle with a little olive oil and pat down.

tarragon, arugula or thyme

If baking, transfer tomatoes on foil to a baking dish and bake for 18-20

·· 3 tablespoons freshly grated Parmesan or

minutes. If grilling, close foil around tomatoes. Place to the side of the

Pecorino cheese

grill. Check after 10-15 minutes to see if they are soft. Continue grilling

·· 2 tablespoons dry breadcrumbs

until done.

·· Olive oil ·· Aged balsamic vinegar (optional)

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Optional serving idea: Drizzle with aged balsamic vinegar.


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L AT E S UMM ER 2 0 1 3

NO 0 08

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Who's Hungry? Magazine | Late Summer 2013 | No 8  

Blending the worlds of food and photography, the magazine features travel stories and recipes from top food writers, as well as styling tips...

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