Page 1

late summer 2012

NO 0 03

1


FEATURES

16

8

2

34

In Season: Pickled & Preserved

5 Great Farm-to-Table Restaurants

CONTENTS

28

Weather Permitting

Simple Summer Sides


CONTENTS

44

High Spirits: Garden in a Glass

46

Cherries & Tar

4

Contributors

5

Letter from Steve

6

Stylist’s Corner

8

5 Great Farm-to-Table Restaurants

10

Out of the Bag

12

Art of the Grill

14

Portrait of a Chef

16

In Season: Pickled & Preserved

28

Weather Permitting: Tomato Time

34

Simple Summer Sides

44

High Spirits: Garden in a Glass

46

Cherries & Tar

56

How We Did It

58

Recipe Index

CONTACTS media inquiries Judith Mara | marabeach@sbcglobal.net Deirdre O’Shea | deirdre@stephenhamilton.com

sponsorship opportunities Deirdre O’Shea | deirdre@stephenhamilton.com

representation Schumann & Company | www.schumannco.com patti@schumannco.com | 312.432.1702

stephen hamilton 1520 W. Fulton | Chicago, IL 60607 www.stephenhamilton.com

CONTENTS

3


contributors

NO 0 0 3

judith mara | Editor and Writer

ian law | Design

Deirdre O’Shea | Production Director

Judith has worked with Stephen for almost

Ian designed every aspect of Who’s Hungry?™

If you have worked with Stephen Hamilton,

seven years and helps to lead the editorial

magazine with meticulous attention to detail and

you’ve worked with Deirdre. Drawing on 15

concept and execution of Who’s Hungry?™

typography, and helped turn static images into an

years of experience in managing photography

magazine. An award-winning former creative

interactive experience. His award-winning design

studios, Deirdre has a hand in nearly every

director for major ad agencies such as Leo

work has been featured in the pages of Print,

aspect of Stephen’s business. She’s been

Burnett and J. Walter Thompson, Judith sweats

Creativity, How, PDN and Graphic Design USA.

instrumental in organizing the magazine’s

the details, pens Weather Permitting and

shoots, sourcing ingredients, and always

literally hand writes How We Did It.

keeping production on schedule.

ian knauer |

kathryn o’malley |

steve dolinsky | Writer

Writer, Author, Soon-to-be TV Personality

Associate Editor and Writer

Since 2003, Steve has been the recognizable face

A former editor at Gourmet Magazine, Ian

Kathryn’s love of food is matched only by her

of ABC 7’s “The Hungry Hound,” filing reports on

develops recipes for Food Network and

passion for writing about it; as the newest

the best eats in Chicago. He has also appeared

contributes regularly to Bon Appétit. His own

addition to the Who’s Hungry?™ team, she

as a guest judge on “Iron Chef America”, as a

PBS show, The Farm, will air in 2013 and bring to

indulges in a bit of both. Her popular food blog,

contributor to “Unique Eats”, and serves as one

life the stories and recipes from his celebrated

dramaticpancake.com, garners more than 40,000

of the Academy Judges for “The World’s 50 Best

new cookbook by the same name. For Who’s

unique viewers per month and highlights the

Restaurants.” For Who’s Hungry?™ magazine,

Hungry?™ magazine, Ian takes us to his family’s

people and stories behind great recipes.

Steve ticked off his favorite al fresco restaurants

farmhouse kitchen where we’re put to work and

across the country.

rewarded with an incredible meal.

a special thanks to : Janet Rausa Fuller, Stephanie Izard and her assistant Jen Eisen, Giuseppe Tentori, Paula Deen and her right-hand creative man Brandon Branch, Emeril Lagasse, Elizabeth Karmel, Art Smith and his mother Addie Mae, Paul Virant, Hugh Acheson, Tom Hamilton, Juan Palomino, Paula Walters, Raymond Barrera, CeCe Campise, JoAnn Witherell, Ruth Siegel, Josephine Orba, Andrew Burkle, JJ Campise, Breana Moeller, Tamara Morrison, Vanessa Dubiel, Justin Paris, Taylor Strohmeyer. 4

CONTRIBUTORS


LETTER FROM STEVE Take, for example, this issue’s cover shot. To me, the best burger is thick, cooked on a charcoal grill and adorned by simple additions: cheese, ketchup, pickles, lettuce, tomato, and a swipe of mayonnaise. The purity of ingredients is why late summer is my favorite season. Much of this simple abundance begins at one place–the farm. I’m excited to present a personal story from Ian Knauer, a former editor of Gourmet magazine and the author of a new cookbook, The Farm: Rustic Recipes for a Year of Incredible Food. His witty and charming tale about rehabbing his family’s post-Civil War farmhouse kitchen pulls you right to your knees as he removes tar from the floor and then back up again as he describes his celebratory farm meal. Fussy entertaining has no place in the

I live and work by the philosophy that simple is better. My

summer kitchen. In “Simple Summer

approach to photography is to keep my images clean, natural

Sides,” I challenged our good friends and renowned chefs to share a side dish that

and uncomplicated. My philosophy for eating and cooking

they would serve at their family barbecue.

isn’t any different.

Elizabeth Karmel, Art Smith, and Emeril

Who would know better than Paula Deen, Lagasse how to use all the impeccable produce available at this time of year? To preserve some of the bounty of the season, you’ll want to read “In Season.” Chefs and food preservation experts Hugh Acheson and Paul Virant pen their thoughts and recipes for canning some of that goodness for the winter months ahead. Simply said, this is the perfect time of year to answer “Who’s Hungry?™” STEPHEN HAMILTON

LETTER FROM STEVE

|

CONTRIBUTORS’ PORTRAITS BY ANDREW BURKLE

|

STEVE’S PORTRAIT BY ANDREW BURKLE

5


STYLIST’S

CORNER tom hamilton b y K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

When Tom Hamilton, globe-trotting stylist and flea market connoisseur, arrived in Jasper, Florida for a farm-inspired photo shoot as part of Art Smith’s cookbook, Back to the Family, he had only three days to prepare. In instances like this, where time is limited, Tom’s keen eye for found objects can be incredibly useful. To play to the land’s natural beauty, Tom turned to local antique stores for props that embodied the rustic look he was seeking. Here, mismatched wooden chairs, tin containers, and a ceramic pitcher convey a casual, no-frills dinner scene that echoes the feel of the farm. Varying the heights and shapes of the dishware while working within a certain color scheme, says Tom, is the key to creating a striking yet cohesive look. With the addition of a loose bouquet of garden flowers, the resulting setup appears simple, fresh and natural–the very essence of farm-to-table cooking.

6

STYLIST’S CORNER


P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

|

S T Y L E D B Y T O M H A M I LT O N

7


GREAT

BLACKBERRY FARM

BLUE HILL AT STONE BARNS

1471 WEST MILLERS COVE RD.

630 BEDFORD RD.

WALLAND, TENNESSEE 37886

TARRYTOWN, NY 10591

Situated on a majestic, 4,200-acre estate

It took a family farm in Massachusetts to

in the Great Smoky Mountains of eastern

inspire Dan and David Barber. They started

Tennessee, Blackberry Farm truly exemplifies

cooking farm-to-table in 2000 with their first

the farm-to-table ethos of the Old South, with

restaurant, Blue Hill, in Greenwich Village. Four

more than a few modern amenities in both

years later, they reestablished their family’s

the Inn and adjoining restaurant. The chefs

Blue Hill Farm in its original form, within the

employ Foothills cuisine, a style they define

Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture

as “refined yet rugged.” Meals are served in a

in Pocantico Hills, New York. The Center is a

restored, 18th century Amish barn, and reflect

working, year round farm and educational

the season. Guests are encouraged to spend

center just 30 miles north of New York City.

time working in the fields and gardens, to

Sourcing from the nearby fields and pasture,

better appreciate the ripe peaches, foraged

as well as other local farms, the restaurant

mushrooms and heirloom produce that will

highlights the abundance of the Hudson

ultimately grace their dinner table.

Valley. There are no menus. Instead, guests are presented with a list of more than a

FARM-TO-TABLE

hundred ingredients, updated almost daily,

RESTAURANTS

field and market, such as sunflowers, Carmen

which contains the best offerings from the peppers, heritage breed pigs and Magic Mountain tomatoes.

by STEVE DOLINSKY

Steve Dolinsky, Food Reporter for ABC 7 News in Chicago and 12 time James Beard Award winner, shares five recommendations for farm-to-table restaurants from coast to coast.

Portrait by Todd Rosenberg Photography

8

5 G R E AT FA R M - T O - TA B L E R E S TA U R A N T S


EARTH AT HIDDEN POND

THE HERBFARM

WILLOWS INN

354 GOOSE ROCKS RD.

14590 NE 145TH ST.

2579 W. SHORE DR.

KENNEBUNKPORT, ME 04046

WOODINVILLE, WA 98072

LUMMI ISLAND, WA 98262

Imagine a walk in the woods, next to a series of

For much of the year, The Herbfarm’s gardens

Since 1910, this hideaway—located in the

gardens with unlimited produce, harvested and

and farm supply the restaurant with its produce.

archipelago that includes the San Juan Islands

transformed into some of the most delicious

It’s not uncommon to see wild mushrooms,

and the Gulf Islands in the Salish Sea—has been

food on the East Coast. Maintaining that “simple

heritage fruits and handmade cheeses share

nestled among mountains, volcanoes, rivers,

yet innovative” mantra, Earth’s menu—driven

menu space with oddities such as water-grown

lakes and salt waters. Salmon, blackberries and

by James Beard award-winning Boston chef

wasabi root and artisanal caviars. Each day’s

wild roses are as common as potholes in Chicago.

Ken Oringer—is all about “farm to fork.” While

9-course menu is finalized just a few hours before

The prix fixe menu is available Wednesday

the ability to source local meats and seafood

the meal, highlighting the best from farm, forest,

through Sunday, and chef Blaine Wetzel’s

is relatively easy, produce comes from one of

and sea. Paddlefish caviar and Puget Sound perch

creations seem to channel Copenhagen’s Noma

two onsite organic gardens; they’re picked daily

might arrive with a fiery kimchi made from local

as much as anyone. How many dining rooms,

and are incorporated into just about every dish.

cucumbers, while muscat-poached peaches and

after all, turn the forest loose on your tongue?

Even cocktails are created using their own herbs

anise hyssop ice prove local doesn’t always have

Salmonberry flowers, spruce needles and stinging

and muddled fruits. The restaurant’s walls are

to be predictable. Even the wines all hail from the

nettles are used as frequently as some other

made from trees cut to clear the site, which will

Pacific Northwest.

chefs might use basil or thyme. Perhaps it’s one

remind you of your surroundings even as you

of the reasons Food & Wine Magazine named him

polish off a local seafood paella embedded with

one of their “Best New Chefs” earlier this summer.

spring peas and greens.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

9


OUT BAG of the

b y K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

1

There are no beaches in Stephen Hamilton’s studio. No snow-capped mountains or azure skies or grassy fields, either. So when a photo calls for the perfect setting, Stephen relies on the talents of Tamara Morrison to create a place with her paintbrush. Tamara’s custom painted backdrops are truly works of art, featuring everything from billowy clouds to glittering sands. Most importantly, they have the ability to transport food to anywhere in the world, all without ever stepping out of the studio. Take a peek into Tamara’s toolbox on wheels, overflowing with the tools of her craft.

1. buckets and rulers It may look like a painter robbed an elementary school, but these rulers are the perfect paint stirrers, and these paint buckets are the perfect mixing bowls.

2. tints A variety of tints lets Tamara fine-tune a paint color and create her own; she may adjust a paint color as many as five times during a shoot until she gets it just right.

3. canvas & muslin backdrops Every scene begins with a blank canvas. Tamara usually arrives at a shoot with only a base color painted, and then paints the rest of the scene while on set in the studio. Working on set allows Stephen and Tamara to collaborate and make adjustments as necessary.

4. paint brushes Wide skies call for big brush strokes. The veins of a leaf call for lots of little ones. With her arsenal of brushes, Tamara is ready for anything–no matter what shape or size.

10

O U T O F T H E B A G : TA M A R A M O R R I S O N

2


3

4

tamara morrison

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

11


»

THE WHISPERING FLAME With special effects master Geoff Binns-Calvey’s custom flame rig–a snaking collection of metal

»

valves, bottles, and glass tubes–we can control exactly where, when, and how large the flames appear. This way, they don’t disrupt an already perfectly styled piece of meat.

THE SIMULATED GRILL This isn’t your traditional grill. Grill grates placed above a light box allows Geoff to easily manipulate the appearance of heat. When lit from the light box beneath, red acrylic briquettes dusted in grey powder look so real you would swear you could smell the smoke.

12

THE ART OF THE GRILL


THE GRILL MARKS When it comes to photography, where timing is everything, a product needs to be styled completely before it hits the set. After searing the pork chops, food stylist Josephine Orba created grill marks with hot metal skewers to give the meat a

THE JUICE

wonderfully charred, smoky appearance.

The pork chops are left

»

slightly undercooked so that they don’t dry out on set, where they are exposed to additional heat. A browning agent

»

and a brush of oil makes them look extra juicy.

THE ART of the

GRILL

Few things say summer like a hot, juicy hamburger fresh off the grill, or a glazed piece of pork cooked to perfection. But creating a grill shot can pose unique challenges. How do you capture the heat of the grill without disturbing (or drying out) a styled product? How do you control something as wild as fire? The answer begins with a talented stylist, calculated timing, some complex contraptions, and of course, the

by K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

photographer’s vision. Click the bullets to learn more about how we tamed the flame.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

13


PORTRAIT OF A

CHEF STEPHANIE IZARD

b y K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

14

PORTRAIT OF A CHEF: STEPHANIE IZARD


Stephanie Izard knows success. She is the first female winner in

worthy flavors draw flocks of

what would you do if you weren’t a chef?

hungry fans and food lovers from

Scuba instructor.

Izard’s laid-back style and swoon-

Top Chef history, owner of one

across the country. Her cooking is

of Chicago’s hottest restaurants,

bold and complex, yet completely

what’s one of your funniest

unpretentious–much like the chef

moments in a kitchen?

Girl & the Goat (inspired by the

herself. Izard’s infectious enthusiasm

Not sure if it was funny, but it was

Izard surname, which is French

and warm, no-fuss personality makes

awkward: When a guest started talking to

her one of the most likeable culinary

one of the male line cooks, thanking him

rock stars you will ever meet.

for the meal, convinced it was me. Do I look

for a Pyrenean goat-antelope), and is about to launch a

that manly? Hmmm. We invited Giuseppe Tentori, the

spin-off restaurant-diner,

subject of last issue’s “Portrait of a

Little Goat, this October.

Chef,” to submit questions he was

what do you look for in chefs who apply to work

curious to ask Stephanie…and it

in your kitchen?

seems they both have a great sense

We like line cooks that love what they do

of humor.

and are also fun. 12 to 14 hours is a long time to spend with people that are not fun.

what’s one ingredient that you’d rather not ever cook with? why? Green bell peppers. For no other reason than they just do not taste good.

what do you miss the most about your days on the line? When I start to miss it I just go back there and cook.

Quite possibly the most popular item on the Girl and the Goat’s menu is Stephanie’s Sautéed Green Beans with fish sauce vinaigrette and cashews.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

15


August

September

But why just get by? In the stark cold, why

missing: the sun-kissed stone fruits and

not uncap a jar of sprightly giardiniera or

snappy green, red and yellow vegetables

pickled peppers from the garden that recall

of summer. Root vegetables are reliable

the sweet heat of backyard barbecues? A

partners for the long haul. You’ll manage.

slather of homemade strawberry jam on warm toast, in a snowstorm–it’s seasonal confusion at its most delicious.

16

I N S E A S O N : P I C K L E D & P R E S E RV E D

December

June

Think back, or ahead, to January. What’s

November

9 10 11 12 October

8

July

6 7

May

4 5 April

3 March

February

January

1 2


IN SEA SON by JANET RAUSA FULLER

Pickled & Preserved

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N |

R E C I P E S & E S S AY S B Y H U G H A C H E S O N & PA U L V I R A N T

|

RECIPE BY CECE CAMPISE

17


summer peach jam View Cece Campise’s recipe on page 58 

18

I N S E A S O N : P I C K L E D & P R E S E RV E D


Canning stretches the seasons, and now is

It takes effort. But there are plenty of

the time to get started. The produce at the

resources in print, online, and very likely

market in August that begs to be bought by

within your social network to guide and

the armful can be enjoyed, well preserved,

inspire you.

in April–atop a burger, stirred into sauce, eaten straight from the jar.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N |

Starting on the following pages with a jam recipe from CeCe Campise, then essays

Putting up food isn’t strictly a warm-

and recipes by Virant and James Beard

weather pursuit. As Chicago chef and

Award-winning chef Hugh Acheson, whose

pickling savant Paul Virant writes in his

book, A New Turn in the South, should also

book Preservation Kitchen, winter citrus is

be on your short list. As the seasons shift,

fair game for preserving as well.

you’ll be glad you did.

R E C I P E S & E S S AY S B Y H U G H A C H E S O N & PA U L V I R A N T

|

RECIPE BY CECE CAMPISE

19


Putting Up

Essay by HUGH ACHESON

Hugh Acheson is the chef/partner of Five & Ten and the National restaurants in Athens, Ga. and Empire State South in Atlanta. He wrote the James Beard Award-winning cookbook, A New Turn in the South: Southern Flavors Reinvented for Your Kitchen and has appeared on Bravo’s “Top Chef Masters” and “Top Chef.”

20

I N S E A S O N : P I C K L E D & P R E S E RV E D


Pickling and preserving has been a nourishing facet of the Southern

9 September

August

8

Even with a boom in the popularity of preserving and pickling, we are losing ground to the grocery store. This is the

table for centuries. This “putting

malaise of convenience. The aisles provide

up” practice has long demarcated

a homogenized landscape to our palates,

the seasons, reminding us that to have tomatoes in December, we had better get working in August.

where everything is always available. I love reminding people about that moment in early fall when the apples of northeast Georgia burst onto the scene. It’s then that I get antsy for Arkansas

Filling the pantry with chow chow, okra, dilly beans and cukes is hard work, but the

Blacks, my favorite varietal of apple from a local farm in Elberton, Ga.

redemption comes in February when you are able to eat a little bit of summer with

The process is so basic, so tried and true.

your wintery supper.

I pick up the phone and talk to Bill. Bill goes and gets the apples and brings them to Athens. I buy said apples. It’s a glorious relationship that happens every year and results in canned treasures of conserves, apple butters and chutneys.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N |

R E C I P E S & E S S AY S B Y H U G H A C H E S O N & PA U L V I R A N T

|

RECIPE BY CECE CAMPISE

21


I can remember making my first batches of

Increasing production to a level that even

bread-and-butter pickles and pickled okra,

I could not snack through let us enjoy the

leaning on old tomes of American food like

pickles months later. Now the January

The Joy of Cooking, Fannie Farmer, and the

sandwich, the February burger and the

Time Life Good Cook Series. I remember going

March egg salad get August’s pickles.

through the whole process, tweaking to keep things current, and then trying to wait patiently for the pickles to mature. That last step rarely worked out because of my love of snacking. The bread-andbutter pickles were sweet and savory at the same time, with the mustard seed pulling through, the bright notes of celery leaves, the pungency of turmeric, and the acid kiss of cider vinegar.

22

I N S E A S O N : P I C K L E D & P R E S E RV E D

We have to get back to the canning pot to fully embrace the beauty of living in a wonderful world of seasonal foods.


bread ’n’ butter pickles View Hugh Acheson’s recipe on page 59 »

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N |

R E C I P E S & E S S AY S B Y H U G H A C H E S O N & PA U L V I R A N T

|

RECIPE BY CECE CAMPISE

23


grape aigre-doux View Paul Virant’s recipe on page 60 »

24

I N S E A S O N : P I C K L E D & P R E S E RV E D


From the arrival of ramps in

Can-do Aigre-Doux

spring to the last cranberry harvest in fall, my cooks and I turn into canning machines, preserving as many vegetables and fruits as our pantry shelves can handle.

E s s a y b y PA U L V I R A N T a s t o l d t o K AT E L E A H Y

Ever since I opened Vie, my restaurant in Western Springs, Ill., in 2004, I have made a habit of preserving seasonal produce. Back then I did it so I could feature produce from local farms on our menu year round. But it’s the depth of flavor I can achieve while cooking with preserves that keeps me excited about it all these years later.

Paul Virant is the chef and owner of the Chicago area

In those early days, I was only just figuring

restaurants Vie and Perennial Virant, and author with

out how to cook with pickles and jams. I

Kate Leahy of Preservation Kitchen: The Craft of Making and

began finishing meat sauces with spoonfuls

Cooking with Pickles, Preserves and Aigre-Doux.

of brine, using butter and stock to glaze pickled vegetables, and garnishing a few cocktails with preserved berries or pickled ramps. Each splash of acidity or sweetness added complexity to the final product, so I kept at it while adding more and more types of preserves to the pantry.

August

8

September

9 25


It wasn’t long before I came across aigredoux, a sweet-sour condiment from France. I took a class with Christine Ferber, a French preserving expert whose jams are famous in Paris. One of Ferber’s demonstrations showcased pears soaked in wine, vinegar, honey, and vanilla bean. It was a revelation: the sharpness of the wine and vinegar was offset by the pears’ mellow sweetness. I was hooked on this bittersweet combination, and I incorporated aigre-doux into my canning program. Aigre-doux is most often composed of fruit in a wine-based brine, but it also can be made with sweet vegetables such as onions, beets and carrots. While it tastes complex, aigre-doux is very easy to make. Take grapes, for instance. All you do is put stemmed grapes (I like goldenrod or canadice varieties) in a jar, pour hot brine over the grapes, cap the jar with a lid and boil the jar in a water bath. During the processing time, some of the sweetness of the fruit leaches out into the brine. The result is a sweet-sour grape juice. To use it, I take the brine and simmer it in a pot until reduced by half. I mix in olive oil, shallots, and aigre-doux grapes to make vinaigrette. It’s also good tossed with roasted cauliflower, capers and parsley. No matter the application, the tang of grapes and wine is the main draw.

26

I N S E A S O N : P I C K L E D & P R E S E RV E D

waldorf salad with apples, candied walnuts, and grape aigre-doux dressing View Paul Virant’s recipe on page 61 »


P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N |

R E C I P E S & E S S AY S B Y H U G H A C H E S O N & PA U L V I R A N T

|

RECIPE BY CECE CAMPISE

27


3.

4.

1.

Summer tomatoes. What better captures the flavor of summer and sunshine? At every farmer’s market from as far north as Bemidji, Minnesota

2.

to as far south as San Antonio, Texas, it’s tomato time.

WEATHER PERMITTING by JUDITH MARA

TOMATO TIME Treat Your Heirlooms With Respect

28

W E AT H E R P E R M I T T I N G : T O M AT O T I M E


5.

8. 9.

10. 6.

7.

1. black russian 2. brandywine 3. isis candy 4. sun gold 5. yellow gooseberry 6. green zebra 7. matt’s wild cherry 8. jaune flammÊ 9. san marzano 10. black krim

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

29


These days, heirloom tomatoes boast artistic first and last names such as Cherokee Purple, Green Giant, Hawaiian Currant, Great White, German Stripe, Black Krim, Paul Robeson, Green Zebra . . . and the list gets longer every year.

On your next trip to the farmer’s market, scoop up some tomatoes still on the vine. Soak the tomatoes in water for 10 minutes and drain. Place on a sheet of foil then grill until soft. The tomatoes and a tuna steak will take about the same amount of time to grill. Garnish with olive oil, sea salt, Kalamata olives and fresh herbs.

grilled tomatoes on the vine

30

W E AT H E R P E R M I T T I N G : T O M AT O T I M E


There are now so many subtle colors in the

A perfectly ripe tomato needs no more than a

tomato rainbow, it can be confusing to those

few grains of salt to heighten its sweetness.

who have only shopped for the red variety in

Too much of anything strongly flavored, such as

the past. We’ll help solve the uncertainty of how

commercial salad dressing, is going to compete

to tell if a green tomato is ripe or not. Just give

with that burst of juicy tomato flavor you have

it a gentle press; if it’s soft, it’s ripe. The same

looked forward to all summer.

tip goes for black, purple, yellow, orange and striped varieties.

Our final word on tomatoes may be the most important: Tomatoes love the heat and hate the

Then there is the question of what does a green

cold. The plants won’t even develop fruit if the

and purple Ananas Noire tomato taste like?

nights aren’t above 60 degrees. And after they

The easiest way to find out is to ask the farmer

are picked, they are still cold sensitive. So treat

for a sample or take one home and give it a try.

your tomatoes with respect and never store

But in truth, tomato flavors vary only slightly

them in the refrigerator–it makes them mealy

depending on the tomato’s degree of sweetness

and insipid like so many supermarket tomatoes.

and acidity. Homegrown tomatoes taste like a tomato should taste.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

31


Summer tomatoes should be the star of the dish. Slice tomatoes into wedges and sprinkle lightly with salt and fresh pepper. In a bowl, combine some olive oil, red wine vinegar, a half clove of chopped garlic (optional), sliced red onion and fresh herbs. Add tomatoes and toss.

32

W E AT H E R P E R M I T T I N G : T O M AT O T I M E


mostly tomato salad

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

33


chilled grilled corn and watermelon salad View Paula Deen’s recipe on page 62 »

rec ipe by

PAU L A DEEN paul adeen.com

34

SIMPLE SUMMER SIDES

“Side dishes are never just plain ol’ sides for me. They’re what make a regular meal something great!”


SS U IM M P L E MER SIDES When the weather grows warm and the nights grow long, the season calls for plenty of parties, picnics and barbecues. b y K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

35


Cooking out is an American tradition. No swim at the beach, excursion to the local park, or gathering in the backyard is complete without a little extra summer sizzle.

We love our grills, and we recall charred

Of course, a barbecue cannot consist

grates, cold drinks, and Frisbee-filled

of hamburgers and hotdogs alone.

afternoons as fondly as our first dates and

With all that grilling going on, we

old cars. According to a Weber GrillWatch

decided to ask four all-American

Survey, more than two thirds of American

chefs for their favorite go-to sides

adults own an outdoor grill or smoker,

for summer–and they gave us a little

which they ritualistically pamper and

something else to remember.

frequently fire up.

36

SIMPLE SUMMER SIDES


Done right, summer sides are delicious

“Side dishes are never just plain ol’ sides

True to her word, Paula’s grilled corn and

in their own right and elevate a meal

for me. They’re what make a regular meal

watermelon salad is elegant, refreshing,

into something truly special. When we

something great! So keep in mind that your

and guaranteed to make a lasting

asked our friend Paula Deen, Emmy

salads and stuffings are just as memorable

impression.

Award-winning television personality and

as anything else you put on your plates

Southern sweetheart, for her philosophy on

this summer.”

sides, she responded:

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

37


Food Network star and James Beard winner Emeril Lagasse knows that good food doesn’t have to be complicated. His recipe for sautéed spinach with plump figs and a drizzle of honey is a seamless blend of sweet and savory that’s just as stunning as it is easy. When we asked for his thoughts on summer sides, he explained: “For me, it’s all about keeping it simple and fresh.”

recipe by

EMERI L LAG A SSE f rom Th e Essen ce of Em eril

“Summer is filled with an abundance of great-tasting produce that makes for great sides.”

38

SIMPLE SUMMER SIDES


spinach sautéed with garlic, figs, and honey View Emeril Lagasse’s recipe on page 63 »

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

39


grilled panzanella, a.k.a. italian bread salad with summer vegetables View Elizabeth Karmel’s recipe on page 64 »

40

SIMPLE SUMMER SIDES


Elizabeth Karmel, author of Soaked, Slathered and Seasoned, and unofficial “Queen of the Grill,” tells us her

recipe by

approach to summer sides can be

EL IZABETH KA RME L

summed up with three key words:

ElizabethKarm el.com

ripe, color, flavor. Her take on the Italian panzanella–filled with toasty golden bread, bright grilled vegetables, and traditional Tuscan seasonings–

“The [side] dish should strike a balance of acid, salt, richness, and freshness. And, it should be as ‘craveable’ as the main course.”

embodies them all. “No matter what you are grilling for the main course,” Elizabeth advises, “it’s important to serve a vibrant dish with juicy, top-of-the-season flavors.”

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

41


Some dishes linger in our minds for their incredible taste; others, for the memories they conjure. For our long-time friend Art Smith, Top Chef Masters contestant and author of Back to the Family, part of what makes a dish great are the ties and traditions behind it. Here, he shares with us a personal family favorite: the prized potato salad recipe belonging to his mother, Addie Mae. Familiar and satisfying, it is summer comfort food at its best.

42

SIMPLE SUMMER SIDES


recipe by

“All great meals have great

A RT SMI TH

side dishes as part of the

From Back to th e Fam ily

become the meal itself.”

equation. Some sides can

addie mae’s potato salad View Art Smith’s recipe on page 65 »

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

43


garden bloody mary View Andrew Chabot and Graham Case’s recipe on page 66 »

44

HIGH SPIRITS: GARDEN IN A GLASS


HIGH SPIRITS

G A R DEN in a

GL A S S by JUDITH MARA

The views are never ending at Blackberry Farm, which is tucked into the idyllic foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains of Tennessee, and so is their connection to the earth. The renowned restaurant, fondly called

Chabot asserts that making their own

The Barn, is revered for both its Foothills

Bloody Mary mix with Angostura syrup

cuisine and its resident culinary artists: the

bitters and hot pepper sauce gives the

chef, the master gardener, the baker, the

drink a depth of flavor rather than just

cheesemaker, the forager, the butcher, the

heat. The traditional ingredient notably

jam lady, the chocolatier, the mixologist,

missing is celery salt. He claims the fresh

and the sommelier.

sour mix is what livens up the tomato

Blackberry Farm’s Sommelier and Food

flavor and makes the cocktail more vibrant.

& Beverage Director, Andrew Chabot, and

However, this spirited drink has one

Mixologist, Graham Case, have created no

distinction not tied to a garden: It’s

less than three separate cocktail menus

made with fine Kentucky bourbon. When

based on what is grown on the farm. To us,

Chabot was asked why he uses bourbon,

nothing represents a garden of fresh flavors

he responded, “Why not?” As fresh and

more than their Garden Bloody Mary

delicious as this recipe tastes, we say the

served in a Mason jar.

exact same thing.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

45


C H ERRI ES & TAR by IAN KNAUER

Ian Knauer, author of the acclaimed new cookbook, The Farm, weaves for us a tale of battling his ancient farmhouse kitchen floor and the reward of sharing a family meal to celebrate its imperfections.

Stephen Hamilton illustrates Cherries & Tar with four seasonal farm dishes from Knauer’s new cookbook.

46

C H E R R I E S & TA R


P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

|

RECIPES BY IAN KNAUER

47


The Farm: Rustic Recipes for a Year of Incredible Food sorts recipes by the season. Stephen Hamilton chose to follow the same model with his food photography.

thyme-roasted butternut squash View Ian Knauer’s recipe on page 67 

48

C H E R R I E S & TA R


If you’re looking for a sure-fire guarantee

I could have kept the job simple and just

that your great-grandchildren will curse your

replaced the stove. But the wallpaper had

name, I’ve got two words for you: linoleum

started to peel off on its own and while

and wallpaper. My family’s farmhouse was

I was at it, I could rip up the linoleum

built just after the Civil War and has been

exposing the expected perfect patina of

passed down from generation to generation

pine floorboards. I told myself it wouldn’t

with little renovation. But some time around

be hard, just scrape, paint, and sand. I

the 1940’s, someone got the hair-brained idea

figured it would just be a couple days

to cover the kitchen floor with linoleum and

before I was whipping up Cherry-Sour

the walls with a pink floral print. Now it’s my

Cream Crostatas in my new farmhouse-

turn to keep the place in good shape, and, I’m

chic country kitchen to share with my

a cook. The old stove with two small working

friends and family. I have never been so

burners (and two more that have been kaput

wrong about anything in my life.

for years) just wouldn’t do.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

|

RECIPES BY IAN KNAUER

49


I want it to look as nice on camera as it does in my mind and heart. I love this place; my roots grow deep here.

chicken with a ton of garlic View Ian Knauer’s recipe on page 68 

50

C H E R R I E S & TA R


My motivation to renovate is not just driven by my stomach and my love of shared meals.

I wrote a cookbook about the farm and

In fact, the linoleum itself wasn’t so bad;

the family, and PBS has signed on to air a

it was the tar paper between it and the

cooking show based on the book and the

floorboards that had (probably some time

place. It will be filmed in the kitchen of

around the 1970’s) ceased to be paper and

the farmhouse. A sponsor has donated a

just became tar. Finding it made me want

cooking range. I want it to look as nice on

to cry, but I had an idea. I rented a drum

camera as it does in my mind and heart. I

sander. I would just shave off the top

love this place; my roots grow deep here.

layer of the wood–which needed to be

The wallpaper took me an agonizing week to remove. The linoleum was another story.

done anyway–taking the tar up with it. One foot into the project, the sandpaper was gummed to the point of no return. I no longer wanted to cry–I just cried.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

|

RECIPES BY IAN KNAUER

51


cold-spring-night asparagus soup View Ian Knauer’s recipe on page 69 »

52

C H E R R I E S & TA R


I spent the next two weeks on my hands and knees applying hot water to the tar with a sponge before scraping it away an inch at a time. My pace was 3 square feet an hour. My knees stuck to the floor. My sweat poured off of me and into the freshly exposed ancient wood. I cursed my ancestors aloud. And, it is still not finished, but the area of the floor that houses the stove was the first order of business. Finally, the range was installed. To celebrate I called my family and friends to join me for a meal at the farm. As they arrived in waves on a hot summer Saturday, everyone took turns admiring the stove and rolling their eyes at the remaining sticky patches of floor. But the promise of fresh produce can be a great distraction. The garden that I planted with my sisters last spring was in full bloom. We wandered through rows of tomatoes (and weeds) picking everything we would cook before we gathered on the front porch to eat.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

|

RECIPES BY IAN KNAUER

53


54

C H E R R I E S & TA R


It is true that hard work makes everything taste better, but roasted cherry tomato and homemade ricotta crostini are pretty wonderful even without hours of tar scraping under your belt. Little basil leaves always fall in just the right nooks when scattered over grilled ratatouille pizza. Blue cheese and freshly pulled beets is a marriage that no chef can outdo, especially when tied together with dill. It is dinners like this one that remind me of my grandfather. He too loved this place and poured his time and sweat into its earth. But, he liked to remind us that the work and upkeep of the farm will always be here. There will always be a list of chores too long to finish in one lifetime. And, the most important work we can do is to love and feed each other and spend time together as a family. It is the easiest job of all–made even easier with Cherry-Sour Cream Crostatas.

sour cherry-sour cream crostata pie View Ian Knauer’s recipe on page 70 »

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

|

RECIPES BY IAN KNAUER

55


HOW WE

DID IT

Deconstructing a shot from Stephen Hamilton’s The Restaurant Project by JUDITH MARA

favorite dish

40 Day Ribeye Restaurant

Primehouse, Chicago food stylist

Josephine Orba prop stylist

Paula Walters

56

HOW WE DID IT


P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

57


At Green City Market in Chicago, I picked up some really ripe tomatoes from Mick Klug farm. I waited a few days to use them. They became so ripe I didn’t even use a knife to cut them–just squished them in my fingers!

makes 8 cups jam

summer peach jam Cece Campise

Place a small plate in the freezer to test the jam later on. Place the peaches, lemon juice, and sugar in a large deep pot.

ingredients:

Bring to a rolling boil, stirring constantly. Add the pectin, and cook for 1 minute.

·· 4 cups mashed peaches

Remove plate from freezer and dab a little jam on it. The jam

·· 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice

should set pretty quickly. Take it off the heat and process

·· 7 cups sugar

in jars for shelf-stable jams, or plastic containers to be

·· 1 pouch of liquid pectin

refrigerated.

58

RECIPE INDEX


bread ’n’ butter pickles Hugh Acheson: A New Turn in the South: Southern Flavors Reinvented For Your Kitchen

Wash the cucumbers under cold water and then slice them into 1/3-inch-thick rounds. Peel the onion and slice into 1/3inch strips. Mix the onions and the cucumbers in a medium bowl and add half of the kosher salt. Toss well and let sit for 1 hour at room temperature. Rinse the onions and cucumbers well using a colander and cold water to remove the salt. When thoroughly rinsed and drained, place them in a medium nonreactive bowl, tear the celery leaves into the mixture, and set aside. Pack the cucumbers, onion, and celery leaves into clean pint jars with the tops off. In a nonreactive pot, combine remaining salt, the red pepper flakes, fenugreek, fennel seeds, turmeric, mustard seeds, allspice, vinegar, sugar, sorghum and ½ cup water. Bring to a rapid boil and then pour evenly over the cucumbers. This recipe is a very simple one to do and the results are just what you envision: tons more flavor than the store-boughts, a little less sweet and a little zestier.

makes 3 to 4 pints

Attach the lids and leave them out on the counter for 2 hours and then place in the fridge. If you would like them to keep for the long haul, follow your jar manufacturer’s directives for canning. At this point the pickles are pretty much done but the will be at their best a day or two later. The shelf life, without hot canning processing, is about 10 days.

ingredients: ·· 10 small picking cucumbers (4 to 5 inches long and an 1½ inches in diameter) ·· 1 medium sweet onion, partial to Vidalia when possible ·· 1/4 cup kosher salt ·· 1/4 cup fresh celery leaves ·· 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes ·· 1/4 teaspoon ground fenugreek ·· 1/2 teaspoon fennel seeds ·· 1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric ·· 1 teaspoon mustard seeds ·· 8 allspice berries ·· 11/2 cups of cider vinegar ·· 1/2 cup granulated sugar ·· 1/4 cup sorghum or maple syrup

RECIPE INDEX

59


grape aigre-doux Paul Virant: Preservation Kitchen: The Craft of Making and Cooking with Pickles, Preserves, and Aigre-Doux by Paul Virant with Kate Leahy

In a pot over medium-high heat, mix together the wine, verjus, vinegar, sugar, salt, and pepper and bring to a boil. Split the vanilla bean in half and scrape out the seeds with the tip of a spoon. Mix in the seeds and bean and simmer for a minute more. Transfer to a heat-proof pitcher and remove the vanilla bean (reserve for another use). Scald 4 half-pint jars. (To scald, using tongs put the jars into a large pot of simmering water fitted with a rack — you will use this pot to process the jars. Remove the jars right before filling.) Meanwhile, soak the lids in a pan of hot water to soften the rubber seal. Pack the grapes into the jars, leaving about a 1/2-inch space from the rim. Check the jars for air pockets, pouring in more of the liquid if necessary to fill in gaps. Wipe the rims with a clean towel, seal with the lids, then screw on the bands until snug but In late summer, farmers start to bring more nuanced, thin-skinned

not tight.

table grapes to market. While it is easy to eat an entire bunch of small, sweet goldenrod or perfectly round, purple canadice varieties,

Place the jars in the pot with the rack and add enough water

I make sure to save some for aigre-doux.

to cover the jars by about 1 inch. Bring the water to a boil and process the jars for 15 minutes (start the timer when the water reaches a boil). Remove the jars from the water and let cool

makes 4 half-pint jars ingredients: ·· 11/2 cups (12 ounces) white wine ·· 1/2 cup (4 ounces) verjus ·· 1/4 cup (2 ounces) champagne vinegar ·· 1/2 cup sugar ·· 1/2 teaspoon salt ·· 2 teaspoons ground black pepper ·· 1 vanilla bean ·· scant 4 cups small red or green grapes, such as canadice, goldenrod, Bronx, or Thompson seedless, stemmed

60

RECIPE INDEX

completely.


waldorf salad with apples, candied walnuts, and grape aigre-doux dressing Paul Virant: Preservation Kitchen: The Craft of Making and Cooking with Pickles, Preserves, and Aigre-Doux by Paul Virant with Kate Leahy

To make the dressing, in a small pot, reduce the apple cider, lemon juice and curry powder until almost dry. Stir in the grapeseed oil and cook until the oil is too hot to touch, about 2 minutes. Cool the oil to room temperature. In a food processor, blend the egg, crème fraîche, and AigreDoux liquid. While the processor is on, gradually drizzle in the curry oil until it becomes thick. (The oil and egg are binding together to form an emulsion. If the emulsion breaks and loses its shape, pour the mixture in a liquid measuring cup, add an egg yolk to the food processor and drizzle in the broken mixture as if it were oil.) Season with salt and refrigerate until needed. You will have about 2 cups. Refrigerate until needed.

While this salad has a few components, most of them can be made ahead of time. The curry oil in the dressing can be made as much as a week ahead, the candied walnuts will stay crisp for at least five days, and the dressing will keep in the refrigerator for about five days. This recipe makes more dressing than you need, but the extra is terrific served with plain mixed greens.

To make the candied walnuts, line a baking pan with parchment paper or a non-stick, silicone baking mat. In a cold pan, combine the sugar with just enough water to create a mixture that resembles wet sand. Place the pan over high heat and cook the sugar until it begins to brown. Lower the heat to medium and stir in the walnuts. Season with a few pinches of salt and pepper and cook, stirring constantly, until a frosty

serves 4

coating covers the walnuts. Pour onto the prepared baking pan and let cool completely.

ingredients: ·· 1/2 cup apple cider ·· Juice of 1/2 lemon ·· 1 tablespoon Madras curry powder

To serve the salad, combine the lettuce, apples, celery and drained grapes. Spoon just enough dressing to coat the ingredients evenly (about 1/4 cup) and add a pinch of salt and pepper. Mix well and garnish with candied walnuts and grapes.

·· 1 cup grapeseed oil ·· 1 large egg ·· 2 tablespoons crème fraîche ·· 1/2 cup liquid strained from Grape Aigre-Doux ·· kosher salt ·· 1 cup toasted walnuts ·· 1/2 cup sugar ·· freshly ground black pepper ·· 2 cups shredded iceberg lettuce ·· 2 stalks celery, sliced ·· 1 apple, thinly sliced (preferably honeycrisp) ·· 1/2 cup drained grapes from Grape Aigre-Doux RECIPE INDEX

61


makes 4 servings ingredients:

chilled grilled corn and watermelon salad Paula Deen

·· 4 cups watermelon, seeded and diced ·· 3 ears sweet corn, grilled and kernels cut off the cob ·· 1 tablespoons rice wine vinegar ·· 2 tablespoons cilantro, finely chopped ·· salt and pepper to taste

62

RECIPE INDEX

In a medium mixing bowl, gently toss all ingredients. Serve chilled.


makes 4 servings

spinach sautéed with garlic, figs and honey

ingredients: Emeril Lagasse: The Essence of Emeril ·· 2 tablespoons olive oil ·· 2 tablespoons garlic, thinly sliced ·· 1/4 cup dried figs, sliced ·· 1/4 cup chicken stock ·· 1 pound baby spinach ·· 1/2 teaspoon salt ·· 1/4 teaspoon pepper ·· 2 teaspoons honey

In a medium skillet over medium-high heat, add the olive oil and, when hot, add the garlic and cook until lightly toasted, about 30 seconds. Add the figs and chicken stock and cook until stock is nearly completely reduced, about 2 minutes. Add the spinach and cook, stirring, until wilted, about 2 minutes. Season with the salt and pepper and drizzle with the honey just before serving.

RECIPE INDEX

63


makes 6 servings ingredients: ·· 4 large, ripe beefsteak tomatoes, seeded and cut into ¾-inch dice

grilled panzanella a.k.a. italian bread salad with summer vegetables Elizabeth Karmel

·· 1 cucumber, peeled, halved, seeded and cut on a sharp diagonal into ¼-inch thick slices ·· 4 small garlic cloves, minced

Grilling Method: Direct/Medium Heat

·· 2 tablespoons pine nuts, toasted

In a large mixing bowl toss tomatoes cucumber, garlic, pine

·· 2 tablespoons drained capers

nuts, capers, olives and basil together with1 cup of olive oil and

·· ½ cup imported black olives, pitted and coarsely chopped

the vinegar. Season with salt and pepper. Set aside to marinate

·· 1 cup shredded fresh basil leaves

at room temperature for 45 minutes.

·· 1 cup best-quality extra-virgin olive oil plus more for brushing veggies

Meanwhile toss the zucchini, eggplant, peppers and onion

·· 1/4 cup Balsamic vinegar

together with olive oil. Brush the remaining oil lightly over both

·· 2 medium zucchini, halved lengthwise

sides of the mushrooms, onion slices and sliced bread. Season

·· 2 long, thin eggplants, halved lengthwise

with salt. Place the vegetables on the cooking grate, turning to

·· 1 red bell pepper, stemmed, seeded and quartered

sear all over, until crisp-tender, 5 to 7 minutes. Remove and set

·· 2 yellow bell pepper, stemmed, seeded and quartered

side. Place bread on the cooking grate and grill on both sides

·· 2 large portobello mushrooms

until golden, 1½ to 2 minutes per side. Transfer the vegetables

·· 1 large red onion, peeled and sliced

and bread to a cutting board and chop all into chunks. Combine

·· 4 1-inch slices day-old peasant bread, cut from a round loaf

with the tomato mixture, tossing well, and adjust seasoning to

·· sea salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

suit. Serve warm or at room temperature.

64

RECIPE INDEX


makes 6-8 servings

addie mae’s potato salad

ingredients:

Art Smith: Back to the Family: Food Tastes Better Shared by the Ones You Love

·· 2 pounds Yukon gold or new red potatoes, peeled and cubed ·· 1/2 cup sweet pickle relish ·· 5 hard-boiled eggs, chopped

Cover the potatoes with water and cook in a large

·· 2 teaspoons yellow prepared mustard

pot over medium-high heat until just tender, about 6

·· 1 cup mayonnaise

minutes. Check the potatoes frequently, making sure

·· 1/2 onion, chopped

they do not overcook.

·· 1 teaspoon celery seeds or 4 celery ribs, finely chopped ·· salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste ·· 4 slices bacon, cooked and crumbled for garnish

Drain the potatoes in a colander and run cold water over them to let them cool. Transfer the potatoes back to pot.

·· 1 red bell pepper, chopped, for garnish

Add the relish, eggs, mustard, mayonnaise, onion, celery

·· cider vinegar to taste

seeds and salt and pepper, mixing gently. (For variety, you can also use dill relish instead of the sweet relish.) Garnish with bacon, red pepper and a sprinkling of vinegar, if desired.

RECIPE INDEX

65


makes 8 — 1 pint servings ingredients for 1 cocktail: ·· 1.5oz Buffalo Trace Bourbon Whiskey

garden bloody mary Andrew Chabot and Graham Case ingredients for sour mix:

·· 1 tablespoon fresh squeezed lemon juice ·· 2 rosemary stems

·· 1 lime in a pressed in a juicer for every 4 lemons

·· 2 thyme sprigs ·· 2 fresh bay leaves ·· 1 basil leaf ·· Bloody Mary Mix, recipe follows

ingredients for bloody mary mix: ·· 5, 32 oz cans of tomato juice

In a mixing tin with ice add everything. Give a quick shake and then pour into a large mason jar. Garnish with a celery stalk speared in between a lemon wedge and an olive.

·· 10 dashes of Angostura Bitters ·· 20 dashes of Worcestershire sauce ·· 25 dashes of Tabasco sauce ·· 3 tablespoons of Sour Mix ·· 3 bar spoons (1 1/2teaspoons) of horseradish salt and pepper to taste Stir the ingredients together then store in whatever container you desire. Keep refrigerated.

66

RECIPE INDEX


When butternut squash are ripe (you can tell by the hollow sound they make when you tap them), they are unbelievably sweet and nutty, with a smooth, buttery flavor. This recipe keeps things simple by roasting the squash with oil, thyme, salt, and pepper, then generously sprinkling it with cheese. It may seem like a lot of cheese at first, but once everything

thyme-roasted butternut squash Ian Knauer: The Farm: Rustic Recipes for a Year of Incredible Food

gets mixed together, the salty cheese and the fresh thyme do a great job of balancing the inherent sweetness of the squash. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees, with racks in the upper and

serves 4-6

lower thirds. Peel and seed the squash and cut it into 1/2-inch pieces. Toss

ingredients:

the squash with the oil, thyme, 3/4 teaspoon salt, and 1/2 teaspoon pepper and divide between two large baking sheets.

·· 1 (3-pound) butternut squash

Roast the squash, stirring occasionally, until it is tender and

·· 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

browned, 25 to 30 minutes. Transfer the squash to a serving

·· 2 teaspoons fresh thyme, chopped

bowl and sprinkle generously with the Parmesan. Season with

·· kosher salt and black pepper

salt and pepper to taste.

·· 2/3 cup finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano

RECIPE INDEX

67


chicken with a ton of garlic Ian Knauer: The Farm: Rustic Recipes for a Year of Incredible Food

I came up with this recipe after a long day in the garden. We had just planted what would become the following year’s garlic, using the heads that we had saved from the previous summer. I was left with four heads of garlic and figured this was a great way to celebrate the coming crop. I used it all in this recipe, and the result is a beautiful ode to “the stinking rose.” Half of the garlic is roasted beforehand, mashed into a paste, and spread under the skin of the bird. The rest is stuffed inside the cavity, along with half a lemon and some thyme. The deep, caramelized flavor of the roasted garlic makes this taste like it’s been on a rotisserie, but, in fact, it’s just the oven.

Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Butter a 13-by-9-inch baking dish. Roast two heads of garlic by cutting the top 1/2 inch off each head and discarding. Place each trimmed head on a small piece of foil, drizzle with a little olive oil and sprinkle with pinch of

serves 4-6

salt. Wrap garlic in foil and roast in preheated oven 45 minutes to 1 hour. Remove foil and cool. (Garlic can be wrapped in plastic and refrigerated for up to a month.)

ingredients:

Peel and mash roasted garlic together with thyme leaves, oil and 1/4 teaspoon each of salt and pepper.

·· 2 whole heads garlic, for roasting ·· olive oil

Increase oven temperature to 450 degrees, with rack in middle

·· pinch of salt

of oven.

·· 1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves, plus 2 large fresh thyme sprigs ·· 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil ·· 1 1/4 teaspoons Kosher salt (divided) ·· 1 1/4 teaspoons black pepper (divided) ·· 1 chicken (3 1/2 pounds) ·· 1/2 lemon ·· 2 heads garlic, halved

Rinse chicken and pat it dry. Being careful not to tear the skin, start at the large cavity and gently run your fingers between the skin and meat to loosen the skin. Push the roasted garlic mixture under the skin, including around the thighs and drumsticks, and massage skin from the outside to spread garlic evenly. Squeeze the lemon half over the chicken, then season chicken inside and out with remaining 1 teaspoon each salt and pepper. Place halved garlic heads, lemon half and thyme sprigs in the cavity and loosely tie legs together with kitchen string. Roast chicken in preheated oven until golden and skin pulls away from base of drumsticks, about 50 minutes. Transfer chicken to cutting board and let rest 15 minutes before carving

68

RECIPE INDEX

and serving.


In most of the country, spring nights are still chilly enough for

cold-spring-night asparagus soup

warming soups. This one is an appropriate bridge between winter and spring, and I like to sip it from a mug in front of one of the season’s last crackling fires. It’s hearty with chicken stock and a

Ian Knauer: The Farm: Rustic Recipes for a Year of Incredible Food

leek and bright from the herbs (dill and cilantro) and sour cream. Be generous with the sour cream. It lends a tangy richness to the soup. Slice the leeks crosswise and rinse under cold running water.

serves 4-6

Melt the butter in a large heavy saucepan until the foam subsides. Cook the leek and garlic with 1/2 teaspoon each salt

ingredients:

and pepper over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until the leek is soft but not browned, about 6 minutes. Add the stock and bring to a boil.

·· 1 large leek, pale green and white parts only ·· 2 tablespoons unsalted butter

Cut the asparagus into 2-inch pieces, then add to the stock.

·· 1 garlic clove, smashed

Cook until tender, 6 to 10 minutes. Remove the pan from the

·· Kosher salt and black pepper

heat and stir in the cilantro and dill. Transfer the soup to a

·· 4 cups chicken stock or low-sodium broth

blender in batches and blend until smooth. Season the soup

·· 1 pound asparagus, trimmed

with salt and pepper to taste. Serve topped with a dollop of

·· 12 cilantro sprigs

sour cream.

·· 6 fresh dill sprigs ·· sour cream for serving

RECIPE INDEX

69


sour cherry-sour cream crostata pie Ian Knauer: Recipe adapted from The Farm: Rustic Recipes for a Year of Incredible Food

You might think sour cherries are sour enough on their own and don’t need any help from anything else soured. But sour cream brings more than just a little pucker to the mix. The sour cream in this pie seems to melt into the fruit filling balancing the fruit tart with supple, satisfying intrigue.

Work together the flour, cornmeal, butter, sugar, and 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt with your hands until mostly combined with some small lumps of butter remaining. Stir in 3 tablespoons water with a fork. Press a small handful of dough together, if it looks powdery and does not come together, stir in the additional 1tablespoon of water. Transfer the dough to a sheet of plastic wrap. Using the edge of plastic, fold dough over on itself, pressing until it comes together. Form the dough into a disk, wrapped completely in the plastic and chill for 1 hour. Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Roll out the pastry dough on a well-floured surface with a

serves 6-8

floured rolling pin into a 12-inch round. Place the dough in a 10-inch pie tin. Spread the sour cream evenly over the bottom of the crust.

ingredients for pastry dough: ·· 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour ·· 1/4 cup finely ground cornmeal

Toss the cherries with the sugar and zest, then spread the fruit evenly over the dough in the tin. Fold the border of dough up and over the edge of the fruit.

·· 1 teaspoon brown sugar

Bake the crostata until the crust is golden, the filling is

·· 1 stick unsalted butter, cut into cubes

bubbling, and the cherries are bubbling and slightly thickened.

·· 3 to 4 tablespoons cold water

This will take 45 to 50 minutes.

·· kosher salt

ingredients for filling: ·· 1/4 cup sour cream ·· 1 3/4 lbs fresh sour cherries, pitted (about 5 cups)* ·· 3/4 cup sugar ·· 1 1/2 tablespoons cornstarch ·· 1 teaspoon lemon zest

70

RECIPE INDEX

*editor’s note: frozen cherries can be substituted


promo alert The first 10 new people to like us on Facebook

(www.facebook.com/WhosHungryMagazine?)

and leave a comment and their address can receive a Who’s Hungry?™ market tote bag!


L AT E S UM M ER 2 0 1 2

Who's Hungry? Magazine | Late Summer 2012 | No 3  

Blending the worlds of food and photography, the magazine features travel stories and recipes from top food writers, as well as styling tips...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you