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summer 2014

NO 0 11


FEATURES

06 12

40

Top 5: BBQ Sides

Portrait of a Chef: Stephen Gerike

The Art of the Spark

22

High Spirits: Beer

42

In Season: Old World. New World.

54

Summer’s Sweetest Vegetable

24 14

2

A Different Kind of BBQ

CONTENTS

Stone Soup: Pork Summit Chef After-Party


NO 0 1 1

CONTENTS

62

Stylist’s Corner

64 70

The Sweet Life

How We Did It

4

Contributors

5

Letter from Steve

6

Top 5: BBQ Sides

12

The Art of the Spark

14

A Different Kind of BBQ

22

High Spirits: Beer

24

Stone Soup: Pork Summit Chef After-Party

40

Portrait of a Chef: Stephen Gerike

42

In Season: Old World. New World.

54

Summer’s Sweetest Vegetable

62

Stylist’s Corner

64

The Sweet Life

70

How We Did It

72

Recipe Index

CONTACTS media inquiries Judith Mara | marabeach@sbcglobal.net Deirdre O’Shea | deirdre@stephenhamilton.com

sponsorship opportunities Deirdre O’Shea | deirdre@stephenhamilton.com

representation Schumann & Company | www.schumannco.com patti@schumannco.com | 312.432.1702

stephen hamilton 1520 W. Fulton | Chicago, IL 60607 www.stephenhamilton.com

CONTENTS

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contributors

kathryn o’malley |

NO 0 1 1

deirdre o’shea | Studio Director

Editor

Kathryn’s love of food is matched only by her

If you have worked with Stephen Hamilton,

passion for writing about it; as part of the

you’ve worked with Deirdre. Drawing on 15 years

Who’s Hungry?™ magazine editorial team, she

of experience in managing photography studios,

indulges in a bit of both. Her popular food blog,

Deirdre has a hand in nearly every aspect of

dramaticpancake.com, garners more than 40,000

Stephen’s business. She’s been instrumental in

unique viewers per month and highlights the people and stories behind

organizing the magazine’s shoots, sourcing ingredients, and always keeping

great recipes.

production on schedule.

judith mara | Editor

ian law | Design

Judith has worked with Stephen for almost

Ian designed every aspect of Who’s Hungry?™

seven years and helps to lead the editorial concept

magazine with meticulous attention to detail and

and execution of Who’s Hungry?™ magazine. An

typography, and helped turn static images into an

award-winning former creative director for major

interactive experience. His award-winning design

ad agencies such as Leo Burnett and J. Walter Thompson, Judith sweats the details, pens Weather Permitting and

work has been featured in the pages of Print, Creativity, How, PDN and Graphic Design USA.

literally hand writes How We Did It.

dannielle kyrillos |

ian knauer |

Writer and Lifestyle Expert

Writer, Author and TV Personality

As a mom with a decade of experience as a lifestyle

A former editor for Gourmet magazine, Ian develops

writer and editor, television commentator and

recipes for Food Network and contributes regularly

cooking show judge, Dannielle Kyrillos offers

to Bon Appetit. His own PBS show, The Farm, brings

perspective on entertaining, food, style and

to life the stories and recipes from his celebrated

parenting with humor, practicality and relatable charm. For Who’s Hungry?™

cookbook of the same name. For Who’s Hungry?™ magazine, he tells the

magazine, she shares her top five barbecue side dishes. Get ready to dig in.

secrets of summer’s sweetest vegetable.

elizabeth karmel |

jared rouben |

Chef, Author and Media Personality Elizabeth Karmel is the founder of GirlsattheGrill.

President and Brewmaster of Moody Tongue Brewing Company

com and a nationally respected authority on grilling,

Jared Rouben is responsible for the creative and

barbecue and Southern food. She is the Executive

technical development of Moody Tongue Brewing

Chef of Hill Country Barbecue Market in NYC and

Company’s portfolio of beers. Following culinary

Washington, DC, and NYC’s and Brooklyn’s Hill Country Chicken. In addition

school, he worked as a cook at the highly regarded Martini House in Napa

to making frequent national television appearances, Elizabeth contributes

and as Expeditor at Thomas Keller’s renowned Per Se in NYC. For Who’s

regularly to top magazines and is the author of three cookbooks. For Who’s Hungry?™ magazine, she shares her sexiest summer pizzas.

Hungry?™ magazine, Jared writes about beer and barbecue and all the ways that they’re a match made in heaven.

stephen gerike | Writer

cece campise |

Chef

As the director of foodservice marketing at the

Cece discovered her passion for pastry while

National Pork Board, Stephen oversees pork

working at a German bakery in high school,

marketing, advertising and culinary education for

eventually going on to work at some of the

the restaurant trade nationally. In addition to food

country’s most acclaimed restaurants. A former

service public relations efforts, he also hosts the

pastry chef at Spiaggia, she honed her skills at

annual Pork Summit and Pork Crawl events. He lives on a small farm in the

Table Fifty-Two, The French Hound, The Metropolitan Club and more. At

town of Price on Maryland’s Eastern Shore raising pigs, vegetables, fruits and

Who’s Hungry?™ magazine, she ensures that every culinary detail is both

his family. For Who’s Hungry?™ magazine, he recounts the most delicious

delicious and beautiful.

Napa Valley potluck.

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CONTRIBUTORS


LETTER FROM STEVE Soon we will make our way, once again, to the Food & Wine Classic in Aspen, where we’re thrilled to help sponsor the Pork & Co. Industry Nights event with chef Justin Brunson of Rappahannock River Oysters, Buffalo Trace and Old Major in Denver. Stop by and say hello! There is no more sensational side dish than freshly picked, sweet corn. Ian Knauer, host of “The Farm” on PBS, passionately describes his ritual of tasting that first ear of summer corn in “Summer’s Sweetest Vegetable.” And from chef Elizabeth Karmel, we learn all about making pizza on the grill in “A Different Kind of BBQ.” According to Jared Rouben of Moody Tongue Brewing Company, having your face slathered in barbecue sauce and then taking a swig of ice-cold beer is what summer is all about—and we certainly wouldn’t argue. In “High Spirits,” he gives his personal recommendations for pairing

We’ve had a particularly brutal winter

the two together.

this year, even for Chicago standards, so

And our best-loved picnics require nothing

our summer issue was especially fun to

sausage maker, plus a sharp knife and a bottle of

put together. We were able to dig into all

we show you ways to create a sensational

the pleasures of BBQ, festivals, picnics and grilling just a little bit ahead of Mother Nature’s schedule.

a special thanks to:

more than a jaunt to the local store, butcher or fine wine. In “In Season: Old World. New World,” charcuterie and cheese picnic. Now, Who’s Hungry™ for summer?

Stephen Hamilton

Greg Laketek, Rob Levitt, Scott Buer, Karen Bell, Missy

Corey, Jackie Doran, Josephine Orba, David Raine, Juan Palomino, Tom Hamilton, Amy Cesta, Eleanor Martin, Andrew Burkle, Cece Campise, Elizabeth Fife, Melanie Moss, Josh Gripper, Lauren Busch, Caroline Wright, Josh Newton, Powell Jordano, Kaitlyn McQuaid, Justin Paris, Paula Walters

LETTER FROM STEVE

|

P O R T R A I T B Y AV E R Y H O U S E

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TOP 5 by DA N N I E L L E K Y R I L L O S

BBQ

SIDES 6

TOP 5 : BBQ S I D E S


Portrait by Peter Hurley

Dannielle Kyrillos, a series judge on Bravo’s Top Chef Just Desserts and expert on all things food and entertaining, shares her five favorite BBQ sides.

1

In barbecue as in the rest of life, it’s important to be familiar with—but not overwhelmed by—the backstory. The epic and dramatic family saga surrounding the Muellers and their various smoky

BAKED SQUASH JOHN MUELLER MEAT CO.

enterprises is vaguely interesting but best gingerly stepped over on the way to John Mueller’s baked squash. The mercurial and masterful cook, known for the pepper-

2500 E. 6TH ST.

crusted brisket and ribs he coaxes out

AUSTIN, TX 78702

of a smoker by a trailer in a chain-link-

WWW.JOHNMUELLERMEATCO.COM

surrounded yard behind an old bar, turns squash into a decadence that transcends its spot on the menu under “Sides.” Most every meat-seeking customer also orders, with omnivorous pride, the cheesy, melty, gooey but not mushy black-pepper-specked yellow squash. Maybe more cheese than squash, infused with meaty smoke through osmosis, it weighs heavily in John Mueller’s column when considering where to plop down to get your hands dirty in Austin.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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HUSH PUPPIES ALLEN & SON BAR-B-CUE 6203 MILLHOUSE RD. CHAPEL HILL, NC 27516 919.942.7576

It’s a safe bet that many Northerners

it with hickory wood charcoal and a pig on

first discover the vinegary surprise that is

a spit that cooks slowly all day. The meat

Eastern Carolina barbecue at something

gets so tender you pick it off the animal

called a pig pickin’. If you didn’t grow

with a fork, and what plays off the tangy

up around this almost clear-sauced BBQ

tenderness best are baked then fried balls of

style, it’s hard to imagine it exists, in all

cornmeal called hush puppies. Allen & Son’s

its tomato-less glory, until you watch

are light and fluffy on the inside, crunchy on

this glorious native party unfold. Strong,

the outside, and coated in a heavenly veil of

prototypical pit masters hop out of a dusty

honey: art from corn mush.

old pickup truck and load the box trailing

8

TOP 5 : B B Q SIDES

2


BBQ SPAGHETTI COZY CORNER | 745 N. PARKWAY | MEMPHIS, TN 38105 | 901.527.9158

3 As my mom would say, the idea of noodles,

and your mouth to it. Even today it’s notable

let alone noodles drenched in barbecue

that a woman, Desiree Robinson, runs Cozy,

sauce, at a place you visit expressly to enjoy

and in each bite of anything, you can taste the

barbecue-sauce-drenched meats seems like

decades of history she’s preserving. But the

gilding the lily. Sorry Mom, but especially

spaghetti! Overcooked in a good way, to make

in Memphis, you would be entirely wrong.

the strands big, fat and plump like worms so

BBQ spaghetti is as a natural addition to a

they soak up tons of the sauce, the spaghetti

meaty meal to Memphians as it is weird-

is without any meat—unlike many other

sounding to the rest of us, and the beloved

versions—and immediately explains itself as

Cozy Corner is the place to open your mind

absolutely necessary.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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HASH AND RICE WISE BAR-B-Q HOUSE 25548 US HIGHWAY 76

4

NEWBERRY, SC 29108 803.276.6699

Leave no meat unused! The longtime battle

course variations are endless. Wise Bar-

cry of pit masters throughout history, but

B-Q House is in the middle of nowhere,

nowhere more masterfully heeded than in

is open just a few days a week, and

colonial South Carolina, where a succulent,

the proprietor concocts his mustardy

stew-y hash made from less desirable cuts

vinegary masterpiece in a more than

of pork stewed for countless hours in a cast

forty-year-old family kettle. The hash

iron kettle was the result. Virtually unknown

is served over white rice, and while it is

outside the state, hash these days is usually

hard to believe it’s a side dish rather than

made from pork shoulder. Other variables

the main attraction, it’s clear it’s a badge

depend on the region and the family, so of

of distinction.

10

TOP 5 : B B Q SIDES


5

FRIED GREEN BEANS L C’S BAR-B-Q | 5800 BLUE PKWY | KANSAS CITY, MO 64129 | 816.923.4484

It is a million times easier to think about

intentional delight that plays smartly

the best barbecue side dishes than the

off the main event? Among KC

best barbecue. Meat and its fat and

barbecue institutions, L C’s ambience

how it is sliced and spiced and sauced

is considered nonexistent, its meat has

and smoked are topics so nuanced and

raving fans, and its fried green beans

personal that you can’t win trying to

are snappy sentinels whose cornmeal

pick a winner. But when you consider

coating can’t help but get saucy and

what that meat is served with, you make

whose inner green crispness contrasts

progress into the mind of the proprietor.

beautifully with the surrounding

Is a side utilitarian like sauce-sopping

tender mess. They’re spicy and for a

bread, an afterthought from someone

second let you fool yourself into feeling

thinking his ribs stand alone, or an

you’re eating healthily.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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A juicy, sizzling hot burger is a low-effort, high-payoff summer classic. But capturing the delicious taste appeal on camera is not quite so easy; it requires a well-seasoned stylist, careful timing, a complex rig set-up and just the right amount of special effects. Click the buttons to the right for a peek into our process.

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T H E A RT O F T H E S PA R K


to control the exact placement, timing and size of the flames. In this case, a light, almost translucent flare helps to keep the look

THE SMOKE

realistic and doesn’t steal focus from the patty.

No special effects here—just an all-natural by-product of

THE SPARK

THE FLAME

Special effects man Geoff Binns-Calvey uses a custom flame rig

A second custom rig pushes flammable powder through a

the flame and the spark that hints at a wonderfully smoky, char-grilled flavor.

small tube that opens up just below the grill grates. When the powder hits the flame, it ignites into a brief flurry of sparks that imitates what happens naturally when a burger is flipped.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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A DIFFERENT KIND of

PIZZA ON THE GRILL by ELIZABETH KARMEL AND BOB BLUMER

“Once you’ve experienced grilled pizza, you’ll never want to eat it any other way!” — ELIZABETH KARMEL AND BOB BLUMER

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A DI FFE RE N T KI N D OF BBQ


FIRE ROASTED VEGGIE PIZZA View recipe on page 72 Âť

Short of moving to Naples, Italy, nothing

a recipe for a gluten-free dough. It is

can elevate the quality of your pizza-eating

interesting to note that the toppings are

existence more than learning how to make

almost all intrinsically gluten-free, so the

pizza on your own backyard grill.

only barrier between pizza and a gluten-

Grilling solves the age-old problem of a

free lifestyle is the crust.

soggy pizza. The dough is grilled first and the toppings are placed on the grilled crust

What makes grilled pizza so mind-blowing

so that every slice will always be crispy,

is that it takes so little effort and so few

crunchy, slightly charred and smoky.

tools to produce. The essence of grilled pizza is its life-changing crust. Because the

We are so addicted that a few years ago

rustic texture and bold flavor of a grilled

we co-wrote the cookbook, Pizza on the

pizza crust is bigger and more textural

Grill, and this spring we released a new

than that of a traditionally baked pizza,

expanded version of the book with more

it’s a perfect base for a wide variety of

recipes, more step-by-step photos and

nontraditional ingredients and flavors.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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There are a few tricks of the trade that will

And, don’t worry about rolling the dough in a

help you to perfect pizza on the grill. It is not

perfect circle. In fact, we prefer a more organic

essential that you make your own dough—you

and “odd” shape. It goes with the rustic nature

can buy it from the refrigerator section of the

of grilled pizza. Be sure to use grits or polenta

grocery store or from your favorite pizzeria. But

and not cornmeal unless you don’t like the

it is essential that you take the dough out of the

rough texture that the coarse ground corn gives

refrigerator an hour before you want to use it.

the crust. Liberally coat the dough with olive oil,

This will warm the dough and allow it to “relax,”

which will help the dough crisp up and prevent

making it much easier to work with. While you

sticking. Keep the dough thin, about 1/4 inch or

are waiting for the dough, it’s a good time to

thinner, as it will puff up as it rises and cooks

prep all of the other ingredients.

on the grill.

fire roasted tomato & cabrales pizza

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A DIFF EREN T KIN D OF BBQ

View recipe on page 74 »


P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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The key to grilled pizza is using a combination of direct and indirect heat.

SMOKIN’ SALMON PIZZA View recipe on page 76 »

Finally, the key to grilled pizza is using a

your inner pizza artist and create your

combination of direct and indirect heat.

own masterpiece. Think of a pizza crust

First you grill the crust over direct heat,

as a blank canvas ready to hold all of your

and then you warm the toppings and

favorite flavors and favorite ingredients.

melt the cheese over indirect heat.

In the summer, we love to create lighter pizzas that highlight our favorite warm-

Once you have mastered the basic steps

weather foods, and lobster tops the list! But

of grilling the crust and have knocked

before you start dreaming of your toppings,

out a few simple pies, you can unleash

let’s review the basics.

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A DIFF EREN T KIN D OF BBQ


Grilled pizza can be broken into four key

grill. Sure, you can make dough from

components: dough, sauce, toppings and

scratch, but a buck or two will buy you

cheese. Paradoxically, even though grilling

a ball at your local pizza joint or grocery

the dough is the most crucial step in

store. This will leave you with plenty of

making grilled pizza, just about any pizza

time to seek out fresh, flavorful ingredients

dough can be transformed into a heavenly

for your sauce and toppings, and robust

crust. All you need is a generous splash

artisanal cheeses that will make you melt.

of olive oil, a dusting of coarsely ground

Now that’s amore!

polenta (a.k.a. grits) and the heat of your

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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maine event lobster & corn pizza View recipe on page 77 Âť

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A DI FFE RE N T KI N D OF BBQ


1.

Remove the dough from refrigerator and let it warm to room temperature, about an hour.

2. Prepare your toppings. The short time it takes to grill the pizza will only warm the toppings. Therefore, all toppings must either be edible raw—i.e., cured meats or olives—or be precooked. Set all your toppings on a tray so that you can have them at your fingertips when you start grilling.

3. Sprinkle your work surface with a handful of coarsely ground grits or polenta. Use a rolling pin, a wine bottle or your hands to roll out the dough thinly (3/16 to 1/4 inch thick). Embrace the resulting organic shape. Brush both sides very generously with olive oil.

4. Preheat the grill with all the burners on high for approximately 10 minutes with the lid down, or until the internal temperature of the grill is at least 500°F. While the grill is preheating, roll out your dough. Make sure the cooking grates are clean.

GRILLED PIZZA BOOT CAMP

5. Reset the grill to medium direct heat by turning all the burners to medium. Pick up the dough by the two corners closest to you. In one motion, lay it down flat—

Before getting started, assess your burner

directly onto the cooking grate—from back to front as

configuration and figure out how to set

you would lay a tablecloth on a table. I promise you

your grill for indirect heat. There are three

the dough won’t fall between the grates. Immediately

common burner configurations for gas grills:

close the lid and grill for 3 minutes (no peeking!). Then check the crust. If necessary, continue grilling until the

Two burner grills: Turn one burner off in

bottom of the crust is well marked and nicely browned.

step 7. This configuration is found mostly in

And if it is browning unevenly, rotate the crust before

older grills. Because the heat source is coming

continuing to grill.

from just one side, you may need to rotate the pizza 180 degrees halfway through the cooking process of both the dough and the topped pizza.

6. Use tongs to transfer the crust from the grill to a peel or rimless baking sheet. Close the lid to maintain the heat. Flip the crust to reveal the grilled side. Spread the entire surface with the sauce, add the toppings and

Three burner grills: Turn the middle burner

sprinkle with the cheese.

off in step 7. For this style grill, you should stretch your dough so that it is twice as long as it is wide.

7. Reset the grill to high indirect heat by turning off the appropriate burners (see burner configurations to the left) and increasing all remaining burners to high. Re-

Four burner grills: Turn the middle two

turn the pizza to the grate over the unlit (indirect heat)

burners off in step 7.

section, close the lid, and grill for approximately 7 to 10 minutes, or until the bottom is golden brown

For charcoal grills: Let the coals get red hot,

and the cheese is bubbly. Remove from the grill and

then gray-ashed. Move them to one side and

serve immediately.

follow directions for a two-burner gas grill. P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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HIGH SPIRITS

BY JARED ROUBEN

This past year, I checked off a barbecue trip to Texas that has been at the top of my bucket list for far too long.

I was born in Georgia, where I originally cultivated my love for outdoor barbecues. I have childhood memories replete with pulled pork sandwiches, baby back ribs and Brunswick stew. The experience was about eating with your hands, getting sauce on your face, sharing with family, and finishing meals with sweets like freshly baked blackberry cobbler or a slice of peach pie.

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HIGH SPIRITS: BEER


So when I headed down to new barbecue

Beef Brisket: A cold, light lager cuts

In general, the best barbecues always take

territory, I had high hopes. I marked my

through the fattiness of beef brisket

place outside, under the sun and with a

Texas barbecue map with every pit from

without overshadowing the complexity

lighter style beer—say, a pilsner, wit or

the Hill Country to Austin to San Antonio

of its rub.

pale ale—in hand. With barbecue in my

Beef Ribs: The residual sugars which

complement many of my favorite dishes.

blood, I enjoy brewing these styles to

to Houston. My goal was to explore the region’s smoked fare and to find the best beers to wash it all down. The layers of flavors and aromatics across

sweeten a Bock beer complement the

Pair the sweet, citrus notes of Moody

caramelized sugars often found coating

Tongue’s Crushed Green Coriander Wit

beef ribs.

with smoky beef brisket, or the tropical flavors in our Cold-Pressed Paw Paw

different cuts and treatments of meat naturally lend themselves to the variety

Pork Sausage: The fruit-forward hops and

Belgian with smoked turkey to add a layer

and flexibility found in various beer styles.

carbonation of an American Pale Ale help

of fruitiness to the dish, the same way you

For example, fully smoked, thick-cut, fatty

cleanse the palate of the richness and

might pair cranberry sauce with turkey on

beef brisket slathered in sweet, tomato-

fattiness in each bite of pork sausage.

Thanksgiving.

Pork Ribs: The molasses flavor found

With this recent trip in mind, I look

based barbecue sauce might call for a cold Texas Pilsner like the local favorite, Lone Star. Or, take the same brisket and, for

in the amber malts of a Scotch Ale

forward to creating culinary beers that

another layer of flavor, pair it with Moody

complement the brown sugar flavor found

can stand up to the complexities found

Tongue’s Crushed Green Coriander Wit,

in many barbecue sauces and rubs used

in the smoke, rubs and sauces across the

which matches the same light body with a

on pork ribs.

great state of Texas.

layer of fruity crushed green coriander. Smoked Turkey: The light body and So I tossed all greens to the side and

touch of smoke found in a Smoked

focused exclusively on eating smoked

Helles complement the lighter body and

meats and drinking beer for the next week.

smokiness of a barbecued turkey.

Here are a few of my pairing takeaways with several of Texas’ finest offerings: P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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1

2

3

7 by STEPHEN GERIKE

PORK SUMMIT CHEF AFTER-PARTY

12

STONE

13

souP

14

17 Each spring, a group of like-minded chefs gathers together in St Helena, California, at the Culinary Institute of America’s Greystone Campus for Pork Summit. The three-day educational workshop is an invitation that can’t be purchased and is a once-in-a-lifetime experience. A large part of the experience is the opportunity to spend the weekend meeting, watching,

22

hanging out and cooking with some of the top chefs in the country. On Sunday evening, after the last of the work has been completed, kitchens are cleaned, and before the attending chefs prepare to return to their own restaurants, everyone gathers for what can only be described as a true Stone Soup supper.

1. Bruce Aidells – Aidells Sausage | 2. Brad Farmerie – Public, Saxon + Parole, The Thomas 3. Matthew Vawter – Fruition | 4. Eleanor Martin – Schafer Condon Carter | 5. Colin Smith – Schafer Condon Carter | 6. Pedro Alvarez – Jose Enrique | 7. Jonathan Waxman – Barbuto | 8.Allison Waddell – GoGo Delicious | 9. Stephen Gerike – National Pork Board

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S T O N E S O U P : P O R K S U M M I T C H E F A F T E R - PA R T Y

10. Lars Kronmark – The Culinary Institute of America | 11. Macy Incontro | 12. Stephen Barber – Farmstead at Long Meadow Ranch | 13. Eric Alegria – Del Dotto Vineyards


4

8

p 9

5

10

15

18

11

o

19

23

6

20

!

24

16

r k

21

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14. Heidi Holzhauer – Cross Vineyards | 15. Jose Enrique Montes – Jose Enrique | 16. Bill Briwa – The Culinary Institute of America | 17. Jared Rouben – Moody Tongue Brewing Company 18. Robert Danhi – Chef Danhi & Co. | 19. Tony Incontro – Del Dotto Vineyards | 20. Neel Sahni – National Pork Board | 21. Kathy Walker – Big Chef Tom’s Belly Burgers | 22. Amy Cesta – Schafer Condon Carter | 23. David Danhi – The Grilled Cheese Truck | 24. Esther Danhi 25. David Bottagaro – National Pork Board

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N , A N D R E W B U R K L E A N D DAV I D R A I N E

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The setting this year was the old Spring Mountain Road farmhouse overlooking the vineyard behind Beringer Brothers. It was built in the late 19th century and is run by the family of a local tavern owner known as Gee Gee. It was a beautiful, early spring evening with the sun sliding behind the Vaca Mountains to the east across the northern Napa valley floor, and reflecting off of the Mayacamas Mountains to the west.

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S TO N E S O U P : P O R K S U M M I T C H E F A F T E R - PA RT Y


P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N , A N D R E W B U R K L E A N D DAV I D R A I N E

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elk sausage patties View recipe on page 78 Âť

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S TO N E S O U P : P O R K S U M M I T C H E F A F T E R - PA RT Y

bruce aidells


First to arrive was chef, author and

catch. Chefs David Bottagaro and Neel

sausage maker Bruce Aidells. After a

Sahni from the National Pork Board began

long weekend of sharing his incredible

preparing the outdoor cooking area for the

knowledge of all things pork, it didn’t take

evening. Allison Waddell from Barn Raiser

long for Bruce to find a comfortable spot

showed up with baskets of produce from

in the sunshine where, with a glass of

the farmer’s market and began making

rosé in hand, he began to mix an amazing

a seasonal crudité to share while folks

ground elk and pork sausage to put on

arrived, plus a beautiful mixed greens and

the wood fire that was just starting to

herb salad for dinner later in the evening.

nEel sahNI pork chops View recipe on page 79 »

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Brewmaster Jared Rouben, from Moody Tongue in Chicago, taught a beer and food pairing class during the summit and brought along five incredible beers from around the world. The beers were buried in ice in a large, galvanized watering trough. The selections of Scotch ale, IPA, Weiss, Pilsner and Saison paired well with the sweet, fatty and spicy dishes that eventually came together to become our supper. Some of the dishes that arrived took days of advance preparation. A Filipino-style, adobobraised pig’s head with fresh, bright herbs, citrus and hot peppers took center stage on the kitchen table and was picked clean by the end of the night.

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Chef Tom Pizzica of BCT Belly Burger

Chef Stephen Barber and his family, who

in San Francisco brought a Peking duck

came from Farmstead at Long Meadow

that he started at home several days

Ranch, arrived with a whole, 400-day aged

earlier. It was served with Cantonese

“Surry-ano� ham from Sam Edwards in

pancakes and hoisin sauce. Chef Robert

Surry, VA. It was added to the beer table

Danhi used the carcass to create a

and chefs took turns practicing their skills

flavorful duck soup.

at shaving the buttery, sweet and salty slices from this dark, rich ham.

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Chefs Brad Farmerie and Jonathan Waxman, both from New York City, joined the fun and jumped into the mix before heading back to the East coast later that night. Chef Tony Incontro, salumist and sous chef at a local winery, began slicing some of his housemade culatello, coppa and salumi to add to the table, along with some fresh bread and a bagna cauda of salt-cured anchovy, garlic, sweet butter and olive oil. Chef Lars Kronmark from the Culinary Institute of America pulled up in his 1960’s Austin Healey convertible with a large, cast iron cauldron for his Mock Turtle Soup: an old English recipe for a rich, thick and velvety soup using pork bones and offal, garnished with Danish “meatballs” called frekedeller, hard-cooked eggs and sherry wine. He assembled the soup over the wood fire as he fought off the army of curious spoons until supper.

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bartender’s chorizo with andante acapella goat cheese View recipe on page 80 

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bill briwa


Chef Bill Briwa, also from the Culinary Institute of America, arrived with an interesting and unique device from Germany that he used to serve spicy sausages over flaming brandy. The sausages were then sliced and paired with rich sheep’s milk cheese and crusty bread. Chef Jose Enrique Montes—of Jose Enrique, Miel and Capital in San Juan, Puerto Rico— manned the wood-fire grill with his friend and once sous chef, Pedro Alvarez, the coowner of Alcor, an artisan sausage company in Puerto Rico. Together they cooked and served a large platter of chorizo and linguica sausages for the table. Local meat broker and rabbit farmer Eric Alegria arrived with a cured and ready-tocook ham from a local Mangalitsa pig. It snapped, crackled and popped on the grill until it was ready to be served.

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As the evening faded to nighttime and the stars began to emerge in the sky, we all moved to the backside of the house, overlooking the vineyards and among the trees strung with a warm, orange glow. Large harvest tables were adorned with candles, flowers from the garden and beautifully set china from the family home. The buffet table swelled with delicious scents, sights and flavors. Inevitably, as we all began to relax and enjoy the end of another great summit, talk turned to plans for the year ahead.

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Stephen Gerike

CHEF portrait of a

b y K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

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PORTRAIT OF A CHEF: STEPHEN GERIKE


Chef Stephen Gerike has two tattoos: one of a clam and one of a pig. The former, he says, is emblematic of his first true food passion, and the latter represents where his zeal has ultimately led. As the National Pork Board’s foodservice marketing director, Gerike is now intimately involved in the most rapidly growing protein in foodservice today—and he can butcher a whole hog faster than it takes most of us to fry a piece of bacon.

Learn more about the evolution of Gerike’s career, his ideal “last supper” and the camaraderie of professional cooking in this exclusive interview led by our previously featured chef, Rodelio Aglibot.

if not pork, what protein would you be passionate about?

dan dan pig skin noodles with szechuan numbing sauce View recipe on page 81 »

your “last supper” would be consist of what? Eight raw clams from Barnegat, NJ, on the half shell, plus an ear of

I began my food career working in a cheesemonger’s shop. I learned to

sweet, white corn from the Wallkill Valley in NY, a few slices of warm

appreciate new, unusual and subtle flavors. I also worked in the fisheries

garden tomato, and a sea water and buckwheat honey-brined, pork

business, where I found my first and true food passion that has stayed

shoulder chop—about 1 inch thick—cooked on a wood fire. That, and a

with me until today: a cold, briny, firm, Eastern hard-shell clam on the

cold bottle of Miller High Life.

half shell. In my family we have a saying that “clams is good.” And I have two food tattoos—a pig and a clam.

who would you want to cook for? cook with? and have cook for you?

what do you think the challenges are for chefs today versus 10-15 years ago? Without a doubt it has to be the shallow labor pool of young people who truly love food and want to work. Kitchens need young cooks. Some

I like to cook for chefs. Chefs appreciate good, simple and humble food

cities are different than others, for sure, but we need cooks who actually

if it’s cooked correctly. They appreciate it more than anyone else and

enjoy eating and understand hospitality. There are so many amazing

will eat just about anything.

foods available to kitchens today and a growing movement to learn the basic crafts of cooking. Yet there are still so many places that disrespect

There is nothing better than cooking with a group of chefs that are as

those ingredients or just plain don’t know how to make food taste good.

passionate about food and eating as I am. And the camaraderie in a

Keep it simple and pay attention to what you’re doing.

working kitchen, on a deadline, is one of the most fulfilling experiences you can share. I have friends all over the country and they are almost

what do you want to do in 5 years?

all chefs with whom I have cooked. The same thing as I’m doing now—but smarter, more thoughtful, Like most chefs, I love to eat anything that someone else took the time

with a continued open mind, with even more great cooks, artisans,

and care to prepare. A simple cut of meat on a wood fire, a handmade

professionals and friends surrounding me.

sausage, a thin slice of salami, a clam or oyster shucked in a parking lot—it’s all good, all good. P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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IN SEASON by JUDITH MARA

Old World.

New World. T H E A R T F U L N E S S O F T H E C H A R C U T E R I E P L AT T E R

I

n the early summer, with days getting

It was the fifteenth century French

longer and nights getting shorter, lazy

charcutier (derived from the term “chair

alfresco dining is no longer something to

cuit,” which means “cooked flesh”) shop

fantasize about. It is a welcome pleasure

owners who brought ingenuity to how we

to savor charcuterie and cheese laid out

enjoy charcuterie today. By law they were not

picnic style with a glass of something

allowed to sell uncooked pork, so they created

cool in hand.

all manners of cooked, salted, smoked and dried dishes which sparked creativity and

Long before there was refrigeration,

competitiveness.

people had to be clever about the conservation of food. This included the

Skip ahead to Chicago and the upper Midwest

preservation of meat: sausages, hams,

which took on the U.S. leadership of hog (and

bacon, pâtés, rillettes and terrines that

cattle) butchering over 150 years ago. With

are all part of this historic culinary art

readily available meat and a vast European

called charcuterie.

immigrant population, local butchers became famous for their sausages and cured meats–– traditions that are still carried on today.

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Cheese, the other lovely ancient artisan

and Sous Chef Missy Corey recommends

indulgence, reflects similar ingenuity

diversification. “Pick one cured item (a

with a salty, savory, made-from-the-earth

salami or a cured whole muscle like coppa),

honesty. Farmstead and artisan cheeses

choose a pâté or terrine and a ham, as well

made from the milk of cows, sheep, goats

as a pork pie, a pâté en croute or rillette.

or water buffalo in late summer should

That would be a great diversified plate.”

now be aged to sharp perfection. Together, cured meat and aged cheese are the

As far as selecting the right cheese for the

foundations of the perfectly indulgent

platter, Chef Corey added, “I really enjoy

early summer charcuterie platter.

semi-firm cheeses for charcuterie—softer cheeses or blues are better left to cheese

It is a fun yet brutal challenge to stand in

plates. Cabot Clothbound Cheddar is great

front of a charcuterie counter and figure

with meat, so is Pleasant Ridge Reserve.

out how to select the right combination.

Queso iberico, manchego, pecorino pepato

Publican Quality Meats in Chicago offers

are all great options for charcuterie plates.”

both artisan charcuterie and cheese,

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Charcuterie Primer Charcuterie covers a gamut of dry-cured, fermented and smoked meat, fowl and game. PâtÊ, terrine, rillette and confit that are preserved in their own fat are also included. The most popular charcuterie in the U.S. is made in the European style, but all old-world food cultures offer some form. The biggest difference in what is made by Americans is that our artisans tend to be more creative and less bound by tradition. Plus, locally made charcuterie is unique in flavor simply because it comes from our land, our pastures and our terrain.

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Dry-Cured, Fermented

and Smoked Charcuterie The most important difference to note is that artisan salumi is not like commercially cured salami. Each portion is hung and naturally fermented (natural yeast develops similar to a good bread starter) and then is dry-cured for months. It is a very time-consuming process, but each bite is well worth the wait.

Instead of slicing and laying the slices flat, pinch, roll or fold the slices to make it easier for people to pick up.

Passion, Italy and a grandfather who was

spreadable salami made in the tradition

a butcher are what drove Greg Laketek

of the Ascoli Piceno, a province of

to open West Loop Salumi last year.

Italy. Then add ultra thin slices of a

Laketek became an authority on Italian-

whole muscle salumi such as coppa or

style salumi after studying in Italy under

bresaola, and to spice things up, add

Massimo Spigaroli, a master salumiere.

some peppery capocollo.

All of Laketek’s world-class salumi and

Laketek also offers a great tip for cutting

salami is gently fermented in one chamber,

and serving salumi. Instead of slicing

then slowly dry-cured in another chamber

and laying the slices flat, pinch, roll

on site. (All of his pork is 100% milk-fed

or fold the slices to make it easier for

Berkshire heritage hogs.) Understanding

people to pick up. Also, slice your salami

the difference between salumi and salami

(cured sausage) about as thick as a

is a charcuterie tongue-twister. Laketek

black peppercorn. Whole muscle salumi,

explains it this way, “All salami is salumi,

such as coppa, should be sliced as thin

but not all salumi is salami.� Got it?

as possible so you can taste the whole piece at once and feel the silky texture.

When asked how he likes to build a charcuterie platter, Laketek suggests beginning with ciauscolo. This is a

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IN S E AS ON : OL D WO RLD. NEW WORLD.


Pâté, Rillette,

Terrine and Confit To round out a charcuterie platter, include French-style or country-style pâtés, terrines, rillettes or confit. Figuring out which to choose can be confusing can be confusing without a garde manger diploma, so we asked Rob Levitt, a former chef and now co-owner of The Butcher & Larder in Chicago, to give us brief definitions. “Traditionally, a pâté was baked in a pastry crust and a terrine was layered in a dish called a terrine,” Levitt explains. “The terms are used interchangeably now with pâté usually indicating ground meat versus a terrine indicating larger pieces of meat. A confit is anything cooked in its own renderings, i.e., duck cooked in duck fat or tomatoes cooked at a very low temperature in their own juices. A rillette is meat that has been cooked confit-style, then separated from its cooking juices and finally whipped into a paste with the juices (mainly fat) emulsified back in.” Most popular at butcher and charcuterie counters are pâtés and terrines. They are typically made of veal, duck, pork or their livers, salmon or vegetables. In higher-end stores and restaurants you’ll also find pâtés made from pheasant, rabbit and venison. However, Levitt says they still sell quite a bit of good oldfashioned chicken liver pâté.

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Ways to Pair Cheese with Charcuterie Typically charcuterie is selected first and then cheese is paired to that selection. There are a few ways to think about selecting cheese, but understand that it’s different from how you would create a cheese platter with salumi on the side.

Style and Origin Pair the country of origin, or style, of charcuterie with cheese from the same country of origin or style. For example, a local handmade air-dried

Typically charcuterie is selected first and then cheese is paired to that selection.

chorizo is made in the Spanish style of using sweet paprika, pairs well with salty Spanish-style manchego cheese. Pair an Italian-style soppressata with aged Fiore Sardo.

Aged

Smooth and Assertive

Dry-cured and smoked sausages are aged

Pâtés, rillettes and terrines are not cured

(preserved) and pair magnificently with aged

or smoked; they are preserved primarily by

cheeses. But don’t limit yourself to the expected

a high ratio of fat. Most are soft enough to

Parmigiano-Reggiano and pecorino. Try aged (3

spread on bread and work well with smooth,

month +) cheeses made from different types of

assertive cheeses. The most common choice

milk such as a cow’s milk aged blue, a cave-aged

would be a ripe brie, but other semi-soft

Cheddar or a Gruyère-style Wisconsin cheese.

cheeses such as Chaumes, Boursault,

Or try an aged sheep’s or goat’s milk cheese.

Taleggio and aged farmstead goat cheese

For example, Laketek suggests pairing an

are divine.

Italian-style soppressata with an 11-month aged Giunco Gran Ducco.

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Accoutrements

WHERE TO BUY

All of our experts agree on one thing, and that

The charcuterie for this story was

is a charcuterie platter needs accoutrements.

supplied by four businesses that are

Traditional garnishes served with charcuterie

known for working to the highest

include capers, caperberries, cornichons, dates, figs,

standards. Publican Quality Meats and

fig paste, lingonberries, lightly dressed microgreens,

The Butcher & Larder are traditional local

olives, pink peppercorns, honeycomb, toast points,

whole animal butchers who make their

garlic toasts and toasted nuts. Laketek also

own fresh sausage but also sell dry-cured

suggests lightly seasoned tomatoes, torta fritta

salumi made by West Loop Salumi or

and aged balsamic vinegar. None recommend juicy

Bolzano Artisan Meats. Both Bolzano and

fruits such as peaches, melon, oranges or grapes.

West Loop Salumi have online stores and nationally supply fine restaurants and

Rather than serving a charcuterie platter for

specialty retailers. West Loop Salumi has

survival, we now eat and think about it as a way

a small retail operation where you can

to start a meal, entertain at parties, be served as a

drop in, taste and take home––kind

snack, added to a sandwich, munched on alfresco,

of like a wine tasting room for salumi.

or enjoyed at a picnic. It’s a completely new world to think of these old world ways as simply delicious and more than just preserving food and tradition.

The Butcher & Larder (and meal carry-out) thebutcherandlarder.com 1026 N. Milwaukee Ave. Chicago, IL 60642 773.687.8280

West Loop Salumi (and tasting room) westloopsalumi.com 1111 W. Randolph St. Chicago, IL 60607 312.255.7004

Publican Quality Meats (and restaurant) publicanqualitymeats.com 825 W. Fulton Market Street Chicago, IL 60607 312.445.8977

Bolzano Artisan Meats bolzanomeats.com Milwaukee, WI 53212 414.426.6380

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WEATHER PERMITTING B Y I A N K NAU E R

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S U M M E R ’ S S W E E T E S T V E G E TA B L E


My grandfather was famous

f or his v eg eta b le g arde n His rows of beets seemed to glow

His corn stood at soldier-like attention in

burgundy at their base and furl upward

perfectly straight, weedless columns—a

into green. The summer squash was a

platoon of light green feathered uniforms

well-tucked blanket or comforter with

clutching tightly wrapped grenades of

flecks of sun-gold yellow that sparked

sweet corn.

from underneath when the breeze fluffed the leaves back and forth.

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S U M M E R ’ S S W E E T E S T V E G E TA B L E


It was the corn that I looked so forward to at the end of June, when the first ears were ripped from the stalk. I can still hear the tear of the husk, paper-like and creaky. We ate it raw in the field. Those

Those kernels popped like caviar. their juice was as sweet as punch.

kernels popped like caviar. Their juice was as sweet as punch. This is what I look for when I buy the season’s first sweet corn. You have to be able to eat it without cooking. The longer an ear of corn spends off the stalk the less sweet it becomes. Its sugars immediately begin to convert to starch. Sweet corn is made to be eaten right away. It waits for no meal.

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It is tightly layered and hugs itself, guarding the golden candy-sweet treasure.

Today I stand at the farmer’s market and

The silk is a pale verdant, almost

I eat it in front of the farmer. I can tell

spend an uncomfortable amount of time

translucent, and moist—never dry. I peel

it was picked that morning and give the

hovering over the bins of corn before I

back the top to see the kernels that are

early-rising grower a knowing look of

choose a test ear. The wrapping of the

plump with sugars, ready to burst under

approval and pleasure. I buy enough for

husk has to be just so. It is tightly layered

the slightest pressure. I dig my thumbnail

lunch and head home. If the corn is not

and hugs itself, guarding the golden

in and feel how they pop. I rub the juice

just so, I change the menu.

candy-sweet treasure.

between my fingers, feeling for even a little starch. I buy the ear and rip it open.

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S U M M E R ’ S S W E E T E S T V E G E TA B L E


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Raw corn salad is a wonder to behold. Stripped from the cob and tossed with a simple olive oil and cider vinegar dressing and a handful of fresh basil and dill, the kernels become balanced with acid and salt and herbs. Their sweetness is made complex, even sophisticated in the farmy-est of ways. The salad is my mark of summer’s start when the garden work of spring begins to yield for the season. It is when those perfectly straight, weedless rows of the garden all seem worth it.

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S U M M E R ’ S S W E E T E S T V E G E TA B L E


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STYLIST’S CORNER


S T Y L I S T ’S CORNER B Y K AT H R Y N O ’ M A L L E Y

In Japan, yakitori restaurants are the antidotes to long, taxing days at the office: smoke-filled joints offering sticks of juicy meat and bottles of ice-cold sake and beer. These are places to wash away stress, and just as the food is fuss-free, so too is the décor. “It’s all very casual and laid-back,” says prop stylist Tom Hamilton, who returned from a recent trip to Kyoto with new food memories and 30 antique plates he picked up along the way—a few of which are pictured here. To recreate the effortless beauty of a yakitori restaurant table involves a certain degree of controlled chaos. You want to mix and match a variety of colors, textures and patterns, but unite them with a common theme or color palette (in this case it’s red, blue and green). And, “Be patient,” advises Tom. “Trust your eye, and experiment with different options until you’re satisfied with the final result.”

T O M H A M I LT O N

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B Y K AT H R Y N O ’ M A L L E Y

These delicious, warm-weather desserts are perfect for all your summer picnics and backyard parties. There’s something magical about a casual

And, like everything else you eat

summer soirée, even if all you’re eating is

this time of year, summer desserts

a simple potato salad, some char-grilled

should hold up well over lingering

burgers and a last-minute bowl of the

conversation and plenty of carefree

ripest, juiciest fruits you can find. Great

fun. You want treats that are fresh,

weather, after all, is meant to be enjoyed and

easy to serve and portable—or simply

celebrated, so the more time you can spend

so delicious you’ll want to savor every

outdoors with family and friends—and the

bite. Here are a handful of favorites.

less of it indoors cooking—the better.

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THE SWEET LIFE


N AU G H TY B R OW N I ES View recipe on page 82 Âť

Cece Campise Pastry Chef & Food Stylist

Pastry chef Cece Campise wondered how she could improve upon her recipe for tender, melt-in-your-mouth shortbread. Lucky for us, she found the answer in a layer of fudgy brownies.

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TEDDY’S FILLED TRES LECHES CUPCAKES View recipe on page 84 »

66

Caroline Wright

This petite and portable rendition of the traditional tres leches

Recipe Developer & Cookbook Author

if desired—can be used to caramelize the frosting that tops these

THE SWEET LIFE

cake is “part Hostess cupcake and part pyromania,” says Caroline Wright, author of Twenty-Dollar, Twenty-Minute Meals. A blowtorch— tender little treats filled with gooey dulce de leche.


Peak-season strawberries and a hit of aromatic basil make this nostalgic American classic taste both sweet and refreshing. “Best of all,” says creator Elizabeth Fife, “it’s light enough that you could still go for that

Elizabeth Fife Founder & Owner of Batter & Cream Bakery

afternoon bike ride or play at the beach.”

S T R AW B E R R Y B A S I L W H O O P I E P I E View recipe on page 83 »

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Josh Gripper Pastry Chef at The Dutch, Miami, FL

“Key lime pie is a Miami favorite but tends to be on the tart side,” says chef Josh Gripper, who makes his version with just a hint of sweet orange liqueur, plus a dash of salt to balance the flavor. You can serve the cool, creamy dessert à la mode, or with fresh fruit salad and homemade whipped cream.

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THE SWEET LIFE


S A LT E D L I M E P I E View recipe on page 86 Âť

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HOW WE

DID IT

Deconstructing a shot from Stephen Hamilton’s Who’s Hungry? blog by JUDITH MARA

dish

Ice Cream Scoop food stylist

Kathy Aragaki prop stylist

Paula Walters

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HOW WE DID IT


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fire roasted veggie pizza

ingredients for pizza:

from “Pizza on the Grill: 100+ Feisty Fire-Roasted Recipes for Pizza & More” by Elizabeth Karmel and Bob Blumer

·· 1 small red onion, cut into 4 slices ·· 6 tablespoons olive oil, divided ·· Kosher salt to taste ·· 2 large portabella mushrooms, stems removed and caps cut into

serves 2-4

½-inch-thick slices ·· 3 Japanese eggplants, cut into ¼-inch-thick slices ·· 1 yellow bell pepper, seeded and quartered ·· 1/4 cup uncooked grits or polenta, for rolling the dough ·· 1 ball prepared pizza dough, at room temperature ·· 1 cup Basil or Sun-Dried Tomato Pesto (see below or use store-bought) ·· 20 Fire-Roasted Cherry Tomatoes (see below) ·· 6 ounces aged goat cheese (chevre) or Brie, rind removed if preferred, and cut into ¼-inch-thick slices ·· B&E Sprinkle-icious Spice Blend (see below) or your favorite spice blend ·· freshly ground black pepper to taste

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RECIPE INDEX


ingredients for sun-dried tomato pesto:

heat or in the oven. Slowly roast until the tomatoes are shriveled and soft, about 2 hours. Remove from the

·· 1 cup pine nuts or walnuts, lightly toasted ·· 1/2 cup fresh basil leaves ·· 2/3 cup freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese ·· 1 clove garlic, minced

grill or oven and let cool. They will keep, tightly covered, in the refrigerator for up to 2 days.

·· 1 cup oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes (one 8.5-ounce jar), plus 1/3 cup of the oil (top off with olive oil if necessary) ·· 2/3 cup olive oil ·· 1/4 teaspoon Kosher salt ·· 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

ingredients for fire-roasted cherry tomatoes: ·· 40 cherry tomatoes (we like those sold on the vine) ·· 1 teaspoon olive oil or as needed to coat ·· 1 cup Kosher salt

to make b&e sprinkle-icious spice blend: Mix all the ingredients thoroughly and store in an airtight container for up to 3 months.

to make pizza: Preheat the grill per the master instructions for gas or charcoal. Soak 4 bamboo skewers in warm water for 10 minutes. Thread each skewer through the center of one onion slice so it

ingredients for b&e sprinkle-icious spice blend: ·· 1 tablespoon dehydrated onion ·· 1 tablespoon roasted dehydrated garlic ·· 2 teaspoons dried lemon peel ·· 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes ·· 1 teaspoon dried thyme ·· 2 tablespoons Kosher salt ·· 2 tablespoons freshly ground black pepper

resembles a lollipop. Brush them with 1 tablespoon of the oil and season with salt. Place the onions, mushrooms, eggplant, and bell pepper on the cooking grate directly over the heat and grill until well marked and tender, about 4 minutes per side. Let cool, then slice the bell pepper into thin strips, pull the skewers out of the onions, and separate into rings. Reserve for topping. Roll out and shape the dough, then grill the first side of the curst per the master instructions. Use tongs to transfer it from

to make sun-dried tomato pesto:

the grill to a peel or rimless baking sheet. Flip the crust to reveal the grilled side.

Place all the ingredients in a food processor and process until

Spread the surface with the pesto and artfully arrange the

smooth. Taste and adjust the salt and pepper, if necessary.

grilled veggies and tomatoes over the top. Sprinkle with cheese.

This will keep, tightly covered, in the refrigerator for up to 3

Finish grilling the pizza per the master instructions.

days or in the freezer for up to 2 months.

Remove from the grill and season with the spice blend, salt, and pepper. Slice and serve immediately.

to make fire-roasted cherry tomatoes: Preheat a gas grill, build a charcoal fire, or preheat the oven to

Adventure Club: Add grilled seasonal veggies from your local farmers’ market.

275 degrees. Lightly coat the tomatoes with the oil. Cover a rimmed baking sheet with the salt to form a “salt bed.” Place the tomatoes closely together bottom side down on the salt bed. Place the baking sheet on the grill on the cooking grate over low indirect

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fire roasted tomato & cabrales pizza

ingredients for pizza:

from “Pizza on the Grill: 100+ Feisty Fire-Roasted Recipes for Pizza & More” by Elizabeth Karmel and Bob Blumer

·· ¼ cup uncooked grits or polenta, for rolling the dough ·· 1 ball prepared pizza dough, at room temperature ·· 2 tablespoons olive oil ·· 1 cup Onion Marmalade (see below)

serves 2-4

·· 1¼ cups Fire-Roasted Cherry Tomatoes (see below) ·· 4 ounces Cabrales or your favorite blue cheese, crumbled ·· 1/4 cup pecan pieces, toasted and chopped ·· freshly ground black pepper to taste

ingreidents for onion marmalde: ·· 2 tablespoons olive oil ·· 1 tablespoon unsalted butter (or salted and reduce the salt a bit) ·· 3 large yellow onions, thinly sliced and roughly separated into strings ·· 1 teaspoon Kosher salt

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ingredients for fire-roased cherry tomatoes:

to make the pizza:

40 cherry tomatoes (we like those sold on the vine)

Preheat the grill, roll out and shape the dough, and grill the first

1 teaspoon olive oil or as needed to coat

side of the crust per the master instructions for gas or charcoal.

1 cup Kosher salt

Use tongs to transfer it to a peel or rimless baking sheet. Flip the crust to reveal the grilled side.

to make the onion marmalde:

Spread the entire surface with the onion marmalade. Top with the tomatoes and sprinkle with cheese.

Heat the oil and butter together in a large, heavy sautĂŠ pan over medium heat. When the butter bubbles, add the

Finish grilling the pizza per the master instructions.

onion rings and salt and cook, covered, for 20 minutes,

Remove the pizza from the grill, garnish with the nuts, and

stirring occasionally. Remove the cover and cook, stirring

season with pepper. Slice and serve immediately.

occasionally, until the onions are all a deep golden color, about 20 more minutes.

Adventure Club: Replace the cherry tomatoes with heirloom cherry tomatoes.

This will keep, tightly covered, in the refrigerator for up to 2 days.

to make the fire-roasted cherry tomatoes: Preheat a gas grill, build a charcoal fire, or preheat the oven to 275 degrees. Lightly coat the tomatoes with the oil. Cover a rimmed baking sheet with the salt to form a “salt bed.� Place the tomatoes closely together bottom side down on the salt bed. Place the baking sheet on the grill on the cooking grate over low indirect heat or in the oven. Slowly roast until the tomatoes are shriveled and soft, about 2 hours. Remove from the grill or oven and let cool. They will keep, tightly covered, in the refrigerator for up to 2 days.

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smokin’ salmon pizza

Preheat the grill, roll out and shape the dough, and grill the

from “Pizza on the Grill: 100+ Feisty Fire-Roasted Recipes for Pizza & More” by Elizabeth Karmel and Bob Blumer

charcoal. Flip the crust and grill until the second side is well

first side of the curst per the master instructions for gas or browned, 2 to 3 minutes. (Since you’re not melting cheese or warming toppings, you don’t need to switch to indirect heat for a gas grill).

serves 2-4

Remove from the grill and immediately spread the entire surface with the boursin. Sprinkle with the shallot and top with the strips of salmon. Finish with the zest, dill, and

ingredients:

pepper. Slice and serve immediately. Adventure Club: Replace the salmon with pieces of

·· 1/4 cup uncooked grits or polenta, for rolling the dough ·· 1 ball prepared pizza dough, at room temperature ·· 2 tablespoons olive oil ·· ½ cup boursin or other soft garlic cheese (one 5.2-ounce round) ·· 1 small shallot, minced ·· 4 slices smoked salmon (about 4 ounces), cut into strips ·· zest of 1 lemon, finely grated with a Microplane or a zester ·· 2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill or chives ·· freshly ground black pepper to taste

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smoked sturgeon.


Adventure Club: Grill your own lobster. Poor Man’s Lobster: Substitute frozen, thawed and sautéed crayfish tails for an equally as delicious and slightly more economical pizza. Preheat the grill per the master instructions for gas or charcoal. Brush the corn with 1 tablespoon of the oil and season with salt and place on the cooking grate. Grill corn over direct medium heat, turning occasionally, until it begins to brown, about 8 minutes. Remove from the grill and let cool. To remove the kernels, stand the corn upright on bottom of cob. Grip the top of the cob, and slide your sharpest knife straight down between the cob and the kernels. Set aside and reserve for topping. Just before making the pizza, melt the butter in a small saucepan over medium heat. Reduce the heat to low or set it off to the side of the grill. In a medium-size bowl, combine the tomato sauce and crème fraîche. Set aside and reserve for topping. Roll out and shape the dough, then grill the first side of the crust per the master instructions. Use tongs to

maine event lobster & corn pizza from “Pizza on the Grill: 100+ Feisty Fire-Roasted Recipes for Pizza & More” by Elizabeth Karmel and Bob Blumer

transfer it from the grill to a peel or rimless baking sheet. Flip the crust to reveal the grilled side. Spread the entire surface with the sauce. Top with the corn and cheese. Set the pizza back on the cooking grate over the unlit section and grill, with the lid down, until the bottom

serves 2-4

is well browned and the cheese is melted, about 7 to 10 minutes. While the pizza finishes cooking, add the lobster (or

ingredients:

crayfish) meat to the butter. Cover and warm for 3 minutes, then remove saucepan from the heat and

·· 2 ears corn, husked

reserve. When the pizza is hot off the grill, remove

·· 3 tablespoons olive oil, divided

the lobster from the butter and add to the pizza.

·· Kosher salt to taste

Sprinkle with the chives and season with salt and

·· 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter (very little of this will be consumed)

pepper to taste. Slice and serve immediately.

·· 1 cup crushed tomatoes ·· 2 tablespoons crème fraîche or sour cream ·· 1/4 cup uncooked grits or polenta, for rolling the dough ·· 1 (4-inch) ball of prepared pizza dough, at room temperature ·· 1 cup cooked lobster meat ·· 4 ounces St. Andre cheese (a triple crème cheese) ·· 4 fresh chives, thinly sliced ·· Kosher salt or Fleur de sel and Freshly ground black pepper to taste

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elk sausage patties by Bruce Aidells; recipe adapted from “Bruce Aidell’s Complete Sausage Book” serves 8

Cut the meat, fat, and bacon into 2-inch strips. In a large bowl, mix the meat, fat, and bacon with the

ingredients:

brandy, salt, black pepper, juniper berries, garlic, shallots, rosemary, sage and green onions. Cover and place in the refrigerator to marinate overnight.

·· 1½ pounds elk shoulder ·· 1 pound pork butt ·· ¾ pound pork back fat ·· 1/2 pound slab bacon, rind removed ·· 2 tablespoons brandy ·· 4 teaspoons Kosher salt ·· 2 teaspoons coarsely ground black pepper ·· 2 teaspoons minced juniper berries ·· 1 teaspoon minced garlic ·· 1 teaspoon minced shallots ·· 1 teaspoon fresh chopped rosemary ·· 2 teaspoons chopped fresh sage ·· 1/2 cup finely chopped green onion

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The next day, grind the mixture through a ½-inch plate. Add any juices remaining in the bowl. Knead to blend all ingredients thoroughly. Form into 3-inch by 1-2-inch patties. The sausage will keep for three days in the refrigerator, or for two months in the freezer.


pork chops

Cut pork rack into individual steaks, including the

by Neel Sahni, National Pork Board

stovetop, bring salt, sugar and 1 cup water to a boil

bone and belly sections. Set aside in refrigerator. On until salt and sugar are dissolved. In a large container, add the hot solution to remaining water, ice, and black pepper. Add pork chops and let brine for 1-2

serves 10

hours. Remove meat from brine and rinse with cold water, placing in refrigerator until ready to use. Before grilling, pat meat dry with paper towels. Season

ingredients: ·· 5 pounds of pork chops or pork of your choice ·· 1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons Kosher salt ·· 1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons granulated sugar ·· 1/2 cup water

with fresh cracked black pepper but no salt. Once the meat has been grilled to an internal temperature of 145 degrees with a 3-minute rest, test the pork to see if more salt is needed. If so, add it just before serving. Drizzle very lightly with high-quality extra virgin olive oil and a squeeze of fresh lemon juice.

·· 1 gallon water ·· 1/2 gallon ice ·· 1/2 teaspoon fresh cracked pepper ·· Optional: extra virgin olive oil, fresh lemon juice

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bartender’s chorizo with andante acapella goat cheese by Bill Briwa, The Culinary Institute of America

serves: grill 1 sausage per person

Grill the chorizo until it is cooked through and it takes on a little color. Transfer to a plate and bathe in a generous helping of

ingredients:

bourbon. Set alight. Serve the sausage, sliced and still flaming, with the goat cheese and

Chorizo de Bilbao (or other Spanish chorizo) bourbon Andante Dairy’s Acapella cheese (an ashed round goat) crusty bread

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RECIPE INDEX

crusty bread.


ingredients for pig skin “noodles”: ·· Skin from one large pork belly

ingredients for pork topping: ·· 1 tablespoon peanut oil ·· 2 teaspoons minced garlic (about 2 cloves) ·· 1 teaspoon minced ginger ·· 2 scallions, white and green parts chopped ·· 6 ounces ground pork ·· 1 tablespoon Chinese rice wine or dry sherry ·· 1/2 teaspoon salt, or to taste ·· 1 handful dry-roasted peanuts, finely chopped

to make the “noodles”: Remove all lean and fat from the pork belly skin. Place the skin in a large stockpot, cover the skin with water and bring to a simmer. Simmer for about an hour or until the skin is tender but not falling apart. Remove the skin from the water and set it on a sheet pan to dry and cool. Reserve the liquid in the pot to reheat the noodles prior to serving. When the skin has cooled, roll it into a tight roll, like a jellyroll, and cut it crosswise into

dan dan pig skin noodles with szechuan numbing sauce by Stephen Gerike, National Pork Board

¼-inch slices to create “noodles.” Set all the noodles aside.

to make the sauce: In a medium bowl, whisk together all sauce ingredients. Reheat the noodles in the hot water for one minute and drain. Pour

serves 4 as part of a multi-course meal or 2 as a single dish

the sauce over the noodles and toss so the sauce is evenly distributed. Set aside.

to make the pork topping: ingredients for sauce: Heat a large wok or skillet over medium-high heat. Add the ·· 1/4 cup pork stock or water

oil and swirl to coat the base and sides. Add the garlic, ginger

·· 2 tablespoons soy sauce

and the white parts of the scallions. Cook until fragrant, about

·· 1/2 tablespoon Chinese sesame paste or tahini

30 seconds. Add the meat and stir-fry until the meat is a little

·· 1 tablespoon Chinese black rice vinegar, or substitute

crispy on the outside and no longer pink. Add rice wine to

good quality balsamic vinegar

deglaze the pan. Season with salt to taste. Spoon the cooked

·· 3 tablespoons chili oil (adjust according to your tolerance of spiciness)

meat mixture over the noodles, sprinkle the chopped scallions

·· 2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil

greens and chopped peanuts on top, and serve.

·· 1 teaspoon sugar ·· 1/2 teaspoon ground Szechuan pepper

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to make shortbread base: Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Beat together the butter and both sugars until light and fluffy. Add the vanilla and salt. With the mixer on low, add the flour and mix until just combined. Press dough into a 9x13 greased baking dish. Chill in fridge for 20 minutes, then bake for 20 minutes until the edges turn slightly golden. While that’s baking, prepare the brownie layer.

ingredients for brownie layer: 2 sticks (1/2 pound) high-quality butter. 8 ounces semi-sweet chocolate (Valrhona 66% Caribe is great) 2 cups sugar 4 eggs 1/2 teaspoon salt 2 teaspoons vanilla 1¼ cups self-rising flour

to make brownie layer:

naughty brownies

Place the butter and chocolate over a double boiler

by Cece Campise, Who’s Hungry? Test Kitchen

sugar and stir until uniform. Add the eggs, one at a

and melt the two together. Remove from heat, add the time, stirring quickly with a spatula until combined. Mix in the salt and vanilla. Lastly, fold in the flour. Pour over the shortbread crust and bake an additional

makes about 12-16 squares

30 minutes at 350 degrees. Baking time will vary depending on how hot the shortbread is when you add the brownie batter, so keep an eye on it.

ingredients for shortbread base: 1½ sticks high-quality butter 1/4 cup sugar 1/4 cup packed dark brown sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla 1/2 teaspoon salt 2 cups all purpose flour

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substitutions: Feel free to substitute the vanilla in the brownie layer for something more decadent, such as Grand Marnier or, my favorite, Frangelico. Grand Marnier brownies with orange zest in the shortbread would be delicious, as would Frangelico brownies with Hazelnut shortbread.


to make cake: Preheat the oven to 375 degrees and grease whoopie pie tin. Purée sour cream with fresh strawberries until smooth. Set aside. In a large bowl, whisk flour, salt, baking powder, and baking soda together and set aside. In a separate bowl, mix the brown sugar, egg, vanilla, and oil together. Add the strawberry sour cream purée and whisk until fully combined. Gradually add the flour mixture to the strawberry mixture and whisk until evenly combined. Next add in the dried strawberries. Use an ice cream scoop or carefully spoon equal amounts of dough into each tray on the tin, so that the whoopie cakes are all the same size. Bake for 4-5 minutes until the tops of the cakes are spring-like and a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean. Remove from oven and let cool completely before adding the filling and assembling your whoopies.

ingredients for basil buttercream:

strawberry basil whoopie pies by Elizabeth Fife, Batter & Cream Bakery

·· 1 large bunch basil ·· 1 cup granulated sugar ·· 3 egg whites ·· pinch of cream of tartar ·· 1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt ·· 2 sticks cold unsalted butter, cubed

makes 12 whoopie pies to make buttercream: ingredients for cake:

Remove basil leaves and wash them. Boil in water 1 minute, remove quickly and shock in cold water. Place basil, 172

·· 1/4 cup sour cream

grams water and sugar in saucepan, bring to boil and

·· 1½ cups fresh strawberries

infuse for 20 minutes. Blend 2 minutes until puréed with

·· 1½ cups all-purpose flour

immersion blender.

·· 1/2 teaspoon salt ·· 3/4 teaspoon baking powder ·· 1/2 teaspoon baking soda ·· 1 cup firmly packed dark brown sugar ·· 1 large egg ·· 1/2 teaspoon vanilla

Whip the egg whites and cream of tartar to soft peaks. Cook the sugar-basil syrup to 238°F (115°C). Gradually pour the syrup down the side of the bowl, cool on medium speed about 8 minutes. Add in the salt and butter and mix until fluffy and emulsified, about 8 minutes.

·· 1/2 cup vegetable oil ·· 1/4 cup dried strawberries, roughly chopped

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teddy’s filled tres leches cupcakes

ingredients for cupcakes:

by Caroline Wright, Author “of Twenty-Dollar, Twenty-Minute Meals”

·· 1 cup cake flour, spooned and leveled ·· 1 cup all-purpose flour, spooned and leveled ·· 1 teaspoon Kosher salt ·· 1/2 teaspoon baking soda

makes 12 cupcakes

·· 1/2 teaspoon baking powder ·· 1½ sticks softened, unsalted butter ·· 3/4 cup sugar ·· 2 large eggs ·· 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract ·· 1 cup whole milk

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ingredients for sauces:

to make sauces:

·· 1 (14-oz) can of sweetened condensed milk’s worth of

Measure out 1/4 cup dulce de leche; reserve. Transfer

dulce de leche (see below)

remaining dulce de leche to a piping bag or plastic bag.

·· 1/4 cup milk

Meanwhile, warm reserved dulce de leche in microwave

·· pinch of Kosher salt

or on stove; stir in remaining sauce ingredients and set

·· 1/4 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

aside. Meanwhile, using a small (1/2-inch) round cutter, cut into cooled cupcakes and pull out a small cylin-

ingredients for meringue frosting:

der of cake without piercing through to the other side.

·· 1 cup sugar

Using your piping bag, fill the hollowed cupcakes with

·· 1/2 cup water

dulce de leche; replace tops.

Discard all but ¼-inch of the very top of the cupcake.

·· 3 large egg whites

ingredients for dulce de leche: ·· 1 (8 ounce) can sweetened condensed milk ·· 1/8 cup heavy cream

to make frosting : Bring sugar and water to a boil in a small saucepan; boil swiftly until temperature of syrup reaches 240 degrees. Meanwhile, using an electric mixer, beat egg whites until soft peaks form; in a thin stream, drizzle

to make dulce de leche:

in hot syrup into the eggs while they’re being whisked. Continue to whisk until stiff peaks form and you’ve

Place the sweetened condensed milk in a large pot and cover

added all your syrup (the meringue will be glossy).

with water by 1-inch. Cook over medium-low heat (with bubbles

Frost cupcakes; if desired, torch the cupcakes with a

clinging to side of pan, but not simmering) for 4 hours. Let can

blowtorch for added caramelization. Serve with re-

cool before handling. Transfer dulce de leche to a large bowl;

served dulce de leche/milk sauce.

whisk in heavy cream to loosen.

to make cupcakes: Whisk together first 5 ingredients in a medium bowl. Beat butter and sugar together using an electric mixer until light and fluffy; add eggs, then vanilla. Turn speed on low and alternately add flour and milk, beginning and ending with flour. Divide batter between 12, paper-lined muffin tins; bake in a preheated 350-degree oven for 30-35 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.

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salted lime pie by Joshua Gripper, The Dutch

serves 8

Preheat oven to 300 degrees. At a high speed, whip together egg yolks and lime zest until light and fluffy.

ingredients: ·· 4 egg yolks ·· 1 lime, zested ·· 14 ounces condensed milk ·· 1 cup key lime juice ·· 1/4 teaspoon salt ·· 1 teaspoon orange liqueur ·· 2 gelatin sheets

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RECIPE INDEX

In a separate bowl, combine condensed milk, lime juice, salt and liqueur. Mix together with the egg yolk mixture. Melt gelatin sheets and whisk in. Pour into pre-baked pie crust. Bake for 20 minutes.


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Who's Hungry? Magazine | Summer 2014 | No 11  

Blending the worlds of food and photography, the magazine features travel stories and recipes from top food writers, as well as styling tips...

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