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spring 2014

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FEATURES

24 06

Beach Vacation

42

Portrait of a Chef: Rodelio Aglibot

Top 5: Breakfasts that Take You Away

34

The Art of the Artificial Summer

44 36 12

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Beyond the Cronut

CONTENTS

Weather Permitting

In Season: Seafood Pasta


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CONTENTS

50

High Spirits: Cognac

52 62

The Ultimate Indulgence

How We Did It

4

Contributors

5

Letter from Steve

6

Top 5: Breakfasts that Take You Away

12

Beyond the Cronut

24

Beach Vacation

34

The Art of the Artificial Summer

36

Weather Permitting

42

Portrait of a Chef: Rodelio Aglibot

44

In Season: Seafood Pasta

50

High Spirits: Cognac

52

The Ultimate Indulgence

62

How We Did It

64

Recipe Index

CONTACTS media inquiries Judith Mara | marabeach@sbcglobal.net Deirdre O’Shea | deirdre@stephenhamilton.com

sponsorship opportunities Deirdre O’Shea | deirdre@stephenhamilton.com

representation Schumann & Company | www.schumannco.com patti@schumannco.com | 312.432.1702

stephen hamilton 1520 W. Fulton | Chicago, IL 60607 www.stephenhamilton.com

CONTENTS

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contributors

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kathryn o’malley |

deirdre o’shea | Production Director

Editor and Writer

Kathryn’s love of food is matched only by her

If you have worked with Stephen Hamilton,

passion for writing about it; as part of the Who’s

you’ve worked with Deirdre. Drawing on 15 years

Hungry?™ editorial team, she indulges in a bit of

of experience in managing photography studios,

both. Her popular food blog, dramaticpancake.com,

Deirdre has a hand in nearly every aspect of

garners more than 40,000 unique viewers per month and highlights the people and stories behind great recipes.

Stephen’s business. She’s been instrumental in organizing the magazine’s shoots, sourcing ingredients, and always keeping production on schedule.

judith mara | Editor and Writer

ian law | Design

Judith has worked with Stephen for almost

Ian designed every aspect of Who’s Hungry?™

seven years and helps to lead the editorial concept

magazine with meticulous attention to detail and

and execution of Who’s Hungry?™ magazine. An

typography, and helped turn static images into an

award-winning former creative director for major

interactive experience. His award-winning design

ad agencies such as Leo Burnett and J. Walter Thompson, Judith sweats the details, pens Weather Permitting and

work has been featured in the pages of Print, Creativity, How, PDN and Graphic Design USA.

literally hand writes How We Did It.

dannielle kyrillos |

audarshia townsend |

Writer and Television Commentator

Fueled by an obsession with Chicago’s vibrant

A series judge on Bravo’s Top Chef Just Desserts,

culinary scene, Audarshia Townsend was one of the

Dannielle is an expert on stylish entertaining, food,

first two editors at metromix.com. And while she

fashion, and travel. She appears regularly on NBC’s

continues to write lifestyle features for the Chicago

Writer

Tribune, Essence, Los Angeles Times, The Huffington

Today and The Nate Berkus Show, as well as on E! News, BetterTV, CNBC, CNN, and local morning programming in New York

Post and more, she also connects with readers through her dining and

and Philadelphia. For Who’s Hungry?™ magazine, Danielle shares her top

drinking blog, 312diningdiva.com. For Who’s Hungry? magazine, Audarshia

five breakfasts that take you away.

shares a decadent French cocktail made with the nuanced flavors of cognac.

ina pinkney |

geraldine campbell | Writer

Chef and Writer

After 33 years in the food business, Ina has closed

Geraldine is a freelance writer, travel enthusiast,

her beloved Chicago breakfast spot but continues

and ex-Southerner with a love of grits and all things

to make frequent guest appearances on local news

deep fried. She has written about everything from

and cable TV. The acclaimed chef has also been

love and sex to beauty and fashion, but her first loves are food and travel. When she’s not writing,

featured in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Gourmet, Vogue, and many more. For Who’s Hungry?™ magazine,

she’s testing recipes in her itty-bitty kitchen or plotting her next adventure—

Ina indulges our sweet tooth with a dip into the world of chocolate.

which, most recently, has meant a trip to the Caribbean for Who’s Hungry?™ magazine.

kate bernot |

Writer

As the nightlife and events reporter at RedEye, Kate covers Chicago beers, booze, beer and restaurants. She has also contributed to the Chicago Sun-Times, Conde Nast Traveler, Serious Eats Chicago and BlackboardEats. In this issue of Who’s Hungry?™ magazine, Kate explores the darker, sultrier side of pasta.

a special thanks to:

CeCe Campise, Lars Kronmark, Rodelio Aglibot, Ruth Siegel, Paula Walters, Josephine Orba, Valrhona Chocolate,

European Imports, Jessica Bright, Karl Helfrich, Jackie Motooka, Rebecca Mason, Leigh Omilinsky, Meg Galus, Derek Poirier, Sarah Mispagel, Momofuku Milk Bar, Chile Pies & Ice Cream, The Iron Press, Clafouti Patisserie, Bea’s of Bloomsbury, Southport Grocery and Café, David Chhay, Sophie’s at Saks Fifth Avenue, Paul Kahan, Erling Wu-Bower, Matthew Accarrino, Tony Priolo, Jackie Doran, Tom Hamilton, Juan Palomino, David Raine, Justine Paris, Powell Jordano, Breana Moeller

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CONTRIBUTORS


LETTER FROM STEVE This has been the hardest issue we’ve had to produce. Selecting content was difficult because winter isn’t over and spring hasn’t quite settled in. Plus, spring vegetables aren’t out yet, so we rolled with contrasts of the season. It’s that time of year when the winter blahs set in as our body, mind and palate crave spring. To fend off those feelings, we offer you fun indulgences in “Beyond the Cronut” such as Crookies, Wookies and Duffins. Then chef Ina Pinkney offers some serious balm for the blues in her essay on chocolate, “The Ultimate Indulgence.” One way to beat winter is to travel someplace warm––at least in our imaginations. Geraldine Campbell takes us on a casual Caribbean beach trip in “Beach Vacation” where the sky is blue, the sea is even bluer and local BBQ and seafood are available in abundance.

Each issue of WH comes out at slightly

Seafood is a wonderful way to lighten up winter

different times so we can come up with

pasta dishes. In “In Season: Seafood Pasta,” Kate

fresh stories that are in tune with the

and some recipes collected from Italian chefs

exact season.

meals and Italian chefs are known for seafood Bernot shares curious facts about squid ink pasta across the US. Another way to lighten up is with the springlike colors of cauliflower. If that’s hard to believe, check out our Weather Permitting column, “Cabbage That Blooms Like a Flower.” Goes to show that signs of spring are everywhere if you know where to look. Who’s Hungry?™

Stephen Hamilton

LETTER FROM STEVE

|

P O R T R A I T B Y AV E R Y H O U S E

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TOP 5 by DA N N I E L L E K Y R I L L O S

Dannielle Kyrillos, a series judge on Bravo’s Top Chef Just Desserts and expert on all things food and entertaining, shares her five favorite breakfasts that take you away from around the country. Portrait by Peter Hurley

A Catalan might scoff at the simple breakfast she’s been eating since birth being elevated to chic restaurant fare, but Jose Andres’ team recreates this breakfast of campeones so expertly that for those few minutes, anyone enjoying it knows what it feels like to wake up in the Spanish sun with friends, somehow fresh and invigorated, even though dinner ended only a few hours ago and there was so much dancing after that. The olive oil is so splendid, the coarse salt sticks to your lips and it’s hard to understand how tomatoes could taste so sweet and so rich (peeling then grating them is the secret). A bite with Manchego, jamon and toast is heaven, and then bites of each component separately are heaven, and then you realize it will soon be time for a nap.

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TOP 5 : B REA KFA ST THAT TAKE YOU AWAY


1

CATALAN BREAKFAST ‘PA AMB TOMÀQUET’ TOASTED BREAD, FRESH GRATED TOMATO, EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL, JAMÓN SERRANO ‘FERMÍN’ AND MANCHEGO CHEESE

THE TERRACE BY JOSÉ ANDRÉS SLS SOUTH BEACH 1701 COLLINS AVENUE MIAMI BEACH, FL 33139 305.674.1701 WWW.SLSHOTELS.COM/SOUTHBEACH/TASTE

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2 BAKED EGGS WITH BASIL, TOMATO SAUCE, CREAM AND MERGUEZ SAUSAGES CAFÉ GITANE

In New York, Café Gitane’s petite original location

French-North African food put one in the buttery

THE JANE HOTEL

has been a busy NoLita fixture for almost twenty

leather slippers of a kooky socialite playing hippie

113 JANE STREET

years. But it’s the second outpost, in the quirky

in 1970s Morocco. They serve the baked eggs all

NEW YORK, NY 10014

Jane Hotel in the Far West Village, that’s truly

day, crinkly toward the edges and creamy in the

212.255.4143

transporting. Bathed with magical morning light

middle, romantically spiced and sauced, with

WWW.CAFEGITANENYC.COM

longer than seems possible, with an ancient

lamb-y Merguez redolent of the winding road

crocodile on one wall, a fading painting of an

to Essaouira. As glamorous as it all feels, one

eastern potentate on the other and a lifetime

mustn’t resist sopping up everything with the

of treasures strewn in between, the spot makes

classic baguette slices found alongside.

even a café crème mysterious. This, and the 8

TOP 5 : B REA KFA ST THAT TAKE YOU AWAY


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NASI GORENG BOROBUDUR 700 POST STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94109 415.775.1512 WWW.BOROBUDURSF.COM

If you have spent time in Indonesia, you

an amalgam of everything you hope the day

have fallen in love with the sublime pleasure

ahead will be. Like all the best breakfasts in

of richly nuanced fried rice, hopefully with

the world, nasi goreng is made with yesterday’s

chicken and fried egg, for breakfast. The first

leftovers but goes far beyond saving them from

time it is offered, you think maybe there’s been

waste—it makes them perfect. Borobudur is as

some mistake. Then you realize a bit wistfully

authentic as it gets, and even though it doesn’t

that every breakfast you haven’t eaten nasi

open until 11:30 in the morning, that’s not too

goreng was kind of a waste. It is sweet and

late to jumpstart the day the Indonesian way.

spicy and crispy and ginger-y in every bite,

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CAST-IRON GRANOLA THE RANCH AT ROCK CREEK | 79 CARRIAGE HOUSE LANE | PHILIPSBURG, MT 59858 | 406.859.6027 WWW.THERANCHATROCKCREEK.COM

Most chefs have intriguing backgrounds – it’s the

of Early America. Crunching into it conjures blazing

nature of the beast. But Chef Josh Drage might be

new trails under the big, big sky in crisp morning air,

one of the most fascinating, having grown up in an

building a fire to cook the next meal, the thrill of the

electricity-less cabin in rural Alaska and learned

unknown, and infinite possibility. Wherever you woke

to cook over open fire from his grandmothers.

up before eating it, you feel like you slept under the

Each bright mouthful of his ruggedly elegant

stars. So even though the original cowboys probably

cooking, most especially the earthy and not-too-

weren’t granola nuts, it tastes like their fearless hope

sweet granola he roasts in a cast-iron skillet each

lingers in Drage’s cast iron.

morning, is packed with the wild and free spirit

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TOP 5 : B REA KFA ST THAT TAKE YOU AWAY


DONUTS: GLAZED BUTTERMILK & CINNAMON SUGARED | WILLOW BAKE SHOPPE | 1084 COMMERCIAL STREET | ROCKPORT, ME 04856 | 207.596.0564

All food can take us to a faraway place

cake-y buttermilk and sugary cinnamon and

or time, but at breakfast we are at our

cider, taste like Maine and writing letters to pen

most impressionable. How powerfully and

pals and wood-paneled station wagons. I don’t

instantaneously that first morsel of the day can

think they make them with salt water, but with

carry us off! It’s clear even driving past Willow

each bite a chilly but entirely pleasant ocean

Bake Shoppe that all of its treats inspire those

breeze playfully slaps you in the face, even if

journeys daily; it is a donut shop from a simpler

you’re munching them 500 miles inland. You

time, when people sat and had coffee and met

practically feel the sea spray and hear the gulls.

friends at donut shops. The donuts, in marvelous,

And you are happy.

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BEYOND CRONUT the

Hybrid Desserts by K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

Foodies around the world will look back on 2013 as the year of the cronut, the obsessioninspiring, black market-inducing croissantdoughnut hybrid created by New York City pastry chef Dominique Ansel. But the cronut wasn’t the first—and certainly won’t be the last—pastry remix to grace our plates. Here, a look at some more playfully innovative desserts that guarantee to satisfy your sweet tooth.

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BEYOND THE CRONUT


Croissant + Cookie

CROOKIES Two treats—perfect in their own, very different ways—come together in this high-low marriage from Clafouti Patisserie in Toronto. Is it over the top? Sure. But each Oreo-packed piece of flaky, buttery pastry is also incredibly delicious.

crookies View recipe on page 64 »

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bread pudding pancakes View recipe on page 66 Âť

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BEYOND THE CRONUT


BREAD

PUDDING

Breakfast takes a cue from a classic Southern dessert in these pancakes made with gooey bread pudding from Chicago’s Southport Grocery and Café. Serve them warm with a swirl of cinnamon butter and a drizzle of silky vanilla custard.

PANCAKES Bread Pudding

+ Pancakes

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DUFFINS Doughnut

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BEYOND THE CRONUT

+ Muffin


duffins View recipe on page 71 Âť

This scrumptious doughnut-muffin mashup, from the London-based Bea’s of Bloomsbury, combines a nutmeg-infused buttermilk batter with a raspberry jam filling. Once baked, the duffins are dipped in butter and coated with sugar.

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LEMON BUTTERMILK

PIE Pie

+ Ice Cream

Yes, this is happening. San Francisco’s Chile Pies & Ice Cream is taking two

classic desserts—homemade pie and ice cream—and blending them into smooth, creamy milkshakes studded with bits of buttery pie crust. Mix and match as you please, but we’re partial to the velvety Lemon Buttermilk combined with cool vanilla ice cream.

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BEYOND THE CRONUT

SHAKE


lemon buttermilk pie shake View recipe on page 72 Âť

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wookies View recipe on page 65 Âť

Created by the geniuses at The Iron Press in Orange County, CA, this decadent dessert is made by stuffing chocolate chip cookie dough into a waffle iron. Then, once pressed, the waffle-shaped cookie is topped with French vanilla ice cream and chocolate sauce that melts into every crevice.

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BEYOND THE CRONUT


Waffle

+ Cookie

WOOKIE

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Cake

+ Truffles

Before the cronut came the cake truffle, little bites of bliss from the kitchen of Momofuku Milk Bar. Their signature dessert has everything going for it: dark chocolate cake splashed with malted milk is rolled into balls, dipped in white chocolate and showered with malted milk crumbs.

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BEYOND THE CRONUT

MALTED CHOCOLATE CAKE TRUFFLES


chocolate malt cake truffles View recipe on page 68 Âť

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BEACH VACATION by GERALDINE CAMPBELL

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B E AC H VAC AT I O N


HN

This winter, I’ve decamped to the beach. My East Hampton home for the season is a single-story yellow cottage. It’s mostly unremarkable, save for a windowed wall of doors leading to a screened-in porch that lends the house a lightflooded hopefulness that is good for my soul. There’s a certain romance to the snowy

warmer climes. I long to trade snow-

scene here—barren boughs heavy with

covered beaches for umbrella-studded

the weight of fresh powder, deserted

expanses, dark, turbulent waters for

stretches of sand set against a rose-hued

tranquil, turquoise seascapes, and pale

morning sky—but two weeks in, I’ve

wintery skin for bronzed limbs that

begun to tire of nights spent swaddled in

smart from exposure to sun, salt, and

down, still shivering.

sand. In my mind, I am shedding my winter wardrobe of woolen socks and

The polar vortex—and Punxsutawney

oversize sweaters and bidding adieu to

Phil’s prediction of six more weeks of

root vegetables and slow braises.

arctic outbreak—has me dreaming of

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It’s true that the Caribbean has not always been synonymous with good food. Fruity cocktails and ice-cold beers, sure, but the reign of continental cuisine, chewy conch, and imported ingredients has been long and misfortunate. In keeping with island time, it’s only in the past decade that the Caribbean has really started to show its gastronomic mettle. Star chefs like Eric Ripert, Alain Ducasse, and Bobby Flay have upped the ante at posh resorts from the Bahamas to Vieques, while native toques have cut their teeth at some of the world’s best restaurants—and then returned to lend their culinary chops to traditional flavors and cooking techniques.

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B E AC H VAC AT I O N

In keeping with island time, it’s only in the past decade that the Caribbean has really started to show its gastronomic mettle.


In St. Barts, the global-meets-Caribbean fare—sashimi with green chili dressing and crunchy rice, lobster tacos, and spice-crusted snapper—at Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s On the Rocks is rivaled only by the ocean views and see-and-beseen scene. And in the U.S. Virgin Islands, Zak Pelacchio has successfully merged the Malaysian flavors of Fatty Crab with local seafood and produce.

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B E AC H VAC AT I O N


It’s the roadside shacks, beachfront BBQ joints, and fish markets where locavore dining exists in its most natural form.

Still, when I think of Caribbean food—really good Caribbean food—it’s not the temples of haute cuisines that come to mind. It’s the roadside shacks, beachfront BBQ joints, and fish markets where locavore dining exists in its most natural form. It’s Fisherman’s Restaurant, a humble cook shop in Jamaica’s Long Bay, where the cook, Wayne, serves goat curry cooked in a cauldron set over a car rim filled with coals. It’s Mr. X’s Shiggity Shack, a run-down beach bar on St. Kitt’s where you can find the island’s best lobster—and eat it at picnic tables with your feet in the sand.

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B E AC H VAC AT I O N


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On St. Martin, the shanties and parking lot grills are known as lolos, and while they all serve variations on the same theme— barbecue chicken, ribs, fried plantains, and rice and peas—Cole Bay’s Johnny B Under the Tree is worth seeking out for chef Johnny Bridgewater’s char-grilled spiny lobster. Ultimately, the pleasure of eating in the Caribbean, for me, at least, is about skipping the fuss. It’s the come-as-you-are attitude, the red and white checkered tablecloths, and the salty ocean air as much as the fresh catch, falling-of-the-bone meat, or potent rum punch. In the words of Anthony Bourdain, “Food tastes better with sand between your toes.” Looking out at the frostcovered lawn, I raise a hot toddy to that.

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B E AC H VAC AT I O N


In the words of Anthony Bourdain, “Food tastes better with sand between your toes.”

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T he

Art of Th

e

Artificial

SUMMER by

kathryn o’malley

34

THE ART OF THE ARTIFICIAL SUMMER


In an ideal world, Stephen and his crew would jet away to a beautiful tropical locale whenever a photo shoot called for a sun-streaked, gardenlike feel. But, more often than not, the reverse is much more practical—and the location must come to the studio in the form of paintings, props and just the right kind of lighting. Here’s how it’s done.

The Background Layers, layers, and more layers— that’s the key to creating a realistic backdrop. Behind the table of food sits a combination of carefully arranged real and artificial plants and, behind that, an intricately detailed painting in various shades of green. Taken all together, and put into soft focus, these layers set the stage for a highly convincing garden shot.

The Props A rustic cutting board, ice-cold beer and ceramic bowl tell you two things right away: the weather here is warm and the vibe is laid-back.

The Lighting Winter skies tend to be dull and grey, so warming up the natural window light is really important. Here, Steve uses a bright key light—streaming from the far righthand side of the scene—with just a touch of lens flare for added softness.

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Cabbage flower weather permitting

T H AT BLOOMS LIKE A

by judith mara

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C A B B AG E T H AT B L O O M S L I K E A F L OW E R


Cauliflower, like its cabbage family

could afford it, has cauliflower been

what most of us can buy now––they are

brethren of broccoli, kale, and kohlrabi,

considered trendy or particularly exciting.

grown for cold storage. It is somewhat

is a cool weather plant that is pretty

stronger tasting and may look a little dull,

much available all year. But what

It’s time for a cauliflower comeback. Its

so if I am boiling or blanching cauliflower

makes cauliflower strikingly different

cousin kale has been getting all the glory,

I faithfully soak the whole head in cool

is its springlike colors of white, yellow,

yet cauliflower is just as nutritious and

water for at least 30 minutes to reduce

orange, purple and chartreuse. Colors

certainly more flexible as far as cooking

the acidity. Then I do what the Italians

so pastel pretty they could fill an

goes. The list is a long one; cauliflower

do: add a couple teaspoons of white wine

Easter basket.

can be roasted, sautéed, steamed, boiled,

vinegar to the cooking water to make the

pureed, pickled, baked, mashed, grilled,

vegetable whiter and sweeter.

Not a lot has been written about the

blanched, fried, stewed, microwaved,

wonders of cauliflower––at least since

used as a salad ingredient, or even baked

the 1970’s when everyone in America,

into chocolate cake.

all at once, seemed to discover that you can eat it raw (with ranch or

I have an unscientific theory that there

spinach dip, of course). And not since

are two broad camps of cauliflower, winter

the Victorian era, when only the rich

and summer. Winter white varieties are

there’s a springlike look to these baseball-size heads of romanesco, purple, white and orange cauliflower.

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Cooking Caulif≈ower •

While most people call the broken-down pieces

of cauliflower “florets,” they are technically called curds. •

in water. Then add about 2 teaspoons of white wine vinegar to the cooking water.

If a recipe such as a stew, curry or gratin calls for florets, it is best to steam or blanch the whole

If cooking winter (typical white grocery store) cauliflower, soak the trimmed head for 30 minutes

Grilling or pan sautéing/roasting cauliflower

head first, cool it under running water, then cut it

steaks is a tasty vegetarian trend. Just treat them

into florets.

like a steak by rubbing olive oil, pesto, or oilbased marinade and seasonings onto them before

Prepping the whole head is simple. Cut away

putting them on the grill or in the pan.

all the green outer leaves. Cut the stem out by cutting around it in a conical shape, then place it head side down into the pot.

The colorful varieties are not as firm as the white variety, so they will not take as long to cook al dente.

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C A B B AG E T H AT B L O O M S L I K E A F L OW E R


white cauliflower can be cooked over 20 different ways, including in desserts.

White varieties are typically more compact, crisp

At better grocers and farmers’ markets, spring and summer

and firm, which are perfect for slicing to grill or to

varieties of cauliflower are slowly starting to become available

pan sauté. White cauliflower also makes a striking

depending where you live. There is a rainbow of colors and

presentation when the entire head is steamed or

sizes available, which make you wonder if each one tastes

roasted whole. Because it has a little more starch

different––the answer is yes, at least slightly. Plus, some

than the color varieties, it also makes a great

scientists have claimed that the pretty ones are also healthier

substitution for mashed potatoes.

as they are not a result of genetic engineering, but of selective breeding.

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The color of purple cauliflower is caused by the presence of the antioxidant group anthocyanins, which are also found in red cabbage and red wine. This variety does taste similar to the regular white cauliflower, but it is milder and tender. Watch out with this variety to not boil it or overcook it – the purple color will fade away and not look appetizing at all. Orange cauliflower is bred with betacarotene, giving it 25 times more vitamin A than white cauliflower lending it a sweeter flavor reminiscent of a carrot. Green cauliflower is sometimes called by the trademarked name of broccoflower. It is a cross between cauliflower and broccoli and strangely enough, it tastes like cauliflower when raw and broccoli when cooked. The most photogenic member of the cruciferous family is Romanesco cauliflower. The fractal-shaped spikes are an amazing chartreuse color, and like snowflakes, no two heads ever look the same. Many people assume that this fascinating vegetable is some sort of hybrid between cauliflower and broccoli, but it’s not – it is a species unto itself and been around since the 16 th century. There is just a short window of time left before the markets start filling up with asparagus, peas, ramps, and rhubarb, but we can swing into spring with cabbage that blooms like a flower and looks just as pretty.

overcooking purple cauliflower will cause it to lose its beautiful color.

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C A B B AG E T H AT B L O O M S L I K E A F L OW E R


romanesco cauliflower is probably the only fractal vegetable you’ll ever eat.

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Rodelio Aglibot PORTRAIT OF A

CHEF b y K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

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PORTRAIT OF A CHEF RODELIO AGLIBOT


Born in the Philippines and raised in Hawaii, chef Rodelio

Aglibot, aka “The Food Buddha,”

do you have a culinary mentor and, if so, how has that person influenced you as a chef? My parents have both been instrumental in developing my style

has opened over 40 restaurants across the

and palate. My father was a cook in the U.S. Navy and he taught

country, including Chicago’s acclaimed Earth +

kitchen. My mother is also an amazing cook. She taught me that

Ocean and the stylish hotspot Sunda. Now, he’s putting his passion for flavor and appetite for innovation toward yet another delicious project:

me at a young age how to handle a knife and get around in the to cook for someone else is a gift—sort of like an edible kiss or an “I love you.”

how would you describe your cooking philosophy?

a dim sum restaurant called Yum Cha, slated to

I draw a lot of inspiration from the Buddhist monastery, where

open early this April in Lakeshore East. We hear

of the monks known as the tenzo (which translates to “heavenly

the menu will offer an eclectic mix of traditional Cantonese dishes—like sweet and sour pork and shrimp with lobster sauce—in addition to more playful, modern twists—such as coconut-stuffed fried taro balls and crispy pumpkin fries with salted duck egg.

there is a person responsible for the cooking and nourishment monk”). The tenzo accepts food and products with gratitude and respect, nothing is ever wasted (even the water to wash rice is used to water plants) and nothing is ignored. He cooks with intention and is connected to each ingredient, and his hands—not a machine—are used to prepare every dish. 

what has been your best street food experience? Too many to share, but the one that stands out most was in Cambodia on my visit to Angkor Wat in 2006. It was dawn and 100 degrees out with humidity to match. My friends (also chefs) and I were about to start our hike through the temples but decided to

Hungry for more details? Dive into Aglibot’s interview led by our

eat first.

previously featured chef, Lars Kronmark. We were warned the evening before to carry small bills, since the kids from the village tend to ask for money or sell trinkets as their way to help their families. So, we obliged and took out 100 onedollar bills. As we approached the food stalls, we were mauled by some 30 to 40 kids asking for money. But, instead of handing out cash, we decided to feed them. We approached a street vendor, who let us take over his makeshift kitchen of propane burners, warped sauté pans and tray of seasonings. And we killed it. I made eggs scrambled with noodles and vegetables, enough to feed the whole crowd. Definitely a great day.   

where is your dream food location? Or, where would you go if you had one week to eat whatever you wanted? I’ve been fortunate to travel the world and have visited over 50 countries and counting—eating, learning and most of all living. More travel to South America is in my near future, but quite frankly, anywhere new is a dream location.

tell us about your new restaurant, Yum Cha. What was your inspiration? I’ve always loved going out for dim sum and, as a chef, have

Aglibot’s signature dessert Avocado Mousse.

been inspired many times by my experiences. So very I’m excited to bring a refreshing and “food buddha” take on dim sum and Cantonese cuisine.

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spaghetti nero ai frutti di mare View recipe on page 74 Âť

44

I N S E A S O N : S E A F O O D PA S TA


In Season

by kate bernot

April is a promise.

The cold winter winds begin to whisper that spring will come if we are patient. We wait as the ground still is covered in snow, the earth hard and dormant, and so we look to the richness of the sea. From the bounty of the ocean come the indulgent flavors that help us stave off late winter blues: lobster, clams, uni. Rich enough to satisfy but light enough to turn our palates toward spring, seafood pastas become our most elegant comfort food.

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What better way to show off what

In the kitchen, chefs prefer squid ink for

the fish market has offered fresh

its deep black color rather than sepia’s

that day—plump, bursting blue

rusty brown hue. Once the ink sac is

prawns or pristine, tender squid—

split and emptied, the ink is frozen and

than against a jet black backdrop

sold to restaurants and markets, usually

of squid ink pasta.

in one-pound increments that can be defrosted and stirred into pasta flour

Its deep, uniformly dark ribbons

along with eggs and water.

present seafood as the star of the plate. And because the ink is nearly

Finding squid ink at a market can be

flavorless, it won’t distract from the

difficult—try gourmet Italian groceries

Italian ingredients that we return to

like New York and Chicago’s Eataly—but

again and again: fragrant garlic, fresh

premade ink pastas are more easily

chopped parsley, salty anchovies and

tracked down. If you do opt for the

tangy San Marzano tomatoes.

liquid, though, remember what any

Visually stunning but willing to

your cutting board and fingers in your

play a supporting role, squid ink

pursuit of perfect pasta.

Italian chef knows: that ink will stain

pasta has long been a favorite of Italian chefs. As we wait for the colors of spring to arrive on our plates, the dark tendrils offer an unexpected intrigue. Humanity’s relationship with cephalopod ink is an ancient one. Greek and Roman civilizations used cuttlefish ink, called sepia, for writing. Leonardo da Vinci rendered many drawings of his fantastic machines in sepia, and photographers used it to tone photographs for their archives.

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I N S E A S O N : S E A F O O D PA S TA

Visually stunning but willing to play a supporting role, squid ink pasta has long been a favorite of Italian chefs.


saffron gemelli View recipe on page 75 Âť

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The seafood pasta recipes collected

These are the dishes that beg a trip to

here from top Italian restaurants in

your favorite fishmonger, where your

Chicago, Seattle and San Francisco vary

eyes scan the bushels of tight-lipped

in difficulty. Ambitious cooks may try

clams, the still-briny shrimp and the

homemade pasta, while others can begin

smooth, white calamari. The effort is

with their favorite fresh or dried pasta

returned to you in spades. As you slip

from the grocer. All recipes, though, call

the curled pasta strands into your mouth

for the most pristine seafood possible.

at the dinner table, indulging in the last of winter’s richness, you also will find spring’s beginning on your lips.

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I N S E A S O N : S E A F O O D PA S TA


All recipes, though, call for the most pristine seafood possible.

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HIGH SPIRITS

by AU DA R S H I A TOW N S E N D

According to cognac expert David Chhay, during the 19th century, the exquisite spirit was regularly consumed mixed with seltzer water. It was also a widely used spirit base for cocktails.

Today, cognac—in all its pure glory—serves

The longer the aging process, the more

as a pop-culture status symbol. In A-List

likely you’ll get to experience those rich

the time to share it,” he says. “I would share

circles, the likes of Robin Thicke and Paula

nuances of vanilla, caramel and chocolate

it with my friends, but also with anybody

Patton are regularly spotted indulging in

on your tongue.

interested in wines.”

late-night snifters at the club of the moment.

“The best way to experience cognac for me

“The best occasion for me is when you have

While he prefers to drink it neat, he will

The truly dedicated connoisseurs take their

is drinking it neat as you can fully enjoy the

collections seriously with not only more

aromas,” advises Chhay, who serves as the

or Manhattan, replacing the usual rye

expensive cognacs, but also limited-edition

prestige business ambassador for the House

whiskey. The spirit adds richer, deeper and

and rare selections such as L’Essence de

of Remy Martin. “I approach the tasting

complex flavors to the cocktails. Bartenders

Courvoisier ($3,500) and Remy Martin Louis

process with what I call ‘restrained desire.’”

at Sophie’s, the fashionable new restaurant

XIII ($3,100). They’re aged longer than the usual 20 years to 50 years required of other cognacs, and they are also encased in more dramatic packaging.

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HIGH SPIRITS: COGNAC

Chhay adds that similar to wine, cognac should be consumed when the imbiber has set aside time to really enjoy it.

occasionally order cognac in a Sazerac

in Chicago’s Saks Fifth Avenue, also prefer to use cognac in the following classic French sparkling cocktail:


french 76 Recipe on page 76 Âť

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THE

Ultimate

I NDU L G ENCE by I N A P I N K N E Y

“Chocolate symbolizes, as does no other food, luxury, comfort, sensuality, gratification, and love.” K AR L PETZKE

52

T H E U LT I M AT E I N D U L G E N C E


Chocolate. Nothing else soothes and satisfies with so available a combination of tastiness and taboo. For it FEELS forbidden. For us, chocolate is more than a flavor or a treat or a dessert. It is spiritual nourishment, a ritual communion, an almost sexual submission to the powers of the subconscious.

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brownies with caramel |

Derek Poirier, Valrhona USA Pastry Chef

View recipe on page 77 »

“Your hand and your mouth agreed many years ago that, as far as chocolate is concerned, there is no need to involve your brain.” D AV E B A R R Y

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T H E U LT I M AT E I N D U L G E N C E


The short-term reward is unparalleled. It can be a balm for the blues, a healer of heartaches, a morale booster for the melancholy baby. For patting ourselves on the back, for doing ourselves a favor, for giving ourselves a break, chocolate has no equal. The perils and punishment of chocolate indulgence are well known. But to us, the chocolate lovers, the pleasure in ounces consumed is well worth the price in ounces gained.

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valrhona dulcey mousse Leigh Omilinsky, Executive Pastry Chef, Sofitel Chicago View recipe on page 78 Âť

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T H E U L T I M A T E I N DU L G E N C E


valrhona chocolate ice cream with cacao nibs and caramel sauce Sarah Mispagel, Pastry Chef, Nightwood View recipe on page 79 »

“Don’t wreck a sublime chocolate experience by feeling guilty. Chocolate isn’t like premarital sex. It will not make you pregnant. And it always feels good.” L OR A B RODY

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tanori parfait with pickled cherries, “bread pudding” and pistachios Rebecca Mason, Pastry Chef, Fluff Bake Bar View recipe on page 80 »

“Every now and then, I ’ll run into someone who claims not to like chocolate, and while we live in a country where everyone has the right to eat what they want, I want to say for the record that I don’t trust these people, that I think something is wrong with them, and that they’re probably - and this must be said - total duds in bed.” ―ST EV E A L MO N D C A N DY F R E A K : A J O U R N E Y T H R O U G H T H E C H O C OL AT E U N D E R B E L LY OF A M E R I C A

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T H E U LT I M AT E I N D U L G E N C E


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choco macchiato By Meg Galus, Executive Pastry Chef, NoMI Kitchen

View recipe on page 82 »

It is chewable passion, edible infatuation, a love affair that we can devour. Whatever there is between us and chocolate may be sinful, but when we give in, it is such sweet surrender.

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T H E U L T I M A T E I N DU L G E N C E

“There is nothing better than a friend, unless it is a friend with chocolate.” L I N D A G R AY S O N


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HOW WE

DID IT Deconstructing a shot

from Stephen Hamilton’s portfolio by JUDITH MARA

dish

Steamed Mussels food stylist

Jackie Motooka prop stylist

Paula Walters

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HOW WE DID IT


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crookies Courtesy of Clafouti Patisserie, Toronto, Canada ingredients:

Lay out a square of croissant dough and place 1 ½ broken Oreo cookies in the center. Add a small piece of white fondant,

·· Croissant dough, cut into 3-inch squares

then fold up the corners of the dough around the cookies and

·· Double Stuff Oreos

fondant. Press together to seal. Place in dough proofer for about

·· Fondant

30 minutes, then place half an Oreo on top. Spread the top of

·· Egg wash

the croissant with a bit of egg wash and sprinkle with sugar,

·· Brown sugar

then bake at 375 degrees for 15 minutes.

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RECIPE INDEX


wookies Courtesy of The Iron Press in Costa Mesa, CA serves 8

ingredients: ·· 2¼ cups all-purpose flour ·· 1 teaspoon baking soda ·· 1¼ teaspoons salt ·· 1 cup (2 sticks) butter, softened ·· 3/4 cup granulated sugar ·· 3/4 cup packed brown sugar ·· 1¼ teaspoons vanilla extract ·· 2 large eggs ·· 1 bar Hershey’s milk chocolate, chopped

Put flour, baking soda and salt in small

Once iron has hit its highest possible

bowl. Beat butter, granulated sugar,

temperature, open it up and drop in a

brown sugar and vanilla extract in large

cookie dough ball, centered on the iron.

mixer bowl until creamy. Add eggs,

You don’t need to fully close the iron,

one at a time, beating well after each

but you should press it down firmly.

addition. Gradually beat in flour mixture.

You will be able to smell when wookies

Stir in chopped Hershey’s chocolate bar.

are ready and when they are over-done.

Use a large ice-cream scoop to mold 8-10

(When the fresh cookie smell is in

balls of dough; refrigerate dough for

the air=good, while chocolate burning

15-20 minutes. Keep refrigerated until

smell=bad). Cook time will range from

ready for waffle iron. When you’re ready

45 seconds to a 1½ minutes. You want

to make the wookies, heat your waffle

to remove when the cookie is still soft,

iron to the highest possible temperature

using a little shake of the iron while

(home irons will very). If you are working

tilting it at a 90-degree angle. Add a

with a lower-temp iron you may want to

scoop of fresh vanilla bean ice cream

do a quick spray of butter-flavored Pam.

on top while freshly off the iron to shock

If your iron is newer and has a high-

it. Drizzle melted chocolate for garnish

temp rate, nothing else will be needed.

and enjoy.

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65


bread pudding pancakes with vanilla anglaise sauce and cinnamon sugar butter Courtesy of Southport Grocery and CafĂŠ, Chicago, IL

serves 6

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RECIPE INDEX


ingredients :

Place bread in a large bowl. Add milk. Let bread soak for about 10 minutes until softened. While bread is soaking, mix together in a

·· 14 slices of firm white bread, cut into

small bowl the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Add flour mixture

1 inch squares

to the bread and gently fold until just about half incorporated. Add

·· 2 ½ cups milk

eggs and vegetable oil. Mix gently.

·· 3 eggs, beaten ·· 1 teaspoon vegetable oil

Melt butter in skillet. Drop batter in 1/3-cup-fulls. Cook 3–4 minutes

·· 1 ¼ cups flour

on each side over medium heat. Pancakes will have a moist, bread

·· 3 tablespoons sugar

pudding-like inside.

·· 1 tablespoon baking powder ·· 1 teaspoon salt

Serve pancakes topped with cinnamon sugar butter with a ramekin

·· 2 tablespoons butter

of vanilla custard sauce on the side.

ingredients for cinnamon sugar butter:

to make cinnamon sugar butter:

·· 1/2 pound unsalted butter, cold

Melt 1/4 pound of butter in a small saucepan; add salt,

·· 1/4 teaspoon salt

cinnamon and sugar. Cook until the sugar is dissolved.  Pour

·· 2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

into mixing bowl and let come to room temperature. Add

·· 2 tablespoons granulated sugar

remaining 1/4 pound of cold butter. Whip with hand mixer until creamy and fluffy.

ingredients for vanilla anglaise sauce:

to make vanilla anglaise sauce:

·· 1 pint heavy cream

Put heavy cream in a sauce pan. Add the vanilla bean pod

·· 1 vanilla bean, cut in half lengthwise and seeds scraped out

and seeds. Bring to a simmer. Add sugar to egg yolks and

·· 4 egg yolks, whisked

whisk until all there is no clumps. Add ¼ cup of warm heavy

·· 1/4 cup granulated sugar

cream mixture to egg yolk mixture and whisk immediately; this is called ‘tempering’. Add the egg yolk mixture to the warm heavy cream. Simmer while mixing with wooden spoon until thickened and coats the back of the spoon. Chill over an ice bath.

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ingredients: ·· 3 cups Chocolate Cake scraps ·· 2 to 4 tablespoons Malted Chocolate Milk ·· 1/2 recipe for Chocolate Malt Crumbs, finely ground in a food processor ·· 3 ounces white chocolate, melted

the basics The base: Cake scraps, the fresher the better. We stick to one flavor of cake scraps at a time. The binder: This can be the additional milky soak from a cake assembly or a moist filling, curd, or sauce. Depending on the moistness of the cake base, we can use more or less binder. We have recipes, but there is always a range for the binder. The shell: To seal in freshness and flavor, we roll each truffle in melted chocolate. The melted chocolate also serves to glue the crunchy coat onto the outside. We use Valrhona 72% dark chocolate or white chocolate, depending on the flavor of the cake truffle.

chocolate malt cake truffle

The crunchy coat: Finely ground crumbs or crunches work best, but we’ve even been known to use toasted yellow cake crumbs.

Courtesy of Momofuku Milk Bar in New York, NY makes 12-15 (1 oz.) balls

Combine the chocolate cake scraps and 2 tablespoons malted

Put 3 or 4 chocolate-covered balls at a time into the bowl of

chocolate milk in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with

chocolate malt crumbs.

the paddle attachment and paddle until moist enough to knead into a ball. lf not moist enough to do so, add up to 2

Immediately toss them with the crumbs to coat, before the

tablespoons more malted chocolate milk and knead it in.

chocolate shell sets and no longer acts as a glue (if this happens, just coat the ball in another thin layer of melted

Using a soup spoon, portion out 12 even balls, each half the

chocolate).

size of a ping-pong ball. Roll each one between the palms of your hands to shape and smooth it into a round sphere.

Refrigerate for at least 5 minutes to fully set the chocolate shells before eating or storing. In an airtight container, the

Put the ground chocolate malt crumbs in a medium bowl.

truffles will keep for up to 1 week in the fridge.

With latex gloves on, put 2 tablespoons of the white

Steps 3 and 4 are easiest when you have a buddy: one person

chocolate in the palm of your hand and roll each ball

coats the cake balls in melted chocolate; the other tosses

between your palms, coating in a thin layer of melted

them in the milk crumbs.

chocolate; add more chocolate as needed.

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RECIPE INDEX


ingredients for chocolate cake: ·· 8 tablespoons (1 stick) butter, at room temperature

·· 1 ¼ cups cake flour

·· 1½ cups sugar

·· 1/2 cup cocoa powder, preferably Valrhona

·· 3 eggs

·· 1½ teaspoons baking powder

·· 1/2 cup buttermilk

·· 1½ teaspoons kosher salt

·· 1/4 cup grapeseed oil

·· Pam or other nonstick cooking spray (optional)

·· 1 teaspoon vanilla extract ·· 3 tablespoons Fudge Sauce

makes 1 quarter sheet pan cake to make chocolate cake:

With a spatula, stir the flour, cocoa powder, baking powder, and salt together in a medium bowl. On very low speed, add the dry ingredients and mix for 45 to 60 seconds, just until

Heat the oven to 350 degrees.

your batter comes together. Scrape down the sides of the Combine the butter and sugar in the bowl of a stand mixer

bowl, and mix on low speed for another 45 seconds to ensure

fitted with the paddle attachment and cream together on

that any little lumps of cocoa powder and cake flour are

medium-high for 2 to 3 minutes. Scrape down the sides of

incorporated.

the bowl, add the eggs, and mix on medium-high for 2 to 3 minutes. Scrape down the sides of the bowl once more.

Pam-spray a quarter sheet pan and line it with parchment, or just line the pan with a Silpat. Using a spatula, spread

On low speed, stream in the buttermilk, oil, and vanilla.

the cake batter in an even layer in the pan. Bake for 30 to 35

Increase the miser speed to medium-high and paddle for 3

minutes. The cake will rise and puff, doubling in size, but wiII

to 5 minutes, until the mixture is practically white, twice

remain slightly buttery and dense. At 30 minutes, gently poke

the size of your original fluffy butter-and-sugar mixture, and

the edge of the cake with your finger; the cake should bounce

completely homogenous. There should be no streaks of fat or

back slightly and the center should no longer be jiggly. Leave

liquid. Stop the mixer and scrape down the sides of the bowl.

the cake in the oven for an extra 3 to 5 minutes if it doesn’t pass these tests.

Add the fudge sauce and mix on low speed until fully incorporated. Scrape down the sides of the bowl.

Take the cake out of the oven and cool on a wire rack or, in a pinch, in the fridge or freezer (don’t worry, it’s not cheating). The cooled cake can be stored in the fridge, wrapped in plastic wrap, for up to 5 days.

ingredients for malted chocolate milk:

to make malted chocolate milk:

·· 1¼ cups milk

Combine milk and Ovaltine powder and stir until mixed

·· 4 ½ tablespoons Ovaltine

thoroughly. in the fridge for up to 2 weeks; do not freeze. In a pinch, substitute 2 tablespoons corn syrup for the glucose.

makes about 1½ cups

continued on next page... RECIPE INDEX

69


ingredients for fudge sauce:

to make fudge sauce:

·· 1 ounce 72% chocolate, chopped

Combine the chocolate, cocoa powder, and salt in a medium

·· 2 tablespoons cocoa powder,

bowl. Combine the glucose, sugar, and heavy cream in a

preferably Valrhona

heavy-bottomed saucepan and stir intermittently while

·· 1/8 teaspoon Kosher salt

bringing to a boil over high heat. The moment it boils, pour it

·· 1/4 cup glucose

into the bowl holding the chocolate. Let sit for 1 full minute.

·· 2 tablespoons sugar

Slowly, slowly begin to whisk the mixture. Then continue,

·· 1/4 cup heavy cream

increasing the vigor of your whisking every 30 seconds, until the mixture is glossy and silky-smooth. This will take 2 to 4 minutes, depending on your speed and strength. You can

makes about ½ cup

use the sauce at this point or store it in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 2 weeks; do not freeze. In a pinch, substitute 2 tablespoons corn syrup for the glucose.

ingredients for chocolate malt crumbs:

to make chocolate malt crumbs: Heat the oven to 250 degrees.

·· 1/2 cup milk powder ·· 1/4 cup flour

Combine the 1/2 cup milk powder, the flour, cornstarch,

·· 2 tablespoons cornstarch

sugar, Ovaltine, and salt in a medium bowl. Toss with your

·· 2 tablespoons sugar

hands to mix. Add the melted butter and toss, using a

·· 2½ tablespoons Ovaltine

spatula, until the mixture starts to come together and form

·· 1/2 teaspoon Kosher salt

small clusters.

·· 4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) butter, melted

Spread the clusters on a parchment-or Silpat-lined sheet pan

·· 1/4 cup milk powder

and bake for 20 minutes. The crumbs should be sandy at that

·· 3 ounces white chocolate, melted

point, and your kitchen should smell like buttery heaven. Cool the crumbs completely.

makes about 2¼ cups

Crumble any chocolate malt crumb clusters that are larger than inch in diameter, and put the crumbs in a medium bowl. Add the 1/4 cup milk powder and toss together until it is evenly distributed throughout the mixture. Pour the white chocolate over the crumbs and toss until your clusters are enrobed. Then continue tossing them every 5 minutes until the white chocolate hardens and the clusters are no longer sticky. The crumbs will keep in an airtight container in the fridge or freezer for up to 1 month.glucose.

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RECIPE INDEX


ingredients: ·· 3 cups all-purpose flour ·· 4 teaspoons baking powder ·· 1/2 teaspoon salt ·· 1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg ·· 1 2/3 cups superfine sugar ·· 2 eggs, lightly beaten ·· 1½ cups buttermilk ·· 2 teaspoons vanilla extract ·· 2/3 cup sunflower oil

coating & dipping: ·· 2 sticks unsalted butter, melted ·· 1½ cups superfine sugar ·· About ½ jar of raspberry jam ·· 2 x 12-hole muffin trays, well greased piping bag fitted with a plain nozzle/tip

Preheat the oven to 365 degrees. Put all the dry ingredients in a bowl. Add all the wet ingredients and stir until just combined. Don’t overmix. Spoon the mixture

duffins Courtesy of Bea’s of Bloomsbury, Bloomsbury, UK makes about 22

into the muffin tray holes, filling them three quarters of the way up. Bake in the preheated oven for 22–30 minutes. A wooden skewer inserted in te middle should come out dry and crumbly. While the muffins are baking, put the melted butter and sugar in their own shallow bowls and set aside. Remove the muffin trays from the oven and tip the muffins out. Immediately dip the muffins in the melted butter, then roll in the sugar to liberally and evenly coat. Fill the prepared piping bag with jam. Push the nozzle/tip through the top (or bottom if you want it to look neater) of the doughnut, up to midway. Pipe about 1 tablespoon of jam inside each doughnut and serve immediately. Apple Cinnamon: Add 1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom to the batter, and 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon to the sugar used for coating. Fill with apple jam or compote. Coconut: Replace the nutmeg with vanilla extract and fill with coconut pastry cream.

RECIPE INDEX

71


lemon butter pie shake Courtesy Of Chile Pies & Ice Cream, San Francisco, CA serves 8-12

to make milkshakes: Place 4 scoops of vanilla ice cream, 1 slice of Lemon Buttermilk Pie and 1 tablespoon whole milk in a blender. Blend until mostly smooth with some bits of pie remaining. Pour into pint glass and top with whipped cream.

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RECIPE INDEX


ingredients for butter pie crust:

to make butter pie crust:

·· 3 ½ cups all-purpose floured

Place flour in salt in a large bowl. Place half of flour/salt

·· 1/4 teaspoon salt

mixture and half of the cubed butter into a food processor. Then

·· 1/2 pound Straus or other good quality butter, cut into 1” cubes

top with the remaining flour/salt and butter. Pulse/process until

·· 1 cup + 3 tablespoons cold water

small, pebble-sized pieces of butter remain. Dump into large bowl and use pastry cutter to add in cold water, one tablespoon at a time, until the dough just begins to clump. You may or may not need the full 3 tablespoons of water. Gather dough into ball; shape into flattened 4-inch round on lightly floured board. Using a floured rolling pin, roll the dough into a circle 2 inches larger than the base of your pie pan. Roll from the center outward in light strokes. As you roll out the pastry, periodically rotate it a quarter of a turn. As needed, lightly flour the board so that the pastry does not stick. Occasionally, flip the pastry. When completed, gently fold the pastry into quarters (fold the pastry in half and then in half again); place the folded pastry into the pie plate with the point in the very center and then unfold it in the pan. Trim overhanging edge of pastry 1 inch from rim of pan. Set aside in refrigerator while you make the pie filling.

ingredients for lemon buttermilk pie filling:

to make lemon buttermilk pie filling:

·· 1 cup sugar

Bring all ingredients to room temperature. In a large bowl,

·· 1/4 cup all-purpose flour

mix together sugar, flour and cornstarch. Add the vanilla and

·· 1 tablespoon corn starch

beaten eggs. Whisk. Add buttermilk and lemon juice and whisk

·· 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

together. Add warm melted butter, whisking again until filling

·· 4 large eggs, lightly beaten

is smooth.

·· 1 cup buttermilk ·· 1/2 cup fresh lemon juice

to make lemon buttermilk pie:

·· 1/2 cup melted butter Pour filling into unbaked Butter Crust. Top with Candied Lemon Slices (6 per pie) or fresh fruit (blueberries or raspberries). Bake at 375 degrees for 10 minutes, then reduce to 300 for 38–40 more minutes.

to make candied lemon slices: Bring 2 cups sugar and 2 cups water to a boil. Cut 6 lemons into slices and simmer on in the syrup on low heat until translucent.

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73


spaghetti nero ai frutti di mare

ingredients:

by Tony Priolo, Picoolo Sogno

·· 2 ounces cleaned calamari, sliced into rings ·· 3 Manila clams in the shell, washed ·· 3 Prince Edward Island mussels, washed ·· 5 shrimp, peeled and deveined

serves 1

·· 1 ounce dry white wine ·· 2 ounces shellfish stock ·· 1/2 ounce brandy

In a small pan over low heat, mix the breadcrumbs with olive oil and toast, frequently stirring, until golden brown. Remove from heat and season with a pinch of salt and lemon zest. Bring a large pot of water to a boil and season with salt. Stir in the pasta and cook until al dente, 3 to 4 minutes. In the last minute of the cooking time, add the raw broccoli florets. Drain, reserving about 1/2 cup of cooking water. Return the pasta to the pot and add spoonfuls of the braised squid until the pasta is evenly coated.

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RECIPE INDEX

·· 3 ounces Mt. Vesuvius cherry tomatoes ·· 1½ ounces extra virgin olive oil ·· 1 clove garlic, sliced ·· 1 tablespoon butter, unsalted ·· pinch of Italian parsley, washed and chopped ·· sea salt and black pepper to taste ·· 4 ounces fresh black spaghetti, cooked for 1 minute in boiling salted water


ingredients: ·· 1 Ounce pancetta, sliced into 1/2” x 1/2” x 1/8” pieces ·· 1/2 Ounce fennel, sliced wafer thin ·· 1/2 Ounce knob onion, whites sliced wafer thin ·· 1 Ounce squid tentacles ·· 1 Ounce squid tubes, sliced into 1/2” x 2” strips (squid marinated in thyme, garlic, chile and extra virgin olive oil) ·· 1 Teaspoon garlic, minced ·· 1 Pinch chili flakes ·· 4 Leaves rosemary ·· 2 Tablespoons tomato conserva (recipe to follow) ·· 3 Ounces vermouth ·· 6 Ounces fish fumet ·· 2 Tablespoons butter ·· 1 Teaspoon aged balsamic ·· Lemon to taste ·· Salt and pepper to taste ·· 90 Grams gemelli noodle ·· Small handful of toasted breadcrumbs ·· Extra virgin olive oil to finish

saffron gemelli

ingredients for tomato conserva:

by Paul Kahan and Erling Wu-Bower, Nico Osteria

·· 32 ounces good quality (or homemade) tomato sauce ·· 4 ounces extra virgin olive oil

Start pancetta in a cold stainless steel sauté pan with a bit of olive oil. Heat on high, being sure not to stir until pancetta has created a fond on the bottom of the pan. Flip the pancetta once, adding squid, fennel and onions. Create a second fond with the squid and vegetables, season with salt, pepper and chili flake. Add garlic and toss once to toast lightly then add rosemary and tomato conserva. With the back of a wooden spoon, mash the tomato into the mixture. Allow the tomato sauce to caramelize further, it should be a deep brick color. Deglaze with vermouth and simmer until the alcohol has burned off. Drop

to make tomato conserva: Heat olive oil in a saucepot until smoking hot. Carefully dump tomato sauce into hot oil so as to “fry” it. Reduce to a simmer, stirring constantly. Continue to slowly cook the tomato sauce for 3-4 hours until reduced by 3/4 and has turned brick red, taking care not to let the bottom burn.

pasta into a large pot of boiling salted water. Add fish fumet and butter to the pan and reduce until emulsified. When pasta is perfectly al dente, strain from cooking liquid and dump into sauce. Add a little bit of pasta cooking water to the pan and reduce on high heat. Toss the pasta at least 25-30 times to release the starch and properly emulsify the sauce. Once sauce is at the correct consistency, finish with aged balsamic and adjust seasoning with salt and chili, and acidity with lemon. Spoon pasta onto a plate and top with breadcrumbs, drizzle a bit of good olive oil to finish the plate.

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french 76 Courtesy of Sophie’s at Saks Fifth Avenue

ingredients: ·· 1 ½ ounces Le Reviseur Cognac ·· 1/4 ounce B.G. Reynolds’ Falernum ·· 1/4 ounce lemon juice ·· Champagne Shake all ingredients in shaker. Pour into champagne flute; top with champagne. Garnish with lemon twist.

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brownies with caramel

ingredients for caramel:

to make caramel:

by Derek Poirier, Valrhona USA Pastry Chef

·· 13 ½ ounces heavy cream

Heat the cream and infuse it with the vanilla

·· 2 vanilla beans, split down the middle

and cinnamon sticks. Warm the glucose,

·· 3 cinnamon sticks

slowly adding the sugar and cooking until

·· 1 ½ ounces glucose (or corn syrup)

you have a light caramel. Remove from heat

·· 13 ¼ ounces sugar

and deglaze with butter. Slowly whisk in

·· 3 ½ ounces good quality salted butter

the infused cream, then strain. Cook until

makes about 12-16, depending on size

caramel reaches 320 degrees.

ingredients for brownies:

to make brownies:

·· 10 ¼ ounces pecans chopped

Chop the pecans and Ivoire chocolate

Mix in the flour and cocoa powder with a

·· 8 ¼ ounces Valrhona Ivoire 35%

together and set aside. Whisk the eggs

spatula, then add the chopped pecans and

chocolate, chopped

with the brown sugar. Meanwhile, melt the

lvoire chocolate. Pour into a half sheet pan

·· 7 eggs

butter and the Nyagbo chocolate together

greased and lined with parchment paper

·· 14 ½ ounces brown sugar

in a double boiler. Once it’s melted and

and bake at 350 degrees for approximately

·· 13 ½ ounces butter

uniform, add it to the egg mixture and

17 minutes.

·· 6 ¼ ounces Valrhona Nyangbo

whisk together.

68% chocolate ·· 3 ¼ ounces flour ·· 1 ounce Valrhona cacao powder

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77


valrhona dulcey mousse by Leigh Omilinsky, Executive Pastry Chef, Sofitel Chicago

ingredients:

Bring the milk, cream and half the sugar to a boil. In a separate bowl, whisk the egg yolks, salt, and other half of sugar together.

·· 9 ounces whole milk

Pour the hot milk mixture over the eggs, whisking constantly to

·· 9 ounces heavy cream

temper them. Pour back into the pot and return to heat, cooking

·· 1/2 ounce sugar

to 176 degrees.

·· 11-12 egg yolks ·· 1/4 ounce salt

Strain mixture over the chocolate and whisk to combine. Scale

·· 35¼ ounces Valrhona Dulcey 32% blonde chocolate

61 ounces of this base into a bowl. Whisk in the bloomed gelatin

·· 1 ½ packages gelatin powder, bloomed

and add to the scaled chocolate base. Fold in the whipped

·· 31 2/3 ounces heavy cream, whipped

cream 1/3 at a time. Add the Whiskey last. Chill until set and

·· 2 ounces Whiskey

serve in glasses.

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ingredients for ice cream: ·· 2.2 quarts whole milk ·· 3 ½ ounces sugar ·· 3 ½ ounces Trimoline ·· 1/3 ounce stabilizer ·· 3¼ ounces milk powder ·· 1/3 ounce salt ·· 12-13 egg yolks ·· 35.2 ounces Valrhona Bahibe 46% chocolate, melted

to make ice cream: Warm the milk to 100 degrees. Stir in the sugar, Trimoline, and stabilizer. At 158 degrees, add the milk powder and salt. When the mixture reaches 186 degrees, whisk in the egg yolks and pour over the chocolate. Mix it with a hand mixer until completely blended. Let sit in the refrigerator overnight. Process in your ice cream machine according to manufacturer instructions.

ingredients for caramel sauce: ·· 24 ounces glucose (or corn syrup)

valrhona chocolate ice cream with cacao nibs and caramel sauce by Sarah Mispagel, Pastry Chef, Nightwood

·· 35 ounces sugar ·· 5½ ounces butter ·· 36 ½ ounces cream

to make caramel sauce: Boil the glucose then slowly add the sugar. Cook to 350 degrees until you reach the desired color of caramel. Take it off of the heat, whisk in the butter, and then slowly add the cream while whisking constantly. Heat it back up to 248 degrees. Reserve.

to serve:

ingredients for candied cocoa nibs:

Place the ice cream in a dish with caramel sauce and garnish

·· 3 ½ ounces sugar

with candied cacao nibs.

·· 2¼ ounces water ·· 2 cups Valrhona cacao nibs

to make candied cocoa nibs: Boil the water and sugar together. Add the cacao nibs and stir until very thick. Transfer to a Silpat or aluminum foil to cool.

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79


tainori parfait with pickled cherries, “bread pudding” and pistachios by Rebecca Mason, Pastry Chef, Fluff Bake Bar

to assemble: Spread the brioche “Bread Pudding” on a plate. Place a slice of the Tainori Parfait on the plate and top with the Pistachio Crumble. Scatter cherries around the plate.

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RECIPE INDEX


ingredients for tainori parfait:

to make tainori parfait:

·· 3 egg whites

Make a Swiss meringue by cooking the egg whites and sugar in a

·· 3½ ounces sugar

double boiler. When the sugar dissolves completely, pour into a

·· 7 ounces heavy cream

stand mixer with the whisk attachment and whip to stiff peaks.

·· 5½ ounces Valrhona Tainori 64% chocolate, melted

Remove from mixing bowl, then pour in the heavy cream, whipping to stiff peaks on medium speed. Fold the melted chocolate into the Swiss meringue, then fold in whipped cream. Pipe the mixture into fleximolds, ring molds or even a spring form pan and freeze. When they are completely frozen, unmold and return to freezer until you are ready to use.

ingredients for “bread pudding”:

to make “bread pudding”:

·· 19 ounces stale or toasted brioche bread

Break up the brioche and put into a food processor. Scald cream with

·· 19 ounces heavy cream

sugar and salt; pour it over the brioche and let sit about 4 minutes.

·· 3 ½ ounces sugar (plus or minus, depending on taste)

Process the brioche in food processor until smooth. Place the puree

·· A few pinches Kosher salt to taste

into quart containers and set aside.

ingredients for pickled cherries:

to make pickled cherries:

·· 3/4 cup sugar

Bring all but the cherries to a boil, then remove from heat and let cool

·· 2 ¼ cups white wine vinegar

completely. Pour over cherries and let sit overnight. Cut cherries in

·· 2 cloves

half to plate.

·· 4 peppercorns ·· 1 cup water ·· 1 pound pitted cherries

ingredients for pistachio crumble:

to make pistachio crumble:

·· 2 ¾ ounces pistachios, roughly chopped and toasted

Mix everything together by hand. Reserve in quart container.

·· 5 ½ ounces pistachio paste ·· 2 ½ ounces feuilletine or corn flakes ·· 1¼ ounces powdered sugar ·· Kosher salt to taste

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ingredients for coffee cream: ·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ··

0.35 ounces crushed coffee beans 24 ounces heavy cream 0.35 ounces instant espresso powder 1 ½ ounces corn syrup 12 ¼ ounces sugar 4 ½ ounces butter

·· 15 ounces Valrhona Jivara Lactee milk chocolate, melted Bring the coffee beans, cream, and espresso to a boil. Cover and let infuse. Meanwhile, melt the corn syrup in a pot. Slowly scatter in the sugar. Melt the two together and cooking until you reach a dark caramel. Working quickly, remove from the heat and whisk in the butter until smooth. Whisk in the infused cream and bring to a boil. Strain into melted chocolate and mix with a whisk or hand blender. Let it set overnight in the refrigerator. Whip it lightly on a low speed until it lightens in color and and is a bit fluffy.

ingredients for nibby shortbread crunch:

choco macchiato By Meg Galus, Executive Pastry Chef, NoMI Kitchen serves 6

·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ··

4 ½ ounces powdered sugar 4 ½ ounces butter 2 ounces graham flour 1 egg pinch of salt 8 ¼ ounces cake flour

ingredients for whipped panna cotta:

Beat the butter, sugar, and graham flour in a stand mixer until combined. Add the egg slowly while mixing. Slowly add the salt and flour until combined. Spread it on a sheet pan lined with parchment or silpat and bake at 300 degrees until golden. Let cool. Crush in a food processor until you get crumbs.

·· 35 ounces heavy cream

mix the crumbs with:

·· 1 ounce crushed coffee beans ·· 1/3 of a lemon, zested into strips ·· 1 vanilla bean ·· 0.35 ounces (approx. 1 ½ envelopes) powdered gelatin

Bring the cream, coffee, zest, vanilla and sugar to a boil. Take it off the heat, cover and let it steep for about 20 minutes. After 20 minutes, whisk in the gelatin. Strain the mixture into a container and let it set overnight in the fridge. The next day, whip it in a stand mixer until stiff peaks form. Reserve.

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·· ·· ·· ·· ··

2 ounce Valrhona cacao nibs 2 ½ ounces Feuilletine (or corn flakes) 7 ounces Valrhona Jivara Lactee milk chocolate, melted 2 ounces Valrhona Caraibe Milk Chocolate, melted 1/4 ounce instant espresso powder

Combine all ingredients in a bowl and mix well. Spread out on a Silpat or aluminum foil and separate into chunks. Let it set.

to assemble: Serve in a small glasses or a trifle dish. Sprinkle some Nibby crunch on the bottom. Fill the glass 1/3 of the way with Coffee Cream. Top with some Nibby Crunch. Pipe or spoon some Whipped Panna Cotta on top. Finish it with some more Nibby Crunch.


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Who's Hungry? Magazine | Spring 2014 | No 10  

Blending the worlds of food and photography, the magazine features travel stories and recipes from top food writers, as well as styling tips...

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