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FEATURES

6

Stylist’s Corner

12

5 Great Pizzas

14

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CONTENTS

Portrait of a Chef

16

32

Mustard Valley: Photo Essay

Weather Permitting


CONTENTS

36

In Season: Photo Essay

4

Contributors

5

Letter from Steve

6

Stylist’s Corner

8

Out of the Bag

10

Art of the Pizza Pull

12

5 Great Pizzas

14

Portrait of a Chef

16

Mustard Valley

30

High Spirits

32

Weather Permitting

36

In Season

48

How We Did It

CONTENTS

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contributors

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judith mara | Editor and Writer

ian law | Design

Deirdre O’Shea | Production Director

Judith has worked with Stephen for the last six

Ian designed every aspect of Who’s Hungry?™

If you have worked with Stephen Hamilton, you’ve

years and helped to lead the editorial concept

magazine with meticulous attention to detail and

worked with Deirdre. Drawing on 15 years of expe-

and execution of Who’s Hungry?™ magazine. An

typography, and helped turn static images into an

rience in managing photography studios, Deirdre

award-winning former creative director for major

interactive experience. His award-winning design

has a hand in nearly every aspect of Stephen’s

ad agencies such as Leo Burnett and J. Walter

work has been featured in the pages of Print, Cre-

business. She’s been instrumental in organizing

Thompson, Judith penned “Weather Permitting”

ativity, How, PDN and Graphic Design USA.

the magazine’s shoots, sourcing ingredients, and

and literally hand wrote “How We Did It.”

janet rausa fuller |

Writer

always keeping production on schedule.

kate bernot |

Editor and Writer

steve dolinsky | Writer

Janet is the former food editor of the Chicago Sun-

A freelance food writer and editor, Kate Bernot has

Since 2003, Steve has been the recognizable face

Times. A two-time James Beard Award finalist, she

contributed to NBC’s The Feast, Chicago Sun-Times,

of ABC 7’s “The Hungry Hound,” filing reports on

created the paper’s food news beat and won a Peter

Conde Nast Traveler, and Serious Eats Chicago, and

the best eats in Chicago. He has also appeared as a

Lisagor Award for consumer reporting for her story

was just named the dining critic for RedEye and

guest judge on “Iron Chef America,” as a contribu-

on the city’s changing restaurant scene. For Who’s

the editor of BlackboardEats Chicago. She helped

tor to “Unique Eats,” and serves as one of the Acad-

Hungry?™ magazine, she reported on the elusive

develop the editorial vision of Who’s Hungry?™

emy Judges for “The World’s 50 Best Restaurants.”

world of mushrooms, and tested the recipes that

magazine, and wrote about mustard plants, liquid

For Who’s Hungry?™ magazine, Steve tracked

accompany the story. When she’s not cooking for

nitrogen cocktails, and chef Sarah Grueneberg’s

down the greatest pizza pies worth traveling the

her two daughters and husband, she’s snacking.

pasta for this inaugural issue.

country for.

a special thanks to : Paula Walters, Tom Hamilton, Andrew Burkle, Raymond Barrera, Josephine Orba, Kim Hartman, Micah Melton, Craig Schoettler, Ruth Siegel and CeCe Campise 4

CONTRIBUTORS


LETTER FROM STEVE Culinary culture is always present in my studio, even when the cameras are put away. From discussions around the lunch table to visits from chefs and farmers, I’m always curious about the stories other people tell through food. Each story in this magazine has been a personal opportunity for me. It’s a chance to take new, beautiful photography, and a chance to learn about people and places that fascinate me, from mustard plants in Napa Valley to mushroom foragers in Chicago. Of course, there’s a hefty dose of fun in here, too. You’ll find behind-the-scenes looks at how our stylists make magic in the studio, as well as recipes and

This magazine has been a dream of mine for a long time. Its

restaurant recommendations from top

purpose is to bridge the worlds of food and photography, to

national food writers.

blend my passion for both and share that enthusiasm with a

The beauty of the digital platform is that

wider audience. Together, the images and stories represent my

it allows me to keep this content fresh.

reflections on a food-focused life.

The stories in this magazine reflect the bounty of spring, with its promise of new growth and adventure. It’s a heady, intoxicating season, and an appropriate theme for our first issue. I hope this magazine is as much a joy for you to read as it has been for me to conceive. Flip the pages, dive into a story, and ask yourself, “Who’s Hungry?™” STEPHEN HAMILTON

LETTER FROM STEVE

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CONTRIBUTORS’ PORTRAITS BY ANDREW BURKLE

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S T E V E ’ S P O R T R A I T B Y AV E R Y H O U S E

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STYLIST’S CORNER: MOSS AS MUSE


STYLIST’S

CORNER Moss as Muse

Prop styling brings a table to life, setting the mood for the meal ahead. Paula Walters, a professional stylist for more than 20 years, was given only one cue for this place setting: spring moss. To capture the rich and varied green tones of moss without using the actual plant, Paula chose cruciferous vegetables that have similar visual appeal. The vintage and Asian props evoke a Zen garden, where moss commonly grows in quiet, shaded spaces. To recreate this for your table, group similarly colored bowls of varying heights and diameters, fill them with water and a base of clean stones, then add rich, cruciferous vegetables. The beauty is in the fresh simplicity.

paula walters

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S T Y L E D B Y P A U L A WA L T E R S

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2 K-Y LIQUID This gel, normally stashed away in nightstand drawers, can be used to bind food crumbs together.

1 OIL–ABSORBING SHEETS These cosmetic blotters are normally used for touching up oily skin, but they can also help reduce shine on moist meats or cheeses.

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OUT OF THE BAG


POLIGRIP DENTURE CREAM If it’s strong enough to hold Grandpa’s teeth in place, it’s also strong enough to stick ingredients together when stacked on a sandwich.

3

OUT BAG of

the

Stephen Hamilton keeps his subjects as natural as possible, using real food and fresh ingredients. But even the best dishes may still need some enhancements to make them shine on camera, which is why food stylists have entire kits of jars, bottles, and tools to help them bring out the ingredients’ beauty. Here, a few of the curious surprises that might spill from stylists’ bags…not from their medicine cabinets.

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THE ART of the

PIZ ZA PULL by K AT E B E R N O T

The best food photography evokes a visceral reaction. All five senses are engaged, creating a nearly palpable desire to dig in to the dish. When photographing a pizza, it’s the pull of melted, gooey cheese that makes our mouths water. But achieving this is no easy task; it requires a knowledgeable stylist, a complex rig set-up, and some magic from the photographer. Click on the buttons to the right for a peek at our methods.

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THE ART OF THE PIZZA PULL


» » THE PULL It’s not the model’s hand that holds the slice in place.

THE CRUST Baking preparation and technique are the keys to the pizza’s blistered, crusty edges.

»

THE CHEESE Precision styling makes the cheese look stretched and piping hot.

THE STEAM It takes a bit of machinery to create this fresh-from-the-oven look.

»

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GREAT

1. PIZZERIA BIANCO, PHOENIX, AZ

2. GREAT LAKE, CHICAGO, IL

Obsession isn’t something you want in

Nick Lessins looks up to Chris Bianco, so

ex-girlfriends or IRS agents, but when it

what does that tell you? For starters, he

comes to the guy making your pizza, all

makes every pie himself, always working

bets are off. Every night (after you’ve waited

alone, and his long-fermented dough is

in line or had a few drinks in the college

the stuff of dreams – it results in a crust –

campus-like house next door), you’ll see

and a cornicione, or lip—with a beautiful

Chris Bianco all by his lonesome behind the

structure and a one-of-a-kind tang that has

counter, just a few feet from the mouth of

just the right amount of salt. That’s quite an

his beehive-shaped wood-burning oven. It’s

achievement, considering he uses a regular

here where he forms every crust by hand,

electric oven to bake his four types of pizzas.

topping it with bits of mozzarella he’s made

The waits can be interminable – there are

himself, sausage that probably came from

just four tables – and don’t even bother

New York and herbs he probably picked

asking about delivery or reservations.

himself from nearby, resulting in a pizza with a beautiful char and chew.

PIZ ZAS by STEVE DOLINSKY

We asked Steve Dolinsky, Food Reporter for ABC 7 News in Chicago and 12-time James Beard Award winner, what five pizzas he thinks are worth a special trip.

Portrait by Todd Rosenberg Photography

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5 G R E AT P I Z Z A S


3. PIZZERIA MOZZA, LOS ANGELES, CA

4. MOTORINO, NEW YORK CITY, NY

5. FRANK PEPE’S, NEW HAVEN, CT

Nancy Silverton is to dough what Lance

I have to admit, I was dubious about

Any Yale Bulldog worth his/her Ivy League

Armstrong is to cycling: both have a mastery

Motorino, hidden away on a street in the

education knows that the war of dough

of their skill set. But where Armstrong relies

West Village. Sure, the location was charming

and cheese between Frank Pepe’s and

on his legs, Silverton relies on her innate

and the room was tightly packed with folks

Sally’s Apizza is one of New Haven’s longest

ability to tease the best out of yeast, flour

from the neighborhood, but surely this had

running and most beloved battle royals . I

and water. She honed her skills in Europe

to be just another pizza joint that was getting

think the edge goes to Pepe’s, primarily for

and as the founder of La Brea Bakery and

too much press by virtue of being located in

their massive oven that’s the length of a

Campanile in L.A, then teamed up with a

New York (having started in Brooklyn). Boy,

school bus and constantly loaded up with

guy named Batali to open Osteria Mozza

was I wrong. The crusts – nicely blistered

coal, producing incendiary temperatures

as well as a pizzeria right next door. Where

and puffed on the outer edge – were full of

that render the oddly misshapen pies with

some pizzaolas might venture into creamy

flavor and mildly salted chew, with a great

a killer crust. Be sure to try at least one

burrata or spicy sausage, Silverton would

complexity so rare among New York pies. The

white clam pizza; it’s a true mark of East

rather use earthy chanterelles and peak-of-

brussels sprouts and pancetta version was

Coast pizzography.

the-season squash blossoms to grace her

particularly memorable.

pizzas. One thing you can’t deny: the crusts here are ethereal.

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P O R T R A I T OF A

CHEF S A R A H G RU E N E B E RG

b y K AT E B E R N O T

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PORTRAIT OF A CHEF: SARAH GRUENEBERG


A Texas girl at heart, Sarah Grueneberg is the executive

what’s the worst sin committed by americans cooking italian food?

chef at Michelin-starred Spiaggia restaurant in Chicago, and

Cooking pasta first with unseasoned

was the runner-up on the most recent season of Top Chef.

water and then pouring the sauce on

Working with mentor Tony Mantuano, Sarah has continued

afterwards. Marry the pasta and the

his tradition of authentic, elegant food inspired by the

sauce together by cooking the pasta with the sauce [in a sauté pan].

ingredients, language, and people of Italy.

what three items are always in your home fridge? Parmigiano-Reggiano, no-fat Greek yogurt —I eat that daily—and kombucha. I’m on a big kick with kombucha. I just bought

how has your cooking evolved over your career?

what’s the best bite of food you’ve ever had in italy?

My career started in Houston, Texas,

Wow, there’s been so much. Probably

with Creole, Cajun, and Texas cuisine.

the eggplant parmigiano in Rome at

I really focused on the farms, game

Grano Restaurant. I was like “Holy Shit.”

meat, and Gulf Coast seafood. Then,

I realized, “Wow, this has been made

when I moved [to Chicago], it was

incorrectly my entire life.” It’s made

Italian. I really tried to learn and

without bread crumbs, and not a ton

study and be as well educated on

of cheese. I do it now at the restaurant

Italian cuisine as I could. I fell in love

when eggplants are in season and

with it, and that really became my

people just rave about it.

twelve jars the other day.

if you weren’t a chef, what would you be doing? When I was a little girl, I wanted to be a marine biologist or archeologist, but I don’t know that that’s still true. I love history, and I tie my love of food together with the history of Italy, so maybe I’d be a historian.

choice of cuisine.

how did top chef fit into that? On Top Chef, you realize that these judges have seen everything, and the dishes that I might love to make and that I believe in so much aren’t enough to wow them. You have to start forcing yourself out of your comfort zone. I want to keep looking for other ingredients [that are] out there that I can integrate into my style.

This squid ink tagliatelle with spot prawns and coconut was the first course that Sarah Grueneberg prepared on the Top Chef Season 9 finale.

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M U S T A R D VA L L E Y


b y K AT E B E R N O T

MUSTARD VA L L E Y While the grapevines sleep and the days gradually become filled with more sunlight, the vineyards of Napa unfurl a blanket of lush greens and golden yellows. It’s early spring, and it’s mustard season in the Valley.

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The Biblical parable of the mustard seed speaks to the enormous power of one of the world’s smallest seeds. From a dot the size of a pinprick, a mustard plant can grow nearly nine feet tall, cascading down the mountains

Three months after the last of the autumn’s rains, long after the last grapes have been plucked from the vines, the first shoots of mustard spring from between the rows of brittle, empty grape branches. Winemakers know

and hills of Napa in a blaze of brilliant yellow. But no one

that these plants are as crucial to their

understands the potential of the mustard plant like Napa’s

grapes’ health as proper rainfall or rich

winemakers, who rely on the black mustard plant for much

nutrients and water, repel damaging

more than just its chartreuse blooms.

nematodes, and prevent soil erosion.

soil; they help the grapevines absorb

While the grapevines slumber, the unseen roots of the mustard plants work quietly beneath the earth.

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M U S T A R D VA L L E Y


While the grapevines slumber, the unseen roots of the mustard plants work quietly beneath the earth.

California vineyards began to plant mustard as a cover crop at the turn of the 20th century, but the plant has an even longer history in The Golden State. Locals tell the story of Father Junipero Serra, a Spanish priest who came to the coast in the 19th century as a missionary. As he traveled north across the sparsely populated expanse, he scattered Spanish mustard seeds behind him on the path. When the Franciscan made his return trip the following year, he needed no map, simply following the bright swath of the blooming mustard flowers. (continued on page 22)

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Most of you don’t think about making your own mustard from scratch. Why not? It’s actually easy if you are willing to wait a couple days. The main ingredients are mustard seeds or powder and liquid (water, beer, wine, cider, vinegar). You let that soak for a day or two, then add your seasonings. Done.

mustard seeds There are three primary types of whole-grain mustard seeds: yellow/ white is the mildest and used mainly in American-style mustards and for pickling; brown, which is zestier and used in European-style mustards, for pickling, and in Indian cooking; and black, which is also used in Indian food. (Black mustards seeds are

whole-grain beer mustard (makes 16 oz.)

interchangeable with brown.) 1/2 cup brown or black mustard seeds, 1/4 cup yellow mustard seeds, 3/4 cup dark beer, 1/2 cup apple cider vinegar,

mustard powder

2 tablespoons packed brown sugar,

Is nothing more than ground mustard

1 teaspoon salt, 1/4 teaspoon black pepper

seeds. The most common brand is Colman’s and is a blend of brown and white seeds.

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M U S T A R D VA L L E Y

Click to view complete recipe »


dijon-style mustard (makes 10 oz.)

2 cups dry white wine (such as Sauvignon Blanc or Chablis), 1 large onion, finely chopped, 2 cloves garlic, minced, 4 ounces mustard powder, 2 tablespoons honey, 1 1/4 teaspoons salt

Click to view complete recipe Âť

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Now, those blooms guide not Spanish priests but tourists and photographers, who flock to wine country in January, February, and March to witness the hills’ transformation. For vineyards, the mustards’ annual arrival is a sure portent of spring, enriching the soil before the Merlot and Malbec vines snap to life for another season. The mustards’ deep roots cling to the earth, preventing soil erosion while improving water penetration.

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M U S T A R D VA L L E Y


duck breast salad with mustard vinaigrette (makes 2 servings) mustard vinaigrette

salad

3 tablespoons minced shallots (about 2 medium shallots),

1 tablespoon white vinegar, 2 quail eggs, 4 cups baby

2 1/2 tablespoons Dijon or whole-grain mustard,

spinach, 1 baby yellow beet, peeled and very thinly sliced,

2 tablespoons red wine vinegar, 2 tablespoons balsamic

8 ounces smoked duck breast, cut into bite-size pieces

vinegar, 1 clove garlic, minced, 3/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil, sea salt, black pepper

Click to view complete recipe Âť

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For organic and biodynamic winemakers especially, mustard is worth its weight in gold. The plants give nitrogen and other beneficial nutrients back to the soil, reducing the need for chemically-based fertilizers. The plants’ leaves and flowers also create an Edenic refuge for birds and insects that eat harmful species among the grapes. In a seemingly wild burst of vine and flower, an entire symbiotic ecosystem silently pulses, one plant supporting the other, each playing a natural role in a delicate relationship.

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M U S T A R D VA L L E Y


A platter of cured meats, tiny spring vegetables, hard-boiled eggs and capers is the quintessential companion to just about any type of mustard.

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Of course, most people have no opportunity to witness this silent cooperation. Mustard reaches them in its edible form: the seeds left whole or crushed, bruised, or ground into a paste that adds a familiar tangy flavor.

More than likely, this mustard did not come from a vineyard, but it could have come from the same plant, the Brassica nigra. The raw seeds come to life with just the addition of salt, vinegar, and sugar, lending a spicy and sour counterpoint to richer meat dishes, and subtly coaxing the nuances out of lighter vegetables when whisked into vinaigrette.

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M U S T A R D VA L L E Y


mustard & honey pork tenderloin (makes 3 to 4 servings) 1 pound pork tenderloin, 1/4 cup Dijon mustard, 2 1/2 tablespoons honey, 1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt, 1/4 teaspoon black pepper, fresh rosemary sprigs

Click to view complete recipe Âť P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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two mustard cornish hen (makes 2 servings) 2 small lemons, 1 Cornish hen (about 1 1/2 pounds), 3 tablespoons apricot preserves, 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard, 1 tablespoon wholegrain mustard, 1/2 teaspoon salt, black pepper

Click to view complete recipe Âť

facts for cooks 1. Cooking mustard significantly reduces its pungency. 2. Mustard adds flavor to dishes without adding fat or sugar. 3. Mustard seeds can also be fried or toasted and added as a garnish. 4. All parts of the mustard plant are edible, not just the seeds. Mustard greens are exceptionally tasty.

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M U S T A R D VA L L E Y


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M E E T V I OL E T TE b y K AT E B E R N O T

No liqueur captures the ethereal

It’s a favorite ingredient at The Aviary,

color and fresh, fleeting bloom

cocktail wizardry. The Aviary is a place

of spring like crème de violette, a spirit distilled from violets. From its lavender hue to its kiss of botanical flavor, it captures the promise of the season in a glass.

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HIGH SPIRITS: MEET VIOLETTE

Grant Achatz’s futuristic temple of where bartenders are not bartenders, or even mixologists—they are chefs. Executive chef Craig Schoettler uses a splash of the violette in a sake-based cocktail whose creation is as magical as spring’s first blooms. Give the complex recipe a try, or use crème de violette in a most classic cocktail, The Aviation.


v i o l e t te recipe (makes 1 drink) Creator: Craig Schoettler

violet sorbet 3L water, 20g fresh violets, 250g crème de violette, 30g super neutrose, 400g sugar, 5g salt, 10 sheets gelatin

passionfruit foam 225g passionfruit juice, 50g sugar, 1.5 sheets gelatin

Click to view complete recipe »

c l a s s i c recipe (makes 1 drink) Creator: Samuel Kinsey 2 oz gin, 1/2 oz lemon juice, 2 tsp maraschino liqueur, 1/4 oz crème de violette

Click to view complete recipe »

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WEATHER

PERMITTING by J U D I T H M A R A

The only thing less predictable than spring weather is what will be the first offerings found at farmer’s markets across the country. Our advice is to grab what you can. Young, tender vegetables need little work or seasoning and they can be prepared in a myriad of colorful ways.

RADISHES

“REAL” BABY CARROTS

ASPARAGUS

Radishes are the first full-sized root

Do not believe for one second

Easily the most universal spring

vegetable to appear at farmer’s

the carrots labeled “baby” in the

delicacy available at farmer’s markets.

markets in spring. Classic radishes

supermarket are true young carrots.

The most common asparagus are

are red but Watermelon radishes

They’re not. True baby carrots are

green, shown here with their stalks

and French Breakfast radishes sell

typically long, slim, tender, and very

peeled. You’ll also find white asparagus,

out faster these days because of how

sweet. More and more markets are

which are preferred in Europe, and

pretty they look and how mild they

carrying heirloom varieties that come

purple varieties are also becoming

taste. They pair perfectly with spring

in a rainbow of colors such as white,

popular. Wild asparagus are rarely

lettuce and herbs in a salad.

red, purple and yellow.

available at farmer’s markets; you’ll just have to hunt down your own.

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W E AT H E R P E R M I T T I N G


PEA AND BEET SHOOTS Beet shoots are beets that are only a few days old, yet they already pack a powerful, earthy flavor. Pea shoots can be different young parts of a pea plant. They can be the actual “sprout� of a pea plant, or the choice leaves and tendrils picked off the pea vines. All pea shoots have an enchanting, fresh pea flavor. Mix a variety of shoots together with mild mustard vinaigrette for a simple salad. See recipe on page 23.

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W E AT H E R P E R M I T T I N G


RAMPS The popularity of wild ramps reaches near hysteria in areas where they are foraged. Also known as wild leek and wild garlic, they have a distinct garlic odor with a pungent onion flavor. Use to top pizza and salad, or toss in scrambled eggs. Many chefs serve ramps sautĂŠed, pickled, or charred with grilled meats.

BABY BEETS, ASPARAGUS AND CARROTS One easy farm market treat is to gently steam a combination of small spring vegetables, let them chill, toss with a bit of sea salt and serve as cruditĂŠs. Perfect to dip into a warm bagna cauda sauce of olive oil, butter, anchovies and garlic.

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Mushrooms might not be the first food that comes to mind when thinking about spring produce. Yet some varieties are as much a harbinger of spring as fiddlehead ferns and strawberries. From morels in the East and Midwest to porcini in the West, it’s mushroom hunting season, whether in your backyard or at the farmer’s market.

IN SEASON Morels to Chanterelles by JANET RAUSA FULLER

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IN SEASON: MORELS TO CHANTERELLES


April

June

August

September

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December

9 10 11 12 November

8

October

6 7 July

4 5 May

3 March

February

January

1 2

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It’s spring, the season of earthy deliciousness. To Iliana Regan, a Chicago chef and forager, April brings visions of morel mushrooms. “As soon as there’s any kind of sign of warmer weather, I start dreaming of them,” says Regan, who hosts monthly dinners to showcase her bounty of fungi and other wild foods.

In the winter months, coastal California’s cool valleys are able to sustain hardy varieties such as black trumpets, hedgehogs and yellow trumpets. But it is spring’s gentle warmth and moisture that usher in the wild mushroom hunting season across the country. Morels, those fabulously meaty, cone-shaped specimens, come first and in full force, particularly in the Midwest. From there, as spring turns to summer, the foraging fun really begins: porcini out West; pheasant back, wood ear, lobster and yellow feet elsewhere; more hedgehogs and black trumpets in the East; and, later, chanterelles and maitakes.

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IN SEASON: MORELS TO CHANTERELLES


“Then the wheel starts again,” says Connie Green, owner of the Wine Forest, a Napa purveyor of wild

“Mushrooms are strange

mushrooms and other edibles.

things. They have minds of

Mushrooms being the mysterious creatures they are,

their own,” says Bill Russell,

the fun is fleeting – four-week bursts here, six weeks

author of “Field Guide to

there, and not always in the spot you last found them, or where you expect them to grow. Last fall,

the Wild Mushrooms of

Regan spotted the unmistakable shaggy lion’s mane mushroom “on Fifth Avenue, right in the middle of

Pennsylvania and the

Brooklyn, on an oak tree.” (continued on page 42)

Mid-Atlantic.”

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sautéed morels Morels are a perfect companion to ramps, spring peas and pea shoots. After cleaning the morels, sauté in a little brown butter, then add a dash of salt, pepper and a squeeze of fresh lemon juice. Add blanched peas, and top with fresh pea shoots.

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IN SEASON: MORELS TO CHANTERELLES


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pasta with mushrooms (makes 4 servings) 12 ounces bucatini, 2 tablespoons olive oil, 10 ounces beech or other small mushrooms, 2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced, 1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme, salt and pepper, 3/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese, plus more for serving

Click to view complete recipe »

The thrill of the hunt is only part of what enthralls mushroom lovers. The mushroom’s symbiotic relationship with the organisms around it is endlessly fascinating. Mushrooms grow underground from spores, feeding off tree roots while in turn feeding them, until the “fruit”—the part we see—is ready to push forth and disperse its spores. And the wheel starts again.

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IN SEASON: MORELS TO CHANTERELLES

And there is the umami factor, the socalled fifth taste. Mushrooms often are described as meaty and earthy; some taste nutty, even buttery. The chicken of the wood mushroom, some swear, is chicken-flavored. The quirky candy cap mushroom “has a profound maple flavor,” says Green. “It’s magnificent.”


wild mushroom tart (makes 4 servings) With any foraged mushrooms, it is

pastry

necessary to rinse them with water to

1 sheet puff pastry (thawed), 1 egg (beaten)

remove dirt and grit before cooking. Store them in a paper bag in the refrigerator; Green likes to spread them out on a sheet pan, under a towel, to dry them out a bit more.

filling 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, 4 ounces fresh morels or ½ ounce dried morels (soaked in boiling water, drained and rinsed; reserve ¼ cup soaking liquid), 4 ounces beech, chanterelles, maitake or other mushrooms (slice larger varieties), salt and black pepper, 2 tablespoons minced

There are thousands of species of

shallots, 1 tablespoon chopped fresh herbs, 2 tablespoons

mushrooms, waiting to be found both

sherry, 1/2 cup heavy cream, 1 egg plus 1 egg yolk

at the market, on the forest floor, and even on Fifth Avenue. Happy hunting.

Click to view complete recipe »

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polenta with mushroom ragout (makes 4 to 6 servings) polenta 2 cups water, 1/2 cup yellow cornmeal, Salt and black pepper

ragout 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, 2 tablespoons olive oil, 1 pound shiitake mushrooms, stemmed and quartered or sliced if large, salt, 2 tablespoons minced shallots, 1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme, 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce, 1/2 tablespoon balsamic vinegar, 3/4 cup chicken or beef broth, 1 tablespoon heavy cream

Click to view complete recipe Âť 44

IN SEASON: MORELS TO CHANTERELLES


Wild mushrooms can be found at farmer’s markets, green grocers, online and, of course, in the wild. Some varieties previously found only in the wild are now being cultivated year-round. If you’re new to foraging, go with an expert who can identify edible from the poisonous. Here’s a list of popular and/or prized varieties that chefs love to show off:

black trumpet (wild).

morels (wild).

A common late-summer variety

Synonymous with spring and

in the Midwest and East, it grows

most abundant in the Midwest,

in Western coastal forest areas

their season starts in April and

all winter.

can run into June. Dried ones

chanterelles (wild).

are readily available in markets.

Northwest starting in September

oyster (wild and cultivated).

through nearly the end of the

Commonly found in late

year. They can be found in the

summer and fall, though

Midwest and elsewhere in July

certain types grow in the

and August.

spring out East. One of the

Prolific in the West and Pacific

easily to grow commercially.

hedgehog (wild). A winter mushroom in the West,

porcini (wild).

these grow in the summer and

The West enjoys a short stretch

fall elsewhere.

of these in July, and foragers in

lobster (wild). These start around July in most

the Midwest and East will find them in later summer. Dried ones are readily available.

areas and can continue into October on the West Coast.

wood ear (wild).

maitake or hen of the woods (wild and cultivated).

Clusters of these ear-shaped

A chef favorite in late summer

Dried ones are common in

and fall in the Midwest and East.

Asian markets.

mushrooms grow widely in the East in early summer.

They don’t grow wild west of the Mississippi River, though they are now commercially cultivated.

matsutake (wild). Considered a crown jewel of the mushroom world by the Japanese. These are scarce in the States, found only in the Pacific Northwest and Maine starting in September. 45


maitake (hen of the woods) Maitakes have gained increased popularity because of their earthy, chicken flavor. In Japanese, Maitake means “dancing mushroom,� because the lore goes, whoever found it would dance for joy.

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HOW WE DID IT


HOW WE

DID IT

Deconstructing a shot from Stephen Hamilton’s The Restaurant Project by JUDITH MARA

favorite dish

Pickled Pork Loin Tartine with Whipped Feta and Plums Restaurant

Telegraph, Chicago food stylist

Carol Smoler prop stylist

Paula Walters

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E A R LY S P R I NG 2 0 1 2

1520 W. Fulton | Chicago, IL 60607 | www.stephenhamilton.com

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Who's Hungry? Magazine | Early Spring 2012 | No 1