Page 1

spring 2013

NO 0 07

anniversary issue


FEATURES

06

Portrait of a Chef: Art Smith

14

In Season: The Extraordinary Egg

20

The Art of the Splash

22

Ask a Chef: Favorite Kitchen Tools

38

40 48

24

2

Garden Story: A Two Part Feature

CONTENTS

High Spirits: Color Bars

50

An Interview with Gail Simmons

Julia & The New Kid

Pâte À Choux

58

Food Porn


NO 0 07

CONTENTS

72

4

Contributors

5

Letter from Steve

6

Top 5: Spring-iest Salads

12

Portrait of a Chef

14

The Extraordinary Egg

20

The Art of the Splash

22

Ask a Chef: Favorite Kitchen Tools

24

Garden Story

38

High Spirits: Color Bars

40

Julia & The New Kid

48

Pâte À Choux

50

An Interview with Gail Simmons

58

Food Porn

72

Hidden Gems: Backwoods

Hidden Gems:

74

The King of Salmon

Backwoods

80

How We Did It

82

Recipe Index

74

Weather Permitting: The King of Salmon

CONTACTS media inquiries Judith Mara | marabeach@sbcglobal.net Deirdre O’Shea | deirdre@stephenhamilton.com

sponsorship opportunities

80

Deirdre O’Shea | deirdre@stephenhamilton.com

How We Did It

representation Schumann & Company | www.schumannco.com patti@schumannco.com | 312.432.1702

stephen hamilton 1520 W. Fulton | Chicago, IL 60607 www.stephenhamilton.com

CONTENTS

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contributors

NO 0 07

judith mara | Editor and Writer

ian law | Design

Judith has worked with Stephen for almost

Ian designed every aspect of Who’s Hungry?™

seven years and helps to lead the editorial concept

magazine with meticulous attention to detail and

and execution of Who’s Hungry?™ magazine. An

typography, and helped turn static images into an

award-winning former creative director for major

interactive experience. His award-winning design

ad agencies such as Leo Burnett and J. Walter Thompson, Judith sweats the details, pens Weather Permitting and

work has been featured in the pages of Print, Creativity, How, PDN and Graphic Design USA.

literally hand writes How We Did It.

dannielle kyrillos |

ian knauer |

Writer and Television Commentator

Writer, Author, Soon-to-be Television Personality

A series judge on Bravo’s Top Chef Just Desserts,

A former editor at Gourmet Magazine, Ian

Dannielle is an expert on stylish entertaining, food,

develops recipes for Food Network and contributes

fashion, and travel. She appears regularly on NBC’s

regularly to Bon Appétit. His own PBS show, The

Today and The Nate Berkus Show, as well as on E!

Farm, will air this summer and bring to life the

News, BetterTV, CNBC, CNN, and local morning programming in New York

stories and recipes from his celebrated cookbook by the same name. For

and Philadelphia. For Who’s Hungry?™ magazine, Dannielle scouts out the

Who’s Hungry? magazine, Ian takes us on a journey through his garden and

season’s Spring-iest salads.

unearths some valuable insight along the way.

sara moulton | Chef, Cookbook Author, Television Personality

deborah madison | Chef, Writer and Cooking Teacher

One of the hardest-working women in the food

Deborah Madison is America’s leading authority

biz, Sara has hosted multiple Food Network shows,

on vegetarian cooking and author of the

served as Gourmet magazine’s executive chef for 23

groundbreaking Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone.

years, and balanced it all with family life. She has

Her latest cookbook, Vegetable Literacy, illuminates

written three cookbooks, and hosts her own PBS show, Sara’s Weeknight Meals.

the connections among vegetables from the same botanical families and

For Who’s Hungry?™ magazine, Sara reflects on her long relationship with

offers suggestions on how they might work together in the kitchen. For Who’s

Julia Child.

Hungry?™ magazine, Deborah sheds light on another intriguing theme from her book: using the whole plant.

sarah levy | Pastry Chef,

heather sperling | Chicago Editor of

Cookbook Author and Food Consultant

Tasting Table and Co-founder of Fête

Pastry chef and food consultant Sarah Levy

Heather is the Chicago editor of Tasting Table, a

delighted millions as the owner and proprietor of

free daily email publication about the country’s

Sarah’s Pastries & Candies, one of Chicago’s most

best food, drink, chefs and more. A co-founder of

popular confectioneries since its opening in 2004.

Fête (a pop-up night market and cultural festival

She is the author of Sweetness: Delicious Baked Treats for Every Occasion, and has

celebrating the finest in Chicago’s food and design) and food editor of The

been featured in USA Today, Better Homes and Gardens, BRIDES magazine

Chicagoan, her work has appeared in Plate Magazine, TheAtlantic.com, and

and many more. For Who’s Hungry?™ magazine, Sarah reveals her favorite

Planet Green. For Who’s Hungry? magazine, Heather explores some of the

recipe for pâte à choux, the “sexy black dress of pastry.”

best—and most colorful—drinks of the season.

todd womack |

Comedian and Writer

Bryan Olsen is a writer and performer for Barely

has been a writer/performer on the gigantic YouTube

Political’s “The Key of Awesome.” Additionally, he

series The Key of Awesome, since 2010. The series has over 1 billion views to date, and can be found on the YouTube channel “Barely Political.” His credits include Good Morning America, 20/20, Chappelle’s Show; and appearances on Bravo, VH-1, TNT, and in Esquire magazine. For Who’s Hungry?™ magazine, Todd gets dirty with some tantalizing food porn.

4

CONTRIBUTORS

bryan olsen | Writer and Performer

Todd Womack is a Brooklyn-based comedian who

wrote for Comedy Central’s Roast of David Hasselhoff, and sold a screenplay to Paramount Pictures and Ivan Reitman. As an actor, Mr. Olsen has appeared on several episodes of Comedy Central’s Chappelle’s Show. For Who’s Hungry?™ magazine, Bryan gets dirty with some tantalizing food porn.


kathryn o’malley |

deirdre o’shea | Production Director

Editor and Writer

Kathryn’s love of food is matched only by her

If you have worked with Stephen Hamilton,

passion for writing about it; as part of the Who’s

you’ve worked with Deirdre. Drawing on 15 years

Hungry?™ editorial team, she indulges in a bit of

of experience in managing photography studios,

both. Her popular food blog, dramaticpancake.com,

Deirdre has a hand in nearly every aspect of

garners more than 40,000 unique viewers per month and highlights the people and stories behind great recipes.

Stephen’s business. She’s been instrumental in organizing the magazine’s shoots, sourcing ingredients, and always keeping production on schedule.

As we embrace the growth we see outside, we also look to how we’ve grown inside—as a magazine, and as a team. When we launched Who’s Hungry?™ one year ago, we had a few exceptional staff members and a simple goal of bridging the worlds of food and photography. Since then, the magazine has evolved in ways we never could have predicted. Not only is it a deeply satisfying creative project, but it’s also been an opportunity to connect with and learn from some of the most interesting and knowledgeable professionals throughout the culinary world. Each story in this magazine has taken us on a new adventure. We’ve discovered innovative uses for maple syrup at Burton’s Maplewood Farms; enjoyed holiday cookies from some of the nation’s top bakers; sat down with our favorite chefs; explored the secrets behind great food styling; ventured out on a Virginia

LETTER FROM STEVE Spring is the season of renewal. It’s that time of year when the sun shines longer each day, the grass grows just a little bit greener, and the earth begins to soften in the rain, shooting up new life.

a special thanks to:

fox hunt; and been pulled into the personal stories of great writers. I want to thank everyone involved, past and present, who have helped make the magazine what it is today. With one incredible year behind us, we look forward to embracing the next and all the growth that is yet to come. I hope you’ll grow right along with us and continue to ask “Who’s Hungry?”™ STEPHEN HAMILTON

Fabio Viviani, Art Smith, Sari Zernich Worshom, Geoff Bins-Calvey, Josephine Orba, Gail Simmons,

Jennifer Evans Gardner, Dale Levitski, Sara Cruz, Vanessa Dubiel, CeCe Campise, Walter Moeller, Breana Moeller, Raymond Barrera, Andrew Burkle, Paula Walters, Ruth Siegel, Malika Ameen, Tom Hamilton, Juan Palomino, David Raine, Kaitlyn McQuaid, Lauren Holschbach, Justin Paris

LETTER FROM STEVE

|

PORTRAITS BY ANDREW BURKLE

5


TOP 5 Spring-iest Salads by DA N N I E L L E K Y R I L L O S

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TOP 5: SPRING-IEST SALADS


Dannielle Kyrillos, a series judge on Bravo’s Top Chef Just Desserts and expert on all things food and entertaining, shares her five favorite Spring-iest salads from around the country. Portrait by Peter Hurley

A wise woman once said that the best part of

parts of their coats and wacky tendrils, toasty

anything with cheese in it is the cheese. While

hazelnuts, crisp carrot wisps, and a careful mix

many would argue this is never more apt than in

of leafiness surround the perfectly warmed, olive-

the salad kingdom, smart and kindly Chef Jason

oil-enrobed burrata, waiting to be swept up in

Wilson gives the exceptional burrata he lovingly

the inevitable creamy ooze. Like the whole Crush

handcrafts such an elegant gang of vegetable

experience, the dish so comfortably marries the

accomplices that somehow even this enticingly

hallmarks of spring, exuberance and restraint,

quivering globe of creamy goodness doesn’t

and it’s such a lively, tasty salad you almost

overshadow its plate-mates. Sweet peas with

forget that cheese is at its heart. Almost.

1

Burrata Salad CRUSH

2319 E. MADISON STREET SEATTLE, WA 98112 206.302.7874

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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Roasted Broccoli & Green Bean Salad COCHON

930 TCHOUPITOULAS STREET NEW ORLEANS, LA 70130 504.588.2123

If only the Simpsons had been to Cochon.

Green beans lend a fresh crunch, and pickled

The cartoon family taunted their most health-

onions provide trails of pucker. Barbecued pecans

conscious member with the infuriatingly catchy,

come excitingly close to serving as proof that

“You don’t win friends with salad!” but if they’d

candy in salad might not be as horrible as we’d

tried this really green but really rich concoction,

thought. And the mildly kicky poblano ranch

they’d be singing a totally different tune.

coating the whole beautiful mess makes this the

Broccoli is roasted to the edge of caramelization,

only salad that is both veggie-laden and decadent

intoxicatingly earthly and just barely sweet.

enough to make absolutely anyone happy.

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TOP 5: SPRING-IEST SALADS


Salade du Café CAFÉ CHRISTINE

6 COMPANY STREET CHRISTIANSTED, ST. CROIX (USVI) 00820 340.713.1500

Certain lunch scenarios scream for a burger. Others,

roosters. The Christine in question, Madame Grassiot,

like any you’ll encounter at Café Christine, whisper

prepares each sublime dish single-handedly in a kitchen

conspiratorially for a proper, classic salad. Or more

marked “Private” and opens just for weekday lunch. When

precisely, une salade. Thin, rare ribbons of London broil

this salad appears on the daily hand-chalked menu, it is a

are draped over dainty lettuces, Gorgonzola and pine

must, as it allows room to finish the meal comme il faut,

nuts, with just a soupcon of tart dressing. It is utterly

with a slice of what very well might be the world’s best

French and exactly right for its setting, an elegant

pear-chocolate pie.

tropical courtyard of crumbling ruins and meandering

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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4

Kale A(MUSE)

44 BALTIMORE AVENUE REHOBOTH BEACH, DE 19971 302.227.7107

Hari Cameron is the kind of chef you want to be

and he has saved the kale salad from being the

best friends with before you even meet him. His

next Caesar. His version is so inventive it’s like a

not-quite-year-old a(Muse) is a room at once cool

rebirth. The top leaf is actually dehydrated and

and welcoming, his menu is witty and smart,

crisp, hiding a rainbow of fresh leaves, plucky

and his dishes are precise but not precious. And

Meyer lemon and lardo. Underneath it all is

when the Beard-Award-nominated thirty-year-old

humble quinoa, scattered playfully, the texture

emerges from his bustling kitchen to say hello,

suggesting roe or mustard grains. Phew, kale has

you realize the soft-spoken artist is a problem-

been rescued!

solver, too. He has removed any doubt that truly fine dining can flourish in this sleepy beach town,

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TOP 5: SPRING-IEST SALADS


Avocado and Papaya Salad TOWN

3435 WAIALAE AVENUE HONOLULU, HI 808.735.5900

The very best salads are those so fresh, so throbbing with immediacy that the simple tossing together of a few just-harvested items is enough to capture the very flavor of a place. This is exactly what happens with any salad at Ed Kenney’s Town, but when the version involving avocado, papaya, cucumbers, leafy red oak and pecans is on the menu, you will meet and then consume Mother Nature herself. She’ll be wearing a lusty coat of Green Goddess dressing flecked with herbs, and one bite will evoke sunshine and fresh air and everything good. Most all the ingredients will be from nearby MA’O Organic Farms, on the board of which Kenney sits and whose mission is to nurture not just gorgeous produce, but also the region’s young people.

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Art Smith is a two-time James Beard Award winner, author of four cookbooks,

what’s the first full dish you ever cooked, and the first one you cooked as a professional chef?

and executive chef and co-owner of five

The first full dish I ever cooked was Julia Child’s Coq Au

restaurants including Table fifty-two, Art

Vin. Julia’s books were my cooking school. “Chef” is a title

and Soul, Southern Art, LYFE Kitchen, and Joanne’s. Smith’s vast appeal lies not only in his fresh approach to classic Southern cuisine, but also in his dedication to uniting people through good food and shared meals. We invited Fabio Viviani, our previously

in a professional kitchen, and I have always considered myself a “cook.” I have been cooking ever since I could hold a knife, but fried chicken and biscuits are two things I’ve always felt comfortable preparing, whether I’m cooking for family, celebrities or politicians. I am known for saying “Fried Chicken Takes No Sides!” Words to live by, I think.

what’s the biggest satisfaction you’ve ever had thanks to your career? Not having to ever make reservations!

wanted. And Smith—in his usual fashion—

who’s your biggest celebrity crush and biggest chef influences you’ve had in your life?

responded with warmth, honesty, and a

When I was in the closet it would have been Julie Andrews in

featured chef, to ask Smith anything he

healthy dose of humor.

The Sound of Music! LOL. Out of the closet, I’d say Mathew McConaughey—he’s hot. I saved his puppy and when he gave me a little love tap on the shoulder, I melted! I also love and adore Chef Jamie Oliver and his mission of taking kids off the street to teach them how to cook, and helping children across the world eat better. He’s a selfless man and with all that love he has created a mega-empire. What you give out is what you get back!

tell me five favorite kitchen tools, ingredients or flavors. My cast iron skillet—I have over 400 pots but I always use my skillet My new Williams knives Geechie Boy stone ground grits and rice grits Lucini extra virgin olive oil 20-year-old balsamic vinegar

any foods you hate? Processed food. Food not cooked with love.

any fun story about a weird customer? Heck we all are weird, but that’s what I love about meeting new people all the time in my restaurants. We may not

Comfort food has never been so flavorful—or nutritious—as it is in

have a stitch in common, but we connect over food. I call

Art Smith’s Healthy Comfort, the chef’s latest cookbook.

it the fine “Art of Kissing Babies.” I can walk into a snake pit and turn it into a love pit (especially with a piece of Hummingbird cake in tow)! XOXO ART

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PORTRAIT OF A CHEF: ART SMITH


ART SMITH’S PORTRAIT OF A

CHEF b y K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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the

by K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

14

IN SEASON: THE EXTRAORDINARY EGG


What is there to say about the egg

At their best, these delicate little

that hasn’t already been said? Laden with allusions to life and rebirth, we’ve long been intrigued by its elegant oval

orbs are nature’s perfect food, a deliciously compact source of protein, vitamins and minerals all tied into one. But with so many carton labels that are often more

shape and all that it holds. From art and

confusing than they are clarifying,

architecture to literature and religion, eggs

how can you be sure you’re

are everywhere—including, of course, our

do all those terms mean, anyway?

very own kitchens. We whip them into soufflés, stir them into aioli, and sop up

choosing the best option—and what

Here’s your guide to cracking the codes of the carton.

runny yolks with crisp buttered toast.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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U nscram bling the Egg Ca rton

16

IN SEASON: THE EXTRAORDINARY EGG


egg grades: Given by the United States

omega-3 enhanced or fortified: The hens’ diets were fortified

free range: In addition to being raised

Department of Agriculture, egg grades depend mainly on the firmness of the whites, the

with good sources of omega-3’s, such as

outdoors. Just keep in mind that there is no

shape of the yolks, and the condition of

flaxseed, algae or fish oil. These eggs will

regulation dictating how long the hens must

the shells. AA eggs are the handsomest of

contain more omega-3’s than your “plain label”

be outside or how much room they’re given.

the bunch and work well in dishes where

supermarket brand.

appearance is important, though Grade A aren’t bad, either (the only difference being whites that are slightly less firm). Grade B eggs, used for processed, frozen or dried egg products, are rarely found in stores.

natural: There are no regulations for the term “natural,” and any producer can use this label. It says nothing about how the hens were raised or what they were fed.

vegetarian-fed:

This means that

the hens were fed an all-vegetarian diet, free of animal by-products, but it doesn’t tell us

cage-free, the hens were given access to the

pasture-raised:

This means that

cage-free: The hens were not kept in

the hens got at least part of their food from

cages and had continuous access to food and

foraging on greens and bugs, which produces

water, but did not necessarily have access to

healthier and more delicious eggs.

the outdoors. Many cage-free birds are confined to crowded barns or warehouses.

certified humane:

organic: A USDA-certified organic label means that the hens were raised cage-

This label, like

free with outdoor access, on an organic

“cage-free,” means the hens were uncaged but

diet, and with no hormones or antibiotics.

did not necessarily have access to the outdoors.

These eggs are a healthy bet, but it’s still

It’s still an improvement, though, since it

worth investigating your brand of choice as

makes requirements for things like stocking

“outdoor access” can mean many different

density, number of perches and laying boxes.

things—from a large grassy field to a tiny concrete porch.

anything about living conditions. If it’s the only label on the carton, keep looking.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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shell color:

The color of an egg

has nothing to do with health or taste; different breeds of chickens simply produce different colored eggs. So why are the brown ones so expensive? Because the chickens that lay them tend to be bigger and more costly to feed.

yolk color:

The best-tasting eggs

will have richly colored yolks. Hens with more varied diets offer yolks that are dark yellow or orange, indicating higher levels of healthy omega-3’s and carotenoids.

shades of white:

Believe it or not,

cloudier egg whites mean fresher eggs. If the whites are pink, green or iridescent, you’ll know the egg is rotten (and the smell will make that pretty clear).

blood spots:

Sometimes little blood

spots, also called meat spots, appear on the egg yolk. This happens occasionally when a blood vessel is ruptured while the yolk is being formed—not exactly appetizing, but also nothing to worry about.

those twisted strands: You know those rope-like strands of egg white you sometimes see? Chalazae are essentially thin strings that anchor the yolk to the inside of the eggshell, suspending it in the center of the white. The fresher the egg, the more prominent the chalazae.

18

IN SEASON: THE EXTRAORDINARY EGG


S o me M ore E ggsp l a na ti o ns

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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THE ART of the

by K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

20

THE ART OF THE SPLASH


DROPPING THE OBJECT

CAPTURING THE SPLASH

hand drop

eyeing it

Using your hands is the most cost-

It’s hard to get the timing right, but with enough

effective method for dropping an item

trial and error you can train your eye to estimate

a compelling sense of movement

into liquid to create a splash. This

when your dropped object (in this case, berries)

and drama. So how do you go about

strategy can produce a lovely natural

will hit your liquid (in this case, yogurt), so you

look, but results will be inconsistent;

can snap the shot accordingly.

Splashes, by their very nature, are messy, unpredictable, and irregular. But they can also be beautiful, lending an otherwise still photo

capturing a graceful, yet natural looking, burst of liquid? With proper timing, strategic angles, and a hefty dose of patience and practice. Slip on

using an armrest or a visual marker can help.

laser trigger

custom rig

eyes, a laser can be set to trigger the shutter

A more accurate and reliable option than your

Invite Geoff Binns-Calvey, special

whenever a dropped object passes it. Of course,

your rain jacket and let’s dive into

effects pro, to create a custom rig.

it takes some fiddling to achieve the right timing,

the details…

This clever contraption will drop

but once you have it down, the results are

whatever object you’re working with

extremely consistent.

at a precise and consistent location and angle—each and every time.

custom model You can always cut out timing issues completely (and eliminate messes!) with the use of an artificial splash made from resin or acrylic. The one major downside? A single model can cost up to twelve thousand dollars, and once it’s made there is no way of adjusting it.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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{

ASK A CHEF

FAVORITE KITCHEN TOOLS

}

INTRO by JUDITH MARA

A N S W E R S by C H E F DA L E L E V I T S K I

Chef Dale Levitski (Frog N Snail, Sprout) had to think long and hard when we

Chef Dale Levitski’s answers:

asked him what his favorite

chinois (strainer) where to buy »

vintage spoons where to buy »

kitchen tools are. “I have

For sauce work, a chinois is an absolute

Chefs fawn over spoons. My spoons are my

requirement for getting the right texture

grandmother’s silver-plate serving spoons that

never been a cook who

and for getting the impurities out. It refines

she used on special occasions. For me they are

reductions and clears stocks as well.

food memories with a romantic connection.

enjoys gadgets or specialty items” was his initial answer. And we can guess why he answered that way. If you study his work, you’ll see ingenious ingredients cut with masterful knife skills, an egg that’s simply poached, or a perfect oviform quenelle. Certainly a pure approach to cooking that doesn’t require gadgets to get the job done. So what kitchen tools does Dale rely on that could help us non-chefs perform better in our kitchens? All we can say is, the last thing you’ll be buying is a Manual Rotato Potato Peeler As Seen on TV based on his recommendations.

22

A S K A C H E F : FAVO R I T E K I T C H E N T O O L S

They are perfect plating spoons for quenelles

boos wood cutting boards where to buy »

and swooshes, and I use the slotted spoon for

It’s the texture of a BOOS cutting board when

chefs have a spoon that they so are attached

you are working with your knife—the feel

to that they’ll search an entire kitchen for

is much more sexy than cutting on plastic.

hours to find it if they lose track of it. And

They are so sturdy and your knife doesn’t

they all have their own spoon story—usually

skip as much as on plastic. BOOS boards are

it’s about where they stole it.

an amazing investment and a home kitchen must-have. Besides, it looks pretty left out on a countertop.

lifting poached eggs out of the water. A lot of


boos wood cutting boards

vintage spoons

chinois (strainer)

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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GARDEN

STORY A TWO-PART FEATURE by IAN KNAUER & DEBORAH MADISON

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G A R D E N S T O RY: A T WO - PA R T F E AT U R E B Y I A N K N AU E R & D E B O R A H M A D I S I O N


Spring Romance by

IAN KNAUER A former editor at Gourmet, Ian Knauer restored and revitalized his family’s centuries-old Pennsylvania farm and wrote about the experience—and the recipes it bore—in a beautifully unique cookbook, The Farm. His PBS series by the same name begins airing this summer.

1

2

The Whole Plant by

DEBORAH MADISON Deborah Madison is America’s leading authority on vegetarian cooking and author of the groundbreaking Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone. An avid gardener and seasoned chef, Madison has inspired generations of home cooks to think about produce in new and exciting ways. Her latest cookbook, Vegetable Literacy, is bound to become a classic, illuminating the connections among vegetables from the same botanical families and offering suggestions on how they might work together in the kitchen. Here, Madison sheds light on another, equally intriguing theme from her book: using the whole plant.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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I’ve been growing my own

So what am I, then? I am a romantic. I am

didn’t kill it shrank and gnarled. Any surviving

eternally hopeful and naive—truly, a child

tomato plants looked like hundred-year-old

at the core. I’m also a little jaded. By last

grapevines. The eggplants had skins as thick

September, I was defeated.

as leather.

Last spring brought plenty of rain, soaking the

And then, it started to rain, and it wouldn’t

earth and plumping the seeds that had rolled

stop. The tomatoes, those that were left,

off my fingers and into the ground. They burst

swelled and burst, then rotted. The eggplants

I lack any and all patience, have no love of

to life and stretched up and out, reaching

were actually washed away. The weeds

neat and even rows, and am absent-minded

for the sun. This is what I remember. What I

rejoiced. I planted a second crop of greens,

to the point where lettuce wilts from lack of

forget, or at least try to forget, is the scorching

which were immediately eaten by either an

water and weeds reach my chest, choking out

drought that followed. The tilled earth

army of rabbits or a wiley gang of groundhogs.

all things cultivated. Before I started growing

coughed up dust in puffs and swirls every

my own food I’d have described myself as

time the wind blew. I watered and watered,

organized, self-reliant, patient, and focused. I

when I remembered to, but it was pointless.

now know I am none of those things.

The drought lasted for months and what it

vegetable garden for five years now, and I’ve learned a thing or two about myself. Namely, that I am a terrible farmer.

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G A R D E N S T O RY: A T WO - PA R T F E AT U R E B Y I A N K N AU E R & D E B O R A H M A D I S I O N


Spring Romance by

IAN KNAUER

1

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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G A R D E N S T O RY: A T WO - PA R T F E AT U R E B Y I A N K N AU E R & D E B O R A H M A D I S I O N


Of the last five seasons there has been just one, the first one, that was a dream. It took me years to eat through the jars and jars of canned veggies from that bounty. It was a dream because nature just worked in my favor, not because I did anything special or different. Maybe it’s that first year that keeps me coming back for the fantasy. Or maybe it’s just the man I am—innocent with hope and blind with faith in things I don’t understand like rain and sun and vegetable seeds.

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Hold a radish seed in your hand and feel it. Try to find the life it holds inside. It is smaller than a lentil and less perfect. Its shape is not quite round, more rugby-ball shaped at one end, more plum-bottomed at the other. But there are wrinkles, prune-like, too. And no two radish seeds are quite the same shape. If I hadn’t labeled them as such I’d be sure they were small pebbles, lifeless rocks. They are cold. They are dull and brown. And they are made of magic. Radishes are the first tiny green leaves to climb from the spring soil, and those first leaves are shaped like hearts, the symbol of life and love. Imagine. Heart-shaped leaves from lifeless pebbles. It’s the stuff of fantasy. How middle-earth. Those who are good at farming tend to be rational and, well, not romantic at all. They are organized and in control of the land and the rain and the sun. And I wonder if they also think that radish seeds are made of wizardry. I feel sorry for them if they don’t.

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spring garden hodgepodge View recipe on page 82 Âť

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2

The Whole Plant by

DEBORAH MADISON

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The stem of cauliflower is utterly mild and delicious—there’s no reason to throw it out, or the tender leaves that protect the curds. And the same is true of a broccoli stem.

G A R D E N S T O RY: A T WO - PA R T F E AT U R E B Y I A N K N AU E R & D E B O R A H M A D I S I O N


One of the subjects that has long interested

most of that consists of outer leaves. You

luxurious radish tops that come with each

me (and frustrated me as well) is that that

can actually eat some of those leaves—not

radish? It turns out they make a very good

we seldom see the whole vegetable since so

the oldest ones, but certainly some of the

soup, or you can braise them with their roots.

much is lopped off in the field long before it

newer ones closer to the head. The stem of

And how about those meaty-looking chard

gets to a store. Much like the butcher counter

cauliflower is utterly mild and delicious—

stems? There’s a reason why they’re eaten

with its parts and pieces of the animal, the

there’s no reason to throw it out, or the

in France—favored in fact, over the greens.

produce counter gives us the broccoli crowns

tender leaves that protect the curds. And the

Your arugula has gone to flower, and yes, you

but not always the stems, and never the

same is true of a broccoli stem. As long as

can use those lovely blooms in a salad, as a

leaves. It presents us with uniform-sized

it’s well peeled, you have a luminous green

garnish. Your cilantro has bolted and made

chard leaves, collard greens, and kale when

vegetable to use. Artichoke stems are also

little green balls that will turn, when dried,

in the garden bed leaves vary greatly in size.

quite edible when you find them attached to

into coriander. But in their green state, they’re

Leeks are without their yards of greens; beets

the bud. We’re just starting to find them in

a boon to the cook—mysterious, pungent,

and carrots don’t always have their greens

supermarkets, featured as an extra—and at

somewhere in between cilantro and coriander.

nor does chard always have its stems, and so

extra cost. But they’ve always been there, just

There are those who love turnip greens, but

it goes.

not in the store.

those who never eat them. Yet they are quite

If you ever see broccoli growing in a garden,

When you grow something, or see it

you might be amazed at how enormous a

blossoming in a garden, you start to wonder

mature plant is—three feet across—and

what you can eat, really. What about those

edible, and not only that, they’re the most nutritious part of the plant, much more so than the root.

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But even beyond the garden, we can appreciate the whole plant. I’m convinced that people are eating many more Brussels sprouts these days since stores have started selling the entire stalk, festooned with its sprouts. It’s just so irresistible! I watch people cradling their stalks with big smiles on their faces. Suddenly a hated vegetable has become a darling. And if its silly crown of leaves is still attached, so much the better. (And yes, you can eat those, too.) “Eating the Whole Plant” is a theme in my new book, Vegetable Literacy, which points to the possibilities for food that we usually ignore and often don’t even see—and the many ways we can dig just a little bit deeper.

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ON EATING THE WHOLE PLANT radish leaves, where the vitamins and minerals are, are quite edible. Use them in salads or in a radish top soup. Discard any that are old or yellowed.

radish pods

can be pickled and

can also be stir-fried as long as they’re still tender.

carrot tops, especially the smaller, more tender greens, have a pure carroty flavor —perfect to garnish and season a carrot soup or salad.

chard that has bolted (started to go to seed) has fewer leaves and smaller ones, but they are quite edible, even if they don’t look like the ones you get at the store. Of course, chard stems are very good to eat, too.

cilantro

which has gone to seed makes

little green spheres that later dry and are called coriander. In their green form, they are quite delicious, somewhere between cilantro and coriander. Use them in a salad or in a sauce, over fish.

the cores of cauliflower, which so many people tell you to discard, are just as mild and crunchy as the florets. Nibble on them raw, or cook them with the cauliflower florets.

broccoli stems, when thickly peeled, are pale green, moist and crunchy. Like cauliflower, they’re good either raw or lightly cooked, and are a very pretty green.

some cultures

eat the greens of

certain summer squashes (Cocozelle types) and sweet potatoes, and you can too, in stirfries and other dishes.

collard stems will cook to tenderness, unlike kale, and when the plants sprout and make flowers, those parts are tender and delicious to eat, too.

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spinach crowns with sesame-miso sauce View recipe on page 83 Âť

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In winter, my cocktails of choice are golden brown: a Martinez, a Manhattan. These are the faithful companions of cold-weather cocktail hour. Come spring, the brighter, the fresher, the better. The finest drinks I’ve encountered of late are as lively in hue as they are on the palate.

On a recent balmy night in New Orleans,

a gin-and-tonic/gimlet/celery ménage.

after too many fried boudin balls at

Palomino shakes the gin and juice with

Cochon, I found myself at the bar at Cure.

lime, simple syrup and celery bitters,

My request for a drinkable digestion aid

and tops it with Fever Tree tonic. It has

was met with a tall, fiercely crimson

a G&T’s freshness, bolstered by celery

Gunshop Fizz, a Cure original that’s not on

and lime, with its edges smoothed by a

the menu but is available by request.

touch of sweetness.

Peychaud’s bitters—made in New Orleans

To stock a home bar with vibrant

since the 1830’s—anchor the drink, with

color, look to a handful of new cocktail

a full two ounces in the mixing glass.

syrups. Jack Rudy Cocktail Co. of

A vigorous muddling with lemon juice,

Charleston, South Carolina, recently

simple syrup, strawberries, cucumber and

launched small-batch grenadine made

citrus peel follows, then a hard shake and a

with California-grown pomegranates,

topping of Sanbitter, San Pellegrino’s bitter,

cane sugar and orange-flower water

rosy-hued soda. The result is a grown-

(jackrudycocktailco.com). Last fall,

up fruit punch, juicy and bright with a

Brooklyn’s Royal Rose (royalrosesyrups.

backbone of sophisticated bitterness.

com) added saffron to its rainbow of simple syrups, and the latest from

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Fresh celery juice colors the Green Hornet

Madison, Wisconsin’s Quince & Apple is

at Trenchermen in Chicago, where Tona

sunny-hued lemon-lime syrup scented

Palomino, a transplant from New York’s

with lemongrass and lime leaves

WD~50, mans the bar. The verdant cocktail

(quinceandapple.com). In other words:

is the dangerously drinkable lovechild of

Your cocktail future is looking bright.

HIGH SPIRITS: COLOR BARS


HIGH SPIRITS

Color Bars ‘TIS THE SEASON FOR VIBRANT DRINKS by H E AT H E R S P E R L I N G

green hornet View recipe on page 88 »

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JULIA &the new kid S T O RY & R E C I P E S b y S A R A M O U LT O N

ll by Bi photo

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Adler

J U L I A & T H E N E W K I D | S T O R Y & R E C I P E S B Y S A R A M O U LT O N


Think you’ve read or seen everything there is to know about Julia Child? Well, there’s always something new. Sara Moulton looks back on her long relationship with Julia and how she will always be influenced by Julia’s natural thirst for new ways, ingredients and gadgets.

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rhubarb potstickers View recipe on page 84 Âť

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J U L I A & T H E N E W K I D | S T O R Y & R E C I P E S B Y S A R A M O U LT O N


How did I dream up these

Pratt, one of my teammates, about Julia’s method

spring desserts, presenting

them). Berit mentioned that she was a volunteer

seasonal fruits in unusual

of cooking hard-boiled eggs (which is not to boil on Julia’s PBS TV show. I wondered if Julia might ever need another volunteer (namely me), and

new recipes?

Berit said that they were just about to tape

I’m inspired by many things and many people:

The next day Berit told me that she’d talked to

eating out, traveling, cookbooks, online

Julia, and that Julia wanted to hire me. I was

information, and my family and friends… not

astonished that Julia Child would even consider

to mention my own personal lifetime of taste

offering me a paid job without having met me.

memories. But nothing and no one was more

So I trotted down to the corner pay phone and

important to me than Julia Child, the first

dialed her right up. She picked up the phone

person who taught me how to develop a recipe.

herself, said she’d heard all about me, and asked

another season and she’d ask Julia.

if I “food-styled.” In truth, I didn’t really have As the chef/manager of a catering operation in

any professional experience in food styling, but

Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1979, I happened

I figured, heck, as a chef, I certainly take care to

to be in the right place at the right time. One

land my food attractively on a plate. So what did

day I was peeling a lifetime’s supply of hard-

I say? “Yes, Julia. I’m very good at food styling.”

boiled eggs when I started chatting with Berit

And I got the job.

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That was the beginning of the most important

way Julia worked. We were all in it together.

relationship of my career. I worked with Julia

Recipe development was a group effort,

on that show, Julia Child and More Company,

although Julia of course always had the

and on the cookbook that was published

last word.

with it. Afterwards, I assisted her at various industry events. In the mid-eighties, I became

She was endlessly curious about everything

Julia’s prep cook/food stylist whenever

culinary, including all new gadgets. When

she appeared on Good Morning America. We

Carl Sontheimer was developing the original

remained friends until she died, and I was

Cuisinart in the late seventies, Julia made a

lucky enough to host a special on her for the

point of using it on air so that home cooks could

Food Network in the last year of her life.

learn more about it. I don’t know who first put a blow torch in Julia’s hands, but it became her

But back to JC and More Company, for which

weapon of choice for crème brûlée. She was

I was supposedly the food stylist. I learned

reliably fascinated by new ingredients, too. The

a ton on the job, mostly from Julia, but also

first time any of us tasted a sugar snap pea

from the executive chef, Marian Morash. I

was when someone brought it to Julia on the

thought we’d just sit at the feet of a master

set of her show. The same was true of spaghetti

and be told what to do, but that wasn’t the

squash and string cheese.

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J U L I A & T H E N E W K I D | S T O R Y & R E C I P E S B Y S A R A M O U LT O N


ORANGE JELLIES View recipe on page 85 »

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Julia was also on a mission to introduce her viewers to all of the wonderful ingredients to which she’d first been exposed in France, including monkfish, rabbit, and celery root. I’d never cooked with any of them before and each one was a real eye-opener. Julia never hesitated using hard-to-find ingredients as long as they were worth it. She encouraged home cooks to become activists in pursuit of better eating. I can still see her looking dead into the camera and saying, “Tell your produce man you need leeks and shallots, and he must carry them. Tell your fishmonger that monkfish is a

Don’t take things for granted. Keep searching for better techniques, new applications, new ways of combining flavors. Try things out. One’s imagination can play one false—the only real test is to taste.

delicious alternative fish to the usual options.” I took that advice to heart a generation ago and This isn’t to say that Julia was merely trendy.

it continues to guide me today. It happens to be

She always tempered her curiosity with a

spring again, the season of renewal. Why not try

strict reliance on the scientific method. Here’s

something new in the kitchen?

how she boiled it all down in Julia Child and More Company:

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J U L I A & T H E N E W K I D | S T O R Y & R E C I P E S B Y S A R A M O U LT O N


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ONE TECHNIQUE, MULTIPLE WAYS:

PÂTE À CHOUX by SARAH LEVY

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O N E T E C H N I Q U E , M U LT I P L E WAY S : P Â T E À C H O U X


Pâte à choux is like the sexy black dress of

Honoré cake, churros, and gougères alike. I

Pâte à choux was first created by a man

pastry (not to be confused with the little black

have unveiled my favorite pâte à choux recipe

named Pantarelli in 1540. Something that

dress). Everyone should have a great go-to

below, and enlisted the help of two acclaimed

has been around that long must be delicious,

pâte à choux recipe up his or her sleeve. Pâte à

Chicago pastry chefs, Malika Ameen and CeCe

right? The choux rise because of the steam

choux’s versatility makes it easy to transform

Campise, to help you transform this recipe

that the water and milk create, which makes

from one dessert or savory dish to the next

into profiteroles with Chef Malika’s decadent

them nice and puffy. For those of you who

with just a few easy variations. This light

chocolate fudge sauce and eclairs with Chef

like churros, you can use this recipe too;

pastry dough recipe is at the heart of eclairs,

CeCe’s rich chocolate cremeux filling and

simply fry the dough instead of baking it to

profiteroles, croquembouches, beignets, Saint-

caramel glaze.

create the perfect churros.

my favorite pâte à choux View recipe on page 86 »

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50

AN INTERVIEW WITH GAIL SIMMONS


An Interview with

GAIL SIMMONS by K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

Fresh out of college and struggling to find a satisfying career, Gail Simmons took the advice of a friend and made a list—not of job ideas, but of things she liked to do. On a loose-leaf sheet of paper, she scribbled down just four words: “Eat. Write. Travel. Cook.” Little did she know, those four simple words would prove much more powerful than they seemed. photo by Melanie Dunea

Originally from Toronto, Gail now lives in

Steingarten, and manager of high profile

New York City where she works as Director

events for chef Daniel Boulud.

of Special Projects for Food & Wine. She is famous for her television roles as judge on

Clearly, she’s knowledgeable. But in my recent

Top Chef and host on Top Chef Just Desserts,

conversation with the culinary expert, Gail

but her journey to professional acclaim

also revealed herself as kind, authentic,

remains unfamiliar to most. Hidden behind

insightful and funny. Below, she dishes on

the spotlight are many years of hard work

everything from her most memorable meals

as a student in culinary school, a line cook

and the soup that shocked her, to early signs

at the legendary Le Cirque restaurant,

of her future in food and advice for those

an assistant to Vogue food critic Jeffery

wishing to follow in her footsteps.

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You come from a family that loves food. What are some of your earliest and most enduring food memories?

Well, my mother entertained a lot, and

My first wine memory is also sort of funny.

she taught this cooking school out of our

My father is from South Africa and we would

home—so there was always something

often go there to visit family. When I was six

bubbling on the stove and good food to be

years old, we all went out to the wine country,

had. I don’t really remember it, but there is

and my parents tried to teach us, sort of, how

one food story that my family is constantly

to taste wine, and told me I could put a little

telling me. My mother had served me split

tasting glass up to the very tip of my tongue. Of

pea soup—put it in front of me on my high

course, my brothers were a little older than me

chair—and kept trying to feed it to me. I

and kept drinking more than they should have,

didn’t want it and because I got so fed up,

so I copied them; when my parents weren’t

I ended up grabbing the bowl of soup and

looking, I would swig back the wine even though

dumping it on my own head. So, I guess I

I thought it tasted terrible. My family tells me

proved the point!

that I ran around screaming and making jokes and repeating everything that everyone said, and then promptly passed out in the backseat of the car and slept for eight hours straight.

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AN INTERVIEW WITH GAIL SIMMONS


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You’ve done a lot of traveling throughout your life, and it’s a large part of your work. Are there any meals from abroad that have really stood out to you?

Oh, there have been so many. But one meal that I remember very clearly was a meal from my honeymoon. We spent some time in Vietnam, and then on the way home we stopped in Tokyo for a week. A friend of ours had recommended this tiny little sushi restaurant that we had to try. No one spoke English, there was no way to communicate at all. We didn’t even know half the things we were eating, but it almost didn’t matter. It was just bite after bite of beautifully presented, extraordinary food, and we were there long into the night. It certainly was one of the most memorable meals I’ve ever had, and it also made me realize how vast and varied just sushi can really be. When you’re not eating out, what do you like to cook at home? When I cook alone, or just for myself and my husband, I tend to cook almost exclusively vegetarian. Not because I’m a vegetarian by any means, but because I eat such rich food in my work that often when I have the chance to cook for myself, I like to eat simply—lots of vegetables and whole grains. I went through a phase this winter where every single Sunday, I’d make these big vegetable soups and stews. And in the summer obviously I like to do simple dishes, where the ingredients speak for themselves. Lots of salads and grilled vegetables with spices and fresh herbs.

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AN INTERVIEW WITH GAIL SIMMONS


We’ve seen a lot of amazing dishes on

at that point in the competition, Paul would

wallpaper, macaron flowers, honey dripping

Top Chef and Top Chef Just Desserts.

be making something that seemed so simple.

off trees—but more importantly, it was such

Do you have any favorites?

And then I tasted it. The flavors were so

an incredible piece of nostalgia. Desserts

strong and it made me really understand how

don’t serve any practical purpose or have

talented Paul was as a chef, how thoughtful.

any nutritional value—they’re just sugar and

I realized just how powerful vegetables could

butter and flour. But they’re magic, really. And

be. You don’t need a triple-smoked pork belly

I think visually, too, there’s something really

to make an impression.

compelling about desserts. They can be so

With Top Chef, there’s one in particular that I remember mostly because it surprised me. In an episode from season nine, we asked contestants to cook for their mentors, and Paul Qui made a dish for his mentor Tyson Cole. The dish had all these beautifully

I think our most moving episode of Just

shaped vegetables, orchestrated very carefully

Desserts was this one episode celebrating the

on the plate in a shallow bowl, with a dashi

40th anniversary of the movie Willy Wonka and

and vegetable soup poured over them. It was

the Chocolate Factory. There was a lot of really

striking to look at, but I couldn’t believe that

delicious food in that episode, for sure—edible

beautiful to look at.

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Ultimately, you want food to be appealing, and you want You mention that desserts can

it to draw you in using all your senses. And to me at least,

be very visually powerful. How

there are multiple levels to presentation: the craft and the

important is presentation to

art. The craft starts at the very beginning with proper knife

the success of a dish?

skills, whether the food is cut and cooked consistently and to the proper doneness. And then there’s the art of how you actually plate a dish to give it eye appeal. A very casual and rustic feast can be just as appealing as a precious little jewelbox of a piece of sushi, or an ultra-modern presentation of dessert. In every case, I think the presentation needs to be tailored to the dish.

Regardless of whether you’re in the food world or not, I think You’ve found a career you’re

the same sort of rules apply. Find something that you love to

passionate about, but when

do, that interests and inspires you. That doesn’t mean that

you first started out, you

it’s always going be fun. I don’t believe there are any major

didn’t necessarily know what

shortcuts; it’s not as if I snapped my fingers and became a

that looked like. What advice

judge on a successful cooking show. There was a lot of hard

would you give to those who

work along the way; you just never hear about the hard

are still searching for their

work until later in someone’s career. There were many years

place in the world?

where I worked relentlessly for very little reward, and I think most chefs do. But I genuinely loved what I was doing and that made it tolerable. I think you also need to seek out people who can mentor you. I’ve been lucky and worked hard for a couple of really key people who were willing to take a chance on me—people like Jeffrey Steingarten and Daniel Boulud, and then Dana Cowin and Chris Grodovic at Food & Wine. And look, everyone can’t go to Thomas Keller and ask him to mentor them. But studying a person’s work, reading their work, cooking their food, learning as much as you can from them—that’s all very valuable.

Oh man, today was not a very good eating day because I was Great advice. Now here’s a

traveling! This morning I was in Montreal visiting family for

really serious and important

Passover, so I woke up and had matzo with butter and salt

question: What did you

and coffee for breakfast, which is hardly that interesting.

eat today?

And then I flew home. Last night I was in charge of cooking dinner for my family for part of the Passover Seder. So I roasted a turkey inspired by a friend’s recipe—which wasn’t very kosher, but that’s ok! I also roasted cauliflower with capers, olives and parsley, and then I braised endives in a little white wine, lemon, water and butter. We had leftovers, so I brought some home with me and had that for lunch, then came into the office. So far, that’s all I’ve eaten today. Actually, I’m getting kind of hungry!

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AN INTERVIEW WITH GAIL SIMMONS


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FOOD PORN Captions by Bryan Olsen and Todd Womack of the amazing web series The Key of Awesome. Find it at www.youtube.com/barelypolitical.

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F O O D P O R N B Y T O D D WO M AC K & B RYA N O L S E N


RAW Chicken Trent Reznor’s Thanksgiving turkey, pictured here, was also featured in the film Saw 3.

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Oh, god. This place is a total sausage fest.

RING BOLOGNA

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F O O D P O R N B Y T O D D WO M AC K & B RYA N O L S E N


BUTTERED Rolls Enough with the tantalizing pictures! Can someone develop a machine which teleports that shit to the empty plate I have sitting in front of me already?? I mean, mmm, wow, those looks good.

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CREAMED CORN

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F O O D P O R N B Y T O D D WO M AC K & B RYA N O L S E N


This is the hottest soft corn food porn we’ve ever seen.

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Prosciutto Mozzarella Sweet. This is a total FMS. ( Folded Meat Sanctuary )

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F O O D P O R N B Y T O D D WO M AC K & B RYA N O L S E N


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Sashimi Sally sells sashimi by the seashore, so send seven sheckles to Sally C. Shore for a sample.

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POMEGRANATE

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F O O D P O R N B Y T O D D WO M AC K & B RYA N O L S E N


Oh, pomegranate, so intensely flavorful. If it did not take an entire sweatshop’s worth of work to separate the seeds from the good stuff, I would you eat you every day. Unless of course on that day I am wearing my white pants.

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<

HIDDEN Gems

>

The best dishes that no one knows about…yet

You happen to pass by a little bakery and stop in. Next thing you know,

by JUDITH MARA

Those are what we call hidden gems. Fabulous or unique, unheard of places that are worth seeking out because something they offer is just so darn good. We

you are devouring the best double-

are starting this new feature with a hidden gem in

chocolate donut. Ever. A friend tips

Chicago. The city is full of them, but this one stands

you off about a little Greek coffee shop that has amazing onion rings.

out because it is truly hidden and their Belgium frites (fries) are real gems. We hope you have your own suggestions for future

Turns out that your friend is spot on.

hidden gems and we’d love you to share them

The rings are huge, hand breaded and

with us. It can be any dish from any type of food

fried to a shattering crunchiness.

Hidden Gem

BACKWOODS If you can find Backwoods on Google Maps, you have excellent search skills. Since it instantly didn’t pop up for us, it certainly makes our case for the hidden portion of our choice of Backwoods as our first featured Hidden Gem.

establishment, from ice parlors to gas stations. Just make sure we know where to find it.

Once you find Backwoods, your reward

seven sauces to choose from on any given

is what they serve to hungry late-night

night. Most are made in the Belgian aoli style

revelers desperate for something hot and

(meaning garlicky and smooth). The staff’s

delicious around midnight. They only

personal favorites are the curry aioli and

serve one thing––Belgium fries––which are

sriracha aioli, but the most popular is the

authentically referred to as frites by Wood

truffle oil aioli. Ketchup is available for the less

chef Ashlee Aubin. “Frites are perfect for a

adventuresome.

number of reasons. They are easy to cook quickly, portable, and universally beloved. But they are also a great example of simplicity. Frites have only three ingredients and it’s

If however, you search for the recently opened

immediately clear if they are great or not.”

small-plates hot spot, Wood (Chicago), in the Lakeview neighborhood, you’ll find it right away. To explain, Backwoods is a pass-through window inside a small vestibule tucked towards the “back” of Wood restaurant. And you’ll never see it in daylight. The window is only open for late-night feeding starting at 10:00 p.m. every night of the week.

catching the scent of someone walking down the street with a cone of frites and asking where to find them. And the price is reasonable too, setting you back a mere $5, less than the

which are fried twice, are magically

cost of a nightcap in the same neighborhood.

uniform in size and color, and are hand cut from Kennebec or Idaho potatoes. As frite connoisseurs know, the true tests are the perfect amount of seasoning, if they are served piping hot and what enticing Backwoods passes all these taste tests with satisfying colors. And there are no less than

HIDDEN GEMS: BACKWOODS

business by word of mouth. Mostly by people

Chef Aubin’s take on Belgian-style frites,

condiments are available for dipping.

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So far, Backwoods has built most of their

Just how popular can late-night frites be? Chef Aubin claims, “We have a handful of people who come so often that the cooks have made punch cards for “frequent friters” like the old Subway cards––you get your 10th frite free.” We think Backwoods might be the gem of the salty, savory late-night scene.


BACKWOODS Sun & Mon: 10 PM–midnight, Tue-Sat: 10 PM–late night 773.935.9663 3335 North Halsted Street Chicago, IL 60657 Enter on Buckingham

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W E AT H E R P E R M I T T I N G

The King of

Salmon by JUDITH MARA

Hail to the King. Right now, thousands of silver-scaled King salmon are fervently swimming through the Pacific back towards the rivers of their birth. Whether its home is the Yukon or Copper Rivers in Alaska or the Columbia River in Washington, this regal member of the salmon family is in season.

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P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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Salmon with a river name attached, such as Copper River Salmon, was caught while swimming in that particular river.

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W E AT H E R P E R M I T T I N G : T H E K I N G O F S A L M O N


Much of the King salmon in stores right now is fished by boats trawling the Pacific near the mouths of the rivers. Wait a little longer to buy some if you can; the more sumptuous salmon is caught as they swim into the rivers to spawn. As the salmon begin their journey up the frigid rivers, they stop eating and are fatty and luxurious in a wonderful way. The lesson here is that wild-caught salmon is typically fished by trawling. Salmon with a river name attached, such as Copper River Salmon, was caught while swimming in that particular river.

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W E AT H E R P E R M I T T I N G : T H E K I N G O F S A L M O N


King salmon, also commonly called Chinook

The most familiar way of cooking salmon

Cooking salmon on a plank is easy to do, as

salmon, is named for a Native American tribe on

over wood is cedar plank (planked) salmon.

long as you plan ahead—the planks should

the northwest coast whose survival was linked

Native Americans didn’t use cedar so to

be soaked in water a few hours. Online

to the salmon returning to the Columbia River.

speak, but they did tack salmon to wood

you can find hundreds of different ways

It is through this tribe and other tribes native

planks to enable the fish to be held close to

to season the salmon (or the planks), but

to the Northwest that explorers first tasted

a fire pit. The same cooking principle still

connoisseurs usually opt for a light brushing

salmon cooked over wood. Most fish was smoked

applies today. But it is recommended to find

of olive oil, kosher salt, pepper and maybe

or air-dried until very hard and then stored for

cedar or other wood planks (alder, mesquite)

some fresh lemon. Simplicity is key to

the winter months. But the salmon they cooked

that are sold commercially for this purpose.

enjoying the King of the salmon world.

over a wood fire to be eaten straight away still

There’s no point in risking toxicity from the

inspires cooks today.

wrong type of wood.

Check out these websites for more information on cooking with wood planks. Plank Cooking

·

Sara Moulton: Cooking on Wood

·

Healthy Eats: Cooking With Wood Planks

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HOW WE DID IT


HOW WE

DID IT

Deconstructing a shot from Stephen Hamiltonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The Restaurant Project by JUDITH MARA

favorite dish

Smelts Restaurant

Restaurant: The Bristol Chicago, IL food stylist

Josephine Orba prop stylist

Paula Walters

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Depending is the operative word when there is a garden or good farmers’ market. Leeks? Yes, but it could also be ramps or walking onions green garlic, or green onions. (Even the humble onion will do.) Radishes for me are likely to be the long Cinncinati Market variety and a round variety, the roots small and the leaves lush and tender. Peas? A half cup of shucked shelling peas or slivered snow peas or early sugar snaps. Any and all of these vegetables would be good. Groping around your garden, you’re going to find some treasures that will become the stars of this little ragout, which cooks in just about 10 minutes. Here’s an example of what vegetables I used and in what amounts, reflecting what I came across one late Spring day. A few days later and it would have been a different mix. When I’m a better gardener, the combination will change yet again— hopefully to include more than three asparagus spears! Prepare and wash all your vegetables. Trim the radishes and slice

spring garden hodgepodge of radishes, leeks and peas depending… by Deborah Madison

lengthwise, making all the pieces more or less the same. Also wash and dry the greens, ready the leeks, peas, and asparagus. (If you wish, you can make a stock to use in this dish with the leek trimmings, pea pods, asparagus peels, some tarragon, and salt. You’ll only need 1 cup or so.) When you are about ready to eat, melt a few teaspoons butter

serves 2

in a heavy skillet over medium heat. Add the leeks and 1/2 cup of the water and simmer for 5 minutes. Season with a few pinches of salt, add the radishes and asparagus, and simmer for

ingredients:

3 minutes. Next, add the peas and radish greens, making sure there is liquid in the pan as you go and adding more if needed.

·· handful of radish thinnings, plus their greens

Continue cooking until the peas are bright green and the leaves

·· 3 thin leeks, white parts plus a little of the pale green,

are tender, about 2 minutes longer. The radish leaves will wilt and

sliced (about 1/2 cup)

look a little funky, but they will taste mild and slightly nutty.

·· 10 ounces pod peas, shucked (about 3/4 cup) ·· 3 thick asparagus spears, tough ends trimmed, peeled, and sliced on the diagonal ·· Spring butter, made from the milk of grass-fed cows, or your favorite ·· 1/2 to 1 cup water or chicken stock ·· sea salt ·· about 1 teaspoon finely chopped tarragon ·· 1 teaspoon lemon juice

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When the vegetables are done, remove from heat, add a heaping spoonful of butter, season with salt, and stir in the tarragon and lemon juice. Taste and adjust seasonings, then serve and enjoy your garden in a bowl.


spinach crowns with sesame-miso sauce by Deborah Madison Serves 2-3

One bunch of spinach will yield eight or nine spinach crowns (the pink roots, plus about two inches of the stems and the small leaves), enough for two or three people

ingredients: ·· 16 spinach crowns ·· 1 tablespoon white miso ·· 1 tablespoon tahini ·· 1 tablespoon soy sauce ·· white or black sesame seeds, toasted in a dry skillet until golden

to enjoy as a nibble before dinner. I toss them with the same kind of sauce tht is often used for spinach in Japan, one based on sesame paste, white miso, a little soy, and water to thin. It seems that there’s nothing this sauce isn’t good with. Rinse the crowns thoroughly. Trim them, removing a bit of the root and any bedraggled leaves, then soak them in a bowl of cold water, swishing them about to loosen any grit or sand. If a lot of sand comes out, empty the bowl, refill it, and wash again. To make the sauce, stir together the miso, tahini, soy, and 1 tablespoon water in a bowl large enough to hold the spinach crowns. Steam the spinach crowns over simmering water, covered, until they have wilted a bit but are still bright green, after a few minutes. Remove them, rinse under cold water, dry well, then toss with the sauce. Pile them onto a serving dish or individual dishes, scattering sesame seeds over all, and serve.

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rhubarb potstickers by Sara Moulton Toss the rhubarb with the sugar and the orange rind in a medium bowl and let stand for 30

Serves 4

minutes. Drain and save the liquid separately from the rhubarb. Spread out the wonton wrappers on a work surface. Place a small mound of the rhubarb in

ingredients:

the center of each wrapper. Brush the edges of each wrapper with water; lift two opposite corners of each wrapper and press together above the center of the mound of rhubarb; bring

·· 1 cup sliced rhubarb

the other two opposite sides up and press them together. You should have shaped the wonton

·· 3 tablespoons sugar

into a little pyramid with the mound of rhubarb inside. Pinch the wrappers together very

·· 1/2 teaspoon freshly grated orange rind

tightly at the seams to make sure they are well sealed.

·· 12 wonton wrappers (3 ½ by 3-inches) ·· 1/2 tablespoon vegetable oil ·· 1/2 tablespoon unsalted butter ·· sweetened whipped cream or vanilla ice cream (optional)

Heat the oil and butter in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat until bubbly, then arrange the pot stickers, seam sides up, in the skillet. Cook them 2 to 3 minutes or until the bottoms are pale golden. Add 1/3 cup water, reduce the heat to low, cover the skillet with a lid, and cook 5 to 6 minutes, adding more water if necessary to cook the wonton wrappers through. Remove the lid and continue to cook until the bottoms of the pot stickers are crisp and golden. Gently loosen the pot stickers, and lift them out onto a serving plate. Stir 1/4 cup water into the reserved juice. Add the mixture to the skillet, bring it to a boil scraping up the brown bits at the bottom of the pan, and drizzle the liquid over the pot stickers. Serve hot with a spoonful of sweetened whipped cream or vanilla ice cream, if desired.

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orange jellies by Sara Moulton serves 6

Cut the oranges in half crosswise and squeeze out the juice. Strain and measure. You should have about 1 ¾ cups juice. Add more juice if you have less than this amount

ingredients: ·· 3 navel oranges ·· 2 juice oranges ·· 1 envelope unflavored gelatin ·· 1 ½ ounces vodka (optional)

and remove juice if you have more. Carefully scrap out and discard the pulp from the navel oranges to form six half shells. In a small saucepan combine 1/4 cup of the juice with the gelatin and set it aside for 5 minutes to dissolve the gelatin. Heat the mixture over low heat, stirring occasionally, until the gelatin is dissolved and the mixture is clear, 3 to 4 minutes. Whisk in the remaining juice and the vodka, if using. Transfer the liquid to a measuring cup or small pitcher so it is easy to pour. Arrange the orange shells, cut side up, in muffin tins or ramekins and pour the mixture half way up the side of each shell. Put the muffin tin holding the shells in the fridge and finish filling them, carefully pouring the remaining orange mixture all the way up to the top of each shell. (Note: depending on how large the navel oranges were, you will be able to fill 5 or 6 shells.) Cover the filled shells with plastic wrap and chill until firm, at least 4 hours and preferably overnight. Cut each half in 3 wedges before serving.   RECIPE INDEX

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pâte à choux

directions for my favorite pâte à choux: In a saucepan, boil milk, water, butter, sugar and sea salt together. Add the flour and cook until dry. Transfer the cooked mixture to a mixing bowl with a paddle attachment and add the eggs in stages since you may not need them all. Adjust the mixture with warm milk or eggs to ribbon consistency, if necessary. The dough will slowly fall when you stop the mixer. Pipe the choux paste into golf ball-sized balls. Bake at 375 degrees Fahrenheit for 8 minutes, then reduce the heat to 350 degrees

ingredients for my favorite pâte à choux: ·· Whole Milk | 125 grams | ½ cup ·· Water | 125 grams | ½ cup ·· Butter | 110 grams | ¼ cup – 1 stick

Fahrenheit for 18-20 minutes. *For Gougères, omit the sugar, add 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper, and 1 cup (120 grams) Gruyère cheese. Right before piping the choux paste, fold in the cheese and pepper.

·· Sugar | 5 grams | 1 ½ teaspoons ·· Sea Salt | 5 grams | 1 ½ teaspoons ·· AP Flour | 140 grams | ½ cup + 1/3 cup (5/6 cup) ·· Eggs (room temperature) | 197 grams | 3 eggs + 1 egg yolk

profiteroles with malika’s sticky fudge sauce by Malika Ameen To make profiteroles, slice the pâte à choux in half horizontally and fill them with your favorite ice cream or gelato, and top with Malika’s warm fudge sauce. Glossy, sticky, chocolaty and delicious!

ingredients for malika’s sticky fudge sauce: ·· Unsweetened Chocolate | 57 grams | 1/3 cup ·· Unsalted Butter | 17 grams | 2 Tablespoons ·· Agave Syrup | 35 grams | 2 Tablespoons ·· Heavy Cream | 190 grams | ¾ cup ·· Sugar | 212 grams | 1 cup ·· Malted Milk Powder | 11 grams | 1 Tablespoon + 1 teaspoon ·· Instant Espresso Powder | 3 grams | 1 Tablespoon ·· Kosher Salt | 1 gram | ½ teaspoon

makes 2 cups directions for malika’s sticky fudge sauce: In a small heavy bottomed saucepan melt chocolate, butter and agave syrup on low heat. Whisk until smooth. Slowly add cream, sugar, malt powder and espresso powder and stir until dissolved. Bring mixture to a boil and reduce heat to low. Simmer for 3-4 minutes. Constantly stir to avoid burning. Remove from heat and whisk in salt. Can be stored in the refrigerator for 1 week.

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chocolate caramel eclairs by CeCe Campise To make eclairs, pipe the pâte à choux into thin strips (as opposed to round balls), then fill with CeCe’s chocolate cremeux filling and top with CeCe’s caramel glaze.

ingredients for cece’s chocolate cremeux: ·· Half and Half | 350 grams | 1 1/4 cup + 1/3 cup

directions for cece’s chocolate cremeux: *I prefer Valrhona Guanaja 70% chocolate melted over a double boiler

·· Heavy Cream | 350 grams | 1 1/4 cup + 1/3 cup

Whisk the egg yolks, sugar, vanilla bean paste and salt together. In

·· Egg Yolks | 140 grams | 7 yolks

the meantime, scald the liquids. Slowly whisk the hot liquid into

·· Sugar | 80 grams | 1/3 cup + 1 teaspoon

the egg yolks.

·· Vanilla Bean Paste | 5 grams | 1/2 teaspoon ·· Salt | 2 grams | 1/2 teaspoon ·· Bittersweet Chocolate* | 385 grams

Pour the whole thing back into the pot and cook over low heat stirring slowly, nonstop with a spatula, making sure to scrape the bottom. Once it is nape (when you run your finger along the spatula and the custard holds a line) pour it over a fine strainer into the melted chocolate, whisking until uniform. For an extra smooth chocolate filling use an immersion blender to really combine all ingredients. Cover with plastic wrap touching the top to prevent a skin from forming, until cold and ready to pipe.

ingredients for cece’s caramel glaze:

directions for cece’s caramel glaze:

·· Sugar | 100 grams | 1/3 cup + 2 Tablespoons

Combine sugar and a tiny bit of water (so it looks like wet sand)

·· Heavy Cream Warm | 100 grams | 1/3 cup + 2 Tablespoons

in a heavy pot.

·· Premium Butter | 25 grams | 1 ½ Tablespoons ·· Salt | 4 grams | 1 teaspoon ·· Vanilla Bean Paste | 4 grams | ½ teaspoon ·· Bittersweet Chocolate* | 385 grams

Cook on high until the sugar turns a dark caramel. Carefully and slowly add the warm cream, whisking constantly, but be careful to avoid steam burns. When the cream is whisked in, add the butter and vanilla and whisk until combined. Let cool. *An easy alternative to this glaze is to combine 10 ounces of chewy Werther’s caramels, melted in the microwave, with 2 ounces of hot cream.

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green hornet by Tona Palomino of Trenchermen, Chicago serves 1 ingredients: ·· 1 1/2 ounces gin

In a shaker, combine everything except the tonic. Shake vigorously

·· 1 1/2 ounces fresh celery juice 

and strain into a rocks glass filled with ice. Top with tonic and serve.

·· 1/2 ounce fresh lime juice ·· 3/4 ounce simple syrup ·· A few dashes of Bitter Truth celery bitters ·· Fever Tree tonic  ·· ice

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S PR I NG 2 0 1 3

NO 0 07

Who's Hungry? Magazine | Spring 2013 | No 7  

Blending the worlds of food and photography, the magazine features travel stories and recipes from top food writers, as well as styling tips...

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