Page 1

late winter 2013

NO 0 06


FEATURES

6

5 Favorite Winter Dishes

36 14

Portrait of a Chef: Fabio Viviani

28 16

2

In Season: A Golden Elixir

CONTENTS

34

Weather Permitting: Root Vegetables

High Spirits: Bourbon Barrel-Aged Beauties

Stone Soup: Snow Day Supper


NO 0 06

CONTENTS

46 56

Winter Wonderland Aspen Getaway

4

Contributors

5

Letter from Steve

6

5 Favorite: Winter Dishes

12

The Art of Frost

14

Portrait of a Chef

16

In Season: A Golden Elixir

28

WP: Root Vegetables. Digging Deep

34

High Spirits: Bourbon Barrel-Aged Beauties

36

Stone Soup: Snow Day Supper

46

Winter Wonderland: Aspen Getaway

56

How We Did It

58

Recipe Index

CONTACTS media inquiries

How We Did It

Judith Mara | marabeach@sbcglobal.net Deirdre O’Shea | deirdre@stephenhamilton.com

sponsorship opportunities Deirdre O’Shea | deirdre@stephenhamilton.com

representation Schumann & Company | www.schumannco.com patti@schumannco.com | 312.432.1702

stephen hamilton 1520 W. Fulton | Chicago, IL 60607 www.stephenhamilton.com

CONTENTS

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contributors

NO 0 06

judith mara | Editor and Writer

ian law | Design

Deirdre O’Shea | Production Director

Judith has worked with Stephen for almost

Ian designed every aspect of Who’s Hungry?™

If you have worked with Stephen Hamilton,

seven years and helps to lead the editorial

magazine with meticulous attention to detail and

you’ve worked with Deirdre. Drawing on 15

concept and execution of Who’s Hungry?™

typography, and helped turn static images into an

years of experience in managing photography

magazine. An award-winning former creative

interactive experience. His award-winning design

studios, Deirdre has a hand in nearly every

director for major ad agencies such as Leo

work has been featured in the pages of Print,

aspect of Stephen’s business. She’s been

Burnett and J. Walter Thompson, Judith sweats

Creativity, How, PDN and Graphic Design USA.

instrumental in organizing the magazine’s

the details, pens Weather Permitting and

shoots, sourcing ingredients, and always

literally hand writes How We Did It.

keeping production on schedule.

steve dolinsky | Writer

kathryn o’malley |

geraldine campbell |

Since 2003, Steve has been the recognizable face

Associate Editor and Writer

Writer

of ABC 7’s “The Hungry Hound,” filing reports on

Kathryn’s love of food is matched only by her

Geraldine Campbell is a freelance writer, travel

the best eats in Chicago. He has also appeared

passion for writing about it; as part of the Who’s

enthusiast, and ex-Southerner with a love of grits

as a guest judge on “Iron Chef America,” as a

Hungry?™ editorial team, she indulges in a bit of

and all things deep fried. She has written about ev-

contributor to “Unique Eats,” and serves as one

both. Her popular food blog, dramaticpancake.

erything from love and sex to beauty and fashion,

of the Academy Judges for “The World’s 50 Best

com, garners more than 40,000 unique viewers

but her first loves are food and travel. When she’s

Restaurants.” For Who’s Hungry?™ magazine,

per month and highlights the people and stories

not writing, she’s testing recipes in her itty-bitty

Steve tracked down the best winter dishes from

behind great recipes.

kitchen or plotting her next adventure.

cold climate cities.

we are indebted to Lodge Cookware for

a special thanks to:

gifting us with a host of beautiful cast iron pots

Greg Biggers, Alexi Giannoulias, Tony Priolo, Vince Gerasole, Nick Cave, Giuseppe Tentori, Josephine Terlato,

for use in our Snow Day Supper (p. 36). We will

Sandro Miller, Geoff Binns-Calvey, Josephine Orba, JoAnn Witherall, CeCe Campise, Raymond Barrera,

undoubtedly use them time and time again.

Tom Hamilton, Paula Walters, Ruth Siegel, Mark Kelly, John Cibak, Andrew Burkle, Justin Paris, David Raine,

Gale Gand, Fabio Viviani, Paul Kahan and Eric Dresner, Ina Pinkney,

Kaitlyn McQuaid, Sara Cruz, Matt Savage, Juan Palomino, and Ruben Cantu 4

CONTRIBUTORS


LETTER FROM STEVE Or, invite a fun, creative group of people over for a potluck supper, as we did in our story “Snow Day Supper. Pot Lucky.” We invited a delicious mix of chefs, TV personalities, artists, professionals and a former politician and gave them a Lodge Dutch Oven to fill and sat back and watched a magical evening unfold. One great thing about winter is there’s still plenty to do outdoors. Skating, snowball fights and sledding are cold weather activities many of us grew up with. Winter can bring the kid out in anyone, and in “Winter Wonderland” Geraldine Campbell reminisces about snow-filled days. Along with her story, we share cozy recipes including a kid favorite, Egg in a Basket.

These are the last days of winter. Most days the skies

Mornings with frosted windows call

are grey and every time it warms up, before you know it,

with real maple syrup. To learn all about

for a tasty stack of hot waffles drizzled

it’s frigid again. Cabin fever creeps up on us and we feel

this heavenly sap, we interviewed Tim

trapped indoors. As we wait out the next couple of months

three top chefs share their maple syrup

for spring, it’s the perfect time to turn “cooped up” into “cozying up” with enjoyable simple things like playing Yahtzee or cooking for others.

Burton of Burton’s Maplewood Farm and infused-recipes. And if you wonder how we create the frosty effects in our warm studio, special-effect guru Geoff BinnsCalvey tells us how it’s done in “Tricks of the Trade”. Who’s Hungry?™ for something warm and toasty? STEPHEN HAMILTON

LETTER FROM STEVE

|

PORTRAITS BY ANDREW BURKLE

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5

WINTER DISHES

6

from Cold Climate Cities by STEVE DOLINSKY

5 F AV O R I T E : W I N T E R D I S H E S F R O M C O L D C L I M A T E C I T I E S


Steve Dolinsky, Food Reporter for ABC 7 News in Chicago, 12-time James Beard Award winner and a native Minnesotan, shares his five favorite winter dishes from restaurants in colder cities. Portrait by Avery House

1

Short Rib Stroganoff ($18.50) BAVETTE’S BAR & BOEUF 218 W. KINZIE ST., CHICAGO 312-624-8154

As the wind practically slaps you in the face,

at his latest project, Bavette’s Bar & Boeuf,

especially along the Chicago River near Lake

the menus are almost always suited to cold

approximation to a wool sweater

Michigan, there is a constant yearning all winter

weather comfort. That stroganoff is the closest

long for a warm respite. Seek refuge in one of

approximation to a wool sweater you’ll find on

you’ll find on a plate

Brendan Sodikoff’s creations. Between the hearty

a plate: caramelized cremini mushrooms and

cassoulet at Maude’s Liquor Bar, the dijonnaise-

hand-cut fettuccine swaddle the tender braised

dripping cheeseburger at his upscale diner, Au

beef, all of which gets a mild jolt in the form of a

Cheval, and the fork-tender short rib stroganoff

horseradish cream sauce.

That stroganoff is the closest

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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Tater Tot Hautedish ($24) HAUTE DISH 119 WASHINGTON AVE. N., MINNEAPOLIS 612-338-8484 WWW.HAUTE-DISH.COM

8

You don’t have to be a fan of “Prairie Home

starch, a meat and a canned or frozen vegetable,

Companion” or “Fargo” to know that the

usually bound together by a canned soup, like

Twin Cities get downright cold in the winter.

cream of mushroom. At the tongue-in-cheek

Having grown up there, I still have memories

HauteDish in Minneapolis, the casserole is

of watching Vikings games in a snowmobile

ditched, but the ingredients remain familiar: a

suit—covered head-to-toe—while thinking

large puck of braised short ribs is topped with

about what mom could possibly have up her

baby green beans and sliced porcini mushrooms;

sleeve for dinner. If we were going to a family

a béchamel adds further richness, while a pair

gathering or a potluck, chances are you’d see

of “tots” (silky potato croquettes) are saddled up

hotdish: an all-in-one casserole featuring a

on the side.

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5 F AV O R I T E : W I N T E R D I S H E S F R O M C O L D C L I M A T E C I T I E S


3

Shiromaru Hakata Ramen ($15) IPPUDO 65 4TH AVE. (BETWEEN 9TH AND 10TH ST.), NEW YORK CITY 212-388-9923 WWW.IPPUDONY.COM

Walking the streets of the East Village, you don’t have

The Shiromaru Hakata ramen is mainly about the broth

to look too far for a warm-up. There are dozens of

—a heady, porky soup base perfumed with the umami

affordable, interesting eats. Fans of Japanese food might

of soy sauce and miso—jammed with toothsome egg

forget that beyond the assorted maki roll and steaming

noodles, then topped with architecturally precise knobs

(but hardly filling) miso soup, there is ramen. Ippudo is

of mushrooms, red pickled ginger and scallions. A few

a successful chain in Japan, and their presence in New

tender slices of pork loin are draped across the top, and

York comes as no surprise; the search for delicious,

if you like, opt for some extra mustard leaves (extra $3)

affordable food in Manhattan is practically blood sport.

scattered across the fatty-rich surface.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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With the wind whipping up off of Lake Ontario

non-meat eaters can enjoy, fits the bill. Mackerel

and temperatures routinely near sub-zero, the

is cured overnight then hot smoked; a fish stock

demand for hearty comfort food is especially

is fortified with cream, onions and garlic, then

strong in the depths of a season that typically

simmered for hours. When an order comes in, the

sees the sun go down by 5 p.m. The focus at The

hearty broth is garnished with sliced fingerling

Hoof is definitely on meat and offal. But after

potatoes and diced fennel, plus sautĂŠed lobster

slogging around Kensington Market and window

mushrooms as well as earthy chanterelles. This is

shopping at the funky shops along Queen Street,

Canadian comfort that somehow makes poutine

you need to dive into something substantial. The

look downright pedestrian.

smoked mackerel chowder, one of the few dishes

Smoked Mackerel Chowder ($11) THE BLACK HOOF 928 DUNDAS ST. WEST, TORONTO 416-551-8854 WWW.THEBLACKHOOF.COM

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5 F AV O R I T E : W I N T E R D I S H E S F R O M C O L D C L I M A T E C I T I E S

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5

Cassoulet ($31) PIGALLE 75 CHARLES ST., BOSTON 617-423-4944 WWW.PIGALLEBOSTON.COM

In a city that treats its baked beans with the

for the past decade, but few dishes take away

made garlic pork sausage. The protein-palooza

same reverence reserved for its baseball team,

the East Coast chill of a January deep-freeze

is embedded in a sea of great Northern white

the Beantown moniker is especially apt among

better than cassoulet. Chef Marc Orfaly slowly

beans; the heat, juice, fat and starch serve as a

the city’s French bistros and brasseries come

braises lamb shanks, combining the shredded

warm, familiar blanket (albeit more flannel than

wintertime. Pigalle has been perched at the

meat with an entire duck leg confit and house-

cotton) on a bitterly cold night.

higher end of the dining spectrum in Boston

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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FROST T

H

E

A

R

T

O

F

b y K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

The best food photography evokes a clear sense of atmosphere Frost on the windowsill implies a chill

pro Geoff Binns-Calvey. With some

in the air outside, making the scene

scientific know-how and the artistry

inside that much warmer—and a hot

of a master, there’s no need to wait for

bowl of oatmeal especially inviting.

a snow day. Instead, Geoff creates a

Of course, Mother Nature rarely gifts

winter wonderland so beautiful it rivals

us the kind of weather we hope for,

the real thing. Click the bullets to the

so Stephen must rely on the next best

right for a peek into his process.

thing: the handiwork of special-effects

1. THE WINDOWS

2. THE FROST

3. THE DUSTING OF SNOW

Using a photo layout

In what looks like a mad

To imitate light, powdery

for reference, Geoff first

scientist experiment, Geoff

snow, Geoff uses the

constructs a wooden base

whisks together a blend

airbrush to blow a flurry of

for his faux windows and

of magnesium sulfate,

powdered cellulose flocking

measures where each

water, and alcohol, and

(a plant fiber) blended with

frame should be placed.

then carefully applies it to

dry glue onto the frosty

Once the frames are nailed

the windowpanes with an

windowpanes, concentrating

into the base, Geoff cuts

airbrush to create small

on the bottoms and corners

glass panels to fit the

frost-like crystals. For the

where snow would

frames exactly.

most realistic effect, Geoff

naturally settle.

says, the trick is not to overdo it.

12

THE ART OF FROST


1 THE WINDOWS

2 THE FROST

3 THE DUSTING OF SNOW

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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Chef PORTRAIT OF A

FABIO VIVIANI

b y K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

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P O RT R A I T O F A C H E F : FA B I O V I V I A N I


Florence native Fabio Viviani won over millions of Americans while competing on Season 5 of Top Chef,

how did you end up in the kitchen when you could’ve ended up on TV (with those looks)? Well, the reality is that the kitchen chose me way before TV did. I was

where his gregarious personality and charming sense

eleven years old, I had to find a job to help my family bring the money in

of humor made him an all-time fan favorite. Now, in

the household, and the restaurant business was the only business where I could find someone willing to employ me, as an eleven-year-old child.

partnership with DineAmic’s Lucas Stoioff and David

That’s how I ended up in the kitchen. And TV is not that glamorous,

Rekhson (the duo behind Public House and Bull &

trust me! I’d rather be in the restaurant business.

Bear), Viviani is about to launch his third restaurant

if you weren’t a chef and could choose again, what would you do or be?

thus far—and the first in Chicago.

If I weren’t a chef, I would be something really badass. Like a jet fighter pilot or a veterinarian, which is really badass. It’s not like, manly, like a

Opening February 15, Siena Tavern will bring rustic Italian fare and sleek décor to a cool steel building in the heart of River North. Diners can look forward to Neapolitan pizzas, house-made pastas, and even some recipes from Viviani’s mom.

jet fighter pilot, but it’s a very nice, very cute profession. Or, I would be a brain surgeon; I like to mess with people’s brains a lot.

who are your biggest culinary influences? No one knows about him, so this answer will be very short. His name is Simone Mugnaini, who was my business partner and the chef I worked for when I was a young kid. I spent about twelve years of my life listening to whatever he said on the restaurant business, and if I have a grain of success in that business today, it’s thanks to him.

We recently sat down with the star chef to ask him a few questions posed by our previously featured

what’s your favorite ingredient to work with? Wow, that’s like picking your favorite child! We all know you have one,

chef, Gale Gand. And with his thick Italian accent

but you can’t say or your wife is gonna get pissed off. So the reality

and trademark wit, Viviani answered.

is that I have to say three, I can’t just pick one: Parmesan, balsamic vinegar, and pork. Anything pork.

what’s your favorite late-night snack? Roasted chicken. I’m Italian! You always make more chicken than you need, you leave it in the freezer, and at nighttime you pop a piece in the microwave for thirty seconds, it gets hot, and you just peel it off the bone. I don’t have corn dogs, I don’t have those packaged snacks. Leftover food from dinner is my midnight snack. When I travel and I can’t eat leftovers because they go bad, I have a jar of Nutella always available. So I eat Nutella with my fingers. You know the whole concept of farm-to-table? For me, Nutella is finger-to-mouth.

what’s the story with the turtles? Here’s the deal. I am moving from Italy in 2006; I have no friends, I don’t speak English, I’m by myself. And I’m also busy during the day working at the restaurant. But I am a very caring person and I love animals. Can I get a dog? Not really, because you gotta take care of a dog as much as a child. Can I get a cat? Eh, that’s alright, I haven’t had great history with cats. So I said, you know, whatever—I ’m going to get something. Goldfish is not exciting. So I said you know what, I’ll get a turtle. I want a turtle. So what I did was get a little red-eared slider. And a turtle is more animated than a fish. She climbs on the rocks, she does a little sunbathing, she goes back in the water, she plays. And I love animals. So I got a turtle; that was my very first pet in the United States. She is still

The antidote to cold winter nights: Viviani’s Beef and Barley Soup

with me, now she’s 3½ pounds. She’s a big pet and she has a personality. People say ‘oh whatever, it’s a turtle.’ But she has a personality. And now I have a pond in my backyard with a bunch of turtles. P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

15


: n o s a e S

n e d l o G A In

l l A , r i x i l E n Up w o Gr by

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IN SEASON: A GOLDEN ELIXIR, ALL GROWN UP

K AT

’M N O H RY

ALL

EY


Maple syrup isn’t just for pancakes anymore. There’s a sweet renaissance taking place, but not where you’d expect. When most of us think about maple syrup,

Depending on the weather, Tim Burton and his

certain images are likely to spring to mind

wife Angie will start tapping trees as early as

almost immediately—visions of a lady

late January. Together they own and operate

Butterworth, snow-capped hills in Vermont, or

Burton’s Maplewood Farm, a small farm of 700

perhaps the log cabin “sugar shacks” one finds

maple trees tucked away in Medora, Indiana.

scattered throughout Quebec. In all the familiar

Tim is burly and bearded and one of the nicest

places, maple syrup season typically runs from

guys you’ll ever meet. In some ways, he’s exactly

mid-March to mid-April, when a pattern of

what you would expect of a maple syrup maker.

cold nights and warm days sends sap coursing

In others, he could not be more unique.

through the veins of the trees. But in Indiana, sugar season begins much earlier—earlier, in fact, than anywhere else in the world.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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While modern tubing systems certainly exist,

That’s a whole lot of sap for not a lot of syrup.

Tim prefers to collect sap the old-fashioned

But Tim is finding a way to put the evaporated

way: with tap and bucket. The taps are entered

sap to use, bottling the evaporation—with its

into the trees’ cambium layer, where the sap

lovely, subtle tannin flavor—and calling the

flows between the bark and the hardwood. Forty

water Maple Mist.

gallons of sap yield just one gallon of maple syrup. Sap itself is thin, watery, and only faintly

Here’s another thing that sets Tim apart:

sweet. To bring its sugar content up from around

Whereas most maple-syrup makers rely on

2% to 67%, Tim reduces the sap in a three-by-

wood-burning fires to keep their evaporators

twelve-foot pan in an evaporator machine called

going, Tim uses fuel oil which provides for

the Volcano 2000.

greater control over heat. Right before he draws off the maple syrup, Tim runs the evaporator on

“One way of looking at it,” Tim says,

low to allow the syrup to caramelize. The result is a richer, deeper, more nuanced flavor.

“is that you have to boil off 39 gallons of water to produce one gallon of maple syrup.”

18

Sap from early in the season produces Grade A syrup, which comes in three subgrades: light amber, medium amber and dark amber. Sap from later in the season produces Grade B syrup. Grade A has a light, delicate taste—perfect for drizzling on pancakes or stirring into oatmeal— while Grade B has a depth and richness that holds up well to baking, braising, and roasting.

IN SEASON: A GOLDEN ELIXIR, ALL GROWN UP


Lingonberry Waffles View Greg Biggers’ recipe on page 58 »

Chef Greg Biggers slathers his waffles with lingonberry jam and honey whipped ricotta, then crowns them with fresh blueberries, pecan clusters, and a drizzle of Burton’s custom smoked syrup.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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Braised Pork Belly with Maple-Sherry Calabrian Chile Glaze View Paul Kahan’s recipe on page 59 »

The Publican’s Braised Pork Belly with Maple-Sherry Calabrian Chile Glaze

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IN SEASON: A GOLDEN ELIXIR, ALL GROWN UP


P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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IN SEASON: A GOLDEN ELIXIR, ALL GROWN UP


With its bold and complex flavor, Tim’s Grade B

he says. “We see so much creativity in these

is also the preferred syrup of nearly every chef in

chefs’ kitchens, and we are inspired to look

Chicago. At Paul Kahan’s The Publican, braised

at what we produce and how we can do

pork belly is simmered in a spicy-sweet mixture of

something new with it.”

Grade B syrup, sherry vinegar, Calabrian chiles and a healthy dollop of butter. At Café des Architectes,

The options, it seems, are boundless. From

Chef Greg Biggers uses a custom smoked syrup

collaborating with chefs to create exclusive

to top off waffles with lingonberries and honey-

barrel-aged syrups for their restaurants,

whipped ricotta. And Ina Pinkney, of the iconic

to working with mixologist Adam Seger to

breakfast spot, Ina’s, bakes freshly sliced pears

create cocktails using his syrup, Tim is single-

draped in a sweet amber ribbon.

handedly changing the way we think about nature’s candy. His line of boozy adult syrups

Chefs are drawn to Tim’s syrups for their superb

is nothing short of spectacular, blending

quality, but they also respond to his innovation. Like

barrel-aged maple syrup with some of the rum,

the talented group he works with, Tim is constantly

brandy or bourbon that originally occupied

pushing the envelope, asking: how can I make this

the barrels. He is also working with chef David

product different, better, more interesting?

Burke to start a new line of maple vinegars.

“I ’m trying to make maple syrup just a little bit sexier,”

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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Grade A maple syrup is broken into three subgrades which are measured by their translucence: light amber, medium amber and dark amber. Grade B syrup is the darkest of all with the richest and most robust flavor.

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IN SEASON: A GOLDEN ELIXIR, ALL GROWN UP


P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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Tim is no doubt a pioneer in the sap-happy world of maple syrup. But sometimes, blazing new trails means revisiting old ones. Sap from the very end of the season, beyond Grade B, has a “buddy” taste; if you reduce it to syrup, it’s distasteful and bitter, and you would never want to eat it. However, in the early 1900’s people used to put that sap in old bourbon and whiskey barrels, throw in raisins and hops, and let it ferment. This, Tim says, results in a chilled concoction called maple sap beer. He is currently in talks with several different breweries to bring back the historic drink, and he will be doing some trial runs this season.

“It ’s nothing cutting edge or brand new,” Tim explains, “but more of a throwback to another time.” Ina Pinkney’s Maple Baked Pears are simple and fragrant, best topped off with a scoop of vanilla bean ice cream or a dollop of whipped cream.

Burton’s Maplewood Farm MEDORA, INDIANA (812) 525-2663 BURTONSMAPLEWOODFARM.COM Burton’s syrups are available for purchase online and can be found at over two dozen grocery stores, markets, and restaurants all around Chicago. A complete list of retailers is coming soon to Burton’s website.

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IN SEASON: A GOLDEN ELIXIR, ALL GROWN UP


Maple Baked Pears View Ina Pinkney’s recipe on page 60 »

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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W E AT H E R P E R M I T T I N G

Root Vegetables. Digging Deep by JUDITH MARA

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W E AT H E R P E R M I T T I N G : R O O T V E G E TA B L E S . D I G G I N G D E E P


G

rown beneath the earth in dark damp soil, splendid

flavors, colors and textures develop. You can’t see their progress until they are pulled from the ground gnarly and dusty with roots that look like they need a shave. When scraped clean, gemlike colors emerge in garnet red, citrine yellow and diamond white. Root vegetables are oddly similar to jewels in that they also begin their lives underground.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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Gems of cold climate farmer’s markets

All across our winter wonderland states,

The most popular root vegetable today is the

Then there are beets. While they have long been part

root vegetables are the gems of cold climate

potato, including the sweet potato. Is there

of our diets, many people say they hated beets growing

farmer’s markets. It’s lovely to see purple-

anyone who doesn’t know what a potato

up. But a few years ago chefs started to glorify beets

tipped white turnips, deep red, orange and

tastes like or the many ways to eat them?

in salads, soups and roasted side dishes. Then beets

gold beets, cream-colored parsnips and

The same is true for carrots, which have been

began appearing as carpaccio, on pizza, in curries and

rutabagas, and blue, red, purple and gold

popular much longer than potatoes—all the

in desserts. Never has a root vegetable been so fully

potatoes piled high in bunches and baskets.

way back to the 900’s.

explored. Or had so many new fans.

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W E AT H E R P E R M I T T I N G : R O O T V E G E TA B L E S . D I G G I N G D E E P


P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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While a red potato tastes more or less like a gold potato and a purple carrot tastes almost exactly like an orange carrot, there are very distinct tastes between the various types of root vegetables. A raw turnip tastes like a radish, but when cooked its flavor is closer to a potato. Rutabagas are described as tasting like a cross between a turnip and cabbage. Celeriac, unsurprisingly, tastes like celery. Parsnips are

Give these a try This list goes beyond the usual choices of roots (potato, radish, carrot, beet) that are found at farmer’s markets. Here’s a cool tip: Most of these can be eaten raw or lightly cooked in salads; just shave or cut the roots into matchstick pieces to keep them tender.

hard to describe; they look like a white carrot but they have their own distinct flavor that can be called nutty, sweet, oniony, and carroty all rolled into this wonderful gem.

· CELERIAC/CELERY ROOT

· PARSNIP

· JERUSALEM ARTICHOKE

· RUTABAGA

· JICAMA

· TURNIP

· LOTUS ROOT

· YAM

· KOHLRABI (not really a root, but people think it is)

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W E AT H E R P E R M I T T I N G : R O O T V E G E TA B L E S . D I G G I N G D E E P


P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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HIGH SPIRITS

BOURBON BARREL-AGED Beauties by

JUDITH MARA

very mad cow milk stout Brewed at Revolution Brewing »

34

HIGH SPIRITS: BOURBON BARREL-AGED BEAUTIES


For those of us who were brought up believing that freshly brewed beer is best, hold on to your bottle—we’ve been proven wrong by a revolution. Revolution Brewing, Chicago’s new hometown craft brewery and brewpub which produces over ten styles of bourbon barrel-aged beers, has joined in the revolt that may have started right here. Brewing beer in barrels is not new; however, the

What to expect from a bourbon barrel-aged

use of bourbon barrels to age beer is as recent

beer? The longer the beer is aged, the more you

as the early 1990’s when both Goose Island and

can expect an intense taste with more nuanced

Samuel Adams lay claim to be the first to brew

flavors and textures, hence all the wine speak

bourbon barrel-aged beer and place it firmly in

used to describe a bourbon barrel-aged beer. Plus

the hands of the craft beer movement.

it typically has a higher alcohol content that helps the beer age better.

“The barrels contribute a big bourbon nose and flavor, and the charred American oak imparts

Pictured here is the recently released (fall 2012)

aromas and flavors of caramelized sugar,

Very Mad Cow Milk Stout from Revolution

vanilla and sometimes toasted coconut. Similar

Brewing. “It is a huge milk stout, aged in Woodford

to a crème brûlée,” says Revolution Brewing

Reserve Bourbon and Jack Daniels Whiskey

brewmaster, Jim Cibak. The beers can be aged

barrels for six months,” says Cibak. “The resulting

as short as three months or as long as a year

beer is a rich, roasty stout with a silky, smooth

depending on the style and desired intensity of

mouthfeel.” He also claims it has all the crème

barrel character.

brûlée nuances. And does it really contain milk? Close, it’s actually lactose, a milk sugar that gives the beer a touch of sweetness––in its old age.

You can find a bourbon barrel-aged craft brew just about anywhere you live. Here are a few brewers and brewpubs to check out. · Revolution Brewing

· Firestone/Walker

· 3 Floyds

· Bell’s

· Goose Island

· Fifty Fifty

· Founder’s

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t

o

ne

So

u

p

Snow Day S

SUPPER S

er i eS

by JUDITH MARA

Snow Day Supper is part of our occasional Stone Soup series based on the iconic tale of villagers coming together to create a grand meal that fed the entire town. Working with this issue’s theme of Winter Wonderland, we chose to host a potluck supper with guests contributing nourishing onepot dishes that would warm a group of 18 Chicago villagers right down to their toes.

por t ra i ts by SM I LEB OOT H

Pastry Chef Gale Gand

Chef Giuseppe Tentori

Chef Ina Pinkney

Chef Tony Priolo

Steve Dolinksy

Author, Partner in TRU

BOKA, GT Fish & Oyster

Owner of Ina’s

Piccolo Sogno, Piccolo Sogno Due

Hungry Hound ABC 7

Mom’s Braised Short Ribs

Smoked Duck Cassoulet

Moroccan Sweet Potato Stew

Borlotti Beans with Venison Sausage

Georgian Pork Stew

with Winter Vegetables

36

S T O N E S O U P : S N OW DAY S U P P E R


Vince Gerasole, Reporter CBS 2

Sandro Miller, Photographer

Nick Cave, Visual Artist

Alexi Giannoulias, V.P. at BNY Mellon

Steve Hamilton

Vito Gerasole, Girasole, Pittsburgh PA

Szechwan Shrimp

Chicken, Mushroom and Potato Casserole

Josephine Terlato, Southern Wine and Spirits

CeCe Campise

Lentil Soup

Hosts

Braised Chicken, Eggplant and Tomatoes

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37


Ina Pinkney, Chicago’s legendary “Breakfast Queen” was the first to arrive at the Snow Day Supper. Her new Lodge Dutch Oven was gently simmering on the stove when the second guest arrived. Ina, spying the new guest, rushed to greet her, opening her arms to embrace friend and pastry chef Gale Gand. “Some days are just perfect,” Ina sighed. And with that, the party had begun. So often the success of a party depends on the guest list. We developed ours by asking one simple question: Who would we like to spend time with if we were cooped up during a blizzard? After a bit of brainstorming, we came up with a delicious mix of chefs, food-focused TV personalities, artists, professionals and a former politician. Invitations arrived on guests’ doorsteps in the form of large cast iron pots, generously supplied by the wonderful folks at Lodge Cookware. What the guests made in those pots was up to them.

38

S T O N E S O U P : S N O W D AY S U P P E R


Ina Pinkney, Moroccan Sweet Potato Stew

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39


Alexi Giannoulias & Josephine Terlato, Lentil Soup

40

S T O N E S O U P : S N O W D AY S U P P E R


There was no snow on the eve of the Snow Day party, but it was plenty frigid. Before a glass of wine was poured, the room filled with people, introductions and chatter. The stove was soon covered with Dutch ovens holding curious bubbling concoctions, the scent of garlic, onions, spices and herbs wafting throughout the kitchen. While many guests knew one another through foodrelated work, there was no interest in shoptalk–– topics of conversation ranged from historical to hysterical. Reporter Vince Gerasole and chef Gale Gand, bonded over spirited conversation about Downton Abbey. Hungry Hound’s Steve Dolinsky and his wife Amy readily listened to anyone who had tips on traveling to Japan. And former politician Alexi Giannoulias honestly admitted that he had initially been baffled by the 5-quart cast iron Dutch oven that arrived at his house. Luckily, his girlfriend Jo came to the rescue and suggested that he read the pre-invite email.

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41


Everyone was curious about what the others had cooked and all had a story to tell about how they approached their dishes. Artist Nick Cave had the chefs laughing as he described the dish he brought as “chicken and some sort of sauce.” The chefs ticked off ingredients as if reciting dishes on a menu, and more than one guest gave their mother-father-aunt full credit for the recipe. As the Dutch ovens were carried to a buffet table for the grand reveal, everyone crowded around with anticipation. In a cloud of steam and a burst of fragrance, supper was served. Most dramatic was the uncovering of Giuseppe Tentori’s sealed pot, which released a truly heavenly aroma. Inside was a cassoulet of smoked duck confit, flageolets and a generous shaving of truffles.

42

S T O N E S O U P : S N O W D AY S U P P E R


Gale Gand, Mom’s Braised Short Ribs with Winter Vegetables

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Vince & Vito Gerasole, Braised Chicken, Eggplant and Tomatoes

44

S T O N E S O U P : S N OW DAY S U P P E R


All of it was delicious, from a hearty stew of handmade venison sausage and borlotti beans to a comforting braise of chicken, thick with eggplant and tomatoes. Most unusual was a Georgian (as in Russian, with Asian influences) pork stew that sported a lovely combination of spices such as fenugreek and dried marigold. The cinnamon scent that pierced the air was from a creamy Moroccan sweet potato stew, and the only soup of the evening was a peppery lentil family recipe. When it was time to sit down to dinner, the room grew a little quieter as everyone enjoyed their meals. Those well versed in food swapped tasting notes as the happy feeling of sharing good food swelled throughout the night. Photos taken by Matt Savage’s Smilebooth Special thanks to Lodge Cookware for providing a bevy of gorgeous cast iron

captured the joyful mood of each guest.

pots for use at our potluck. On evenings like this one, with good food and a glass of wine in hand, everyone could just be themselves, making our Snow Day Supper more than a potluck—it was oh, so lucky.

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Winter Wonderland A S P E N G E T AWA Y by GERALDINE CAMPBELL

46

WINTER WONDERLAND: BY GERALDINE CAMPBELL


When you’re a kid, snow means snowmen and snow angels, snowball fights and snow forts, sledding and sleighing, and, most of all, snow days. It means getting all bundled up in puffy, dough boy-like snowsuits and, later, stripping off the cold weather gear and relishing that tingly feeling as your fingers and toes defrost. For me, coming in from the cold was as much a part of the magic of snow as the snow itself. Inside, I would thaw myself in front of the open oven and curl my hands around a mug of hot chocolate. It didn’t matter whether my mom made cocoa from a powdered mix or whether she melted down bars of Toblerone for a special winter treat: It was about comfort and warmth.

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48

WINTER WONDERLAND: BY GERALDINE CAMPBELL


When you get older, snow loses some of its magic. There’s the driveway to shovel, the car to clear of snow and ice, treacherous roads and delayed trains, and the inevitability that, no matter how beautiful things look, snow eventually becomes wet, grey slush. When I left New York for what would be a fiveyear hiatus in warm weather climes, I didn’t miss winter or snow. At least I didn’t think I did—until I moved back. That year, back-to-back storms kept the city wrapped in a downy white embrace. It was Narnia in the Hundred Years Winter and I remember taking my dogs, Charlie and Frankie, out in the snow for the first time. For them, snow meant the absence of boundaries. There were no sidewalks and no streets, no grassy patches or green parks, only towering mounds of cold powder. These Frankie insisted on summiting, daintily marking her territory at the top of the highest dune. Even when Charlie, catching me by surprise, gave chase to a snowplow, I recalled the wonder that I felt when I was younger. In the city, those magical moments of childlike innocence are, at least for me, as rare as they are fleeting. So, I seek out my winter wonderlands elsewhere. In the Adirondacks, I trekked through snow-covered woods, skated on frozen ponds, and bobsledded with Olympic hopefuls. In Reykjavik, I made my way across the vast white countryside on an Icelandic horse and soaked in the Blue Lagoon in below-zero temperatures.

In Aspen, I practiced textbook ski turns, spotted a pine squirrel on a naturalist-guided snowshoeing tour and woke before sunrise to hike to the top of Smuggler Mountain—then zipped down on a bottom-size sled, grinning the entire way.

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Lamb Rib Chops with Garlic and Rosemary View recipe on page 61 »

My outdoor romps were tempered by fireside

piling on—and stripping off—of multiple layers of

warm-up sessions, hot tub soaks and simple but

clothing alone deserves a culinary prize. Anything

hearty meals that are the well-deserved reward

meaty will do: grilled lamb chops rubbed with

for the caloric expenditure that results from

garlic and rosemary, perhaps, or a perfectly

doing anything in sub-zero temperatures. The

charred steak, finished with a slab of butter.

50

WINTER WONDERLAND: BY GERALDINE CAMPBELL


Pappardelle Alfredo with Salmon View recipe on page 62 Âť

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51


Porterhouse Steak View recipe on page 63 »

52

WINTER WONDERLAND: BY GERALDINE CAMPBELL


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53


Even when I’m city-bound, blustery nor’easters are an excuse to huddle beneath down comforters and have a lie-in, watching back-to-back episodes of Foyle’s War and substituting my normal blueberry and almond milk smoothie for something more substantial, more, well, eggy. My boyfriend, a chef, is working on a book dedicated to eggs: scrambled eggs and béarnaise-slathered eggs, beet-pickled eggs and deviled eggs, egg custard and egg soufflé. Egg-in-a-basket is, for now, my favorite preparation, not least because of the legsquirming joy you get from buttery, salty toasted homemade bread with a yolky center.

Of course, I still enjoy a cup of cocoa—especially if it’s accompanied by a shot of Pappy—but I’ve graduated to more adult pleasures. Sometimes it’s good to be a grown-up.

54

T AI LNLY W TER HO W! OBNYDM ER OLLA LY N DS :O BR Y G EG E R A L D I N E C A M P B E L L


Egg in a Basket View recipe on page 64 Âť

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56

HOW WE DID IT


HOW WE

DID IT

Deconstructing a shot from Stephen Hamilton’s The Restaurant Project by JUDITH MARA

favorite dish

Roasted Bone Marrow with Herbs Restaurant

The Purple Pig, Chicago, IL food stylist

Josephine Orba prop stylist

Paula Walters

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lingonberry waffles by Greg Biggers serves 1

Cook waffle batter in waffle maker for about 3 minutes. Place one waffle on plate and top with lingonberry jam. Top with next waffle, placing the

ingredients: ·· 2 waffles ·· 3 ounces lingonberry jam ·· 2 ounces honey whipped ricotta ·· 2 ounces Burton’s smoked maple syrup (B-Grade) ·· 5 praline clusters ·· 5 fresh blueberries ·· 5 leaves micro mint

58

RECIPE INDEX

waffle a little off center so that it is not completely covering the first waffle and jam. Place small amount of jam on second waffle, then a quenelle of ricotta cheese. Place blueberries, mircro mint, and praline clusters on and around the waffles. Pour smoked maple syrup over waffles.


ingredients for maple-sherry calabrian chile glaze: ·· 3/4 cup Burton’s maple syrup (B-grade) ·· 1/4 cup sherry vinegar ·· 2 Calabrian chiles ·· 2 tablespoons butter

day 1 Brine 5 pounds of boneless Berkshire pork belly. Dissolve kosher salt, sugar into 1 gallon of water. Submerge meat and allow it to brine for 48 hours. Make the Calabrian chile glaze by combining Burton’s maple syrup, sherry vinegar and Calabrian chiles in a blender. Pour through a strainer to remove the chile seeds. Store at room temperature.

day 3 Remove pork belly from the brine and pat dry with a towel. Heat oven

braised pork belly with maplesherry calabrian chile glaze

to 350°F. In a hot sauté pan or large dutch oven, add canola oil to cover

by Paul Kahan

it, turn the belly over and sear for about 3 minutes on the other side.

Serves 4-6

the bottom of the pan. Carefully place the pork belly skin-side down in the pan and brown the skin. Once the skin has a dark, brown crust to Remove the belly from the pan, add the mirepoix (onions, carrots & celery) and caramelize the vegetables over medium-high heat. Add 2 cups of white wine and reduce the liquid by half and scraping up any browned bits with a wooden spoon. Place the belly into a roasting pan

ingredients:

or dutch oven skin-side up. Pour the vegetables and wine over the belly. (Optional: rub the skin-side of the belly with a garlic-rosemary herb rub,

·· 5 pounds boneless Berkshire pork belly

sambal or grainy mustard.) Add the hot pork or chicken stock. It should submerge the meat 3/4 of the way. Add the sachet of bay, thyme and

ingredients for brine: ·· 1 cup kosher salt ·· 1 cup white sugar ·· 1/4 teaspoon sodium nitrite/#1 cure (optional) ·· 1 gallon water

ingredients for braising: ·· 1/2 cup canola oil ·· 2 onions, medium diced ·· 2 carrots, medium chunks ·· 4 stalks celery, medium chunks ·· 2 cups white wine ·· 1-2 quarts pork or chicken stock ·· cheese cloth & kitchen twine (optional) ·· 1 bay leaf ·· sprig of thyme ·· 1 chile d’arbol

chile d’arbol to the pot. Tightly cover the pan with foil or the lid to the dutch oven. Place in the oven and cook for 2 1/2 hours. Check the meat with a paring knife. If the knife easily pierces the meat, the pork belly is done. Allow meat to rest and cool at room temperature for at least one hour. Refrigerate overnight.

day 4 Place the pork belly on a cutting board and portion into 5” L X 1 1/4” W slabs. Heat the braising liquid. Strain and discard the vegetables, reserve the liquid. In a large sauté pan, add just enough canola oil to cover the bottom of the pan. Once the oil is smoking, carefully place the slabs of pork belly into the pan. Sear the meat for approximately 2 minutes or just until the meat is caramelized and brown. Turn the slabs of pork belly over and sear the other side. Once the meat is browned on both sides, carefully add the Calabrian chile glaze. Once the glaze is bubbling, reduce the heat down to medium and add 2 tablespoon of butter. Once the butter melts, baste the pork belly until it is well-glazed. Serve with your favorite accompaniment and the braising liquid.

·· 5 whole black peppercorns RECIPE INDEX

59


maple baked pears by Ina Pinkney Serves 8

Preheat oven to 400°F.

ingredients:

Peel pears. Cut into thick slices and place in baking dish. In a small bowl,

·· 4 medium pears ·· 1/3 cup (75 mL) Burton’s Rum Infused Maple Syrup (B-Grade) ·· 1/3 cup (75 mL) whipping cream ·· 8-inch (2 L) square baking dish, ungreased

mix together maple syrup and whipped cream. Drizzle over pears. Bake in preheated oven for 20 minutes, or until pears are tender and glazed with sauce. Variation: You can replace the pears with peaches. To Serve: Vanilla ice cream makes everything better.

60

RECIPE INDEX


lamb rib chops with garlic and rosemary

Serves 4

Sauté: Sprinkle lamb with minced rosemary and smear with mashed garlic. Season with salt and black pepper. In a large skillet, heat 1-2

ingredients: ·· 4 8-ounce lamb rib chops ·· a few sprigs fresh rosemary leaves, minced ·· 4 cloves garlic, peeled and mashed ·· butter ·· olive oil

teaspoons of butter and a splash of olive oil on medium-high. Sauté lamb 4-6 minutes per side or to desired internal temperature. Broil or Grill: Preheat broiler to high or grill to medium-high. Lightly brush lamb with olive oil, sprinkle with minced rosemary, and smear with mashed garlic. Season with salt and black pepper. Broil 4-6 minutes each side, or cook to desired internal temperature.

·· salt ·· black pepper

RECIPE INDEX

61


pappardelle alfredo with salmon

Serves 4

Cook pappardelle in a pasta pot of boiling salted water (2 tablespoons salt for 6 quarts water) until al dente. Reserve 1/2 cup cooking water,

ingredients: ·· 8 to 9 ounces pappardelle pasta ·· 1/2 cup heavy cream ·· 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, cut into pieces ·· salt ·· black pepper ·· 1/3 cup grated Parmigiano-Reggiano ·· olive oil ·· 1/2 red onion, diced ·· 1 cup fresh peas ·· 1/2 pound wild sockeye salmon, chopped

62

RECIPE INDEX

then drain pasta. Meanwhile, bring cream and butter to a simmer in a 12-inch heavy skillet over medium-low heat, adding 1/4 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper. Add pappardelle, 1/4 cup reserved water, and cheese to sauce and toss. Add more cooking water if necessary. Heat a splash of olive oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the red onion, fresh peas and salmon and cook and stir about 3-5 minutes until heated through. Add to the pasta and cream mixture and toss to combine. Season with salt and pepper to taste.


porterhouse steak

Serves 8

sear and roast: Preheat oven to 400°F. Season steaks with salt and pepper. In skillet, heat

ingredients: ·· 4 12-ounce Porterhouse steaks, trimmed ·· salt ·· black pepper ·· olive oil

2 teaspoons of olive oil on medium-high heat until almost smoking. Sear steaks 1 minute on each side. Roast in oven 6-8 minutes on each side for medium-rare. Please adjust time if your steak is bigger or smaller, or if you like it more or less done.

grill: Heat grill to medium-high. Lightly brush steaks with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Grill 6 - 8 minutes on each side for medium-rare.

broil: Preheat broiler to high. Lightly brush steaks with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Broil 6 - 8 minutes on each side for medium-rare.

RECIPE INDEX

63


egg in a basket

Serves 1

Heat a small skillet on medium-high heat.

ingredients:

With a small biscuit cutter (or simply a knife) remove center from bread.

·· 1 slice of your favorite bread ·· 1 teaspoon butter ·· 1 egg ·· salt ·· black pepper

64

RECIPE INDEX

Butter the bread on one side only. Grill bread, butter side down, until lightly toasted. Crack an egg into the bread hole, being careful not to break the yolk. Cook until egg has reached desired consistency. Season with salt and pepper to taste.


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L AT E W I N T ER 2 0 1 3

NO 0 06

Who's Hungry? Magazine | Late Winter 2013 | No 6  

Blending the worlds of food and photography, the magazine features travel stories and recipes from top food writers, as well as styling tips...

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