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FEATURES

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5 Favorite Sweet Celebrations

18

Portrait of a Chef Gale Gand

28 20

In Season: Holiday Cookie Exchange

34

High Spirits: The Seraph

36

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CONTENTS

Weather Permitting: Citrus Summer

The Oyster’s Allure


CONTENTS

46 54

A Culinary Inheritance

How We Did It

4

Contributors

5

Letter from Steve

6

Stylist’s Corner

8

5 Favorite Sweet Celebrations

14

The Art of the Champagne Cork Pop

16

Out of the Bag

18

Portrait of a Chef

20

In Season: Holiday Cookie Exchange

28

WP: Citrus. Summer Sunshine.

34

High Spirits: The Seraph

36

The Oyster’s Allure

46

A Cullinary Inheritance

54

How We Did It

56

Recipe Index

CONTACTS media inquiries Judith Mara | marabeach@sbcglobal.net Deirdre O’Shea | deirdre@stephenhamilton.com

sponsorship opportunities Deirdre O’Shea | deirdre@stephenhamilton.com

representation Schumann & Company | www.schumannco.com patti@schumannco.com | 312.432.1702

stephen hamilton 1520 W. Fulton | Chicago, IL 60607 www.stephenhamilton.com

CONTENTS

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contributors

No 0 05

judith mara | Editor and Writer

ian law | Design

Deirdre o’Shea | Production Director

Judith has worked with Stephen for almost

Ian designed every aspect of Who’s Hungry?™

If you have worked with Stephen Hamilton,

seven years and helps to lead the editorial

magazine with meticulous attention to detail and

you’ve worked with Deirdre. Drawing on 15

concept and execution of Who’s Hungry?™

typography, and helped turn static images into an

years of experience in managing photography

magazine. An award-winning former creative

interactive experience. His award-winning design

studios, Deirdre has a hand in nearly every

director for major ad agencies such as Leo

work has been featured in the pages of Print,

aspect of Stephen’s business. She’s been

Burnett and J. Walter Thompson, Judith sweats

Creativity, How, PDN and Graphic Design USA.

instrumental in organizing the magazine’s

the details, pens Weather Permitting and

shoots, sourcing ingredients, and always

literally hand writes How We Did It.

keeping production on schedule.

Dannielle Kyrillos |

kathryn o’malley |

claire bidwell smith |

Writer and Television Commentator

Associate Editor and Writer

Writer and Author

A series judge on Bravo’s “Top Chef Just Desserts,”

Kathryn’s love of food is matched only by her

Claire is the author of the critically acclaimed

Dannielle is an expert on stylish entertaining,

passion for writing about it; as the newest

memoir The Rules of Inheritance, a fearless and

food, fashion, and travel. She appears regularly

addition to the Who’s Hungry?™ team, she

heartbreaking, yet ultimately uplifting, exploration

on NBC’s “Today” and “The Nate Berkus Show,”

indulges in a bit of both. Her popular food blog,

of love and loss. She has written for many

as well as on “E! News,” BetterTV, CNBC, CNN,

dramaticpancake.com, garners more than 40,000

publications including Time Out New York, Yoga

and local morning programming in New York

unique viewers per month and highlights the

Journal, BlackBook Magazine, The Huffington Post

and Philadelphia. For Who’s Hungry?™

people and stories behind great recipes.

and Chicago Public Radio. For Who’s Hungry?™

Magazine, Danielle clued us in on the most

Magazine, Claire shares her hard-earned insight

comforting dishes from across the country.

on what it means to be truly nourished.

a special thanks to : Gale Gand, Rose Levy Baranbaum, Alice Medrich, Matt Lewis, Renato Poliafito, CeCe Campise, Raymond Barrera, Tom Hamilton, Paula Walters, Walter Moeller, Breanna Moeller, Ruth Siegel, Andrew Burkle, Justin Paris, Josephine Orba, Kathy Joy, Mary Ann Melone, Jen Straus, Carol Smoler, Geoff Bins-Calvy, Martha Schrick, Giuseppe Tentori, Pedro Rayes at GT Fish, Travis Croxton and his team at Rapphannock River Oysters and Mindy Segal, Alex Gara and Alex McDaniel at HotChocolate. 4

CONTRIBUTORS


LETTER FROM STEVE When entertaining friends and family it’s all about sharing little luxuries that meld with the season. On the top of my list is the decadent combination of oysters and champagne. In “The Oyster’s Allure” we celebrate the beauty of briny oysters and explain how to pair them with champagne. The cookies in “The Holiday Cookie Exchange Party” are gifts themselves. And we include recipes for every level of baking skill from Christmas cookie expert Rose Levy Berenbaum, pastry chef Alice Medrich and bakery owners Matt Lewis and Renato Peliafito. Much of the holidays are spent with family. Claire Bidwell Smith, author of the highly regarded memoir, The Rules of Inheritance, writes for us her memories of cooking

A bit of indulgence seems to be part of the holidays. Naughty little food treats mysteriously appear all over

along side her food stylist mother and how that has influenced who she is today.

the studio and seem to disappear just as inexplicably.

In “5 Favorite Sweet Celebrations” Dannielle

I can’t resist giving into my kids this time of year with

trip with decadent desserts from Sin City’s

a nonessential gift or two.

Kyrillos takes us on a sensational tasting Montesano’s Cream Cheese Cookies to San Francisco’s Fleur de Lys’s Chocolate Soufflé. Just across the New Year’s line is January when many of us try to correct the holiday excess. It’s back to a simpler life. We cozy up during the short, dark days of winter looking for sunshine. In “Weather Permitting” we salute our Southern states for sending us their “citrus” sunshine. Who’s Hungry?™ Let the holidays begin! STEPHEN HAMILTON

LETTER FROM STEVE

| DA N N I E L L E K Y R I L L O ’ S P O RT R A I T B Y P E T E R H U R L E Y

|

PORTRAITS BY ANDREW BURKLE

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STYLIST’S CORNER


STYLIST’S

CORNER T H E H O L I D AY B A R b y K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

Creating something that is not only visually appealing, but also emotionally evocative, is one of the greatest challenges of prop styling. Here, prop stylist Tom Hamilton was challenged to construct a scene that set a celebratory mood—without being holiday-specific. To begin, Tom opted for a rich color palette of amber, wine, and emerald. “I wanted to draw the viewer into an earlier, more glamorous era,” Tom says, “and veer away from the ubiquitous wintery blues you see this time of year.” A weighty leather-bound book, antique stool with textured fabric, and a variety of vintage glassware all contribute to a regal, old-school atmosphere. “Part of what makes something feel celebratory,” Tom explains, “is using items you wouldn’t normally use, things that are relatively unexpected. A celebration should feel special, and it calls for special décor.”

tom hamilton

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

|

S T Y L E D B Y T O M H A M I LT O N

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FAVORITE

SWEET CELEBRATIONS by DA N N I E L L E K Y R I L L O S

Dannielle Kyrillos, a series judge on Bravo’s “Top Chef Just Desserts” and expert on all things food and entertaining, shares her five favorite comfort food dishes from around the country.

Portrait by Peter Hurley

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5 F AV O R I T E S W E E T C E L E B R A T I O N S


1

Fleur de Lys’s Chocolate Soufflé Fleur de Lys 777 Sutter St. San Francisco, CA 94109 415.673.7779 www.hubertkeller.com

Chef Hubert Keller grew up in Alsace above his

and so complex in practice—the chocolate soufflé.

parents’ patisserie, and to hear him tell it, spent

The iteration he serves at his jewel, Fleur de Lys,

an idyllic childhood playing among flour sacks

with cherry and Kirsch ice cream, brings the other-

and learning the family trade. He is one of the

worldly pleasure only a great dessert can. Like a

sweetest chefs you’ll meet, and while his savory

poufy, eggy cloud you’d like to live on, but then

dishes are world-famous, his heart and his roots

decide to eat because its aroma makes you drool

are in sugar. So of course he is a true master of

even though you’re all dressed up, Keller’s soufflé

that quintessential dessert, so simple on paper

is the stuff of legends, and of very sweet dreams.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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woodFire grill’s “toFFee” woodFire grill 1782 Cheshire bridge rd. atlanta, ga 30324 404-347-9055 www.woodFiregrill.Com

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5 F AV O R I T E S W E E T C E L E B R A T I O N S

Sure, Atlantans really dig temple-of-local

the end of dinner, to a simpler time. Its warm,

Woodfire Grill’s super-fresh, sustainably sourced

hearty bready-ness comforts and cozies, while

savory menu, but they get downright rabid when

the toffee’s contrasting chew provides the most

it comes to pastry chef Chrysta Poulos’s English

fun texture that exists and ties it all together

toffee pudding. This study in sticky has become

(literally!). The accompanying coffee cream lends

an institution in its own right, because it hits

a grown-up elegance and nuanced bitterness,

every mark of what makes a dessert work. As

elevating this pudding to showstopper status.

a classic dish, it conjures childhood nostalgia

Poulos, a former member of the U.S. Air Force, has

and transports us, at least for a brief respite at

hit upon the antidote for longing.


3

Dessert is, by definition, frivolous. One does not eat it

charming restaurant in 2001, and pastry chef Maura

for nutrition or sustenance. It’s never an urgent matter

Kilpatrick has been crafting this exquisite treat since

and it’s never necessary. It is instead a celebration, a

day one. The rakish peaks of meringue are so beautiful,

convivial, instant party, even if the only occasion is

so carefully and lovingly wrought, highlighted by sunny

enjoying someone’s company or having made it through

pools of passion fruit caramel, even mean people can’t

another long day. Dessert creates excitement just by

help smiling when they arrive. A luscious coconut

existing, and that is truly the case with Oleana’s Baked

ice cream is the reward for cracking into them, and

Alaska. Chef Ana Sortun opened her intoxicatingly

suddenly any old Monday is very, very special.

Oleana’s Baked Alaska Oleana 134 Hampshire St. Cambridge, MA 02139 617.661.0505 www.oleanarestaurant.com

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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The best part of anything with yuzu in it is the

yuzu’s delightfully sour spark is balanced with

yuzu. The Asian citrus’s flavor is like a sultry light

the creaminess of chocolate ganache, the moist

with tart edges scampering across your tongue,

crumble of Oreo “soil,” the tangy, earthy sweetness

and it makes everything it encounters brighter,

of blackberries, strawberries and raspberry foam,

more vivid, and more impactful. It’s magical,

it’s like an alchemist has finally hit paydirt—

and I’m a sucker for a dish that showcases it

flavors and textures align to create something

as beautifully as the concoction called Yuzu

transcendental. Which is a pretty good reason to

Eskimo at this subterranean dessert bar. When

skip dinner.

Spot Dessert Bar’s Yuzu Eskimo Spot Dessert Bar 13 St. Marks Place, New York, NY 10003
 212-677-5670

4

www.spotdessertbar.com

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5 F AV O R I T E S W E E T C E L E B R A T I O N S


5

montesano’s Cream Cheese Cookies montesano’s italian restaurant 9905 s. eastern aVe., las Vegas, nV 89183 817. 877.4545 | www.montesanos.Com

Every town in the world has one: the sweet

cream cheese cookie that will haunt you. It’s

that inspires a craving so ferocious you’ll plan

a dense but petite round of dough topped

an entire trip around eating it. It is almost

with a just-airy-enough swirl of cream cheese,

always discovered in the most unusual spot,

made from an old family recipe. It’s a nugget

shared by an insider’s insider, never showy,

of delight so perfect in its simplicity, so nuttily

often overlooked. When you taste it, you can’t

crunchy and creamy at once, so unassuming

remember living without it. Amid the decadence

it catches you off guard. This bite of goodness

and glitz that is Las Vegas, in a humble Italian

in Sin City is a study in honest, wholesome

restaurant and bakery run by teddy-bear-like

satisfaction you wouldn’t have bet on.

brothers and treasured by real locals, lies a

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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THE ART of the

CHAMPAGNE

CORK POP by K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

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The pop of a champagne cork

split-second of action requires

often signals one thing, and one

careful planning, precision

thing only: the celebration has

timing, and a complex set-up

begun and it’s time to let loose.

from special effects guru Geoff

And yet, photographing a cork

Binns-Calvey. Needless to say,

pop is a different story entirely.

this isn’t your average bottle of

The shot needs to look natural,

bubbly. Click the bullets to the

but controlling and capturing a

right for more on our methods.

T H E A R T O F T H E C H A M PA G N E C O R K P O P


THE SPRAY Although you can’t see it here, the bottom of the champagne bottle is connected to an elaborate set of pipes and tubes. With the push of a button, compressed air sends champagne rushing through the bottom of the bottle and up through the neck, erupting in a splash of bubbles and vapor.

» » THE FLYING CORK A thin, stiff wire holds the cork in a fixed place a few inches from the bottle opening, ensuring it doesn’t budge (and that no one loses an eye!). The wire eventually disappears behind the spray of champagne so it isn’t visible in the final shot.

THE DROPLETS Take one part water, one part glycerin,

»

mix them together…and spritz! The drops of liquid look just like beads of champagne, but they don’t evaporate as quickly or trickle down the bottle.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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OUT

of the

BAG

b y K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

Every photo shoot requires a talented

who is responsible for everything from

team of players, and Stephen Hamilton

building sets and adjusting lighting to

has always surrounded himself with

managing staff and ensuring that every

some of the industry’s best. That

shoot goes off without a hitch. Of course,

includes Stephen’s right-hand man and

all these tasks require certain tools…and

lead photo assistant, Raymond Barrera,

what you see here is only a sample.

1

a-clamps These A-shaped clamps are used to secure bounce and fill cards, to hang fabric backgrounds, and to hold small diffusers and reflectors in place.

2

3

flashlight

walkie-talkies

This powerful little beam is most

The studio is a big place, but

often used to point to specific areas

walkie-talkies make it easy to

of a set. But when those on-location

stay connected.

shoots go late into the night, a flashlight can also help you sort through your toolbox—or make an impromptu ghost story extra spooky.

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OUT OF THE BAG


leatherman This multi-talented tool can transform into a screwdriver, a blade, a wrench, a pair of pliers, and a file. It can even open up that can of soup.

5 6

gaffers tape and sharpies Consider these the SUV’s of the office supply world: the go-anywhere, extratough, extra-durable counterpoints to the more common Scotch tape and ballpoint pens.

flash drive The quickest way to transfer files, layouts, and images.

7 4

box cutter The handy collapsible blade makes it easy to open box shipments and cut through tough foam core.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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PORTRAIT OF A

CHEF GALE GAND

b y K athryn O ’ M alley

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PORTRAIT OF A CHEF: GALE GAND


Gale Gand has a knack for turning out some of the nation’s most delectable and dazzling desserts. Winner of the 2001 James Beard Foundation Award for Outstanding Pastry

do you have any early childhood memories of what inspired you to be a chef? Baking cherry pies with my mom. She was THE designated neighborhood pie baker. She taught me how to do elaborate woven lattice tops. And then there was playing restaurant as a kid—I was always the cook, not the waitress. I used to make

Chef, and founding pastry chef and partner at

“banana soup” out of orange day lily buds that my mom had

Chicago’s acclaimed restaurant Tru, Gale is also

in the backyard.

a celebrated cookbook author, television host,

what is your favorite season for cooking (and why)?

and owner of her own root beer company. Talk about a seriously sweet career.

Probably early summer for rhubarb and local strawberries, or midsummer for stone fruit. Peaches and apricots can sometimes be so good they make me weep.

We invited Tony Priolo, the subject of last

tell us about your worst kitchen disaster.

issue’s Portrait of a Chef, to ask Gale anything

I’ve never had one...just kidding! There was the night

he wanted…and she was happy to indulge us with her answers.

Chicago Magazine was in the house dining and reviewing us at Tru our first year, and our gas went down. I remember CM was at the table near a window looking into the pastry kitchen, so I had to remain cool and calm even though we couldn’t cook anything in ovens or on stoves; we only had my convection oven, which was electric, and a few induction burners for the whole restaurant. I also had about 10 boxes of Krispy Kreme doughnuts in the kitchen and I was so afraid they would write about that. I mean, who has that many donuts just hanging around? Well, I do, but other than me, who does that? And then there was that time when a kitchen towel caught fire on the set at Food Network while I was taping Sweet Dreams. I didn’t realize it, so a cameraman had to sneak on set way down low and stamp it out with cameras rolling while I tried to ignore it. But other than that....

what’s your guilty pleasure? Probably sweet (unsalted) butter on baguette slices, or Frosted Flakes with half and half—that’s always my birthday breakfast!

what do you eat when no one’s looking? Cold fried chicken and Peppermint Patties.

Berries: Hibiscus-infused strawberries and

what’s your favorite thing to do with whipped cream?

raspberries give Gale Gand’s silky panna cotta

Put it on hot cocoa or espresso or chocolate pudding—but

a splash of ruby red color.

really good chocolate pudding, like chocolate pot de crème.

Buttermilk Panna Cotta with Hibsicus-Infused

Or, fold it into mousse or plop it on top of a Pavlova and sprinkle with berries. P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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I N SE A SON Holiday Cookie Exchange Party b y K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

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I N S E A S O N : H O L I D AY C O O K I E E X C H A N G E PA R T Y


January

December

12 1

The century-old cookie swap has a simple

Not sure what to bake? Looking to try

yet irresistible premise: bake several

something new? We’ve got you covered.

batches of one kind of cookie, socialize

These knockout recipes from all your

and swap cookies with friends and family,

favorite cookie connoisseurs—and

and take home a spectacular assortment

a couple from our test kitchen—are

of goodies. Unless there are any cookie

guaranteed to give you sweet results.

monsters lurking in your home, the bounty should supply all of your holiday gifting, entertaining, and late-night snacking.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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Jazz up the classic cookie swap: Ask guests to bring a beautiful tin, box, or serving dish, and “dish” them out by drawing names from a hat. Not only will everyone go home with a delicious variety of cookies, but also a lovely vessel in which to display them.

salted toffee peanut cookies “Equally at home with a glass of milk

The big peanutty flavor comes from using

or a bourbon cocktail, these cookies are

pure natural peanut butter. Adventurous

addictively crunchy, sweet, salty on the

eaters must try the variation with Thai

outside and meltingly tender within.

curry peanuts.”

– Alice Medrich, renowned pastry chef and award-winning cookbook author

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I N S E A S O N : H O L I D AY C O O K I E E X C H A N G E PA R T Y


Salted Toffee Peanut Cookies View Alice Medrich’s recipe on page 56 »

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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Malted Milk Sandwich Cookies

View Matt Lewis and Renato Poliafito’s recipe on page 58 »

malted milk sandwich cookies “Malt is one of those ingredients with a taste

vintage American dessert recipe. And like

as much as we like sugar cookies around

you just can’t quite place your finger on. It

all baking things of old, malt is making

the holiday season, we love a sandwich

has a warmth, depth and a nuttiness that

a comeback and features prominently in

cookie with a slightly boozy, creamy center.”

tends to give your recipe an added note of

this amazing sandwich cookie.

flavor, which if you are anything like us, over

– Matt Lewis and Renato Poliafito, owners of

time becomes a serious addiction. There’s

These cookies come from our love of the

famed NYC bakery, Baked, and authors of

a reason that malt permeated almost every

classic Oreo-style sandwich cookie. And

Baked Explorations: Classic American Desserts Reinvented

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I N S E A S O N : H O L I D AY C O O K I E E X C H A N G E PA R T Y


Mexican Wedding Cookies

View Rose Levy Beranbaum’s recipe on page 59 »

mexican wedding cookies “This is a recipe with many names and claims of

explode in your mouth. A real favorite with most

origin. Some people call them Portuguese Wedding

everyone, they are lovely to serve for an after-

Cakes and Wedding Bells, but this version contain-

noon tea and, placed in an attractive container,

ing pecans is said to have come from Mexico.

make a charming and welcome holiday gift.”

These innocent-looking mounds, pristinely dusted

– Rose Levy Beranbaum, James Beard Award-winning

with powdered sugar, are so ethereal they seem to

baker and best-selling cookbook author

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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Mandel Bread

View recipe on page 60 Âť

mandel bread with dried cranberries and pistachios The Jewish mandel bread, sometimes called mondel bread or mandelbrot, is a twice-baked cookie similar to Italian biscotti. Rich, crunchy, and loaded with almonds, the basic recipe is infinitely adaptable and can be dressed up or down. Keep things simple with a dusting of cinnamon and sugar, or try a nontraditional mix of dried cranberries and pistachios.

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I N S E A S O N : H O L I D AY C O O K I E E X C H A N G E PA R T Y


chocolate clouds It’s hard to believe that a cookie containing only a handful of simple ingredients could taste so positively decadent, but here it is. The Chocolate Cloud, with its crisp and crackled surface and luscious, gooey center is sure to please even the most discerning

March

April

June

August

September

December

9 10 11 12 November

8

October

6 7 July

4 5 May

3

February

1 2 January

of chocolate lovers.

Chocolate Clouds

View recipe on page 61 Âť

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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CITRUS. SOUTHERN SUNSHINE.

WEATHER PERMITTING by JUDITH MARA

Turning the pages of a fragile hand-written

are many emerging growers to be found at

cookbook dated 1881, we were surprised to

local markets in southern Louisiana, Alabama

find many recipes using citrus fruit. Even

and Georgia.

more surprising, it was a Wisconsin farm wife who recorded the recipes including

The other secret to finding small citrus

boiled lemon pudding, orange mange and

farmers is no secret at all: There are many

lemon meringue pie. It’s been a long time

on the web that will ship from coast to

that we’ve been grateful for the sunshine

coast. Look for our sidebar list of some small

in the shape of citrus fruit that our warmer

growers we’ve found for you. A box of juicy

states deliver to us all winter.

organic oranges or grapefruit is a without a doubt a welcome gift.

The variety available to us is vast in

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comparison to the 19th century (or earlier)

Citrus looks and tastes bright and refreshing.

when it was limited to lemons and oranges.

Chefs know that the acid in lemons, oranges,

In addition, we now grow tangerines

limes or grapefruit can transform savory dishes.

(clementine and mandarin) blood oranges,

And even though we don’t make orange

grapefruit, Meyer lemons, limes, kumquats,

mange for dessert any more, oranges remain

tangelos and pomelos. Florida, Texas,

the most popular fruit after apples. And lemon

Arizona and California are our big citrus-

meringue pie? It remains the third favorite

growing states, where you’ll find small

dessert in the USA. It seems our tastes

farmers and big producers. However, there

haven’t changed as much as we thought.

W E AT H E R P E R M I T T I N G : C I T R U S . S O U T H E R N S U N S H I N E .


P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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citrus tips for cooks

oranges that look green

sweet and sour kumquats

peeling grapefruit

Many varieties of oranges and lemons are

Kumquats are unusual because it’s the

Sometimes the pith of a grapefruit (the

still green when ripe and turn orange only

rinds that is sweet and the center is sour.

white layer under the skin) is hard to

if the temperature is right. In countries or

Some people peel a kumquat and eat the

remove. The easiest way to remove it is to

in a growing season where the weather

rind, not the pulp. The rind make a nice

bring a deep pot of water to a boil, turn

never cools down, oranges are always green

jam, marmalade or are good added to

off the heat, drop the grapefruit in the hot

on the outside.

chutney and marinades.

water for about 5 minutes, let cool and peel.

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W E AT H E R P E R M I T T I N G : C I T R U S . S O U T H E R N S U N S H I N E .


saving citrus for later All juice and zest (the top layer of skin) from citrus fruit can be frozen and used later to add to marinades, roasted fish and chicken, desserts, salad dressings and so on.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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give a citrus gift

small farms to order citrus gifts Uncle Matt’s, FL – citrus gifts in limited quantities

Fenton Family Farm, CA – mixed citrus

S & J Mandarin Grove, CA – organic mandarins

Beck Grove, CA – Meyer lemons

Lemon Ladies Orchard, CA – Meyer lemons

G & S Groves, TX – a variety of citrus

Crockett Farms, TX – Ruby Red grapefruit

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W E AT H E R P E R M I T T I N G : C I T R U S . S O U T H E R N S U N S H I N E .


P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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HIGH SPIRITS

TH E S ERAPH A HOT HOLIDAY COCKTAIL by JUDITH MARA

It’s cold in Chicago. So we didn’t need to search far for a warm cocktail to wrap our frosty fingers around. As a matter of fact, James Beard Award-winning Mindy Segal’s restaurant, HotChocolate Craft Food & Drink is known for creative ways of serving hot chocolate and coffee.

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The Seraph isn’t any ordinary cocktail

While tasting several variations of the

served at 150 degrees Fahrenheit. The

cocktail, the tasting notes centered

Seraph pairs the expertise of two of

around soft spices and buttery and

HotChocolate’s beverage professionals:

creamy textures. This was in contrast

head barista Alex McDaniel and

to a bolder and spicier drink they

head bartender Alex Gara. Their

were also developing. One drink

inspiration was a desire to reinvent

showed angelic qualities and the other

a coffee cocktail program. Using the

showed devilish qualities, inspiring

methodology of classic cocktails and

a succession of forgettable names

the techniques for creating coffee

relating to heaven and hell and angels

drinks, they decided to do a spin on

and devils. They finally settled on The

traditional hot drinks such as Irish and

Seraph and The Siren. Good choice—

Spanish Coffee.

The Seraph is really quite heavenly.

HIGH SPIRITS: THE SERAPH


THE SERAPH View Alex Gara and Alex McDaniel’s recipe on page 62 »

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T H E OYSTE R’S A LLURE b y K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

All of the exquisite oysters pictured here were provided by the talented folks at Rappahannock River Oysters and GT Fish & Oyster.

36

T H E OY S T E R ’ S A L L U R E


Oysters are a study in contrasts, at once hideous and hauntingly beautiful, with hard shells shuttered to the world and tender, vulnerable flesh locked up within. They are private, mysterious creatures, and yet one taste reveals them completely—the chilled, briny flavor telling an oyster’s whole life story and transporting you momentarily to the salty waters in which it grew.

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38

T H E OY S T E R ’ S A L L U R E


Paired with an ice-cold beer, dry white

Raise your glass to one of the most

wine, or sparkling champagne, oysters

enigmatic of foods‌and read on

make for the perfect hors d’oeuvre or

for some bite-sized facts.

sumptuous appetizer. Best of all, they require no occasion; the mere presence of these delightful masked mollusks is reason enough to celebrate.

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40

T H E OY S T E R ’ S A L L U R E


6 Pearls Of Wisdom

1. Technically, oysters are classified as bivalve mollusks: soft-bodied animals that protect themselves with two hinged shells. They have the ability to change sex depending on reproductive needs, and most will do so at least once during their lifespans.

2. Just like us, oysters are largely a product of their environment, and the waters in which they live have a direct effect on their taste and texture. Because an oyster filters 40 to 50 gallons of water through its gills each day, its flavor profile is highly influenced by ambient minerals, algae and salinity levels.

3. Oyster bars like to dress their oysters in all sorts of fancy names—some descriptive, some geographic. But believe it or not, there are just five species of oysters harvested in North America. Crassotrea gigas, aka the Pacific oyster, and Crassostrea virginica, aka the Eastern oyster, are most common.

4. Though today’s cultivated oysters are changing matters, warm-water months traditionally make up the spawning season, during which oysters spend their energies on reproduction and their fullness and flavor steadily decline. Once water temperatures begin to dip, however, spawning ceases and oysters bulk up on a carbohydrate called glycogen that makes them plump and sweet.

5. There is always some risk in eating oysters, but it’s very slight as long as you’re careful. High temperatures promote bacteria, and for that reason, many oyster farmers prefer water colder than 60 degrees Fahrenheit. Once harvested, oysters should be eaten within five days and stored on ice or refrigerated at all times.

6. It’s the question on everybody’s mind: Are oysters really aphrodisiacs? The answer is open to debate, but their high levels of zinc and iron are said to increase stamina, and at the very least, contribute to a healthy diet. Our best advice? Run your own experiments and draw your own conclusions.

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Champagne & Oysters Champagne and oysters are a classic, luxurious pairing. But

Brut Nature or Brut Zero – extremely dry

which wine to pair with which oyster? The general rule of

Extra Brut – very dry

thumb is that neither one should overpower the other in

Brut – dry

terms of sweetness or body. The briny flavor of an Eastern

Extra Dry, Extra Sec, Extra Seco – medium dry

oyster, for example, calls for a dry, crisp, light-bodied

Dry, Sec, Seco – medium dry

champagne, whereas the sweet and creamy Kumamoto

Demi-Sec, Semi-Seco – sweet

works best with a full-bodied and similarly sweet champagne.

Doux, Sweet, Dulce – very sweet

When selecting the perfect sparkling wine to accompany your oysters, look for the following labeling terms used to distinguish among sweetness levels:

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T H E OY S T E R ’ S A L L U R E


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“Before I was born my mother was in great agony of spirit and in a tragic situation. She could take no food except iced oysters and champagne. If people ask me when I began to dance, I reply, ‘In my mother’s womb, probably as a result of the oysters and champagne, the food of Aphrodite.’”

isadora duncan, American Dancer, (1878 - 1927)

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T H E OY S T E R ’ S A L L U R E


P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

45


A CULINARY

INHERITANCE by C L A I R E B I DW E L L S M I T H

Author of The Rules of Inheritance

“Mom,” my three-year old daughter groans, “why do you keep frosting those cupcakes? Can’t we just eat them already?” I smile at her. “Don’t you want them to look pretty?” I ask, and in a flash I am transported to my own mother’s kitchen. Growing up the only child of a food

I was born in 1978, right in the center of a

stylist, I spent an inordinate amount of

veritable food revolution. Chefs like Julia

time at my mother’s side, helping her

Child and Alice Waters were taking the

create all manner of delectable things

world by storm, and my mother followed

to eat. To say that my mother was ob-

right along, roasting chickens, folding egg

sessed with everything culinary would

whites for soufflés and growing fresh herbs

be an understatement. The kitchen in

and vegetables in her garden. She taught

each house we lived was a bubbling,

me how to hold a sauté pan just so, how to

simmering den of palatable alchemy,

chop an onion so my eyes wouldn’t water,

around which it seemed, our entire

and how to roll out the perfect påte brisée.

lives revolved.

But she also taught me that food couldn’t just taste good; it had to look good too.

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A C U L I N A RY I N H E R I TA N C E : B Y C L A I R E B I D W E L L S M I T H


P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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My mother’s career in food styling came

Although she gave up her profession when she

about by accident. Following art school she

became a mother, she never relinquished her

wound up in Manhattan with a seemingly

passion for food. When I was in middle school

useless MA in painting—that is until she

she opened a restaurant, and if I thought I’d

found work taking a paint brush to raw

spent a lot of time at her side in the kitchen,

Sara Lee turkeys, glossing them over until

nothing compared to the full-fledged food-

they looked perfectly cooked for the ad

service career this change incurred in me.

photographer. By the time she met my

Although her restaurant only lasted a few

father in the mid-seventies, her portfolio

years, by the time I was twenty I had an entire

was chock-full of photos just like these, a

decade’s worth of experience waiting tables,

decade of food styling under her belt.

hostessing, bartending and expediting.

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A C U L I N A RY I N H E R I TA N C E : B Y C L A I R E B I D W E L L S M I T H


monkey bread View recipe on page 63 Âť

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bacon, leek and gruyere soufflĂŠs View recipe on page 64 Âť

During my freshman year of college my

house felt empty with my mother gone,

to the freezer, sheets of cold wafting down

mother died of cancer. I suspect that this

the kitchen a quiet, flat place. In those first

at me, and took stock of what was left: a

loss will forever remain the single most

few weeks I wandered the rooms, letting

container of frozen marinara sauce, a tub

defining aspect of my life. That spring I

my fingertips brush against things she

of homemade pesto, a vegetable quiche.

took a leave of absence from school and

had so recently held: a hairbrush, a book,

returned home to live with my father. The

a whisk. I stood in front of the open door

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A C U L I N A RY I N H E R I TA N C E : B Y C L A I R E B I D W E L L S M I T H


Little by little, I began to take her place at the stove. Some

These were the last meals of my mother’s that I would ever

of the first dishes I made were a disaster, the potatoes crunchy and undercooked in my au gratin, a whole turkey coming out so dry my dad fed it to the dogs, oversalted

eat and yet I could scarcely

soups and under-flavored sauces. But even in the midst

bring myself to thaw them.

of those failed attempts, I felt my mother there alongside me, reminding me how to hold a knife, how to stir a roux and, of course, how to style a plate.

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In the years that followed I remained

was an undercover critic. I remember wishing

determined to forge a career for myself as

that my mother were sitting across from me,

a writer, but a funny thing happened. They

sharing my secret.

say you should write what you know, and what I knew was food. So it was fitting that

She’s been gone for sixteen years and I still

my first magazine writing assignment was

miss her every day. Over the last decade I’ve

to review a restaurant. I’m not sure I’ve

definitely become more of a writer than a

ever missed my mother more than during

foodie, although I still review the occasional

that meal. I remember ordering oxtail påte

restaurant. However, food remains an

and wondering if the waitress could tell I

important part of my life.

Just as my mother did with me, I draw my daughter into the kitchen, letting her sift flour, roll dough, scoop measurements and create something that will nourish us both for years and years to come.

52

T ACL U A LY L IH NO A !R YB YI NMHOELRLY I T ASN OCREG: EB Y C L A I R E B I D W E L L S M I T H


P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

|

R E C I P E S B YP JHOOSTEO PH GR IN AEP HOYR BBAY & STE MPIH C EHN A EHLA M MA I LRTTOI N

53


54

HOW WE DID IT


HOW WE

DID IT

Deconstructing a shot from Stephen Hamilton’s The Restaurant Project by JUDITH MARA

favorite dish

Boon Fly Donuts Restaurant

Restaurant: Boon Fly Café, Napa, CA food stylist

CeCe Campise and Carol Smoler prop stylist

Paula Walters

55


salted toffee peanut cookies

ingredients:

by Alice Medrich

·· 1 1/3 cups (6 ounces) unbleached all-purpose flour ·· 1/2 teaspoon baking soda ·· 1 teaspoon flaky sea salt or 3/4 teaspoon fine sea salt

makes about fifty-six 1 1/2-inch cookies

·· 8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, melted ·· 1/2 cup (3.5 ounces) packed light or dark brown sugar ·· 1/2 cup (3.5 ounces) granulated sugar ·· 1 large egg ·· 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract ·· 1 cup (9 ounces) natural (but not unsalted) chunky peanut butter—stir well to blend in the oil before measuring. ·· 5 ounces store-bought Coconut Toffee Peanuts or Toffee Peanuts, coarsely chopped

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RECIPE INDEX


equipment

upgrades: Salted Peanut Toffee Thumbprints with White Chocolate

Cookie sheets, lined with parchment paper or greased

Surprisingly, white chocolate tastes better than dark or milk chocolate in these cookies (and this from a huge fan

Combine the flour, baking soda, and salt in a medium bowl

of bittersweet chocolate!). And chopped pieces from a bar

and mix together thoroughly with a whisk or fork.

of “real” white chocolate taste better than white chocolate chips. | Have ready 4 ounces white chocolate cut into little

In a large bowl, mix the melted butter with the sugars.

pieces or 2/3 cup (4 ounces) white chocolate chips. Bake the

Whisk in the egg, vanilla, and peanut butter, add the flour

cookies in the shape of balls as described. As soon as the

mixture, and mix with a rubber spatula or wooden spoon

pans come out of the oven, press the back of a chopstick or

just until evenly incorporated.

dowel into the center of each hot cookie and move it around gently to widen the hole. Tuck pieces of chocolate (or chips)

Cover the dough and refrigerate for an hour or two and up to 2 days. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Position racks in the upper and lower thirds of the oven.

into each depression while the cookies are still hot.

salted peanut toffee thumbprints with jam  Have ready about 1/2 cup (5.5 ounces) strawberry or other jam or preserves. Bake the cookies in the shape of balls as described. As soon as the pans come out of the oven, press

Pour the chopped nuts into a shallow bowl. Scoop about 2 level teaspoons of dough for each cookie, shape into a 1-inch ball or a fat little log, and coat the top and sides heavily with

the back of a chopstick or dowel into the center of each hot cookie and move it around gently to widen the hole. Cool the cookies. Just before serving, fill the depressions with jam.

the chopped nuts, pressing in any pieces that fall off so that there are no bald spots. Place 2 inches apart on the lined or greased pans.

salted peanut cookies with thai curry cashews  Made by Sunridge Farms, Thai Curry Cashews can be found

Bake the cookies for 15 to 18 minutes, until they are lightly

in bulk bins in some supermarkets. Substitute Thai Curry

colored on top (and underneath). Rotate the sheets from

Cashews for the toffee peanuts.

top to bottom and from front to back halfway through the baking time to ensure even baking. The cookies will seem

spicy salted peanut toffee cookies 

very soft to the touch (and the one you turn over to assess

Add 1/2 to 1 teaspoon Thai curry paste or other hot

color may even fall apart), but they will firm up as they cool.

sauce to the dough with the peanut butter

For lined pans, set the pans or just the liners on racks to cool; for unlined pans, use a metal spatula to transfer the cookies to racks. Cool the cookies completely before storing. May be kept in an airtight container for at least 2 weeks.

RECIPE INDEX

57


to make the cookies: In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, malt, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Set aside. In the bowl of a standing mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the butter and sugars together until light and fluffy. Scrape down the bowl and add the eggs, one at a time, beating until each is incorporated. Add the sour cream and vanilla and beat until just incorporated. Add half of the dry ingredients all at once and beat for 15 seconds. Again, scrape down the bowl, then add the remaining dry ingredients and beat until just incorporated. The mixture should come together almost in a ball. Loosely shape the dough into two balls, wrap them tightly in plastic wrap, and refrigerate for at least 3 hours. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper. Divide each dough ball in half, to make four portions. Place one portion

malted milk sandwich cookies by Matt Lewis and Renato Poliafito

on a lightly flour-dusted work surface and return the other three to the refrigerator. Roll out the dough so that it is ¼ inch thick. The dough will be sticky, so you may have to flip and lightly flour it a few times while you work. Use a 2-inch

makes about 30 sandwich cookies

round cookie cutter to create the sandwich tops and bottoms, and transfer them to the prepared baking sheets, leaving about 1 inch of space around

ingredients for cookies:

each cookie. Extra dough scraps can be refrigerated and rerolled once more,

·· 4 cups all-purpose flour

Bake the cookies for 10 to 12 minutes, or until they are just slightly browned.

if desired.

·· 3/4 cup malt powder ·· 2 teaspoons baking powder

Place the baking sheets on wire racks to cool for 5 minutes. Use a spatula to

·· 1/2 teaspoon baking soda

transfer the cookies to the racks to cool completely. While the cookies cool,

·· 1/2 teaspoon salt

prepare the filling.

·· 1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, at room temperature

to make the vanilla filling: In the bowl of a standing mixer fitted

·· 1 cup firmly packed dark brown sugar ·· 1 cup granulated sugar ·· 2 eggs ·· 1/3 cup sour cream ·· 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract

ingredients for vanilla filling:

with the paddle attachment, beat the shortening and butter until lump free and smooth. Add the sugar in three parts, mixing each part until just combined. Add the salt, vanilla, and rum and beat again for 10 seconds. The filling should be thick but spreadable (like the inside of an Oreo). If it is too thick, add a drop or two of water as needed. Keep adding water to reach desired consistency, but do not add too much water or the filling will be too thin. Alternatively if the mixture is too thin, add a few tablespoons of

·· 5 ounces vegetable shortening, at room temperature ·· 4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, cut into small chunks, at room temperature ·· 3 1/4 cups confectioners’ sugar, sifted ·· 1/2 teaspoon salt ·· 1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract ·· 1 teaspoon light rum

confectioners’ sugar.

to assemble the malted milk sandwich cookies: Use a pastry bag or a small spoon to apply about 2 tablespoons of filling to the flat side of a cookie. Place another cookie, flat side down, on top. Press down slightly so that the filling spreads to the edges of the cookie. Repeat until all the sandwich cookies are made. Let them set up for about 15 minutes before serving. Store the cookies at room temperature in an airtight container for up to 3 days.

58

RECIPE INDEX


Place 2 oven racks in the upper and lower thirds of the oven. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place the pecans on a cookie sheet and bake them, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes or until lightly browned. Cool completely.

food processor method In a food processor with the metal blade, process the sugar with the pecans and salt until the pecans are powder fine. Cut the butter into a few pieces and add it with the motor running. Process until smooth and creamy. Scrape the sides of the bowl. Add the vanilla extract and pulse in. Add the flour and pulse in until it starts to clump together.

electric Mixer Method Soften the butter. Grate the nuts so that they are powder fine. In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, salt and grated

mexican wedding cookies by Rose Levy Beranbaum makes 4 1/2 dozen cookies

nuts. In a mixing bowl, at low speed, cream the sugar and butter until light and fluffy. Beat in the vanilla extract and scrape the sides of the bowl. Still on low speed, gradually beat in the flour mixture just until incorporated.

for both methods Scrape the dough into a bowl, cover it tightly, and refrigerate

ingredients for cookies: ·· 1/2 cup (1.75 ounces) pecan halves ·· 1 cup (4 ounces) powdered sugar, lightly spooned into the cup

for at least 1 hour and preferably no longer than 3 hours. Measure the dough into a 1 ¼-inch scoop, gently rounded, or 1 scant tablespoon and roll it between the palms of your hands to form 1-inch balls. Lightly flour your hands if necessary.

·· pinch of salt

Place the balls 1 ½ inches apart on the cookie sheets. Bake for

·· 1 cup (8 ounces) unsalted butter

15 to 20 minutes or until the cookies barely begin to brown.

·· 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

(The undersides will be lightly browned.) For even baking,

·· 1 3/4 cups (8.75 ounces) bleached all-purpose flour

rotate the cookie sheets from top to bottom and front to back

ingredients for topping:

halfway through the baking period. Cool the cookies on the sheets for 2 to 3 minutes. Use a small,

·· 1 1/2 cups (6 ounces) powdered sugar

angled metal spatula or pancake turner to lift them from the sheets. Roll them in the powdered sugar while still hot.

equipment:

Several rollings create a lovely powdery coating. Transfer the cookies to wire racks to cool completely. Roll again in the

·· Ungreased cookie sheets

powdered sugar.

store: In an airtight container at room temperature. keeps: About 1 month.

RECIPE INDEX

59


mandel bread

makes 35-40 mandel bread

In a large mixing bowl, beat together oil and sugar, then stir in extract. Beat in eggs.

ingredients:

In a separate bowl, sift together flour, baking powder and salt. Stir the flour mixture into the oil, sugar and egg mixture. Stir in the almonds

·· 3/4 cup vegetable oil

and chocolate chips (or raisins, dried cranberries or dried cherries).

·· 3 eggs

Cover dough with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 30 – 60 minutes.

·· 3 1/2 cups flour

Meanwhile, preheat oven to 350 degrees.

·· 1 cup sugar ·· 1 teaspoon baking powder

Very generously grease two cookie sheets that have edges. Baking sheets

·· 1 teaspoon vanilla or almond extract

can be lined with greased parchment paper or foil for easier cleaning.

·· 1/4 teaspoon salt

Form the dough into three logs, about 1¼-inch thick, and place on

·· 1 cup chocolate chips, raisins, dried cranberries,

greased cookie sheets. Sprinkle a mixture of cinnamon and sugar on top

dried cherries, pistachios, or any combination of these ·· 1/2 – 1 cup sliced almonds ·· cinnamon and sugar, for dusting

of the logs. Bake for 15-20 minutes or until lightly golden on top. Slice logs on the diagonal into pieces about 1-inch wide, and place the pieces on their sides; sprinkle with more cinnamon and sugar and bake 5 minutes. Flip pieces over and bake an additional 5 minutes. Serve warm or at room temperature.

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RECIPE INDEX


chocolate clouds

makes about 24 cookies

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease 2 baking sheets. In a mixing bowl, whisk together the flour, cocoa, baking powder and salt. Set aside.

ingredients: ·· 1 2/3 cups all-purpose flour ·· 1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder ·· 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder ·· 1/4 teaspoon salt

In a large bowl, using an electric mixer, beat the butter and sugar on medium speed until light and creamy, about 3 minutes. Turn off mixer and scrape down sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula. Add 1 egg and beat on medium speed just until blended. Add the other egg and vanilla and beat until blended. Turn off mixer and add the flour mixture. Beat on low speed just until combined.

·· 8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, at room temperature

Form the dough into tablespoon-size balls. Place confectioners’ sugar in

·· 1 1/4 cups sugar

a bowl; roll each ball of dough in the confectioners’ sugar until covered.

·· 2 eggs

Place the balls about 2 inches apart on prepared baking sheet.

·· 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract ·· 1/2 cup confectioners’ sugar

Bake the cookies until they are crackled and puffed, 10 to 12 minutes. Remove the baking sheet from the oven and set it on a wire rack for 15 minutes. Using a metal spatula, move the cookies onto the rack and let cool completely. Repeat with the rest of the cookie dough. Makes about 24 cookies. RECIPE INDEX

61


high spirits: the seraph by Alex Gara and Alex McDaniel The below recipe was written to make in a home kitchen. At HotChocolate the milk is actually steeped with cream that was allowed to sit overnight with vanilla beans, cinnamon sticks and whole nutmeg and cloves. They zest the orange then bake until it’s firm enough to crack in your hand. The zest is then pulverized and mixed with fresh nutmeg. makes 1 cocktail ingredients:

*zest first, allowing to dry out before garnishing.

·· .75 oz Benedectine

Measure out .75 oz Benedectine, .5 oz AE DOR V.S. cognac, and pour in snifter.

·· .25 oz AE DOR V.S. cognac ·· .5 oz espresso ·· 2 heaping tablespoons of melted white chocolate ·· 2 oz steamed eggnog ·· garnish with ground nutmeg, orange zest*

Measure out 2 heaping tablespoons of melted white chocolate, pour into snifter Measure out .5 oz of hot espresso, pour into snifter. Steam 2 oz eggnog and pour into snifter. Sprinkle with dried orange zest and freshly grated nutmeg.

62

RECIPE INDEX


ingredients for glaze: ·· 8 ounces cream cheese ·· 1 cup confectioners’ sugar ·· 1 teaspoon vanilla ·· orange juice or milk, for thinning out glaze

for the bread: Bloom the yeast in the bowl of a mixing bowl in warm water, until foamy (about 10 minutes). Heat milk and butter until butter is melted; add to yeast with 2 cups flour. Mix with dough hook. Add the egg, sugar and salt and stir to combine. Knead for 5 minutes with dough hook, then knead on tabletop until smooth. Cover and let dough rest in an oiled bowl in a warm place until doubled in size, about 1 hour. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a separate bowl, melt remaining butter and combine with brown sugar and cinnamon. Generously grease a bundt pan with butter and coat with extra cinnamon and sugar. Turn the dough out and gently deflate, but do not knead. Cut the dough into squares and gently roll into balls. Toss in melted butter mixture then roll in additional cinnamon and sugar. Pile the balls into the bundt pan about 3/4 the way up. Bake for 30-35 minutes. Allow to cool 5

monkey bread

minutes, then turn out the bread.

for the cream cheese glaze: makes 8-10 servings

In a stand mixer, mix together all ingredients until blended and smooth. If glaze is too thick, thin it out with some orange juice or milk. Drizzle over warm

ingredients for bread:

monkey bread.

·· 1/4 cup warm water ·· 1 envelope yeast ·· 1 1/4 cup whole milk ·· 2 tablespoons butter ·· 1 egg ·· 1/4 cup sugar ·· 1 teaspoon salt ·· 4 cups all-purpose flour ·· 1 1/4 cup dark brown sugar ·· 2 tablespoons cinnamon ·· 1/2 cup (1 stick) butter

RECIPE INDEX

63


bacon, leek and gruyere soufflés

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees and brush eight 1-cup ramekins with butter. Lightly coat the ramekins with 2 tablespoons of the Parmigiano-Reggiano and set them on a sturdy baking sheet.

makes 8 servings

In a medium saucepan, melt the 4 tablespoons of butter. Whisk in the flour and cook over medium heat for 1 minute. Whisk in the milk and cook over medium-low heat until smooth and very thick,

ingredients:

about 2 minutes. Stir in the salt and cayenne. Remove pan from heat. Whisk in the egg yolks; let cool slightly. Transfer to a large

·· 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, plus softened butter for brushing ·· 1/4 cup freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese ·· 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour ·· 1 1/2 cups milk ·· 3/4 teaspoon salt ·· 1/4 teaspoon cayenne

bowl and stir in the Gruyere, bacon and leeks. In a large bowl, using an electric mixer, beat the egg whites with the cream of tartar at medium-high speed until frothy. Increase the speed to high and beat until stiff peaks form. With a rubber spatula, gently fold the egg whites into the soufflé base until blended.

·· 6 ounces diced cooked bacon

Spoon the soufflé mixture into the ramekins, filling them to 1/2-

·· 2 sliced leek whites sautéed in butter

inch below the rim. Sprinkle the remaining Parmigiano-Reggiano on

·· 6 large eggs, separated

top and bake in the bottom third of the oven until the soufflés are

·· 5 ounces shredded Gruyere

puffed and golden brown, about 20 minutes. Alternatively, bake in

·· 1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar

an 8-cup soufflé at 375 degrees for 40 minutes. Serve immediately.

make ahead: The recipe can be prepared through Step 2 and refrigerated overnight. The soufflés can be assembled up to 1 hour ahead. The cooked soufflés can be reheated in the oven. 64

RECIPE INDEX


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Early W I N T ER 2 0 1 2

No 0 05

Who's Hungry? Magazine | Early Winter 2012 | No 5  

Blending the worlds of food and photography, the magazine features travel stories and recipes from top food writers, as well as styling tips...

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