Page 1

fall 2012

NO 0 04


FEATURES

8

5 Favorite Comfort Food Dishes

18

Portrait of a Chef Tony Priolo

28 20

2

CONTENTS

In Season: Beyond the Usual Bird

34

Weather Permitting: Winter Squash

High Spirits: Man About Town


cover image : I originally photographed Floriole Cafe & Bakery’s luscious fig tart as part of The Restaurant Project, a series in which I recreate and photograph restaurant dishes in my studio.Topped with ripe purple figs and a drizzle of golden honey, it’s the perfect fall treat—and the perfect image to welcome you our fall issue of Who’s Hungry? Magazine.

CONTENTS

36 54

Tally Ho!

How We Did It

4

Contributors

5

Letter from Steve

6

Stylist’s Corner

8

5 Favorite Comfort Food Dishes

14

The Art of the Steam Shot

16

Out of the Bag

18

Portrait of a Chef

20

In Season: Beyond the Usual Bird

28

Weather Permitting: Winter Squash

34

High Spirits: Man About Town

36

Tally Ho!

54

How We Did It

56

Recipe Index

CONTACTS media inquiries Judith Mara | marabeach@sbcglobal.net Deirdre O’Shea | deirdre@stephenhamilton.com

sponsorship opportunities Deirdre O’Shea | deirdre@stephenhamilton.com

representation Schumann & Company | www.schumannco.com patti@schumannco.com | 312.432.1702

stephen hamilton 1520 W. Fulton | Chicago, IL 60607 www.stephenhamilton.com

CONTENTS

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contributors

NO 0 04

judith mara | Editor and Writer

ian law | Design

Deirdre O’Shea | Production Director

Judith has worked with Stephen for almost

Ian designed every aspect of Who’s Hungry?™

If you have worked with Stephen Hamilton,

seven years and helps to lead the editorial

magazine with meticulous attention to detail and

you’ve worked with Deirdre. Drawing on 15

concept and execution of Who’s Hungry?™

typography, and helped turn static images into an

years of experience in managing photography

magazine. An award-winning former creative

interactive experience. His award-winning design

studios, Deirdre has a hand in nearly every

director for major ad agencies such as Leo

work has been featured in the pages of Print,

aspect of Stephen’s business. She’s been

Burnett and J. Walter Thompson, Judith sweats

Creativity, How, PDN and Graphic Design USA.

instrumental in organizing the magazine’s

the details, pens Weather Permitting and

shoots, sourcing ingredients, and always

literally hand writes How We Did It.

keeping production on schedule.

Dannielle Kyrillos |

kathryn o’malley |

molly sorge | Writer

Writer and Television Commentator

Associate Editor and Writer

A lifelong lover of all things equine, Molly Sorge

A series judge on Bravo’s “Top Chef Just Desserts,”

Kathryn’s love of food is matched only by her

found a way to unite her greatest passions when

Dannielle is an expert on stylish entertaining,

passion for writing about it; as the newest

she began writing and photographing for the

food, fashion, and travel. She appears regularly

addition to the Who’s Hungry?™ team, she

weekly equestrian magazine The Chronicle of the

on NBC’s “Today” and “The Nate Berkus Show,”

indulges in a bit of both. Her popular food blog,

Horse fourteen years ago. When she isn’t traveling

as well as on “E! News,” BetterTV, CNBC, CNN,

dramaticpancake.com, garners more than 40,000

or scooping up a story, Molly can be found

and local morning programming in New York

unique viewers per month and highlights the

galloping across the countryside on her own

and Philadelphia. For Who’s Hungry?™

people and stories behind great recipes.

steed, the inimitable Elf. For Who’s Hungry?™

Magazine, Danielle clued us in on the most

Magazine, she recounts the thrill of a Virginia

comforting dishes from across the country.

foxhunt and the delectable breakfast that follows.

a special thanks to : Tony Priolo, Melissa Clark, Laura Calder and HarperCollins Canada, Gramercy Tavern, Molly White, the Piedmont and Orange County Hunt Clubs, CeCe Campise, Ruth Siegel, Josephine Orba, Andrew Burkle, Raymond Barrera, Sara Cruz, Paula Walters, Tom Hamilton Walter Moeller, Brittany Culver, Lissa Levy, Juliette Pope and Paul Michel 4

CONTRIBUTORS


LETTER FROM STEVE Something new I’m particularly excited about is the addition of Dannielle Kyrillos to our Who’s Hungry? family. Dannielle, a Top Chef Just Desserts series judge and a regular on NBC’s “Today”, will be sharing some of her favorite finds in each issue. In this issue she provides us five comforting dishes by chefs such as Marcus Samuelsson and John Bess. Change is a way of life at WH magazine. We’ve done things different from the start. We’re a publication that leads visually and beyond that there are no rules––we go the way the wind blows. We develop each issue by gathering around a big table and sharing our ideas. As the ideas fly, I am constantly thinking, how can I make this work visually? In one of our discussions someone

Fall is a time for change. With the weather transforming all around me, the change I like best is cozying up and relaxing

brought up fox hunting in Virginia and the traditional breakfast that follows. I instantly knew that “Tally Ho!” was a

after a fun-filled summer. I also enjoy that it feels new each

story I wanted to photograph. I traveled

autumn when the kids go back to school and we change the

gregarious people, great food––and not a

way we cook and entertain.

to Middleburg and enjoyed two hunts, single fox was harmed. For a fresh approach on what to serve this Thanksgiving, in “In Season” we shake up tradition with game bird recipes from Melissa Clark and Laura Calder. And in “Weather Permitting” we offer some heartwarming ideas for meatless mains made with winter squash. Now, “Who’s Hungry?™” for fall? STEPHEN HAMILTON

LETTER FROM STEVE

| DA N N I E L L E K Y R I L L O ’ S P O RT R A I T B Y P E T E R H U R L E Y

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PORTRAITS BY ANDREW BURKLE

5


6

STYLIST’S CORNER


STYLIST’S

CORNER The Fall Harvest b y K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

To create her harvest-inspired table setting, prop stylist Paula Walters turned to nature for easy, elegant embellishments. Speckled quail eggs, velvety feathers, and ruffled kale lend a touch of the exotic, while décor like pumpkins and wild corn maintain a link to the paula walters

traditional and familiar. When recreating this look for your table, Paula says, begin with a color scheme. A modern palette of smoky purples, tawny neutrals, and verdant greens offers the perfect backdrop for the rich, warm hues of an autumnal feast. Then, look for ways to work in varying tones and textures, and don’t be afraid to get creative. Favorite items from around the home—like a vintage wooden drawer and ceramic pottery— are a perfect match for a rustic, organic setting like this one.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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S T Y L E D B Y P A U L A WA L T E R S

7


FAVORITE COMFORT FOOD DISHES

FROM RESTAURANTS AROUND THE COUNT RY by DA N N I E L L E K Y R I L L O S

Dannielle Kyrillos, a series judge on Bravo’s “Top Chef Just Desserts” and expert on all things food and entertaining, shares her five favorite comfort food dishes from around the country.

Portrait by Peter Hurley

8

5 F AV O R I T E C O M F O R T F O O D D I S H E S


At this time of year, craving something

of hominy, chili peppers, broth and flesh,

different from the roasty, smoky goodness

is usually inspired by the previous day’s

TIM LOVE’S POSOLE

they’re cooking up at The Woodshed is like

spit-roasted meat. He’ll use pork, turkey…

wearing a seersucker suit to Thanksgiving

it’s all good, as long as it’s really, really spicy.

THE WOODSHED SMOKEHOUSE

dinner—it’s just not right. Meat cooked

Posole is not just a mouthwatering use of

3201 RIVERFRONT DRIVE

outdoors with hickory and pecan wood

leftovers, it’s a “gangster hangover cure,”

FORT WORTH, TX 76107

kicks at our most primal urges, the very

according to the chef. Perhaps it’s because

817. 877.4545

ones governing the whole idea of comfort

I first tried this elixir after a morning spent

food. Tim Love’s take on posole (also

swearing off ever drinking again, but I can

spelled “pozole”), the sultry Mexican soup

attest that he’s quite right.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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2

When three of your downtown restaurant’s walls are glass-paned industrial garage doors

JONATHAN WAXMAN’S GNOCCHI

that offer the best people watching in all of

BARBUTO

putting beautifully wrought comfort on the plates

775 WASHINGTON ST.

inside is key. Jonathan Waxman’s earthy Italian

NEW YORK, NY 10014

cooking envelopes you like one of the shaggy

212.924.9700

fellow’s hugs, and his gnocchi, soft nuggets of

Manhattan but less in the way of coziness,

perfection snuggling with some brown butter and seasonal produce such as nutty, golden squash, for me epitomizes autumn in New York: somehow exciting and invigorating and soothing and nourishing all at once. To eat this at the bar with a glass of the Pio Cesare Barbera is to feel like a superhero restoring her powers. “The world revolves around pasta,” Waxman has written. Truer words…

10

5 F AV O R I T E C O M F O R T F O O D D I S H E S


3

MARCUS SAMUELSSON’S RAMEN AFRIQUE RED ROOSTER 310 LENOX AVENUE NEW YORK, NY 10027 212.792.9001

Every culture on the planet has a

noodles are made specially for him

dish that its grandmas have been

with teff, the gluten-free Ethiopian

cooking for hundreds of years to

grain used in injera; raw shrimp

make everyone feel better about just

and scallops cook a bit in the miso

about anything. No one blends the

broth, and a poached egg lends extra

soothing power of so many different

lusciousness. “I love having ramen

grandmas as elegantly as Marcus

when the temperature drops and

Samuelsson. Every once in a while at

this version I can call my own,” says

his Harlem hotspot Red Rooster and

Samuelsson. The mark of a winning

at special events, he concocts a potion

comfort food is intense flavor, and his

he likes to call Ramen Afrique. The

creation has three continents’ worth.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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JOHN BESH’S SEAFOOD GUMBO LÜKE 333 ST. CHARLES AVE. NEW ORLEANS, LA 70130 504.378.2840

There’s a whole chapter in John Besh’s latest

that once you’ve had it, nothing else feels

cookbook, My New Orleans, called “Gumbo

as restorative. Its base is a roux cooked to

Weather,” so you know the guy believes in the

chocolate-brown—Besh has said he no longer

power of that lusty stew at this time of year to

believes the old Louisiana credo that would have

warm up anyone from buddies at his hunting

one brown the flour in the fat for as long as it

camp to New Orleanais brunchers. He loves

takes to down two longneck beers or to listen to

making it with the spoils of a duck hunt, but the

both sides of an LP, but each warm bite of layered

seafood version he serves at his brasserie, Lüke,

flavor tastes like someone spent his whole life

is so rich with oysters, shrimp, sausage, and okra

perfecting it.

4 12

5 F AV O R I T E C O M F O R T F O O D D I S H E S


5

MICHELLE BERNSTEIN’S SHORT RIBS FALLING OFF THE BONE

Even skinny, half-clad Miamians crave more

blanket of potato and corn mousseline, are

substance when the months start to end in

what to eat when it’s time for a real meal,

“r.” Naturally, they turn to the lady who’s

one that will make you smile and feel like

described her whole style as “luxurious

all is right with the world when you wake

MICHY’S

comfort food,” Michelle Bernstein. Does it

up the next morning. About now she’s doing

6927 BISCAYNE BLVD.

go without saying that nothing sticks to

them with roasted root vegetables, which

MIAMI, FL 33138

your ribs like actual ribs? In this case, the

make partaking in this treat feel even more

(305) 759-2001

Short Ribs Falling off the Bone at Michy’s,

like being in a bubble bath with a bottle of

luxuriating in their jus, on a cozy saffron

red wine.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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THE ART of the

STEAM

SHOT by K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

14

THE ART OF THE STEAM SHOT

Few elements in food photography

DARK BACKGROUND

elicit a visceral reaction as

Contrast is crucial. Since steam is

powerfully as steam rising up from

light and somewhat transparent,

a dish. We’ve come to associate those seductive plumes with heat, freshness, and comfort—and that’s enough to rev our appetites almost instantly. But creating and capturing steam is no easy task; it has to swirl in just the right way, and it has to be visible to the camera. Thankfully, we’ve got some tricks up our sleeves that help make this possible. Click the bullets to the right for more on our methods.

it needs to be set against a dark background in order to make it pop.

»


BACKLIGHTING

ARTIFICIAL STEAM

Lighting directed towards the

Real steam fades quickly, and it can be tough

camera, from behind the food,

to control exactly where it goes. Alternative

shines through the steam and

methods range from the simple (a micro-

enhances its visibility.

waved, water-soaked tampon) to the complex (a custom-built steam and helium rig).

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P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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1

3

2 16

OUT OF THE BAG


4

OUT BAG of the

b y K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

The Feds raid criminal hideouts. Teenagers raid their parents’ liquor cabinets. And food stylists? Well, they’ve been known to raid the pantry. Turns out everyday items like Crisco ® and cornstarch make for some unexpected, but useful, styling tools. Read on to learn more about the humble styling stars that may already be stashed in your pantry—just waiting to be discovered.

1. hungry jack ® potatoes Mashed potatoes, meat’s faithful sidekick, can be tucked under a bed of greens or the filling of a pie to give the dish shape and height.

2. kitchen bouquet ® A browning agent adds deep, rich color to everything from meat and stews to sauces and gravies.

3. cornstarch This powdered sugar look-alike doesn’t dissolve or melt when sprinkled atop baked goods.

4. crisco ® The stuff behind tender-flaky pastry, shortening also does a great job of binding together food crumbs.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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PORTRAIT OF A

CHEF TONY PRIOLO

b y K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

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PORTRAIT OF A CHEF: TONY PRIOLO


Chef Tony Priolo brings an authentic slice of Italy to the Chicago culinary scene with his popular

what do you eat on your days off? On my days off, I try and cook for my lovely wife Sarah something that she requests in the morning so it is ready

restaurant Piccolo Sogno and sister hot-spot,

when she gets off work. Something like chili or matzo ball

Piccolo Sogno Due. While the latter carries with

soup. Or, if I am not cooking I try and go out to dinner with my

it an added emphasis on seafood, Tony’s clean and rustic cooking style, focus on high quality ingredients, and masterful preparation make both dining experiences truly exceptional. We invited Stephanie Izard, the subject of last issue’s

friends who are also chefs. Sometimes we like to go to ethnic neighborhoods and eat food from other cultures, such as in Chinatown or on Lawrence Avenue for Korean food.

have you spent a lot of time in italy? I have spent a lot of time in Italy, I try to go at least once a year. It is hard to get away for any longer but I do occasionally sneak in a second trip.

“Portrait of a Chef,” to ask Tony anything she wanted…and Tony was happy to oblige.

what are your favorite food regions? I have to say that in all my travels to Italy, my past trip last January to Sicily was by far the best. The food, the culture, the setting and the people really make it the best. In Sicily you can get the most simple of foods in the Palermo market from fried panelle to arancini, to a mystery meat basket of all kinds of steamed innards and assorted meats. My favorite is Sfincione, a flatbread pizza baked with tomatoes ground with pecorino and anchovies.

what is your favorite childhood food memory? One of my best childhood memories (I must have been six years old) was with my Grandmother Priolo. She was an avid cook and would travel all around Chicago by bus to get the best ingredients and food products. I remember one trip I took with her to Little Italy, which was at least three bus rides away from the Northwest side of Chicago where I grew up, to get a part for her meat grinder that was broken from overuse.

who would you want to cook for if you could chose one person dead or alive? There is only one, my grandmother, Fay Priolo. I would like to show her how she influenced my whole life.

best question, what is your favorite movie? LOL, this is a hard one. I have two: first it would be Shawshank Redemption and second The Rookie (I am a baseball fanatic).

One of the many standouts on the menu at Piccolo Sogno Due: the grilled veal loin with summer squash, cured tomatoes, Tropea onions and aged balsamic.

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IN SEASON: BEYOND THE USUAL BIRD

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

April

June

August September

December

November

October

July

May

3

March

February

January

1 2


I N SE A SON Beyond the Usual Bird ( Non-Turkey Alternatives to Celebrate Thanksgiving )

b y K AT H RY N O ’ M A L L E Y

Turn to any list of foods that help you fall asleep, and you’ll find turkey, with its sleep-inducing amino acids, somewhere at the very top. But the last thing you want to do this holiday season is put your guests to sleep. If you’re ready to try something new and venture beyond the traditional bird, we’ve got just the right alternatives to liven up your dinner party. From Melissa Clark’s Cider-Braised Pheasant with Pearl Onions and Apples to Laura Calder’s Roasted Quail with Grapes, each dish makes for a wonderfully festive and deliciously satisfying centerpiece to surround with all your favorite fixings.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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Cider-Braised Pheasant with Pearl Onions and Apples View Melissa Clark’s recipe on page 56 »

22

IN SEASON: BEYOND THE USUAL BIRD


10 11 November

October

When it comes to cooking with game birds, don’t be afraid to step outside your comfort zone. As Melissa Clark, New York Times food columnist and author of over 30 cookbooks, so aptly puts it, “A bird is a bird is a bird—whether we are talking chicken or quail or wild duck. Just follow the recipe and then you’ll find that the hardest thing about cooking game is tracking it down.” Game birds can be found at many farmer’s markets and high-end butchers, but be sure to place your order well in advance to ensure availability; alternatively, they can easily be purchased online.

“Pheasant is very mild, like a cross between chicken and turkey. It’s a delicious and overlooked bird.” – MELISSA CLARK

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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just be the bird for you. Not only does their dainty size make them easy to handle and quick to cook up, but as Laura Calder—television host and bestselling cookbook author—describes to us, they are “festive little things: the fact that they go so well with deep flavors like fruits or braised mushrooms makes them great for celebrations.”

24

IN SEASON: BEYOND THE USUAL BIRD

November

smaller group to feed, quail might

10 11 October

If you’re short on time and have a


Quail is an excellent option for small

Roasted Quail with Grapes View Laura Calder’s recipe on page 58 

gatherings where you can serve one bird per person. The meat is tender, juicy and non-gamey, pairing perfectly with fresh, sweet grapes and other fruits.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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A regular feature at fine-dining establishments, duck is far easier to work with than one might imagine.

Honey-Roasted Duck Take a dip into fancy-pants waters with Melissa Clark’s honey-lacquered duck, a deep golden roast with rosy meat and crisp, burnished skin. Place your favorite produce—think thick-sliced apples, onions and potatoes—at the bottom of the roasting pan and let it caramelize beneath the bird. Or, forgo the fruits and veggies and save the rendered duck fat— this stuff is pure gold. Refrigerate the fat in a clean, sealed container and use it for frying extra-crispy potatoes, working into tart crusts or making confit.

26

IN SEASON: BEYOND THE USUAL BIRD

View Melissa Clark’s recipe on page 59 »


honey-roasted duck

duck salad

Duck isn’t reserved for reservations-only

Let’s be honest: No one likes cooking the day

restaurants. Melissa Clark’s Honey-Roasted

after an elaborate dinner, but that doesn’t mean

Duck is impressive and accessible.

your post-party meals have to suffer. Leftover duck is great atop a simple salad of mixed greens, vinaigrette, cannellini beans or plump dried fruit.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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FALL INTO WINTER

SQUASH WEATHER PERMITTING by JUDITH MARA

Any time of year that you can grab a bunch of squash blossoms, you won’t regret it. Stuff them with any soft cheese such as goat or Telaggio, add fresh herbs, slivers of speck or crabmeat. Coat with two beaten eggs, roll in panko bread crumbs and lightly pan-fry.

28

W E AT H E R P E R M I T T I N G : FA L L I N T O W I N T E R S Q U A S H


One vegetable family is the epitome of fall and winter food. I’m talking about winter squash. Not only do all the classics like butternut, acorn and sugar pumpkin have a comforting, sweet, earthy taste, they’re probably one of the easiest vegetables on earth to cook. Which is also comforting. Farmer’s markets are brimming with all kinds of exciting and new gold-greenorange winter squash. Did I say exciting? Yes, because each year more heirloom varieties are being rediscovered and grown by small farmers, most of which you can’t find at a supermarket.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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acorn squash Acorn squash stuffed with rice, roasted squash, dried cranberries and scallions. Bake in a shallow amount of water (bain-marie) to retain the shape of the squash.

30

W E AT H E R P E R M I T T I N G : FA L L I N T O W I N T E R S Q U A S H


It used to be easy to answer the question of what the difference was between summer and winter squash: Summer squash is thin-skinned and winter is thick-skinned, hence better for winter storage. Not so anymore. Two heirloom types

squash risotto A traditional style of squash risotto garnished with shaved truffles.

coveted right now are red kuri and delicata, and both are so thin-skinned that the entire squash is edible from seeds to skin. One of our favorite characteristics of winter squash is that you can create all kinds of hearty meatless main dishes with it. A creamy au gratin of butternut squash combined with cheese, cream and bread crumbs is always welcome. Acorn squash makes a wonderful container for any kind of stuffing from rice to quinoa. Risotto, a dish of creamy carnaroli rice simmered in broth and flecked with roasted squash, is as mellow and comforting as a warm fall day.

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squash tips for cooks 1. Just like pumpkin seeds, all winter squash

squash lasts as long as possible. Make sure there

seeds can be cleaned and toasted for a healthy

are no bruises or cuts on the squash you buy,

snack. Just follow any recipe for toasting

then leave it on the countertop for one to two

pumpkin seeds. We recommend low and slow.

weeks to thicken the skins. At that point, you can keep the squash in the fridge (or a cellar)

2. My grandmother kept winter squash (thick-

for quite a while. Avoid the vegetable drawer,

skinned) in the cellar all winter. But most people

however, as it is far too humid.

don’t have a 45-degree cellar. Thankfully, there are other steps you can take to ensure your

3. All cooked squash or pumpkin freezes well.

risotto with cheez-it’s Chef Graham Elliot elevated squash to new heights with his Wisconsin Cheddar Risotto. Creamy risotto with squash, apples, cheddar cheese and Cheez-It’s make this dish more than exciting.

32

W E AT H E R P E R M I T T I N G : FA L L I N T O W I N T E R S Q U A S H


Peel and slice butternut squash very thinly and layer in a buttered ceramic dish with shredded Gruyère cheese, thyme, salt and pepper. Pour about 1 1/2 cups cream over the

au gratin

top and sprinkle with grated Parmesan. Bake at 375ËšF for 40 minutes.

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man about town View Gramercy Tavern’s recipe on page 64 »

34

HIGH SPIRITS: MAN (AND WOMAN) ABOUT TOWN


HIGH SPIRITS

MAN ( and woman )

ABOU T

TOWN by JUDITH MARA

There are cocktails and then there are the cocktails that beverage director Juliette Pope’s team at Gramercy Tavern in NYC create. Stylish and sophisticated, yet carefully rooted in the classics, their latest addition, the Man About Town, has a long pedigree. The name Man About Town was devised by

gin as a partner to the Campari and the

bartender Paul Michel who worked on the

sweet vermouth—all in equal parts.

cocktail—it is simply the translation of the French Boulevardier and seemed appropriate,

Upon tasting it, the team thought it was

given its sleek yet jaunty elegance.

great for autumn because of its orangegold hue, but they wanted to make it

The inspiration for the cocktail came

more drinkable. They added sweeter

from the Negroni, a classic Italian cocktail.

amaro, the classic Sicilian Cynar, upped

While playing around with a different version

the proportion of rye and were thrilled

of the Negroni, the staff at Gramercy Tavern

with the resulting cocktail—one that any

made an older, lesser-known riff on the drink,

man or woman about town would love.

the French Boulevardier. It substitutes rye for

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TA L LY HO! b y M O L LY S O R G E

36

T A L LY H O ! B Y M O L LY S O R G E


Molly Sorge, an equine journalist from

Stephen Hamilton recently traveled

Ruther Glen, Virginia and her horse, Elf,

to Middleburg, Virginia to photograph

often spend autumn mornings on a fox

and experience first hand a traditional

hunt. Molly shares with us a story that

fox hunt and all its trimmings. By his

transports us into her world of hunts,

photos you’ll see he didn’t go hungry.

horses, hounds and a hunt breakfast.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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RECIPES BY JOSEPHINE ORBA & MICHAEL MARTIN

37


Hunting mornings start early, drenched

The air has a piercing chill. We’ve stopped

The 20 or so riders of the hunt field all

in fog and spiked with light as the sun

at a check, which means we are waiting for

standing, waiting, listening. A friend hands

makes its way through the trees. As I ready

the hounds to pick up the scent of a fox. I

me a flask filled with liquid warmth and

my horse, I chat with friends, catching up

lay my hand quietly on my horse’s neck,

courage. The huntsman in charge of the

on all the news and sharing stories. After

murmuring, seeking to calm him because

pack of hounds urges them on with a

swinging a leg over my horse and setting

he lives to chase the pack. He chews on his

soft voice and short blows of his horn.

off amidst the field of riders, I pause a

bit excitedly, creating a metallic music of

They’re looking for the fox.

moment and close my eyes, smelling the

his own.

sharp, tangy sweat of my horse and the smoky musk of the leaves underfoot.

38

T A L LY H O ! B Y M O L LY S O R G E


The huntsman in charge of the pack of hounds urges them on with a soft voice and short blows of his horn.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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RECIPES BY JOSEPHINE ORBA & MICHAEL MARTIN

39


The joyous voices of the hounds draw us dashing through the woods and leaping over stone walls, the thrill of the chase giving wings to our horses’ feet.

40

T A L LY H O ! B Y M O L LY S O R G E


A melodic cry splits the air—a hound has

The hunt flies by, hours of mad gallops

caught the scent. The crisp fall air echoes

interspersed with quiet checks as the

as the pack of hounds gives voice in tune

hounds alternatively discover the fox’s

like a choir—not barking, but literally

scent, then lose and have to search for

singing their delight at giving chase. The

it again. The cry “Tally ho!” reverberates

horses swing their heads high and pull

across the field as a sleek, crafty fox darts

on the reins. We’re off, galloping over

through the meadow, circling back on his

the fields. My horse’s hooves beat out a

tracks in full view of all of us, but giving

staccato rhythm as the wind whistles in

the hounds the slip.

my ears and blood races through my veins. The joyous voices of the hounds draw us dashing through the woods and leaping over stone walls, the thrill of the chase giving wings to our horses’ feet.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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RECIPES BY JOSEPHINE ORBA & MICHAEL MARTIN

41


At the end of the day, the fox merrily

As hungry as foxhunters are for thrills,

finds his way home, having given us

they’re just as ravenous for a fulfilling repast

grand adventures, and we walk back

after a hard gallop. One by one each of us

to the gathering of trucks and trailers,

takes a turn scraping the mud off our boots

sweaty, sated, and hungry. Sometimes

on the cast iron boot scraper. Then we clomp

we eat right outside the trailers, but

loudly as we walk up the steps of our host’s

today we will be at a beautiful home

large frame farmhouse. The door swings open

in the hills. I untack my horse and

and a gush of warm air touches our cheeks

tie him to the trailer, leaving him to

and our fingers as we peel off damp leather

contented hay-munching. It’s time for

gloves. We rub our hands together to relieve

the hunt breakfast.

the numbness and in anticipation.

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T A L LY H O ! B Y M O L LY S O R G E


assorted artisan cheeses & fruit

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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RECIPES BY JOSEPHINE ORBA & MICHAEL MARTIN

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T A L LY H O ! B Y M O L LY S O R G E


Across from the stone fireplace an antique table creaks under the platters of ham biscuits—a must on any Virginia menu, quiches, baked apples and a marvelous cheese and fruit plate. It’s a feast fit for a king, and our hosts have also included a steaming hot stew and roasted vegetables from their fields. The beguiling scent of autumn and tradition surrounds us.

45


boeuf bourguinonne View Josephine Orba’s recipe on page 60 »

No hunt breakfast is complete without a

“That was quite a leap over that wall!

few sips from the flask; each foxhunter

Did you need a parachute to land?”

has his or her own personal concoction for

jokes a fellow hunter. I wink at him

the day. I am soon balancing a plate full of

and ask how he’d been able to see me,

decadent morsels on my lap, feeling the

since his horse had been accelerating

adrenaline of the chase fade and a deep

rapidly, which looked unintentional.

sense on contentment flood over me.

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T A L LY H O ! B Y M O L LY S O R G E


baking powder biscuits (cat head biscuits) View Michael Martin’s recipe on page 61 »

ham biscuits Make biscuits according to your favorite recipes. Heat and slice the ham. While still warm, spread a split biscuit with whole grain Dijon mustard, watercress and sliced Virginia ham. Serve with cornichons.

Recipe courtesy of Josephine Orba

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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RECIPES BY JOSEPHINE ORBA &

MICHAEL MARTIN

47


roasted vegetables View Josephine Orba’s recipe on page 62 »

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T A L LY H O ! B Y M O L LY S O R G E


P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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RECIPES BY JOSEPHINE ORBA &

MICHAEL MARTIN

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This breaking of bread is much like a family dinner, with teasing and congratulations flung about against the background of camaraderie. The end-of-day banter lets us relive each moment, laugh at each other, and soak the experiences into our bones.

baked apples Baked apples are stuffed with chopped dates, raisins, chopped pecans, butter, brown sugar, and sweet spices (cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves).

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T A L LY H O ! B Y M O L LY S O R G E


panna cotta with jelly View Josephine Orba’s recipe on page 63 »

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

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RECIPES BY JOSEPHINE ORBA &

MICHAEL MARTIN

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T A L LY H O ! B Y M O L LY S O R G E


The Virginia hunt breakfast is

hunt breakfast buffet menu

actually served later in the day after

- assorted artisan cheeses and fruit

a full morning of fox hunting. By that

- classic quiche lorraine

time, guests are ravenous and the

- baked virginia ham and ham biscuits

“breakfast” more closely resembles a

virginia hunt breakfast

hearty feast. On our menu you’ll find delightful autumn dishes from ham to roasted vegetables to baked apples to panna cotta. And of course, there has to be some eggs.

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

- baking powder biscuits - baked apples - boeuf bourguinonne - egg noodles, not shown - roasted vegetables - panna cotta with jelly

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RECIPES BY JOSEPHINE ORBA &

MICHAEL MARTIN

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54

HOW WE DID IT


HOW WE

DID IT

Deconstructing a shot from Stephen Hamilton’s The Restaurant Project by JUDITH MARA

favorite dish

Cassoulet Restaurant

Maude’s Liquor Bar, Chicago food stylist

Josephine Orba prop stylist

Paula Walters

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S T E P H E N H A M I LT O N

55


cider-braised pheasant with pearl onions and apples By Melissa Clark serves 8

ingredients for marinade: ·· 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil ·· 5 tablespoons fresh ginger, peeled and roughly chopped ·· 3 tablespoons fresh tarragon leaves, whole ·· 1/2 cup freshly squeezed orange juice (from 1 1/2 oranges) ·· 3 tablespoons finely grated orange zest (from 1 1/2 oranges) ·· large pinch kosher salt ·· 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper ·· 3 (3-pound) pheasants, each rinsed inside and out, patted dry, cut into 6 pieces

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RECIPE INDEX


make marinade:

Using tongs or slotted spoon, transfer pheasant to platter and

In blender, combine olive oil, ginger, tarragon, orange juice, zest,

cover with foil to keep warm. Set pot over high heat and bring

salt, and pepper and purée until smooth. In large bowl, combine

pan juices to boil. Boil, uncovered, until sauce is well reduced

marinade and pheasant and toss to coat. Cover and refrigerate

and thickened, about 25 minutes. Taste and add additional salt

overnight or up to 48 hours.

and pepper, if necessary.

braise pheasant:

while juices are reducing, prepare caramelized onions and apples:

In very large Dutch oven over moderately high heat, heat olive oil until hot but not smoking. Remove pheasant pieces from marinade, scraping off excess, and sprinkle with salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper. Working in batches, sear pheasant pieces until well browned, about

Bring medium pot of water to boil. Add pearl onions and boil, uncovered, 1 minute. Drain and run under cold water until cool enough to handle; slip off skins.

5 minutes per side. Transfer to paper towel-lined platter to drain.

In small skillet over moderately high heat, heat oil until hot but

Preheat oven to 325°F. Skim off all but 1 tablespoon oil from pan,

not smoking. Add onions, apples, sugar, salt, and pepper and stir to

leaving browned bits at bottom, and set pan over moderately low

combine. Sear, shaking pan occasionally, until onions and apples

heat. Add butter and heat until melted. Stir in onions, bay leaf,

are dark golden, about 10 minutes. Stir in apple cider, scraping up

fennel seeds, salt, remaining 1/2 teaspoon pepper, and sugar.

any browned bits in pan. Reduce heat to low, cover, and cook until

Cook, stirring occasionally, until onions are well caramelized,

onions are fork tender, about 2 minutes more.

30 to 40 minutes. Return pheasant to pot. Add chicken broth, cider, and wine. (Liquid should cover half of pheasant pieces. Add more chicken broth if necessary.) Raise heat to high and bring liquid to simmer.

serve: Spoon some of sauce over pheasant and garnish with onions, apples, and chopped tarragon. Serve additional sauce alongside.

Add apples, cover, and transfer pot to oven. Braise, turning pheasant pieces occasionally, until meat is cooked through and tender, 45 minutes to 1 hour.

ingredients for braise:

ingredients for caramelized onions & apples:

·· 1 teaspoon kosher salt

·· 10 ounces pearl onions, root ends trimmed

·· 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

·· 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

·· 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

·· 1 Granny Smith apple, peeled, cored, and cut into 1-inch cubes

·· 1 tablespoon unsalted butter

·· 2 teaspoons sugar

·· 3 large yellow onions, halved and thinly sliced (about 6 cups)

·· pinch kosher salt

·· 1 bay leaf

·· pinch freshly ground black pepper

·· 1 teaspoon fennel seeds

·· 3 tablespoons apple cider

·· 1 teaspoon table salt ·· pinch sugar ·· 2 to 3 cups low-sodium chicken broth, plus additional, if necessary

ingredients to serve:

·· 2 cups apple cider ·· 1 cup dry white wine

·· Fresh tarragon leaves, chopped

·· 3 Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored, and diced

RECIPE INDEX

57


roasted quail with grapes

Rinse, pat dry, and truss the quail. Mix the oil with 1 tablespoon

Recipe from French Taste by Laura Calder. ©2009 by Laura Calder. All rights reserved. Published by HarperCollins Canada.

all over the hens in a dish, and set aside half an hour to marinate.

with 1 tablespoon of the Cognac, and salt and pepper. Rub well Heat the oven to 450 degrees. Heat a roasting pan on the stovetop over medium-high heat, and brown the quail well on all sides, about 10 minutes total.

makes 8 servings

Spoon out any excess oil from the pan, and transfer the quail to the oven to finish cooking, about 25 minutes or until the juices run clear at the leg.

ingredients: ·· 8 quail ·· 3 tablespoons grapeseed oil ·· 3 tablespoons Cognac ·· salt and pepper ·· 1 cup chicken stock (homemade or low sodium) ·· 1 pound seedless green and red grapes, halved

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RECIPE INDEX

Transfer the quail to a serving platter, and cover with foil to keep warm. Pour the fat off the pan, and discard. Over medium-high heat, add the remaining 2 tablespoons Cognac to the pan and carefully light it. When the flames die out, add the stock and boil to reduce by about half. Reduce the heat to low, add the grapes, and heat for about 3 minutes to warm through and barely soften them. Pour the sauce and the grapes over the quail, and serve.


Trim the excess fat from the duck; you’ll see lumps of it next to the tail and around the neck opening. To brine the duck, in a small bowl stir together salt, pepper, minced garlic cloves and bay leaves. Rub the duck all over with the brine mixture, including the cavity. Using a skewer or the point of a paring knife, prick the duck skin all over, being careful not to pierce the flesh. Place the duck in a plastic bag, squeeze the air out, and refrigerate for at least 6 hours or overnight. Preheat the oven to 400ºF. Fill a stock pot with water and bring to a boil. Carefully, using a pair of tongs and a wooden spoon to stabilize the duck, lower the duck into the boiling water and blanch for 5 minutes. The blanching tightens the skin and helps it crisp during roasting. Bring the pot next to the sink; place a colander inside the sink. Carefully, using the tongs and a wooden spoon, lift the duck out of the water and into the colander to drain. When the duck is cool enough to handle but is still warm, stuff its cavity with the lemon and remaining 6 garlic cloves. Place the sage and thyme in last so the herbs poke out of the cavity–they will act as netting and prevent the stuffing ingredients from falling out. Place the duck on a roasting rack, breast side up, over a roasting pan. Roast for 45 minutes; then using a wooden spoon and a pair of tongs, flip the duck so it’s breast side

honey-roasted duck

down. Roast duck for another 50 minutes. Brush the back of the duck with 1 tablespoon of honey, flip the duck so it’s breast side up again, and roast another 20 minutes. Raise the

by Melissa Clark

heat to 500ºF, brush the duck breast with 2 tablespoons of honey, and roast 15 or so minutes until the skin is crispy and

makes 4 servings

brown. Allow the duck to rest for 20 minutes before carving. Serve warm.

ingredients for brine: ·· 2 tablespoons salt, more to taste ·· 1 teaspoon ground black pepper, more to taste ·· 2 garlic cloves, minced ·· 6 bay leaves, crushed ·· One 5-pound Long Island (a.k.a Pekin) duck

ingredients for roasting pan: ·· 6 garlic cloves, smashed and peeled ·· 1 lemon, quartered ·· 3 large sage sprigs ·· 3-4 sprigs thyme ·· 3 tablespoons honey RECIPE INDEX

59


boeuf bourguinonne by Josephine Orba makes 16 servings

Heat oven to 350 degrees. Pat beef dry. On the top of the stove, brown the meat

ingredients:

in a little olive oil in a large skillet. Place into heavy casserole dish and season with salt and pepper. Cook

·· olive oil

onions and carrots in same pan until lightly browned.

·· 4 - 5 pounds beef (top sirloin or top round) trimmed and cut into 2-inch cubes.

Add the garlic and cook a few seconds and add the

·· 4 carrots, peeled and thickly sliced

vegetables to the meat. Deglaze sauté pan with wine,

·· 2 cloves of garlic minced (optional)

then pour wine and stock over meat and braise in

·· 1 bag frozen white pearl onions

slow oven for 2 - 3 hours.

·· 1 - 2 cups beef stock ·· 2 - 3 cups red wine

While meat is braising, sauté mushrooms in a little

·· 1 pound button mushrooms, cleaned, cut in half if they are large

butter, set aside.

·· salt, pepper ·· Beurre Manié (equal parts flour mixed with soft butter, added to thicken the sauce, you’ll need 1- 2 tablespoons) ·· Chopped fresh thyme and parsley

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RECIPE INDEX

After the meat is tender, remove from oven add the Beurre Manié to the pot. Stir well and return to oven. Add mushrooms and heat through. Check seasoning. Stir in fresh thyme and parsley.


baking powder biscuits (cat head biscuits) by Michael Martin Michael Martin is an owner/rider/trainer from Franklin, TN. He has fox hunted for years in Virginia and Pennsylvania. They call these Cat Head Biscuits “Cause they’re as big as a cat’s head”.

Preheat oven to 450 degrees. In a large bowl combine

makes 12-15 biscuits

On floured surface, toss lightly until no longer sticky. Roll

flour, baking powder and salt. Using fork, cut shortening into flour until consistency of coarse meal. Add milk; stir with fork until mixture leaves sides of bowl and forms a soft, moist dough.

out to 1/2 inch thick, and cut with 2-inch round, floured cutter. Place on ungreased cookie sheet. Bake for 8 to 12

ingredients for brine:

minutes or until light golden brown. Makes about 12 to 15 biscuits.

·· 2 1/4 cups all purpose flour ·· 3 teaspoons baking powder ·· 1/2 teaspoon salt ·· 1/2 cup shortening ·· 1 cup milk

RECIPE INDEX

61


roasted vegetables by Josephine Orba makes 16 servings ingredients: Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Scrub carrots and parsnips ·· 3 parsnips

(cut into 2-inch pieces if large). Slice red onion in rings.

·· 6 carrots

Peel and slice sweet potato into wedges. Trim Brussels

·· 1 red onion

sprouts and cut in half. Peel garlic cloves and toss all

·· 1 large sweet potato

vegetables in generous amount of olive oil. Add salt and

·· 1 pound Brussels sprouts

fresh ground pepper to taste.

·· 3 cloves garlic ·· olive oil, salt, pepper, fresh chopped parsley

Spread onto a large baking sheet and roast, tuning occasionally until cooked and browned, about 45 minutes. Sprinkle with fresh chopped parsley.

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RECIPE INDEX


panna cotta with jelly by Josephine Orba

ingredients for brine:

for the panna cotta Sprinkle gelatin onto 1/2 cup cream to soften. Heat 2 cups

·· 2 1/2 cups heavy cream

of cream with 1/2 cup sugar –do not boil. Combine hot

·· 2 teaspoons gelatin

cream and cream with gelatin and cream. Add vanilla

·· 1/2 cup sugar

and stir until thoroughly dissolved. Pour into small, clear

·· 1 teaspoon vanilla

serving containers. Cool and refrigerate until set.

·· 2 cups raspberry jello or fruit juice mixed with gelatin ·· fresh raspberries

for the jelly Make raspberry Jello or add 1 1/2 - 2 teaspoons gelatin to 2 cups fruit juice. Allow to cool but not set. Place single raspberry on surface of set cream and pour raspberry Jello or gelatin over it. Return to fridge to set.

RECIPE INDEX

63


High Spirits: Man About Town Recipe courtesy of Gramercy Tavern

makes 1 cocktail

Stir until very cold in mixing tin filled with ice: 2 oz. rye (we use Rittenhouse but any good rye will do) 1 oz. Cynar (a specific brand of Italian amaro) 1 oz. sweet vermouth (we use Dolin) Strain into coupe or martini glass. Optional garnish: a brandied cherry in the bottom of the glass.

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RECIPE INDEX


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Who's Hungry? Magazine | Fall 2012 | No 4  

Blending the worlds of food and photography, the magazine features travel stories and recipes from top food writers, as well as styling tips...

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