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Issue 14 April 18, 2012

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Whitworth Hosts 42nd annual lu'au Baseball second in Northwest Conference

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Serving the Whitworth community since 1905

about us Volume 102, Issue 14

The Whitworthian has served as the main source of news and sports coverage for the Whitworth community since 1905. The Whitworthian is an organization composed entirely by students which produces The Whitworthian weekly newspaper and thewhitworthian.com.

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OUR MISSION The Whitworthian staff is dedicated to presenting accurate and relevant information in an innovative manner. Our goal is to be accountable while informing, entertaining and providing a forum for expressing the interests of the Whitworth community. GENERAL INFORMATION The print edition of The Whitworthian is published weekly, except during January and student vacations. The content is generated entirely by students. The college administration does not review the newspaper’s content. Opinions and ideas expressed in The Whitworthian are those of the individual artists, writers and student editors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Associated Students of Whitworth University (ASWU), the university, its administration, faculty/staff or advertisers. The Whitworthian is paid for through advertising and subscription revenue and in part by student activity fees as budgeted by ASWU. OPINIONS POLICY Columns, editorial cartoons and reviews are the opinions of their individual creators and not necessarily the opinion of The Whitworthian, its editors or its staff. PUBLIC FORUM The Whitworthian is a public forum that believes in freedom of speech and expression as guaranteed in the First Amendment to the Constitution of the United States. CONTACT US The Whitworthian c/o Whitworth University 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. Spokane, WA 99251 509.777.3248 ONLINE AT www.thewhitworthian.com QUESTIONS? jvalencia12@my.whitworth.edu

News

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5 | Sodexo chooses Whitworth to test new menu 14 | Campus purity culture affects students Whitworth was one of eight colleges across the nation to be chosen to test a new menu that emphasizes quality and healthy options.

Exploring how Whitworth’s perceived purity culture can be detrimental to students’ views of themselves.

Congo escapee Wilondja Muyoma will join the ranks of freshmen in the fall.

on a daily basis.

students need more attention 7 | Refugee to continue education at Whitworth 16 | Anxiety Discussing the anxiety affects students greatly

8 | Honors program dialogue continues

18 | Creationism should be taught in schools

Arts & culture

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Whitworth held two meetings last week for discussion about the honors program, slated to begin in the fall.

9 | Whitworth hosts 42nd annual lu’au

Guests feasted on traditional Hawaiian food and performers danced in the Whitworth Hawaiian Club’s “Do the Hula” lu’au.

10 | Mobile serves Mediterranean

The White House Garlic Mobile includes garlic in some way in every to-go dish they serve.

13 | Film discusses women’s misrepresentation The documentary “Miss Representation” started dialogue about gender stereotypes and the way media portrays women.

Exploring the importance of teaching science without censorship and the benefits of teaching creationism.

19 | Baseball plays for the top spot in the NWC Pirates go up against Pacific University in three home games.

21 | Track and field anticipates conference

Bucs finish last meets, and qualify more athletes for the NWC Championships.

23 | Spotted from the crow’s nest: Alli Marshall

Highlighting senior tennis player Alli Marshall on her four-year career at Whitworth and more than 100 wins as a Pirate.

The Whitworthian is committed to providing the Whitworth community with the most accurate information possible. The Whitworthian never knowingly publishes inaccuracies. If you have

a comment or question about the fairness or accuracy of a story, send an email to jvalencia12@my.whitworth.edu.

Cover photographer: Greg Moser


Editorial:

Editorials in the “In the Loop” section reflect the majority opinion of the editorial board, which is made up of five editors.

Efforts by faculty and staff to increase communication met with student apathy

Photo Editor Chrissy Roach croach14@my.whitworth.edu Assistant Photo Editor Greg Moser gmoser14@my.whitworth.edu Online Editor Rachel Bair rbair13@my.whitworth.edu Copy Chief Dani Dubois ddubois13@my.whitworth.edu Radio Liaison Lauren Denslow ldenslow12@my.whitworth.edu Circulation Manager Crystal Nelson cnelson12@my.whitworth.edu Graphic Designer Maria Ladd mchumov14@my.whitworth.edu Advertising Managers Molly Ferree mferree12@my.whitworth.edu Emily Scott escott15@my.whitworth.edu Adviser Jim McPherson jmcpherson@whitworth.edu Staff Members Hope Barnes, Jasmine Barnes, Sarah Barentson, Melissa Barringer, Cathy Bronson, Rosie Brown, Hannah Charlton, Danielle Christianson, Rebekah Daniels, Meghan Dellinger, Corina Gebbers, Jacqueline Goldman, Linnea Goold, Katie Harriman, Megan Hinzdel, Lindsey Hubbart, Sena Hughes, Jennifer Ingram, Kari Johnson, Heather Kennison, Jonathan Kim, Eva Kiviranta, Nerissa Kresge, Michael Locatell, Ashley Minster, Evanne Montoya, Natalie Moreno, Greg Moser, Max Nelsen, Lauren NuDelman, Jasmine Pallwitz, Catherine Palmer, Samantha Payne, Gabrielle Perez, Emily Roth, Tanner Scholten, Eli Smith, Caitlyn Starkey, Ryan Stevens, Sandra Tully, Elise Van Dam, Nathan Webber, Brianna Wheeler, Haley Williamson

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Amber Johnson Senior

Assistant Sports Editor Andrew Forhan aforhan14@my.whitworth.edu

APRIL 18, 2012

me feel better about myself, it had the opposite of its intended effect for me. Women of Whitworth who subscribe to the misinformation of the Vagina Monologues, my heart breaks for you. This is not how you should endeavor to find healing. You will not find it by searching inward or to the flesh, because beauty does not come from inside of you. Beauty is a divine characteristic. We, as Christian women, are the reflection of that beauty, not the Source of it. There is healing in recognition of that Source, because beauty that comes from Him can grow infinitely and is associated with the healing some of you so desperately seek. There is hope in that kind of beauty. True beauty can be sought after, and is not limited to only what is within you now. There is no limit to how beautiful you can be. Stop looking to yourself, or to the flesh. Stop looking to other people — men or women. Look to the One who gave you your beauty, the One who has an endless supply of beauty to give if you will only cease looking for it everywhere but in Him, and begin to desire to be beautiful as He is beautiful.

Sports Editor Kara Fisher karafisher12@my.whitworth.edu

WHITPICS

Last week, my misplaced trust in Whitworth’s decision to present the Vagina Monologues led me to attend in hope of obtaining a greater understanding of what it means to be a woman. Though I anticipated the experience to align with Whitworth’s mission of educating the mind and heart, and unfortunately found it failed to extend beyond the physical realm. The writers, in an attempt to make women feel good about themselves and their bodies only pointed to a glorification of the flesh to achieve that goal, and even endorsed anti-biblical teaching that cannot possibly be honoring to God, as the Whitworth mission states. Since marriage is designed to be a representation of Christ’s relationship with the church, the female body was designed to fit perfectly with the male body in gentle unity, gloriously reflecting the bride’s sweet surrender to Christ. As a near the culmination of a four year journey aimed at helping me find my identity, and especially as a part of my journey to define myself as a woman, I found that the teaching of the Vagina Monologues is actually the antithesis of who I am. I am not anything the Vagina Monologues told me I am. I am not a vagina. I am not a physical body. I am not a material object. I do not find myself by viewing myself as just a physical being. If the Vagina Monologues were intended to help

Opinions Editor Remi Omodara romodara14@my.whitworth.edu

SPORTS

The Whitworthian welcomes reader responses to articles or issues of interest to the Whitworth community. Send letters to jvalencia12@my.whitworth.edu. Limit to 200 words.

Arts & Culture Editor Jo Miller joannamiller14@my.whitworth.edu

OPINIONS

Letter to the editor:

News Editor Lindsie Wagner lwagner14@my.whitworth.edu

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mation spoon-fed to us. Our professors print out syllabuses and grading rubrics that clearly outline what is expected of us and how we can go about making the grade. We’ve even had those professors who give us a list of potential sources when we have a paper due. Although that help makes our life significantly easier, life is not always so cut and dry. This board feels that in essence, students cried wolf. The need for communication was there, and faculty did what they could to meet that need, but when it came time for students to stand behind what they said they wanted, few were around. ASWU, faculty, administration and student groups did their part. If students received all the information, so be it. If not, then efforts by faculty and staff to facilitate communication should continue. But as we’ve seen in the case of the honors program, students cried out for more communication, but did not take advantage of it once it became available. It is this apathy that can be dangerous at a place such as this, where generally the needs of the student body are at the forefront. If students think they are not informed on an issue, they need to take the initiative to find the information for themselves. Chances are, they aren’t looking hard enough or they aren’t taking advantage of the opportunities in front of them. Let’s face it: We won’t always have faculty and staff who want to communicate so openly with students. Let’s practice being informed by seeking out information for ourselves.

Editor-in-Chief Jessica Valencia jvalencia12@my.whitworth.edu

NEWS

Two forums were held last Tuesday and Thursday to answer further questions students may have had about the honors program. The turnout for those were dismal at best. Tuesday’s meeting brought no more than 15 students throughout the night, while Thursday had even fewer students. This board would like it to be made known that those forums were held in large part because of supposed student interest. Yet it appears those meetings were nothing more than a waste of time. The Whitworthian has received numerous Letters to the Editor talking about the honors program, many voicing concern over its early implementation and to clear the air of any rumors, the honors program is indeed happening in the fall. We recognize the frustration associated with not feeling informed on such a program as this, but two town hall meetings — both initiated as methods of communicating with the student body — largely went unnoticed. At some point the failure to be informed falls on the student body: We have a responsibility to educate ourselves. After ASWU voiced concern over the lack of communication and the subsequent town hall meeting was held last month, faculty involved with the honors program continued to seek student input. As stated earlier, those were largely ignored by students. If the aim is to be informed, then take the necessary steps to seek that information. There are some on this campus that fail to do their part in seeking out information. As part of a college campus, we largely get infor-

STAFF Spring 2012

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news Students raise awareness of water access issues Jennifer Ingram Staff Writer

“It’s so neat to see,” Sullivan said. “We had over 50 people sign up, but even if 10 do it then it’s totally worth A Whitworth club presented a new it to me.” and innovative way to engage stuWhitworth’s Kisima club ended dents by hosting the first ever Water Water Week with a final hike to the Week. From April 12 to April 14, two Back 40 to fill water jugs, which parorganizations pooled their ideas and ticipants then carried approximately resources together to create three two miles to the Hixson Union Builddays of thought-provoking conversa- ing. tions about the limited clean water Kisima club president, Alison Gonsources in third world countries. zalez, said that the club wanted to Whitworth Kisima club, a club that work specifically with Blood:Water raises money to build wells in Africa Mission to raise money toward purthrough Blood:Water Mission, along chasing a well in Eastern Africa. with Team Running Water, a BloomsShe said the idea behind Water day team through Partners Inter- Week was to engage the community national, put on the event to raise in critical thinking and meaningful awareness and funding for clean wa- experiences that would leave them ter around the world. with a desire to act further. A Walk in Their Shoes was kicked “The purpose of the walk is to exoff by mapping out a walkway from perience the discomfort that people Pirates Cove to a water source in the experience every day to get access to Back 40. For water,” Gonzathree conlez said. “Some“The purpose of the walk is secutive days, times it’s not students were to experience the discomfort even clean wachallenged to ter.” people experience every day use only this Live music, water spigot free stickers and to get access to water.” as their resnacks were pro— Alison Gonzalez source for all vided by Sodexo their water for participants Kisima club president needs. to enjoy when Senior Juthey finished the lie Sullivan, Partners International Water Walk. intern, said she thought it would be After the walk, Ross Carper, a juan interactive way for students to be- nior high leader at First Presbyterian come aware of the water supply needs Church Spokane and a long-time in developing countries around the supporter of Blood:Water Mission, world. shared about the importance of the “There are so many speakers that organization. The organization, he come to campus,” Sullivan said. “We said, believes in providing wells to wanted to create something differ- help Africans help themselves. ent and interactive that would pull “Blood:Water Mission believes Afpeople’s curiosity and spark a new ricans are solving African problems,” interest.” Carper said. “Americans aren’t doing As president of Team Running Wa- that.” ter, Sullivan wanted to create an opGonzalez said there are many soportunity for students to experience cial ties to the water issues in Eastern the discomfort that some people Africa. experience every single day. When “Working towards long-term goals students get thirsty in the middle of is so beneficial,” Gonzalez said. the day and think how far they would “These projects are so crucial to the need to walk to get a sip of water, it organizations and we just want to gives them an idea of all the other help.” places in the world that don’t have She said nearly 40 billion school easy access to safe drinking water, she hours are lost for young kids because said. the children are sent out with the

Photographer: Jo Miller (L to R) Freshmen Grant Cole, Eli Deitz and sophomore Jonathan Royal cross the finish line at the end of the Water Walk on Sunday. Students carried water jugs filled in the Back 40 around a two-mile course for the event put on by the Whitworth Kisima club and Team Running Water. women to find safe drinking water for their families. Searching can last all day. “The Water Walk might only take a few hours but hopefully will leave you with an experience that will help you educate others about the issues in the world,” Gonzalez said. The event was free, but donations were accepted to go toward the cause. Anyone who donated $15 received a Kisima water bottle, and the money was put directly into the clean wa-

ter fund. All the proceeds were split between Partners International and Blood Water Mission. “It is such an engaging activity for students,” Gonzalez said. “We wanted to do something creative that would have weight on the participants. They can have their own experiences and we hope it will be impactful on them.” Contact Jennifer Ingram at jingram13@my.whitworth.edu.


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Number of incoming freshmen expected to be accepted to the honors program in the fall.

Photographer: Hope Barnes Sodexo is trying a new menu at Whitworth and seven other colleges that will increase food variety.

Caitlyn Starkey Staff Writer

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Estimated millions of refugees, such as incoming freshman Wilondja Muyoma, across Africa who have fled their homes due to violent conflict and persecution.

SPORTS

The number of dances performed at the Lu’au, including several kinds of hulas, a Tahitian number and a haka, which is an ancient war dance.

65 Number of track and field athletes that have qualified for the northwest conference track and field championships.

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2 Number of seniors on the Whitworth softball team that finished their collegiate careers this past weekend. Second baseman Sami Parr and catcher Ashley Greig played in their final games for the Pirates.

APRIL 18, 2012

ing what food a student ate and what they thought of it. That information will give Sodexo a better sense of how to improve the menu before rolling it out nationwide. So far it seems students appear to enjoy the change. Sodexo is testing a new dining menu that could be “In general, it’s kind of exciting,” junior Brandi Mcrolled out in the fall. Whitworth is one of eight colleges serviced by So- Ferran said. “I haven’t really gotten used to it. It’s pleasdexo that is testing a new preview menu. The dining antly surprising.” The new menu items have appeared to be healthier, hall is testing a two week menu twice in four weeks. After four weeks, the dining hall menu will become McFerran said, which she appreciates. “It’s not all onions,” senior Jeremy White said with a a hybrid of the old and new menu. That hybrid will add back in Whitworth favorites such as French Dip Fri- laugh. White said he would like to see some consistency days and breakfast sandwiches on Wednesday. Genwithin a meal, for example haveral manager of Sodexo Jim ing scrambled eggs at breakfast. O’Brien said Sodexo hopes “The general concept is instead Junior Matthew Rediger has to start the new menu naliked the focus on one high qualtionwide this fall. of offering, let’s say on the grill, ity menu item per dining option. “It’s really a test situation a hamburger, a cheeseburger, “I appreciate more grill opto see if in fact these menus tions, instead of the same three would be something they grilled cheese, French fries every pizza options,” he said. could roll out nationally next day, offer one really good thing.” The change in food options is fall,” O’Brien said. taking some getting used to for The number of dishes of— Jim O’Brien some students. fered will decrease a little bit general manager of Sodexo “I am very much a creature of in order to increase quality, habit but it’s been a nice change,” O’Brien said. senior Jordan Kingma said. “I re“The general concept is instead of offering, let’s say on the grill, a hamburger, ally only notice at lunch. Lunch is better. I haven’t really a cheeseburger, grilled cheese, French fries every day, noticed at dinner. It’s still a starch, grilled or steamed vegetable and a meat.” offer one really good thing,” O’Brien said. The new menu also has a stronger focus on vegetarian options. “[Sodexo] is trying to increase both variety and healthy options that they have in the menus,” O’Brien said. To gain feedback on what students did and did not Contact Caitlyn Starkey at like, surveys will be offered at the end of each meal ask- cstarkey14@my.whitworth.edu.

Number of strikeouts for Whitworth freshman pitcher Dan Scheibe in his last two starts without issuing a walk.

OPINIONS

Dining hall chosen to test new and healthier menu

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215 Number of students housed in Warren, the largest dorm on campus.

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{numbers} crunching

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Distraction fast helps break chambers by Melinda Leavitt

ASWU is excited to be done with elections and begin getting the new folks ready to serve you all next year and to be the best leaders they can be for you all! All of the new coordinators, media heads, and executives will be going through the budgeting process during Budget Committee (April 23-24) in order to learn the process of getting money from ASWU and to start creating their budgets for next year so that they can put on awesome events next year. What else is coming up at the end of the year? Good question! Springfest of course is the event you all should attend. April 28 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. will be the official time for this monstrous event of fun and raising money to support BELIEF. At 10:30 a.m. there will be a Superhero themed Fun Run, 1 p.m. the craziest mentalist I’ve ever seen will be in the HUB, and at 2 p.m. the amazing Mr. Whitworth pageant will be going on. On top of all of these attractions, there will be a rock wall, lunch picnic on the lawn, smooth jazz band tunes, booths of craziness, bouncy toys (because we’re all still children at heart), shirts being sold, games and Frisbee in the Loop and much more! Rain or shine, this event is going on. Oh, and I hear there are also rumors of a car show possibly being a part of the event. Tickets will be sold in order to participate in the booth events and activities in order to raise money for BELIEF. Come support the group by scraping together all of the change you can find in your pockets, drawers, wallets and cars and come buy a ton of tickets to be able to participate. Lastly, I would like to thank all of you who came and attended all of the town halls that occurred during the week of April 9-April 12. The administration appreciates your feedback and they love hearing your questions. Take advantage of those opportunities in the future as they come up in the coming years. It’s a great way to learn about the university and to mingle with professors, administrators, and of course, Beck A. Taylor himself. Until next time, keep drinking water and don’t get dehydrated from all of the wonderful sunshine.

Contact Melinda Leavitt at mleavitt12@my.whitworth.edu.

Scan this QR code with your smart phone to see the ASWU weekly minutes.

dependence on technology

cially need,” Fetzer said. “Growing up, I didn’t have cable; I got a Gamecube when I was 12 but we were only allowed on it for a certain amount of time. I think when I was 13 I got MySpace, and I was on it Students at Whitworth are fasting technology for for hours and hours a day. It was really bad, but I a week to concentrate on “real life” relationships. was addicted.” Distraction Fast is an event which encourages Fetzer said she watches TV shows, such as “How people to give up as much technology as they can. I Met Your Mother,” as she gets ready or cleans her The Distraction Fast, which kicked off April 9 at room. 7 p.m. in the Hixson Union Building multi-purpose “I think I’m going to give up Facebook and TV room, was lead by senior Caleb McIlraith and se- shows,” Fetzer said. “I probably watch one or two nior Jenna Hansen. TV shows a day.” Hansen told the audience how she was brought Sittser said people fast to break a strong-hold up without much technology, especially without and to create a new kind of habit. The fast should social networking sites. Hanincrease one’s awareness of bad sen said she felt that college habits and show behaviors that life pressured students into become addictive. “I think technology and have using sites such as Facebook. “Our culture is too self-indulMcIlraith expressed a conthings like social media gent,” Sittser said. “The goal is to cern for the lack of time we use technology, not to be used by give us a false sense of spend with our friends, and it.” said he hoped that students Sittser warned the audience accomplishment and who take part in this program that technology would always be satisfaction...” will gain a sense of freedom a part of their lives and they have from technology. to learn how to live with it. — Jerry Sittser “I think technology and “The ultimate benefit from this professor of theology things like social media give fast is a greater presence,” Sittser us a false sense of accomsaid. “I call this ‘The fast of replishment and satisfaction pentance.’” with a relationship by allowing us to connect with Sittser went on to give audience members adpeople virtually without actually having to enter vice about how to break their bad patterns, such as into a relationship with the person,” McIlraith said. never allowing yourself to text in front of another McIlraith went on to describe how he hoped person, or to turn your phone off when in the comstudents wouldn’t always depend on technology pany of others. for entertainment and social activity. McIlraith invited participants to come together “It’s something that people do without even re- every evening this week, between 5:50-6:30 p.m. ally thinking about it,” McIlraith said. “I remember in the HUB, to get dinner and to discuss the chalmy freshman year being really frustrated because lenges and successes of their fast. we’d just watch movies all the time. We didn’t even McIlraith summed up his goal for the week as question it.” having more people living in the moment rather Hansen and McIlraith invited audience mem- than being connected to people all over the place bers to share their experiences with technology at one time. with each other before inviting professor of Theol“What I’m hoping people will realize is how ogy Jerry Sittser to speak. great it can be just to be present where you are,” Junior Veronica Fetzer who attended the event McIlraith said. said technology becomes too much of a distraction from work and sometimes damages her friendships as she is more likely to text friends rather than walk across the hall to talk to them. Contact Samantha Payne at “I think this is something college students espe- spayne15@my.whitworth.edu.

Samantha Payne Staff Writer

This week: “Now concerning the collection...”

WhitPres

Worship 8:00 a.m. - contemporary 9:30 a.m. - contemporary 10:45 a.m. - traditional 11:01 a.m. - contemporary Blog


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Congo escapee joins incoming freshmen

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Contact Jennifer Ingram at jingram13@my.whitworth.edu.

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York, and finally to Seattle. “It was a very long flight, but just knowing I was going back to school made it worth it,” Muyoma said. Muyoma settled into his new home in Seattle and quickly taught himself to speak English fluently. He said when he came to America he was excited to learn about business. So, he applied for an internship with Microsoft in the summer of 2011 and was one of 250 finalists accepted into the program. “I had no clue what it was going to be like,” Muyoma said. Muyoma was put into a group which would focus on the social aspect of marketing in the U.S. He worked with real Microsoft clients and learned persuasive marketing skills to get people to buy his products. Muyoma then decided it was time to start a new chapter of his life. He was accepted into Whitworth’s Act Six program and is excited to move to Spokane and live on campus. “When I visited I really liked East and Duvall,” Muyoma said. “But as I researched more, BJ looks fun because it’s all freshmen and it’s a close and tight community, kind of like my home was in Bukavu.”

WHITPICS

Whitworth University sends out letters of acceptance to new students all over the world. This year, a letter of acceptance was sent to the home of Wilondja Muyoma, a 19-year-old living in Seattle. Muyoma, like many other prospective students, came to visit the Whitworth campus last November and fell in love with the university. He attended a few classes and said he was very impressed with the school. “I visited several other colleges but my experiences at Whitworth were so different and unique,” Muyoma said. “And as I did more research on the school, I saw what an amazing job they are doing in academics and I wanted to go there.” He is now looking forward to studying philosophy and economics and perhaps taking a few French classes. Muyoma is soon planning to pack up his things and make the trek from Seattle to Spokane. The transition should be quite easy for him, for his journey to Whitworth began in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Specifically, he has traveled from the city Bukavu in Eastern Congo. Muyoma’s native tongue is Swahili, but at the private Christian school he

attended he mostly spoke French. Muy- to help reconnect families that might oma said that in Bukavu everyone lives have been separated during the war. in a tightly knit area. He said everyone After nearly three years of searching for is so close that he would consider the his family, Muyoma learned his parents members of his community to be like were located back in the Congo. Not wanting to risk going back to Burelatives. He cared deeply for his friends kavu, Muyoma was and family. taken to an overMuyoma’s home was directly af“The [refugee] camp was crowded, Englishrefugee fected by one of the such a blessing, because speaking camp. Mapendo deadliest wars in Africa’s history, the Mapendo International International, also as RefugeSecond Congo War. was there and offered to known Point, is an orgaA peace treaty was nization that hapsigned in 2003 but take me to America.” pened to be visiting fighting prevailed — Wilondja Muyoma Muyoma’s camp at in the eastern part that time. Refugeof Congo. When incoming freshman Point goes to Kenya Muyoma was 12, the war that brought malnutrition and to assist families and individuals fleedisease was forcing young men to join ing war who need urgent and lifesaving the army and leave their families. All of help. The foundation works with the those conditions became too much for United States and the U.N. to identify Muyoma and he decided it was time to durable solutions for people in danger. “The camp was such a blessing, beleave. “Congo is pretty close to Rwanda, so cause Mapendo International was there we decided just to run there,” Muyoma and offered to take me to America,” said. “But along the way, my parents got Muyoma said. “They offered me safety from the Congo and a chance to study lost and we were separated.” There is estimated to be nearly 3 mil- in America and get a real education.” The youngest of the group, Muyoma lion refugees across Africa who have fled their homes due to violent conflict was the only one under 18 to travel to and persecution. There is a program America. He and several others left Naiestablished in Kenya that is designed robi and flew to Europe, then to New

SPORTS

Jennifer Ingram Staff Writer

OPINIONS

Photographer: Corey Hage, courtesy of Waggener Edstrom Worldwide Incoming freshman Wilondja Muyoma’s journey has taken him from the Congo to Rwanda, then to Seattle. In the fall, Muyoma will come to Whitworth.


Open dialogue benefits honors program

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Emily Roth Staff Writer

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on April 12 addressed how the Honors program will make use of internships and study abroad. Senior Danny Gubitz participated in both meetings. The announcement of Whitworth’s new honors “I want to go to [the meetings] because I’m interprogram last month caused a variety of reactions among students. At the town hall meeting on March ested and invested in Whitworth,” Gubitz said. “I want 8, some students felt faculty listened to student opin- to make sure students have a voice and the faculty ions while having already decided their minds in favor knows that students care.” The honors program proposal went through a of the honors program, and therefore there wouldn’t be any use voicing concerns about the future of the lengthy process before getting to that point, committee member Kathryn Picanco, assistant professor of program. education, said in the Tuesday According to the honors promeeting, including being presentgram steering committee, that is “The idea is for open ed to the Curriculum Oversight an untrue assumption. Students and faculty members concerned dialogue [about the honors Committee. Starting an honors program has been discussed by with the honors program met last program] indefinitely.” faculty for 10 or 15 years, Neder week in two open meetings to ansaid. The Honors program Steerswer student questions as well as — Adam Neder ing Committee began about two brainstorm ideas, which would honors program steering months ago and is continuing to be shared with the rest of the honsettle the details of how the proors program steering committee. committee member gram will work. Committee member Adam The students and faculty presNeder, associate professor of theent at the Thursday meeting considered the question ology, facilitated the first meeting. “What incentive will the committee have in not of what would qualify an internship or study abroad hearing what you all have to say?” Neder asked the trip at the honors level. Another question was how students. “The idea is for open dialogue indefinitely,” honors students with incoming credits will participate in the offered classes. Neder later said. “There’s a tremendous amount of research that The meeting on April 10 focused on the community impact and aspects of research, while the meeting went into the initial proposal,” Picanco said. “I know

some people seem to have issues with how fast it has gone through, because students have not known about it for very long.” One original concern of the faculty was that the Honors program would create a two-tiered culture of honors and non-honors students, Neder said. Other issues included how to fund courses and fit classes with teachers. The suggestion of implementing the Honors program also presented the question of why the Program would be needed unless it reflected that current classes are not good enough. “The honors courses are supposed to be innovative in pedagogies, and it encourages experimental thinking,” Neder said. Picanco said the honors program courses would focus on depth, complexity and interdisciplinary studies. The program is expected to accept 140 freshmen for next year and will offer six classes in fall 2012 for entering freshmen. The whole program is planned to grow to about 25 offered courses. Students who are ineligible for honors would be able to appeal where space was available. “I think [the honors program is] important because anything that desires to stimulate intellectual development can be a catalyst for students who want to go deeper,” Buckham said.

Contact Emily Roth at eroth14@my.whitworth.edu.

If you want flexible summer classes, our question is:

your place or ours? 3 & 6-week classes on campus or online

W

hitworth gives you more options. For summer, those options include the summer class schedule. Attend accelerated three-week and six-week classes in the day or evening. Or, opt for online options for the ultimate flexibility. All this at a greatly reduced tuition. The schedule is available on WhitNet, of course.

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Natalie Moreno Staff Writer

Contact Natalie Moreno at nmoreno14@my.whitworth.edu.

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The menu included poi, teriyaki beef and Haupia, a traditional Hawaiian dessert created with coconut milk and sugar. During the entertainment, club president junior Sarah Sagarang spoke and thanked the many contributors and participants of the night’s festivities. Whitworth’s Hawaiian Club began in 1970 and was founded by Hawaiian student Curt Kekuna. The club’s goal is to share Hawaiian culture with both the Whitworth and Spokane community and to build an “ohana,” or family, for the students from Hawaii.

APRIL 18, 2012

One was instantly greeted by leis, island music and an aroma that made one’s mouth salivate while walking into the Fieldhouse Saturday, April 14. The Whitworth Hawaiian Club, also known as Na Pu’uwai of Hawai’i, presented their 42nd annual Lu’au with the theme “Do the Hula.” The event combined both traditional foods and cultural entertainment which showcased the many talents of the club members. Sophomore Joshua Beeksma introduced the festivities and emceed the event. He elaborated on the history and background of the various dances for the audience. There were 12 dances performed including several kinds of hulas, a Tahitian number and a haka, which is an ancient war dance.

Among the other performers was Another highlight was the solo performance by freshman Seneka Viernes. freshman Jade Faletoi. Faletoi originally joined the HawaiFreshman Iris Chavez was impressed ian Club because she said all the isby the numerous dances. “My favorite dance was the one landers are in it. She was excited to be dancing in six of that looked very hard to do with all “My favorite dance was the 12 performances was glad that the the hip shaking,” the one that looked very and Hawaiian Club had Chavez said, referring to the Tahitian hard to do with all the the event because it helped to “showcase dance titled ‘Show hip shaking.” their culture.” Me Your Fa’arupu,’ But, there was anwhich was choreo— Iris Chavez other thing Faletoi graphed by alum freshman looked forward to Keilah Fanene. even more. While all the “I’m most excited for the food,” Faleperformances were impressive, the Waikiki Hula was memorable. This spe- toi said. “It has been so long since I’ve cific hula, which refers to “a vibrant city had it.” Sophomore Brittany Hoppe also enthat is next to the whispering sea and filled with the fragrance of seaweed,” joyed the food. “The food was delicious and I really featured several members of Whitworth faculty and staff including Presi- liked it,” Hoppe said. “I love trying food that’s different and not what I’m use to.” dent Beck Taylor.

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Whitworth and community spend evening on the islands for 42nd annual Lu’au

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‘Do the Hula’

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Photographer: Greg Moser Junior Jack Dunbar (left) danced the Haka, an ancient Maori war dance in the Whitworth Hawaiian Club Lu’au. The Haleakala dance (right) was also performed along with 11 other dances — several kinds were hulas and a Tahitian number called ‘Show Me Your Fa’arupu.’


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The Review Recent Events: Thursday, April 12 Great Decisions Lecture — David Wolman Former Fulbright journalism fellow and author David Wolman discussed the role that social media played in the Arab Spring protests on April 11 in the Robinson Teaching Theatre. Wolman’s focus was on how social media, namely Facebook, allowed protesters in Egypt to communicate with each other during this pivotal time. “Without the ability to communicate, a revolution can lose momentum very quickly,” Wolman said. “Facebook allowed conversation to continue, which kept this movement alive.” Sophomore theology major Josh Silver said he was moved by Wolman’s point about social media being an essentially insuppressible force. “I thought it was a compelling idea that could have a major influence in any modern country,” Silver said.

Nick Meisner Staff Writer

Upcoming:

Saturday, April 14 Laser Tag and Dance Night

Monday, April 23 Shakespeare in the HUB

Saturday, April 28 Walk “ARR” Run Charity Fundraiser

Whitworth put on a Laser Tag and Dance Night in the HUB Saturday night. Laser tag was in the main part of the HUB, while all the dance was in the multi-purpose room. The event was a chance for students to get together and enjoy a Saturday night on campus. “Laser tag was pretty fun,” junior Nick Brunner said. “The guns were kind of unresponsive, and sometimes it was hard to tell whose team you were on, but that just made it that much more crazy in there.” While student dances are frequent at Whitworth, laser tag was an exciting and new addition to the possibilities for oncampus student nightlife.

In honor of William Shakespeare’s birthday, students enrolled in upper division English literature courses will be presenting some scenes from their texts. “Students from two classes, a Shakespeare class and a Medieval Lit class, will be performing four to five scenes — mostly Shakespeare, with a little medieval drama,” Whitworth English literature professor Doug Sugano said. “It’ll be fun; a lot of comedy, a lot of drama and cake.” Celebrate Shakespeare’s birthday by stopping by the HUB during lunch on Monday. Grab some cake and watch a few scenes from one of the greatest English playwrights in history. The event will be in Lied Square from noon to 12:30 p.m.

Whitworth invites students to participate in a charity run that benefits Plan International USA. The event is a 5k race around campus. Plan International USA is a non-profit organization that focuses on children’s health and education in third world countries. “Our vision is of a world in which all children realize their full potential in societies that respect people’s rights and dignity,” according to their website. Moving from one community to the next, Plan works to promise futures that are worthy of all children’s potential. Whitworth students and faculty are given the opportunity to support this organization by coming out to either walk or run on Saturday at 10:30 a.m. in the Loop.

Contact Nick Meisner at nmeisner13@my.whitworth.edu.

Food review:

White House mobile serves garlic on the go Elise Van Dam Staff Writer Everyone knows garlic keeps the vampires away, but at the White House Garlic Mobile on Division Street, the savory taste of garlic is what keeps the customers coming back for more. Owner Raleigh Johnston’s original plan was to take the mobile and travel around to cater various events and parties, but after a positive turnout from the Pig Out in the Park event downtown, he decided to move the mobile to a more permanent place on 6022 North Division St. around Thanksgiving of 2011. Johnston said he believes that the mobile has had a positive impact on the other White House restaurants located on the South Hill and in Post Falls, Idaho. “The mobile is a great marketing tool,” Johnston said. “It gets people to go to the South Hill location.” While the restaurants have a wider variety of Mediterranean food options,

the mobile still serves favorites like the Spicy Garlic Chicken Spring Bowl and the Chicken Fettuccine. Johnston said everything is made fresh to-go and has the same quality as the food at other restaurants. Fresh garlic is included in every dish in some way from garlic sautéed vegetables to meat seasoned with garlic. The item that Johnston likes new customers to try is the Spicy Garlic Chicken Spring Bowl. “It’s perfect for newbies,” Johnston said. “If I get them to try it, they always come back for more.” Another popular item on the menu is the Chicken Fettuccine, which customer and Whitworth junior Colby Davis tried at the Post Falls location. “It’s so good,” junior Colby Davis said. “It’s the perfect mix of garlic and creamy. It’s something you would want to eat when you are having a bad day.” Even though the Chicken Fettuccine looked tasty, I decided because I am a “newbie” to the mobile and it is now of-

Photographer: Cathy Bronson The White House Garlic Mobile, located on 6022 N. Division St., serves Mediterranean food with fresh garlic incorporated in some way in every dish. ficially spring I should try the Spicy Garlic Chicken Spring Bowl. Originally this savory bowl consists of sautéed vegetables, chicken, garbanzo beans, feta and rice, but because I am not a huge fan of garbanzo beans I substituted in green beans. Despite the substitution, the dish was amazing. It was hot and fresh. The garlic was not overpowering, the vegetables were not overcooked, the chicken was tender and juicy and the rice was rich with flavor. An added bonus was garlic bread on the side, which I loved. The meal cost was around $11, which might seem a little expensive to some

people, but the meal was worth the price. The serving size was huge in my opinion; I could have shared it with someone or made two meals out of it. So my advice is that if you are a vampire, stay away from the White House Garlic Mobile. But if you are in need of some fresh Mediterranean cuisine with a garlic twist, then head on over and indulge in some great food.

Contact Elise Van Dam at evandam13@my.whitworth.edu.


Samantha Payne Staff Writer

Here is a look into the Whitworthian archives to see what Whitworth was like back in the day. Articles printed as archived.

Looking At Spring Fashions April 16, 1937

see it. click it. know it.

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TWILL AND COVERT AND TRICOTINE suits are in the news. Usually they are in NAVY OR GREY, ALSO IN BEIGE for this spring. … THERE ARE LOTS OF NEW NECKLINES: SQUARE ONES, BOAT-SHAPED, A NEW “V” that is very narrow, and a delightful new THREE-CORNERED one. … JACKETS ARE OFTEN COLLARLESS. Many of the new ones are CUTAWAYS. Very, very short ones are new. Boleros are growing much more important in the wardrobe picture. … CONTRASTING EDGINGS ARE TERRIBLY SMART. RICKRACK NOVELTY BRAID, CORDED EDGES, PIPINGS, AND BIA FOLD BINDINGS are all being used a great deal. … HAND-RUN STITCHING is another new decidedly new note. We find that this stitching goes under the name of SADDLE STITCHING. Many of the new sports dresses are trimmed in this manner. … WIDELY SPACED PRINTS are very clever, and also infinitely more COLORFUL than ever before. … PEPLUMS are in. We see EMBROIDERED TRIMMINGS on everything. It’s smart to have a FLASH OF COLOR FOR CONTRAST. … GAY COLORED COATS ARE EVERYWHERE. Aren’t they dashing? News of the evening: BORDERED HEMLINES—BARE SHOULDERS. HAIR ORNAMENTS PLACED ON TOP OF THE HEAD IN FRONT. FULLER AND FULLER SKIRTS.

NEWS

A panel sparked discussion amongst students and staff about traditional gender roles, the church’s attitude toward women, marriage and stereotypes portrayed by the media, after a showing of the documentary “Miss Representation.” The film is narrated by Jennifer Siebel Newsom, an expectant mother who fears how a world shaped by the media will affect her daughter’s life. She said the media portrays an ideal woman that women buy into and it leads them to self-objectification, depression, Photographer: Michael Locatell and lower confidence and ambition. “Miss Representation” addressed the degradation East Resident Director Kyle Lantz served as a of women in advertisements, movies, cartoons, poli- panelist for the discussion about the documentary “Miss Representation.” tics, business and news. English professor Pam Parker was part of the panel men, and whether “feminism” was a good term. “Personally, I struggle to call myself a feminist bediscussion and urged the audience to be conscious of cause I feel that it’s known as a negative term and their media purchases. “Think about the images you’re supporting with you don’t want to be a feminist because people are going to look at you and think you hate men or that your money,” Parker said. Women who have made it to the top of their profes- women should rule the world,” Young said. “I believe sion — including Lisa Ling, Condoleezza Rice, Katie in equality, that women and men should be working Couric and Rachel Maddow — were interviewed in together. I don’t believe one should be better than the the film. Each of them admitted that for women to be other.” Junior Greg Wight, who helped put on the event, accepted in a position of power there would need to said he definitely considers himself a feminist in be a “kind of psychological breakthrough.” In the film Newsom said there have been a few some areas, but is hesitant to call himself that. He more than 30 women who have served as governors said he would rather share ideas than be labeled. “It’s about an equality bein America. She said there are tween male and female, but more women in politics in Cuba, “I really want to empower it’s often understood as ‘we’re Iraq and Afghanistan. women and we’re going to take Sophomore Mackenzie Young women to be proud of Wight said. said she found watching the film what we’re capable of and over,’” Sophomore Andy Rowland difficult as it made her realize how women were being objecI don’t want our fears to said he recognizes the challenge women face and is also contified and portrayed unrealistihold us back.” cerned by the portrayal of mascally by the mass media. culinity in the media. “It was very intense and it — Mackenzie Young “I feel like men have certain made me aware of everything sophomore alpha types that are portrayed that has been ingrained in me in the media and a lot of it is the and that has shaped me and how wrong a lot of it is,” Young said. “It broke my heart, ac- hyper masculine — you know, if you’re not big, strong tually. I think it’s something that everyone needs to and fighting explosions then you’re not a real man,” Rowland said. “So it is a challenge that men face, see or hear or at least begin to talk about.” Young said she hasn’t bought a pop magazine since too, and certain aspects such as cooking, sewing and high school because she didn’t like the false portrayal cleaning are not portrayed as masculine and meant of women, but has now noticed how those images are for men.” Rowland said he felt the misrepresentation of everywhere, including her seemingly innocent travel women by the media also affects men’s psychology magazine. “We put too much pressure on ourselves,” Young concerning women. “I think it gives women a false sense of beauty and said. “After seeing this it makes me want to tear those pages right out of my magazine. I compare myself all men a very narrow view of beauty — that a woman the time to these images, which is sad because I know must fit this criteria of skinny waist and large boobs,” Rowland said. they’re false, but it’s hard not to.” Addressing the audience, Parker encouraged feWondering about where to go from here, Young said she intends to start with practical changes by en- male students to use their voices. “It’s not enough women, to be good girls,” Parker couraging her female friends. “I really want to empower women to be proud of said. “It’s not enough to get good grades, you have to what we’re capable of and I don’t want our fears to speak up.” hold us back,” Young said. One issue debated by students after the event was Contact Samantha Payne at how negative stereotypes affect both women and spayne15@my.whitworth.edu.

Whitworth Glimpse of the Past

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Documentary sparks frank talk about women in media


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Photographer: Linnea Goold Junior Morgan Gilbert performed as part of the Vagina Monologues last Wednesday. The Vagina Monologues, written by Eve Ensler, seeks to release the taboo associated with talking about women’s sexuality. The performance also speaks against sexual abuse and gives a chance for victims to be supported.

Monologues empower women against abuse Jacqueline Goldman Staff Writer The room was full of many different faces. Some were bothered and uneasy, some were simply curious, but most were looking for greater understanding. Whitworth hosted its third rendition of the Vagina Monologues last Wednesday at 7 p.m. in the Robinson Teaching Theatre. It provided further understanding to that uncomfortable subject: the vagina. Most are familiar with the Vagina Monologues, written by Eve Ensler, and what they are seeking to inspire. The general idea is to release the taboo associated with talking about women’s sexuality and for women to gain an appreciation and acceptance of the lady friend between their legs. The message is clear during the performance, but what one might find surprising is the student body’s reaction to the Monologues. During the day prior to the performance, Whitworth students around campus were asked to give their overall reaction to the Monologues: if they were going, why or why not and what they thought the Monologues were about. These were some of the responses. Diana Cron, junior sociology major, discussed her general conception of what the show was about. “I guess I think of women talking about difficult experiences they’ve had because they’re women,” Cron said. Lindsay Evans, senior psychology major, said the Monologues aren’t exactly something she finds necessary. “I would never go to it,” Evans said. “It’s just so feminist. It would be like if guys had a penis monologue, and that would be ridiculous.” Jessica King, senior psychology major, talked about her reaction to the production after having seen it previously. “I was really nervous when I went to go see them,”

King said. “I thought it was going to be a bunch of but not everyone realizes the greater theme of raising feminist stuff, and it is, but a lot of it is a comedy, so awareness of sexual abuse. Senior English and theatre major Isabel Nelson it’s funny. It’s a good discussion about female sexualsaid the issue of sexual abuse is a tender and impority.” King went on to put some commonly held rumors tant subject that the Monologues brings up and creates an environment for victims to connect through. of the production to rest. “That’s what this event means to me,” Nelson said. “It’s not a man-bashing event,” King said. Empowering women in accepting their sexuality “Approaching someone you’re afraid of and say, ‘You is a strong theme and contrary to some belief, not at shared something and I want to share something.’ It the expense of men. But one student argues that the makes people courageous in a scary way.” At the end of the theme might come across show, audience and cast too strong and no longer “That’s what this event means members are asked to applies to our generation. stand if they have been “Seeing the signs for the to me — approaching someone victims of sexual abuse. Vagina Monologues, peryou’re afraid of and say, ‘You The desire is to let those sonally I think it’s ridicumen and women know lous,” senior mathematics shared something and I want to that they are not alone. major Stephanie Semb said. share something.’ It makes people “I have a responsibil“Yes I live in a man’s world, ity at the end to stand up and I understand that. courageous in a scary way.” and encourage people More women are becom— Isabel Nelson to be honest, but not ing empowered and that’s push them to be uncomgreat, but personally I’m alsenior fortable,” Nelson said. ready empowered and I’ve “Someone deciding we embraced my womanhood, or my vagina, and I really don’t feel the need to push can’t have the Vagina Monologues might hurt some people, and some people may never know but the that issue.” One may think that the Vagina Monologues is a person that it does affect starts to feel boxed in.” Next time the Vagina Monologues come around, be feminist production that pushes girl power, but during the panel after the production, the deeper themes aware there will be talk about vaginas, but there are other themes that may inspire deep questions. really stood out. “It really makes you focus on individual femininity “The core message really is stand against sexual abuse and violence,” said Brittany Roach, senior po- and what makes you a woman,” senior communicalitical science major and also the special and cultural tions major Breezy Moser said. “You definitely leave events coordinator for ASWU. “It’s a stand for women thinking, ‘OK, I’m a woman, so what do I think of my to claim a part of who we are in our sexuality. If we do vagina?’” not claim this aspect of ourselves, someone else can.” During the panel discussion the theme was further hashed out. The Monologues do talk about the vagina Contact Jacqueline Goldman at jgoldman13@my.whitworth.edu. and all its “glory” and the focus tends to be on that,


Miss Touch My Hair

Surprise at the Theatre You two sitting in the front row at Almost, Maine, I saw the hand holding, the looks, and the sparkle in your eye. Budding couple, I salute you.

Girl ts Mee Boy

Thank You

Workout Trio Graphic Artist: Maria Ladd

You Ask, I’ll Say Yes

Submissions published as received.

Seen someone? Submit your ‘I saw you’ (limited to 50 words) online at thewhitworthian.com.

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APRIL 18, 2012

I see you every Tuesday and Thursday catching my eye across the room. Maybe asking you to coffee was too ambiguous. How about a real date?

WHITPICS

Contact Nerissa Kresge at nkresge12@my.whitworth.edu.

Bagel Stealer I saw you take all those bagels out of Sedexo and I just wanted to let you know that no matter how “cool” you consider yourself to be that wasn’t cool at all!

SPORTS

the secret, weird hearts of human beings,” wrote author E. Lockhart. “He makes me laugh and gasp at the beauty of a sentence or the twist of a tale. He is one of the best writers alive and I am seething with envy of his talent.” In “Why We Broke Up,” the main character, Min, returns a box of things to her first love and details in a letter, item by item, the reason why they broke up. The book is highly relatable to adults and teenagers alike. Who does not remember their first love and the heartache that followed? “It’s easy to predict how Handler’s story will conclude from the book’s few pages,” wrote Susan Carpenter from The Los Angeles Times. “It’s more difficult to take such an everyday tragedy with a predictable ending and elevate it to an end point of enduring, emotionally effective art.” “Girl Meets Boy” is a collection of short stories edited by Spokane author Kelly Milner Halls. Each story is told from the girl’s perspective and the boy’s perspective by some of today’s top young adult authors. “The stories are thus surprising and varied, avoiding any sort of formulaic treatment of relationship dynamics and giving full weight to the complexities of what can happen when a girl meets a boy,” wrote the Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books. Unlike what Stein adamantly believes, each one of these books take on issues both teenagers and adults can relate to and learn from. Death, sexuality, love, helplessness and heartbreak fill these pages making each one of them more than just a frivolous, young adult book.

I saw you three ladies in the gym and you were doing some crunches. Then all of a sudden one of you farted. Nice tone!

OPINIONS

I saw you playing Frisbee in the Loop one sunny afternoon. We had never met before but you ran up to me, said you’d like to get to know me better, and invited me out for coffee. Not many guys will so boldly ask a girl out like that. We like that kind of confidence! Thanks for our coffee date and I hope you continue being Prince Charming and sweeping girls off their feet! :)

ARTS&CULTURE

I saw you touch my hair when I was not looking. After I noticed what you did, you smiled at me. I saw that twinkle in your eye. It was such an honor, you made my day Miss Touch my Hair.

NEWS

Content found in the “I Saw You” section are student submissions and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of The Whitworthian.

Nerissa Kresge Staff Writer Last month, Time Magazine columnist Joel Stein wrote a column about why adults should not read young adult literature. The article is written after months of walking into coffee shops and seeing adults glued to their copy of “The Hunger Games,” years of listening to adults support “Team Edward” or “Team Jacob,” and a decade of adults referencing “muggles” and “quidditch.” Stein’s contention is that young adult literature does not contain the depth, or the advanced level of writing adults should be reading. If an adult reads a young adult book, he or she is automatically forfeiting his or her ability to learn and grow from the piece of literature, and should therefore be ashamed and hide in the corner. “I’m sure all those books are well-written,” Stein wrote. “So is ‘Horton Hatches the Egg.’ But Horton doesn’t have the depth of language and character as literature written for people who have stopped physically growing.” Well, Mr. Stein, there are many people who would fervently argue against such statements. If Stein’s belief is that all “literature” is well-written and contains highly developed characters and plots, has he read some of the romance novels out there? Young adult literature is one of the few mediums that allow adults a peephole into the tumultuous lives of teenagers. Chris Crutcher, local young adult author, recently spoke in an English class at Whitworth about the worth of young adult literature. He said he believes that young adult literature illustrates how teenagers struggle with finding their autonomy and growing up. “[It helps adults] understand what [students] are going through,” Crutcher said. “They’re coming of age, but they aren’t there yet.” Along with struggling with identity issues, young adult literature can talk about hard-hitting issues like abandonment, sex, drug use and abuse. Caitlin Pawlowski, a junior elementary education major, believes reading young adult literature gives her an insight into some of the different struggles her future students might have growing up. “I think it’s really important for me to understand the struggle,” Pawlowski said. As for Stein’s theory that characters are underdeveloped, one might argue that Katniss from “The Hunger Games” is just as much a heroine as any “adult” heroine. “Talk about empowerment,” Crutcher said. “She scares me to death.” Some recently released young adult books that have received a great deal of enthusiasm and praise are “The Fault in Our Stars” by John Green, “Why We Broke up” by Daniel Handler, and “Girl Meets Boy: Because There are Two Sides to Every Story” edited by Kelly Milner Halls. “The Fault in Our Stars” follows Hazel, a terminal cancer-stricken teenager who meets a boy in her support group for kids with cancer. Hazel tackles life issues with a blunt humorous approach that leaves readers wondering if they should be crying or laughing. “John Green writes incredible, honest truths about

{ i saw }

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Young adult books offer valuable insight for adults

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Book review:


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Opinions Whitworth purity culture can be harmful Rosie Brown

VOL 102 ISSUE 14 APRIL 18, 2012

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Whitworth student leadership was recently invited to a lecture by Dr. Donna Freitas, author of “Sex and the Soul.” As a theology professor at Boston University, her students’ interest in the prevalence of “hook-up culture” on college campuses spurred her to initiate an in-depth study across the nation on the correlations between spirituality and sexuality. Her results were astounding, and she found that hookup culture was decidedly disliked by the majority of college students, who felt obligated to participate in it so they would fit in with their peers. Her research also led to some shocking results. She found that the evangelical schools (Whitworth is an example of one, though she did not mention whether it participated in her study) were a completely separate species from the other universities in her study. Rather than a prevalent hook-up culture, evangelical schools showed a strong “purity culture,” where students felt a very strong pressure toward being abstinent and sexually pure. Freitas mentioned that she had to change her interview techniques when collecting data from evangelical schools. Rather than asking, “Have you ever had sex?” she started these interviews with, “Have you ever been kissed?” When she shared this particular story, there were quite a few stifled chuckles in the audience, because, let’s face it, we all recognize that Whitworth fits well And, as a senior at Whitworth who has lived on caminto this category of purity culture. And it’s not a pus for three years, I can confidently agree with the bad thing. I personally have never experienced the accuracy of these sentiments. Perhaps not everyone hook-up culture, where students feel more obligat- has felt it, but one thing is certain: it is impossible to ed to become sexually active but remain emotion- be perfect. Moral perfection can never be attained. It’s a lesson that comes inevially unattached in order to fit in. on the journey of a ChrisIf anything, being surrounded by God made us, man and tably tian, which explains the need a purity culture has, for the most for God’s grace to humanity. part, been a positive influence on woman, sexual organs That being said, purity culstudents. Right? and all. So why ignore the ture, where there is a strong Well, here’s the kicker. Freimoral standard for college stutas mentioned the negative sideconversation? dents to meet in their personal effects that she witnessed in the lives in a social environment, purity culture. First, students often mentioned that there was a secrecy around is oppressive. I’m sure that oppression is an uninsexual activity. This built an environment of taboo, tentional sentiment, but it’s true. College students, distrust and deception among students. Second, who generally range from 17 to 25 years old, need to students complained that their sexuality was being know they are in a safe environment, where tough oppressed. According to the interviews, students questions can be asked without judgment. I once heard the saying, “Turn on the light, and felt they could not be honest about their sexuality or seek support or advice on the subject because they the darkness disappears.” I strongly disagree. Jesus came into a dark world of sinners so he could bring would be judged. When Freitas mentioned the problems associated us into the light. Likewise, we cannot ignore the with purity culture, the audience seemed to agree. “dark areas” or difficult subjects. Sexuality is a real

Graphic Artist: Hannah Charlton thing, and whether it is at a public secular university or Whitworth, it is a present issue. If there is one goal that purity culture has, it is this: to understand the true, God-given purpose of our sexuality and use it properly. If there is secrecy, judgment and oppression tied to purity culture, true understanding of this purpose will be lost to the community. God made us, man and woman, sexual organs and all. So, why ignore the conversation? If you have any questions or want to speak to someone, do not hesitate to contact the Health Center. You can also talk to any professor whom you trust, an RA, other student leader or a friend. The greatest problem with purity culture is the attached assumption that the community will not be supportive. If there is anything I have learned at Whitworth, it is that we are never alone. We are never without a shoulder to lean on or a helping hand to hold.

Brown is a senior majoring in international business. Comments can be sent to rbrown13@my.whitworth.edu.


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saRaH BeRenTsOn

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Whitworth has many key words and phrases that will perk the ears of Whitworthians for the rest of their lives: worldview, pinecone and Core to name a few. A big one is community. Community is a Christian ideal that Whitworth expands on and has made its own. We pride ourselves on the importance of Traditiation, an event that allows freshmen to integrate into their new community. Dorms hold Prime Times almost every evening; there are small groups, clubs, hall dates, hall meetings and a handful of other ways that students can meet other people and find their own niche in the world of Whitworth. Though I roll my eyes when I have to write about community, or even hear the word sometimes, I have found it is one of the aspects of Whitworth I value most. I appreciate that community is a valuable and important quality of campus life because it extends outside the social circle and into the athletic and academic realm, as well. My experience at Whitworth has been valuable because I have developed sincere relationships in every community I have been involved with.

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However, the very thing that many of us value as All are affordable and delicious. Did you know that one of Whitworth’s best qualities is also one of its new music is at your fingertips in Spokane? Just most stifling. Many Whitworth students leave with check out the Pacific Northwest Inlander for recompositive notions of Whitworth, but negative notions mended shows. The nightlife is lively, too. There are co-ops, such as Main Market, of Spokane. Whitworth’s comand farmers markets. There munity lacks only its failure to Though I appreciate the are Spokane-wide events like include the surrounding the Elk Fest, Pig out in the Park community of Spokane. Many emphasis on community and Bloomsday. students stay behind the at Whitworth, I wish there Though I appreciate the pinecone curtain, consumed emphasis on community at in Whitworth’s community. were more off campus Whitworth, I wish there were Spokane is certainly no Seventures that clubs put on... more off-campus ventures attle, but it isn’t the dump that that clubs put on that would many people think it is. Spokane offers beautiful parks, a growing music scene, help students find their niche in downtown Spokane poetry readings, theatre, ice skating, rock climbing, throughout their four years here. Whitworth needs to expand its mentality about laser tag, etc. Whitworth doesn’t help students experience Spokane. Because we are isolated in our community and truly extend (at least metaphoricalcampus up north, I admit it is harder to experience ly) the pinecone curtain to the surrounding Spokane downtown Spokane, but it’s also worth it. I know area. Students need to stop bashing Spokane until that if you don’t have a car, you have a friend that they give it a shot. Take the community we have dedoes because there are certainly a limited number of veloped here, the friendships you have made and go explore Spokane. You might be surprised what you parking spaces. Spokane may not be utopia, but it does have its find. perks. Manito Park is beautiful, as is the entire South Hill. The Centennial trail is perfect for any bike lover. Walking in Riverfront Park is perfect for a date. The BerenTson is a senior majoring in English and restaurant options are endless. Have you been to Spanish. Comments can be sent to Neato Burrito, Ultimate Bagel or South Perry Pizza? sberentson12@my.whitworth.edu.

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Campus community ideal stifles adventure

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16 Students with anxiety deserve extra support jasmine barnes columnist

In schools there is always talk about how people with learning disabilities need extra assistance from teachers and staff. These students sometimes get special help on assignments and tests that other students don’t. Amongst the students that don’t get the same assistance are students with anxiety disorders. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, anxiety disorders affect 18 percent of the adult American population. There are students here at Whitworth who also struggle with anxiety disorders. One student with an anxiety disorder, who will be named Jane Doe, shared her experience here at Whitworth. For Doe, living in a large dorm is unimaginable. “Anything bigger than Stewart would freak me out.” People with anxiety disorders have trouble being in a large or loud dorm. Too many people, too bright of lights or too much sound can trigger a panic attack. Stewart and the Village are great places for students with anxiety. There are a limited amount of people in these dorms and they tend to keep to themselves. If there weren’t dorms at this size available for students, Whitworth could potentially lose students with anxiety who are interested in going here. There needs to be a diversity of dorms that can supply the diverse needs of students. For instance, right now the Village dorms have about 18 people each. Slightly larger you have Boppell at 84 and Ballard at 62. Then there are the two largest: East with 170 and Warren with 215. The large range of numbers of residents leaves the students with the ability to pick what fits their need. For a student with anxiety, the best number would probably be no more than 50 residents anxiety can easily have breakdowns which can end in in the building. Going to the Hixson Union Building for dinner is depression, isolation, self injury or eating disorders. also a challenge. Doe is too nervous to eat by herself Thankfully, Whitworth has a great team of RAs who make sure people are enjoying their time in the resior in front of people who don’t know her that well. “When I eat I can just feel people’s eyes on me. I get dence halls and provide support to those in need. The classroom is also a tough paranoid and assume that they are place for people with anxiety to going to judge me.” Luckily, Doe People with anxiety can be. has a good group of friends who easily have breakdowns, “I study hard for every test but she eats meals with. If she didn’t when they put the test down in have these friends she probably which can lead to front of me I feel like the room wouldn’t eat. depression, isolation, is spinning and that everything “The first few days of school this I studied is swirling out of my year before I met people, I didn’t self injury or eating head.” eat. When I thought about going disorders. Whitworth needs to ask its alone my heart began to race and students if they struggle with my palms began to sweat,” she anxiety in order to provide them with the support and said. Having community in the dorms is also necessary assistance they need. Knowing which students have when supporting people with anxiety. People with anxiety will not only help professors offer academic

Graphic Artist: Eli Smith assistance but the professors will also know not to call on that student randomly in class. “I’m too nervous to ask someone where I can get help or to tell my professors that I have horrible anxiety. I wish there was something that I could just check a box and someone would come to me and offer help. Until then, I am just going to try and make it on my own,” Doe said. Whitworth needs to inform the students of where they can get help and reach out to those who need it. Whitworth is a wonderful institution full of great people who are caring and gentle enough to be mentors to these students. A program should be started for students with anxiety so that people like Doe can get more out of their Whitworth education. Barnes is a freshman majoring in English and secondary education. Comments can be sent to jbarnes15@my.whitworth.edu.

Check out opinions online this week Constitutional amendments must follow procedure - Max Nelsen


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would thank you for: not giving up on him. It is so easy to take a verse out of context and misinterpret it when it stands alone. The verse that follows Haleycolumnist Williamson says that we must seek him with all our heart, and when that happens, we will see God’s promise unfold. God will do his part when we do ours. That second verse is one of the key components that must not be forgotten but is so easily overlooked. Jeremiah 29:11 says, “‘For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the Lord, “plans to prosper you and The true value of this verse is not that bad things will not to harm you, plans to give you a hope and a fu- never happen but that God will be with us, a plan in mind, even through the bad times. ture’.” That is the problem; people miss the true meaning There are many verses in the Bible that are easy to of the verse and take it out of context. Jeremiah 29:11 take out of context; this is one example. Taking the verse out of context is why some people is not the only verse easily misinterpreted or taken to label Jeremiah 29:11 as one of the worst verses of the literally. Leviticus 19:28 commands us to not mark our bodBible. People consider it the worst verse because it gives ies with cuts or tattoo marks. Well if you take that verse false hope. It gives a view that God will never allow alone like that, then no Christian is allowed to have a tattoo. bad things to happen. Just before that Then, when harm verse Leviticus 19:26and hurt come into their 27 says no one should lives, they blame God “For I know the plans I have eat any meat with for not taking care of blood in it. So if you them, and say he is the for you,” declares the Lord, are a Christian you cause of their pain be“plans to prosper you and can no longer eat cause he is not fulfilling your medium steaks. the promise that Jereminot to harm you, plans to We take these versah 29:11 gives. They call give you a hope and a es black and white him a liar. Then what is and label them for the result of that? Lost future.” Jeremiah 29:11 what they say but faith. never take the time Now, while I do agree to further read or furwith some of those ther interpret what points, I believe it is the the true value of the worst verse only if it is verse is. taken out of context. Earlier in Jeremiah the Israelites were told that I may be biased because of the fact that this verse is my family’s verse and I live my life by this verse, but I they would have to endure 70 years of exile, pain and also strongly believe this verse gives the most hope to struggle. Yet, that was God’s plan from the start and after those 70 years he fulfilled his promise to them by anyone and everyone. This verse clearly displays the promise that God will bringing them back to their homeland. Justin Knowles, associate youth ministry pastor at not leave our side. No matter how bad things get, one Christ Church of the Valley in southern California, thing still remains: God will pull us through. It gives us reason to keep on going through the hard said that exile and pain brought upon the Israelites times; if we had nothing to live for or look forward to, was in order to have them look to him, grow and bethen our suffering would consume our lives. It would come stronger during those 70 years. That is what God intends to happen with our hard consume our world and become our identity. Jeremitimes. He wants us to continually look to him and then ah 29:11 gives something to look forward to. When you are on your knees, hitting rock bottom, use these experiences as a learning experience, a way crying out ‘God why me?’, this verse is there telling you to grow and become stronger then ever in our faith. Don’t look at Jeremiah 29:11 when life is good and that whatever you are going through is hard, it’s tough, and it may last days, months or years, but it does not think life will always be good, then when one thing mean God has forgotten you. It is there to give you the goes bad look at the verse as a lie. Rather turn to this promise that there will be a day that God will make verse when you are experiencing the darkest days and you prosperous, a day where he will reveal his hopes remember who is looking out for you. Turn to Him, trust Him and know that the good days are on their for you and give you the most amazing future. Then you will stand at the gates of heaven when way. your time comes and he will stand before you saying ‘thank you, good and faithful servant.’ This verse is your crutch to not give up on him, to WIlliamson is a freshman majoring in journalism not cave in to the hardships, to keep going, keep striv- and mass communication. Comments can be sent to hwilliamson15@my.whitworth.edu. ing, keep pursuing God so that he can one day reveal Graphic Artist: Maria Ladd to you everything great he has in store. That is what he

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Jeremiah 29:11 provides Christians with optimism


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Scientific censorship suffocates learning Ryan sTeVens COLUmNIST

Recently, a bill in Tennessee was passed with a 3-1 margin that will now permit the discussion of creationism in public school classrooms. The bill met expectedly massive dissent from the public, though ironically, its passage reflects more accurately the type of public school system that the United States inevitably works toward. Governor of Tennessee Bill Haslam refused to sign the bill, according to The Los Angeles Times, saying that “it would create confusion over schools’ science curriculum.” Haslam refused to veto the bill, however, due to the large majority of the vote. Haslam also added, “I don’t believe that it accomplishes anything that isn’t already acceptable in our schools.” Unfortunately, this is where Tennessee’s governor is very wrong. Ever since the infamous Scopes Monkey Trial in 1925, public education in the area of Earth’s origins has been intensely controversial. While the outcome of the court case was meant to prevent religious exclusivity in state schools, it has reversed itself to now serve as an instrument designed to prohibit any science that smacks of religious implications. Despite militant prohibition from public classrooms, creationism holds many concrete objections to the theory of evolution. Scientists have provided counter research to that of Charles Darwin, evolution’s “founding father.” Scientific concerns have arisen about the lack of transitional fossils, something Darwin himself saw as a major pitfall in his theory. Challenges have even been made against the representation of facts in science textbooks, for example the notion that similar bone structures in animals provide evidence of a common ancestry. This particular assertion, overwhelmingly prevalent in science textbooks, ignores the possibility should be welcomed, and used in the classroom to allow students to form and defend their own ideas. Sadfor similarity in design. But in addition to challenges against the theory, ly, in American public classrooms, this is not the case. The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), which evidence that supports creationism has also arisen. Archaeological digs in China have produced fossils argued that it was wrong to teach only one theory of that show the appearance of separate species with- origin (creationism at the time) in the Scopes Monkey Trial in 1925, is now a leadout evolutionary transitions. ing advocate of teaching New discoveries regarding the Despite militant evolution exclusively. relationship between light and prohibition from public Educators have suffered gravity, conducted largely by as a result of this dogmatic atheist scientists, support the classrooms, creationism restriction. Consider Roger notion of a young Earth. Even structures known as Polonium holds many concrete objections Paull, a substitute teacher who was indefinitely susHalos, rings found in granite all to the theory of evolution. pended for briefly mentionover the world, suggest a rapid ing intelligent design to his formation of the earth, in constudents. Or Robert Gentry, an acknowledged scitrast to evolution’s billion-year claims. But scientific evidence aside, Tennessee’s bold po- entist with articles in leading scientific journals who litical move to include discussion about creationism was rejected for a research contract because of his in its classrooms is not only beneficial to students, but creationist stance. Or perhaps Guillermo Gonzalez, an associate professor at Iowa State University who essential. Science in particular is a subject where open was denied tenure in part because of his creationist thought and systematic exploration of facts is encour- stance, as two of his colleagues would later admit. Even further than academic censorship, a recent aged. Naturally, the inclusion of varied ideas of origin

Graphic Artist: Hannah Charlton poll was conducted attempting to show that the scientific community is almost entirely against evolution. The study showed that only about 5 percent of American scientists believe in a young Earth. Later examinations showed that the results conveyed opinions of professionals completely unrelated to areas of evolution, such as computer science, chemical engineering, psychology and even business administration. Public school classrooms are where generations of students are given the tools to affect the future of our nation. With employment in scientific areas becoming increasingly important, it is vital that we allow our students access to all types of information, in order to promote true open-minded and informed thinking. Thomas Henry Huxley, a 19th century biologist known for his advocacy of Darwin’s theory said that “the man of science has learned to believe in justification, not by faith, but by verification.” I propose we follow Tennessee’s lead, and allow our classrooms to encourage students to do just that. sTeVens is a sophomore majoring in English and French. Comments can be sent to rstevens15@my.whitworth.edu.


Corina Gebbers Staff Writer

ARTS&CULTURE OPINIONS Photographer: Chrissy Roach Freshman shortstop Nick Motsinger makes a throw to first for a double play during Saturday’s home game against Pacific University.

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fifth when Takemura was hit by a pitch, advanced to second when Motsinger grounded out to the catcher, and scored off Muelheims RBI single to center field. Pacific also scored in the fifth, plating their lone run of the game. But the Boxers had several opportunities to take the lead, leaving 13 runners on base by game’s end. “In the dugout the players knew we were going to win,” Takemura said. “But we gave [Pacific] too many shots.” Spencer Ansett pitched the first six innings, allowing one run off seven hits. Jason Renner finished the game, grabbing his sixth save of the season. “We used a lot of the momentum we had from the second game [on Saturday],” Muelheims said. “Holding those guys to one run took away some of their confidence.” Whitworth improved its record to 13-5 in NWC action, just one game behind Pacific in conference standings, and will face Willamette University in Salem, Ore., April 21 and 22.

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game of a series before and ended up ters with no walks. In his past two pitching performances for the Bucs he has winning the next two games.” Whitworth grabbed an early 2-0 lead struck out 25 batter without a walk, and in game two after Motsinger walked his presence on the mound Saturday and Pfeffer singled up the middle to secured the win for the Pirates, as Pascore Motsinger in the first inning. Mill- cific scored just one run off six hits. “The second game Dan threw great,” er singled to right field in the second inning, advanced to second base on a Takemura said. “He gave us a lot of conbalk, then to third when senior center fidence by shutting them down.” It took until the fourth inning for fielder Kevin Valerio grounded out to second base, and scored on freshman either team to earn a run on Sunday, but after Scott right fielder Erik Nikssarian’s single to “We started a little slow singled to center field, he scored off left field. “I think this whole but I think the confidence Valerio’s sacrifice fly. Jarrell got on year we’ve done a came when the series base with a single great job coming got going.” up the middle, back from losses,” and then scored Takemura said. “We — Michael Takemura thanks to Nikssarwanted to punch senior ian’s RBI single back.” through the left Pfeffer’s three-run homer in the third and Nikssarian’s side. “I think it was pretty key that we got homerun in the fourth boasted a 6-0 lead for the Bucs. Senior first baseman on the board first,” Muelheims said. JR Jarrell’s RBI single brought Pfeffer “Scoring those two runs was big espehome again in the fifth inning to score cially because it was right after an inning where they had the bases loaded Whitworth’s final run. Freshman pitcher Dan Scheibe and we struck their guy out.” Whitworth’s final run came in the pitched a full game, striking out 12 bat-

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In a Northwest Conference baseball show down last weekend, second place Whitworth met conference leader Pacific on Merkel Field in a best out-ofthree game series that went to the wire. The Pirates were topped 6-2 by the Boxers in the opening game Saturday, but took control in the nightcap, gaining a 7-1 victory that boosted them to 3-1 win on Sunday. “We haven’t been in the situation to win the conference in a very long time,” senior catcher Michael Takemura said. “We started a little slow but I think the confidence came when the series got going.” After sophomore second baseman Gerhard Muelheims doubled in the first inning, senior third baseman Landon Scott drove him home on a single that put the first run on the board for either team. “We thought we’d be able to keep adding on after that first run,” Muelheims said. “[But] their pitcher was throwing really well [and] we had a tough time seeing the ball.” But Pacific answered with a flurry of runs over the next three innings, scoring six runs, while Whitworth struggled to connect at the plate. Freshman shortstop Nick Motsinger got the offense rolling with a single to third base in the sixth inning, and Whitworth scored its second run off sophomore left fielder Tyler Pfeffer’s sacrifice fly to right field. “I thought the first game we were a little tight [but] the second game we played pretty loose,” Takemura said. “These games didn’t mean anything unless we won them out.” After freshman pitcher Carson Blumenthal tossed the first four innings, freshman pitcher Nick Scourey stepped on the mound and shut out Pacific in five innings of relief. But the Pirates were unable to close in on the Boxers’ lead, and with the loss surrendered the top spot in the conference to Pacific for now; final conference standings have not been determined. “Everyone was disappointed we lost,” Muelheims said. “But we’ve lost the first

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Pirates win crucial series, take two of three against conference-leader Pacific

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Sports Baseball takes on Pacific for NWC lead

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20 Pirates

split final conference matches

Fourth-seeded men’s tennis set to take on Whitman in NWC tournament Nathan Webber Staff Writer The Pirate men’s tennis team finished the regular season this past weekend, earning a victory against Lewis & Clark College on Friday but losing a close contest to George Fox University on Saturday at the Scotford Tennis Center. The Pirates also played a couple of non-conference matches earlier in the week — an exhibition match against the Community Colleges of Spokane and a home match against Lewis-Clark State College where Whitworth fell 9-0. “It’s a lot of matches but we still have to go out and play,” sophomore Dustin McConnell said. “At this level you need to be prepared for the long matches and do the best you can to fight through.” Whitworth finished the regular season with an 8-4 Northwest Conference record and an 11-8 record overall. The Bucs will take on Whitman next weekPhotographer: Hope Barnes end in the first round of the Northwest Conference Tournament in Walla Wal- Freshman Matt Goebel returns a ball while playing No. 3 doubles against George Fox University. Goebel and his partner, sophomore John Talbot, beat their opponents 8-3. la, Wash. “Playing Whitman is always fun On Friday the Pirates went back to match, but we lost a little momentum because they’re always a challenge,” junior Cameron Williams said. “We finish up the regular season conference towards the end.” After taking a 3-2 lead in the match, gained some information last time we schedule when the team defeated Lewthe Bruins took the No. 3, No. 4 and No. played them and developed some strat- is & Clark College 7-2. Redfern and junior Micah Spaun 5 singles contests, dooming the Pirates. egies around that. Now we want to imcame through in the first match of the Cameron Williams had one of the more plement that and finish strong.” Whitworth started off the week with day as the two beat out the Boxers No. 1 inspiring wins in the match. Williams took the first set 6-4 against the No. 2 an exhibition match on Monday April 9 doubles team 9-7. “I felt really good about how we Bruin singles player but fell behind earat the Community Colleges of Spokane. Whitworth played most of its reserve played doubles on Friday,” Redfern ly in the second. “I sat down with my coach and he players in the exhibition, which ended said. “It felt good to get that win considering how close it had me focus on my breathing,” Wilin a 4-4 tie. liams said, after being down 4-1 in the was.” “We got to see “Playing Whitman is The two teams second set. “It loosened me up and got guys play that don’t always fun because split the first four me back in my groove.” normally get to,” WilWilliams came back and won the set contests but Whitliams said. “It’s exthey’re always a worth responded 7-5, his eighth singles win of the year. citing to watch them challenge.” The Pirates will have a week to prewith five straight succeed on the on pare for Whitman College, the eighthsingles wins to court.” — Cameron Williams close out the ranked team in the nation. This is a The day after the junior match. No. 2 sin- rematch of the contest that was won by CCS match, the Bucs gles player Spaun the Missionaries 9-0 on March 31. took on the Warriors “Personally I’m looking forward of Lewis-Clark State College, falling 9-0 and McConnell, playing No. 3 singles, each won their matches decisively, to playing their No. 1 (singles) player to the NAIA foes. again, he’s the best in the conference,” Two singles matches went to the both beating their opponents 6-1, 6-2. The Pirates closed out the regular Redfern said. “We also have a new linethird set, including No. 1 singles player Daniel Redfern who fell 4-6, 6-0, 6-3. season at home on Saturday with a up for the match so we’ll see how that The other was freshman Chris Engel- close 5-4 loss to the Bruins of George goes.” The match will be played at the Bratmann who lost in No. 5 singles 3-6, 6-4, Fox University. Photographer: Greg Moser Redfern and Spaun had another ton Tennis Center at Whitman College Senior Daniel Redfern serving in 6-2. Two of the three doubles matches close doubles match, this time coming on April 21. his doubles match against George were within four games of each other up just short in a 9-7 loss. Fox at Saturday’s games. Redfern “We lost a pretty tough one on Satur- Contact Nathan Webber at as well, but the Warriors were too much and his partner, junior Micah day,” Redfern said. “We almost had the nathanwebber13@my.whitworth.edu. Spaun, were defeated 9-7. for the Pirates.


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Bucs prepare for NWC Championships Track and field sending 39 men and 26 women to conference championships

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The Pirate track and field teams dominated in meets on April 9, 10 and 12, with many more athletes qualifying for conference and others improving their conference scores in the process. On April 9 and 10, junior Luke Mathews, sophomore Stephen Cooper and senior Janelle LeMieux traveled to Linfield College in McMinnville, Ore., to compete in the Northwest Conference Multi-Event Championships. Mathews placed second overall in the meet, improving his previous mark for the decathlon by five points, and Cooper placed third, with 500 points better in his marks for the decathlon than previously. “Overall, it was a great trip and a great meet,” head coach Toby Schwarz said. Mathews won the high jump on the first day with a height of 5-11.25, and took second in the shot put with a throw of 34-2.75. He also finished third in the pole vault on the second day, clearing 12-7.5. Cooper won the long jump on the first day, finishing with a distance of 20-9.75. He also won the discus on the second day with a throw of 117-7. Because of their performance in the meet, Mathews and Cooper gave the Pirates 14 points going into the 2012 NWC Championships.

LeMieux also did well at the meet, finishing in ninth again,” he said. Sophomore Jonathan Hoff also won both of his place for the heptathlon. She said she did 390 points better on her conference score for the heptathlon, and events in the meet. He won the long jump with a jump of 20-11.75, and the 110m high hurdles with a time of this was her first meet competing in it. “I PRed in four out of seven events which is good,” 15.42. Comito and sophomore Sam Wright also travLeMieux said. “And I qualified for the long jump [in conference]. I PRed on the javelin and that’s normally eled to Central Washington University in Ellensburg, Wash., on April 14 to compete in the CWU Spike Arlt one of my worst events. It was just exciting.” On April 12, Whitworth hosted the Whitworth Twi- Invitational. Comito won the discus with a throw of 168-4, and Wright took second light Open meet at its own Bop“It was nice to be able to with a throw of 152-4. pell track, giving more athletes the The meet on April 12th was chance to qualify for conference. compete on our the last one before the 2012 NWC Schwarz said that the meet reown track again.” Championships on April 20 and ally paid off for the team. 21, and Schwarz said Whitworth “It was awesome, we’ve never — Carter Comito will be represented by 39 men and done a twilight meet like that bejunior 26 women. fore,” he said. “It was definitely a “Now all the hard work is done,” successful meet. A lot of people PRed in their events and a lot more qualified for con- he said. “Now it’s just maintaining and resting, trying to get their bodies rested but also sharp. The ideal outference.” Junior Carter Comito won both the shot put and the come [for the conference meet] is the men winning discus, throwing 54-4.5 for the shot put and throw- and scoring 300 points, and the women finishing in ing 180-2 for the discus, only 12 feet off of his season the top two or three.” best. Comito said his favorite part of the meet was being able to compete on home turf again this season. Contact Meghan Dellinger at “It was nice to be able to compete on our own track mdellinger15@my.whitworth.edu.

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Meghan Dellinger Staff Writer

SPORTS

Photographer: Tanner Scholten Sophomore Tyler Guinn and freshman Matthew Landon compete in the 4x100 meter relay at the Whitworth Twilight Open Meet on April 12.


VOL 102 ISSUE 14

APRIL 18, 2012

WHITPICS

SPORTS

OPINIONS

ARTS&CULTURE

NEWS

CONTENTS

22

sports recaps Alumni game raises money for charity

Whitworth professors and former basketball players hit the hardwood Corina Gebbers Staff Writer What do you get when a medley of professors, authors and graduated basketball stars come together on the hardwood? A down to the wire charity basketball game, complete with hook shots, air balls and alley-oops. On April 9, HooPalousa put on its second annual event to raise funds for the American Indian Graduate Fellowship in Creative Writing, a scholarship created by the University of Idaho’s Master of Fine Arts Program in Creative Writing to help get more Native American students into writing classes. HooPalousa began when National Book Award winner and filmmaker Sherman Alexie, along with three other regional authors, visited a University of Idaho novel workshop. The group of nationally acclaimed authors and basketball junkies put on their first game last November between the Moscow SuperSonnets and the Spokane Dirty Realists. This year, the Dirty Realists aimed to improve their 1-0 record when they faced the Whitworth Wordsmiths in the Fieldhouse last Monday, but fell short 101-96 in an exhilarating finish. The two teams were represented by past all-stars from Whitworth and Gonzaga, including David Pendergraft (Gonzaga), Michael Taylor (Whitworth), and Brian Williams (Whitworth); current professors, including Jim McPherson and Dale Soden; authors Shan Ray, Jess Walter, and Sam Ligon; as well as Whitworth head men’s basketball coach Matt Logie and women’s head basketball coach Helen Higgs. “It was fun to come back and play at Whitworth where we had an amazing season,” Taylor said.

“[And] it was a good opportunity to play against some of the GU guys I grew up watching.” After 11 minutes of action, Spokane trailed Whitworth by just three points. Gonzaga’s Casey Calvary, a two-time All-West Coast Conference First Team selection in 2000 and 2001, sent down several twohanded dunks, reliving the time he spent around the rim for the Bulldogs and keeping the Dirty Realists within points of the Wordsmiths. But MVP of the night, Soden, banked in a hook shot from the right side of the key with a minute to go, and Whitworth went up 52-46 at half. “[There’s called] the MVP and the courtesy MVP,” Soden said. “But really, I’ve watched so many of these guys, so to be out there and to be able to tell my grandkids that for one night I got to play with these guys is great.” Despite the laid-back environment of the game, the competitive nature of the players emerged in the second half as the game stayed close. “Most of us are fairly competitive,” Pendergraft said. “It went from smiles to wanting the ‘W’.” Late in the game, Ray nailed a trey to bring Spokane within two of Whitworth’s 93 points. Then, after a Whitworth layin, Calvary tipped the ball in for Spokane with just 22 seconds remaining. Like any big game, it came down to a handful of free throws, and Whitworth made six in the final minute, earning the championship trophy for the Wordsmiths. All in all, it was a successful event for a great cause, bringing together different facets of community, education and good ol’ competition.

Contact Corina Gebbers at cgebbers15@my.whitworth.edu.

Photographer: Tanner Scholten Whitworth history professor Dale Soden played for the Whitworth Wordsmiths last Saturday.

Women’s golf claims second at NWC Preview Tournament Sena Hughes Staff Writer The Whitworth women’s golf team finished second of three Northwest Conference teams competing at the Whitman NWC Preview on Saturday in Richland, Wash. Senior Darby Moberg led the Pirates individually, tying for second place overall. The weekend was not an ideal one for Whitworth, who finished second to Whitman College and ahead of Pacific University. Head coach Katie Fuqua said that Saturday was not a good round of golf for her team, which she knows has great potential. Earlier in the week, several team members were ill and had to trade in practice for doctor’s appointments. Lack of rest and practice contributed to the disappointing appearance. “I think the conditions were there and they could’ve performed well but [didn’t] just because we weren’t well prepared,” Fuqua said. Though dissatisfied by the performance, the Bucs did get an opportunity to play at Columbia Point Golf Course, which will be the host of next weekend’s

NWC championship tournament. “It was good to figure out the course and get the kinks out before the big tournament,” junior Emily Guthrie said. Guthrie tied with freshman Nicole Lomax for seventh place individually and second place for the Pirates on Saturday. Both golfers hope to earn first team all-NWC honors, which will depend on their performances next weekend. Whitworth’s hopes are high for the conference competition. Aware that last Saturday was not a good indicator of their potential and ability, they are optimistic for what is to come. “Our confidence is pretty high just because we’ve played the course,” Guthrie said. “The weather’s supposed to be nice. Individually, we all know what we can do.” The mental element will be key for the golfers next weekend. Guthrie mentioned the challenge of having approximately five hours to think about anything, yet the necessity of focusing of golf. “There’s a lot of time to think, Guthrie said. “You just have to focus on golf and forget about other

things.” Fuqua also mentioned her desire for the team to be confident mentally. “I want them to have more confidence in their ability,” Fuqua said. “They just need to be mentally prepared, it’s not that they don’t have the skills to do well, they just need to do it.” The nature of championships is that they are emotional competitions. Fuqua stated the reality of the end of a career for the seniors and then the pressure on the whole team to finish the season well in general. “I think they’re excited; I think they’re anxious. [It’s] a big tournament and they know that,” Fuqua said. “There are a lot of emotions I can’t pinpoint.” Regardless, the Pirates are energized and ready for the next big stop. “It’s kind of ‘go big or go home,’” Guthrie said. “That’s our attitude.”

Contact Sena Hughes at shughes15@my.whitworth.edu.


Spotted from the crow's nest Nathan Webber Staff Writer

ALL 33-3

pacific Lutheran

23-4

33-10

Willamette

19-7

20-11

George Fox

14-13

19-20

Whitworth

12-15

19-20

pacific (Ore.)

10-17

12-23

lewis & Clark

3-24

5-32

Puget Sound

3-24

3-30

pacific (Ore.)

NWC 14-4

ALL 17-13

Whitworth

13-5

20-12-1

linfield

15-6

20-10

pacific lutheran

12-6

20-11

George Fox

12-9

16-18

Willamette

7-11

11-19

puget sound

5-13

9-23-1

Whitman

5-16

5-28

Lewis & Clark

4-17

7-30

23

NEWS

End of season

BASEBALL

OPINIONS

NEXT PIRATE Game:

ARTS&CULTURE

Whitworth vs. Lewis-Clark State @ Home Tuesday, April 17 @ 2 p.m.

Men’s Tennis NWC

ALL 19-4

10-1

12-5

George Fox

9-3

10-7

Whitworth

8-4

11-8

Photographer: Greg Moser Senior Alli Marshall has more than 100 career wins as a Buc, including 21 victories this season.

Pacific lutheran

5-7

7-10

Willamette

3-9

3-13

linfield

2-9

2-16

people and making them feel good.” Marshall is sitting at 21 wins so far this season and said she hopes to continue her streak on April 21 when the tennis team takes on Whitman in the first round of the Northwest Conference Tournament. The team, and Marshall, are striving for their third tournament championship in three years.

lewis & Clark

2-10

3-11

puget sound

2-10

2-14

Contact Nathan Webber at nathanwebber13@my.whitworth.edu.

Softball closes out season at George Fox Women's Tennis wins final conference Match Men's Golf Wins NWC Preview Tournament

Saturday, April 21 @ TBA

Women’s Tennis linfield

NWC 12-0

ALL 12-4

whitman

10-2

15-4

whitworth

9-3

13-5

Puget Sound

6-6

8-9

Pacific (ore.)

6-6

7-10

Willamette

5-6

7-8

Lewis & Clark

3-9

3-10

George Fox

2-9

7-11

pacific lutheran 0-12 NEXT PIRATE Match:

1-17

Whitworth vs. Lewis-Clark St. @ Home Tuesday, April 18 @ 3:45 p.m.

Team records as of April 15, 2012

VOL 102 ISSUE 14

Check Out Sports online this week

NEXT PIRATE Match:

NWC Tournament: No. 4 Whitworth vs. No. 1 Whitman @ Whitman

APRIL 18, 2012

12-0

Pacific (Ore.)

WHITPICS

Whitman

SPORTS

Senior tennis player Alli Marshall is on the verge of finishing a strong four year career at Whitworth. In her Whitworth career, Marshall has won three Northwest Conference Championships, been Second Team AllNWC once and First Team All-NWC twice. Currently, she is Whitworth’s No. 1 singles player and is part of the No. 1 doubles team. Marshall has won at least 20 games in each of her four seasons on the team, the most coming in her freshman year when she won 29 games. Recently she won her 100th game as a Pirate after she and her doubles partner, senior Erica Bosman, beat George Fox’s No. 1 doubles team 8-4 last Saturday. “She has been a really solid No. 1 for us,” head coach Jo Ann Wagstaff said. “She is a great example of a person that plays hard and never gives up on a point. She goes for every ball as hard as she can and it inspires the rest of the team to play hard.” The senior from Salem, Ore., has been playing tennis since she was 8 years old and excelled at the sport at Sprague High School. Marshall wanted to continue playing tennis after high school, which led her to Whitworth. “I wasn’t sure where I wanted to go but my sister, who’s a year older, went here [Whitworth] so I came to check out the campus,” Marshall said. “I loved it.” Throughout her four years Marshall has made a lot of memories. “Every Spring Break trip we went on was amazing,” Marshall said. “All the girls get along so well. We won conference and went to nationals in California my freshman year. It was also really fun to win conference three years in a row, too, it was wonderful.” Marshall works hard on and off the court as she is double majoring in journalism and mass communication and kinesiology. She is currently planning on taking a year off after school is over to prepare for her Graduate Record Exam for graduate school. “Since her freshman year she has worked really hard on becoming a more consistent and powerful player, and it’s paid off,” Wagstaff said. That hard work has paid off on the court as Marshall currently leads the team in doubles wins and is third in the conference in singles win percentage as Whitworth’s No. 1 singles player. “Her forehand is really great, definitely her best shot,” teammate Claire Hemming said. Hemming, a fellow senior and roommate, had a lot of good things to say about Marshall when asked what she is like off the court. “I have lived with Alli for a couple of years,” Hemming said. “She is very personable, always engaging

Linfield

NWC 23-3

CONTENTS

Women’s Tennis: Alli Marshall

SOFTBALL


Whitpics

42nd Annual Hawaiian Club

Lu'au

ABOVE: All participants in the 42nd annual Hawaiian Club Lu’au end their performances Saturday night in the Fieldhouse. Photographer: Greg Moser ABOVE RIGHT: Senior Solomon Walden leads the Haka, which is an ancient Maori war dance. Photographer: Tanner Scholten RIGHT: Senior Caitlin Dill dances in the Hula on Saturday night.

Photographer: Tanner Scholten

BOTTOM RIGHT: Senior Katie Fergus dances the Sophisticated Hula. Photographer: Tanner Scholten BOTTOM MIDDLE: Freshman Jade Faletoi rattles her ‘uli ‘ulis during the Haleakala Hula. Photographer: Tanner Scholten BOTTOM LEFT: Senior Jessica Pearson dances in one of 12 dances at the Lu’au. Photographer: Greg Moser


The Whitworthian Issue 14 April 18