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WHITTIER COLLEGE

FACULTY-LED TRAVEL PROGRAM COURSE CATALOG

Explore the world with Whittier College


EXPERIENCE THE WORLD WITH OUR FACULTY-LED TRAVEL PROGRAM! Ride a camel in the heat of the Sahara Desert; mix with musicians, followed by a private concert in Cuba; discuss real-world management challenges with executives at Google China in Shanghai; sample unusual spices and local delicacies in the marketplace of a 1,200-year-old Moroccan city; wander the rolling English countryside as you follow in the footsteps of Chaucer’s Canterbury pilgrims‌ These are just a few of the adventures that await you in our Faculty-Led Travel Program. Operating annually throughout January and May, these three-week intensive travel courses deliver a hallmark Whittier College experience, coupling rigorous academic curricula with valuable opportunities for in-country immersion and hands-on cultural exploration and exchange. Ultimately, under the guidance of our world-class faculty, enrolled participants will experience first-hand the landmarks, people, topics, and ideas from these classes-in-context, and return home with newfound perspective on both life and learning.

To learn more about current faculty-led offerings or to apply, visit the Poet World Portal:

www.whittier.edu/PoetWorldPortal


LEARNING GOALS Faculty-Led Travel Programs have important intercultural learning outcomes at their core, a few of which are listed here. Guided by faculty-leaders, local hosts, and the OIP staff, students will: • Develop the means to gather information about culture, translating this new knowledge into deeper respect for others’ values and beliefs. • Take the initiative to explore aspects of subjective culture. • Learn about trust, friendliness, and cooperation. • Hone their skills to recognize difference, as well as similarity. • Improve their coping skills as well as their understanding of tolerance, open-mindedness and patience. • Gain a more accurate perception of members of a host culture, as well as reflect more deeply upon their own culture. • Improve listening and language skills. • Learn how to adopt a nonjudgmental interaction posture.

OUTCOMES In accordance with Whittier College’s 4C (Community, Communication, Cultural Perspectives, Connections) Liberal Education Outcomes, students will: • Develop an understanding of, and competency in, the use of signs and symbols to construct, create, perceive and communicate meaning. • Develop the capacity to recognize, differentiate and interpret multiple perspectives across cultures. • Define and discuss the dimensions of culture and identify the connections between themselves and others in relation to physical, historical, social and global contexts. • Explain and challenge their own cultural narratives about the world.


BENEFITS OF THE WHITTIER COLLEGE FACULTY-LED TRAVEL COURSES • Faculty-designed courses and travel itineraries draw from individual professors’ experience and professional research, fostering more in-depth discussions and topics, as well as the potential for more local “insider” activities • In keeping with Whittier College tradition, individual class enrollment is limited to ensure the best possible experience for all participants • All courses can be taken for academic credit or no-credit, and non-Whittier students may earn transferable credit to their home institutions • For Whittier College students, faculty-led travel courses can fulfill a liberal education requirement (see individual course listings for specific credits) • There is no limit to the number of faculty-led courses in which a student can enroll over the undergraduate career • Financial aid and private scholarships may be available for enrolled college students • The majority of travel courses are also open to Whittier College alumni, parents, faculty, staff, and other members of the community


PROGRAM INFORMATION

COURSES BY REGION

AFRICA MOROCCO (FEZ, MEKNES, SAHARA DESERT) GENDER AND ISLAM: EXPLORING THE MOROCCAN CONTEXT

Led by Professor Emeritus Marilyn Gottschall, C. Milo Connick Professor of Religious Studies Term Offered: May Term Length of Travel: 18 Days Accommodations: Homestay (pre-arranged) Prerequisites: None Class Year Restrictions: None Other Restrictions: None Max. Academic Credits: 4 Applicable to Whittier Students Only: Fulfills CUL1 Lib-Ed Requirements Course Overview: Traveling to the heart of Fez’s medina, a 1200-year-old medieval city and World Heritage site, students will explore through observation, interaction, and homestay immersion several key issues affecting and directing gender dynamics: current stereotypes of the role and status of women in Islam; central defining religious and legal texts and authority structures; cultural variables such as class, ethnicity, language, education, geography, family structure; the relationship between human and women’s rights in developing nations; and the compatibility of Western feminist theory with Muslim women’s liberation movements. Course Format: Lectures and discussions, independent projects, field trips, visits to NGOs, and participation in local cultural events. Planned excursions include the imperial city of Meknes and the Sahara Desert.


SOUTH AFRICA (CAPE TOWN, JOHANNESBURG) ADVANCED FIELD STUDIES IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE/STUDIES & BIOLOGY Led by Cheryl Swift, James Irvine Foundation Professor of Biology Term Offered: Length of Travel: Accommodations: Prerequisites: Class Year Restrictions: Other Restrictions: Max. Academic Credits:

January Term 20 Days Cottage (shared) ENVS/BIOL 490 (or by permission of instructor) Not open to First-year students None 4

Applicable to Whittier Students Only: Fulfills CUL1 Lib-Ed Requirements Course Overview: Home to several historically, geographically, and environmentally significant locations, South Africa serves as the setting for this very hands-on course. With a primary focus on understanding riparian plant systems in the Western Cape, students will also observe, investigate, and engage with the diverse topography, ethnicities, and cultures that comprise this unique nation. Course Format: Lectures and discussions, fieldwork, team research projects, and cultural visits to explore local customs and practices. Excursions may include Robben Island, Cape Point, Stellenbosch, Cape Town, and Jonkershoek, with a special multi-day wildlife safari in Kruger National Park.


ASIA CHINA (BEIJING) CHINA AND THE WORLD ECONOMY

Led by Roger White, Professor of Economics May Term Term Offered: Length of Travel: 14 Days Accommodations: Hotel Prerequisites: ECON 200 or 201 (or by permission of instructor) Class Year Restrictions: None Other Restrictions: None Max. Academic Credits: 4 Applicable to Whittier Students Only: Fulfills CUL2 Lib-Ed Requirements Course Overview: Based at the Beijing Information Science and Technology University campus, this course will examine a variety of topics related to China’s current economy, including interdependencies that characterize its external relationships; trade and capital flows; migration; global economic imbalances; the Asian Financial Crisis and monetary policy coordination in the region; income and wealth inequality; and demographic and environmental challenges facing China. In addition, China’s history and culture will be explored, in order to consider the relevance of these factors in economic growth. Course Format: Lectures and discussions, independent and team projects, and student presentations, as well as local cultural activities. Excursions may include the Great Wall, Ming Tombs and the Sacred Way, Forbidden City and Tiananmen Square, Summer Palace, Silk Market, and the 798 Arts Zone.


CHINA (SHANGHAI, MULTIPLE CITIES) DOING BUSINESS IN CHINA: MANAGEMENT CHALLENGES OF THE 21ST CENTURY

Led by Jeff Decker, Professor of Business, and Edwin Keh ’79, Whittier College Trustee and Instructor, Wharton School of Business Term Offered: January Term Length of Travel 10 -14 Days Accommodations: Hotel Prerequisites: BSAD 130 (or by permission of instructor) Class Year Restrictions: None Other Restrictions: None Max. Academic Credits: 4 Applicable to Whittier Students Only: Fulfills CUL2 Lib-Ed Requirements Course Overview: Through tours of international facility headquarters, intimate meetings with Chinese business executives, and examination of Harvard Business School case studies, this management course provides students an extraordinary opportunity to experience first-hand the complex, contemporary challenges facing businesses in China. In addition, an overview of China’s history and culture will be covered in readings and discussion, so that students understand both the relevance and context. In preparation for accelerated class discussion and site visits, students will be required to read Civilization: The West and the Rest by Niall Ferguson, in addition to other relevant assigned articles and texts, prior to their arrival in China. Course Format: Class discussions and lectures, independent projects, case studies, corporate site tours and executive meetings; facility site visits may include Beijing, Suzhou, Shenzhen, and Shanghai, among other locations. Cultural activities and additional excursions may include Shanghai Museum, Bund and People’s Square, Rock Gardens, Oriental Pearl Television Tower, Manmo Temple.


MYANMAR (YANGON, MANDALAY) RELIGIOUS CULTURE AND SACRED SPACE IN MYANMAR

Led by Jason A. Carbine and Rosemary P. Carbine, Professors of Religious Studies January Term Term Offered: Length of Travel: 10 -14 Days Accommodations: Hotel Prerequisites: None Class Year Restrictions: None Other Restrictions: None Max. Academic Credits: 4 Applicable to Whittier Students Only: Fulfills CUL2 Lib-Ed Requirements Course Overview: Through readings, discussion, and personal observation of two of Myanmar’s most storied cities—Yangon (formerly Rangoon) and Mandalay—this course will explore the richness and complexity of this country’s religious culture. Focusing on select sacred places, students will examine the history of these sites, why and how people interact with them--and with one another, while at them. Gendered uses of sacred space will be a central theme, as well the ways in which particular places have factored into Burmese local and national identity. Course Format: Lectures and discussions, journal writing, field visits, participation in cultural and religious activities. Excursions may include Sule and Botataung pagodas, Shin Upagupta shrine, Shwedagon Phaya, Ganesha Temple, Lost Mughal Tomb, Musmeah Yeshua Synagogue, Kawgun Cave, Set Se beach, a Sagaing nunnery, as well as other relevant locations throughout the southern part of the country, such as Kyaikhteyoe, Hppan, Mawlamyaing, and Bagan.


EUROPE DENMARK (COPENHAGEN) CHILD AND FAMILY WELL-BEING IN WORKFARE AND WELFARE STATES Led by Paula Sheridan and Lisa Ibanez, Professors of Social Work January Term Term Offered: Length of Travel: 10 Days Accommodations: Hostel Prerequisites: None Class Year Restrictions: None Other Restrictions: None Max. Academic Credits: 4 Applicable to Whittier Students Only: Fulfills CUL6 Lib-Ed Requirements Course Overview: Copenhagen is a place where the moral values of the community are put first: a place where everyone is treated as equals, relates to one another as equals, and shares an equality of economic status as equals. Via field visits, class lectures, and interaction with peers from the Metropolitan University College’s (MUC) Social Work Program, students will gain insight as to how the Danes have adopted these ideal and incorporated contemporary methods of social work as a part of their daily lifestyles; explore the ways in which welfare and workfare states contribute to the well-being of children and families; and examine the gaps in service delivery and resources in both settings. To adequately prepare for in-country work, students will be required to complete the formal instructional portion of this course on the Whittier campus and online, during the January Term and prior to the Denmark travel. Course Format: Classroom and online instruction, lectures and discussions, topic exploration with MUC students, field visits and dialogue with professionals who work in human services organizations, and participation in relevant cultural activities. Excursions may include Rosenborg Castle, Workers’ Museum, Resistance Museum, and Jewish Museum, among others.


ENGLAND (LONDON & CANTERBURY) THE CANTERBURY PILGRIMAGE

Led by Sean Morris, Professor of English January Term Term Offered: Length of Travel: 14 Days Accommodations: Hotel Prerequisites: ENGL 324 (or by permission of instructor) Class Year Restrictions: None Other Restrictions: None Max. Academic Credits: 4 Applicable to Whittier Students Only: Fulfills CUL5 Lib-Ed Requirements Course Overview: In this course, students will trace the footsteps of Chaucer’s literary pilgrims, visiting relevant locations in London and Canterbury, and exploring his tales, as well as biographical and historical context, through discussion, activities, and site tours to taste the “flavor” of relevant regions of England and evaluate modern approximations of some essential components in Chaucer’s work—from inns to taverns to roadways. As a capstone to this experience, each student will be required to likewise craft and share a story of his or her own making or re-making. Prerequisite to this journey is the semester-long intensive course on the author’s work (ENGL 324), during which the idea of pilgrimage will be explored. As The Canterbury Tales is more than a mere collection of stories—it is essentially a debate about which tale, teller, and way of life is best­—individual philosophies of life will be compared to those posed by Chaucer’s characters. Course Format: Lectures and discussion, reading of The Canterbury Tales and related assigned articles and texts, site visits, cultural activities and tours. Excursions will include the Canterbury Tales Museum and Canterbury Cathedral, as well as the Tower of London, British Museum, Westminster Abbey, Oxford, Bath, Stratford-Upon-Avon, and Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre, among others.


IRELAND (DUBLIN, MULTIPLE CITIES) ANCIENT IRELAND

Led by Ria O’Foghludha, Professor of Art & Art History January Term Term Offered: Length of Travel: 12 Days Accommodations: Hotel Prerequisites: None Class Year Restrictions: First-year applicants to be considered case-by-case only Other Restrictions: None Max. Academic Credits: 3 Applicable to Whittier Students Only: Fulfills CUL5 Lib-Ed Requirements Course Overview: This course will examine Irish art, architecture, and archaeology before modern times in Dublin and Leinster. Discussions and readings will provide relevant social, political, and religious context, and the numerous excursions will further enable participants to experience much of Ireland’s rich cultural, scenic, and historical offerings. Course Format: Lectures and active discussion, journal writing, field visits, and a research paper. Excursions may include the National Museum of Ireland, Christ Church Cathedral, Trinity College, St. Patrick’s Cathedral, Trim Castle, Rock of Dunamase, Kells Priory, Cashel, Kilkenny, and Newgrange.


SPAIN (BARCELONA) TESOROS DE BARCELONA (TREASURES OF BARCELONA) Led by Doreen O’Connor-Gomez, Professor of Spanish

January Term Term Offered: Length of Travel: 10 Days Accommodations: Hotel Prerequisites: None Class Year Restrictions: First-year applicants to be considered on case-by-case only None (though basic Spanish language skills are encouraged) Other Restrictions: Max. Academic Credits: 4 Applicable to Whittier Students Only: Fulfills CUL3 Lib-Ed Requirements Course Overview: Spain’s history will be explored through the voices of its artists and architects—Picasso, Dalí, Barcelona’s Antonio Gaudí, among others—as well as its musicians, writers, filmmakers, playwrights, and poets. Through this cultural lens, and via discussions, interactions, and excursions, students will gain a panoramic understanding of contemporary Spain, especially as it is evolving in the 21st century as cosmopolitan, diverse, innovative, and combative with respect to the European Economic Union and general global trends. While this is not a true language course, instruction will be delivered in a mixture of Spanish and English. Students with rudimentary Spanish language skills will experience immersion to develop their comprehension and conversation, while more advanced students will focus on perfecting their skills on a more cultural scale, as well as work on an independent research projects. Some native Catalan language will also be taught. Course Format: Lectures and discussions, readings, language instruction, independent or team research projects, presentations, guided tours, and cultural activities, such as flamenco and theatrical performances. Excursions may include Picasso and Dali Museums, Universidad de Barcelona, Sagrada Familia, Gothic Quarter, Museo Nacional d’Art de Catalunya, Frexinet Winery, Girona, among others.


ITALY (ROME, POMPEII) GREECE (ATHENS, DELPHI, CORINTH, NAFPLION) CLASSICAL GREECE AND ROME

Led by David Hunt, Professor of Philosophy, and Wendy Furman-Adams, Professor of English Term Offered: January Term Length of Travel: 19 Days Accommodations: Hotel Prerequisites: INTD 290A Class Year Restrictions: Not open to First-year students Other Restrictions: None Max. Academic Credits: 6 (3 credits Fall Term; 3 credits January Term) Applicable to Whittier Students Only: Fulfills CON1 and CUL5 Lib-Ed Requirements Course Overview: Focused on the beginnings of Western civilization—roughly the 9th century B.C.E. to the 4th century of the Common Era, the so-called “classical” period— this course will teach students to engage with a history at least as bloody, uncertain, and cynical as that of our own time, but also find some of the world’s most remarkable writers--among them Homer, Sophocles, Plato, Aristotle, Virgil, and Augustine--seeking wisdom and solace in the composition of works that still possess their edge and relevance. Early Greco-Roman civilization will be explored through encounters with its material culture—statues and frescoes, temples and sanctuaries, law courts and marketplaces, theatres and stadiums, houses and cemeteries—which contributed as much as any literary or philosophical text to shaping ancient men and women. Intense examination of written culture during the fall semester (INTD 290A) serves as the preparation for January travel and fieldwork. Course Format: Lectures and discussions, readings, guided tours, cultural and religious activities, archeological site visits. Excursions may include the Roman Forum, Coliseum, Circus Maximus, St. Peter’s Basilica, Vatican Museum, Capitoline Hill, Capuchin Crypt, Acropolis, Theater of Dionysus, Athenian Agora, Areopagus (Mars Hill), Temple of Poseidon at Sounion, Island of Aegina, and a special behind-the-scenes visit to ASCSA.


ITALY (ROME, FLORENCE) GREECE (ATHENS, OLYMPIA, MYCENAE, DELPHI) CLASSIC LITERATURE IN THE HISPANIC TEXTS Led by Gustavo Geirola, Professor of Spanish

May Term Term Offered: Length of Travel: 14 Days Accommodations: Hotel Prerequisites: Courses in Hispanic/Latino Culture and/or Peninsular/Latin American Literature (or by permission of instructor) Class Year Restrictions: Not open to First-year students Other Restrictions: Participants must demonstrate high proficiency in Spanish language in the areas of reading, writing, and conversation Max. Academic Credits: 3 or 4 Applicable to Whittier Students Only: Fulfills CUL5 Lib-Ed Requirements Course Overview: Through readings, discussion, analysis, and Spanish language immersion, students will investigate Greek and Latin literature—myths, narratives, drama, poetry, essays—that has influenced Peninsular and Latin American literary texts, and explore how Hispanic authors, like Cervantes or García Márquez, have incorporated Classic Greek and Roman literature into their own works, respecting or subverting the original in order to offer a new perspective relevant to their own socio-political contexts. This course will be taught entirely in Spanish; demonstrated language proficiency is required for enrollment. Course Format: Readings, lectures and discussion, guided tours, independent projects, archeological site visits, and participation in cultural activities. Excursions will include Capitoline Museum, Coliseum, Vatican and St. Peter’s Basilica, Accademia, Uffizi Gallery, Acropolis, Ancient Stadium, Theater of Epidaurus, Palamidi, Lion Gate, Cyclopean Walls, Palace & Tomb of Agamemnon, Temple of Apollo, and many others.


GREECE (ATHENS, NAFPLION, SPARTA, OLYMPIA, DELPHI, ISLAND OF NAXOS) SAILING THE WINE-DARK SEA: WHY THE GREEKS MATTER Led by David Hunt, Professor of Philosophy May Term Term Offered: Length of Travel: 17 Days Accommodations: Hotel Prerequisites: None Class Year Restrictions: None Other Restrictions: None Max. Academic Credits: 3 Applicable to Whittier Students Only: Fulfills CUL5 Lib-Ed Requirements Course Overview: This course will explore the Greek contribution to modern civilization in such areas as philosophy, literature, science, religion, politics, and art and architecture. While the course will focus on ancient Greece, it will also include sites important to early Christianity, medieval Greece (Byzantine and Crusader), and the Turkish occupation. Course instruction will take place throughout Central Greece, the Peloponnese, and the Greek Islands. Course Format: Lectures and discussion, readings, guided tours, culinary samplings, and participation in cultural activities. Excursions may include Parthenon, Socrates’ Prison, Temple of Olympian Zeus, Parliament Building, Monastery of St. Paul at Laurion, Corinth, Mycenae, Mistra (Byzantine ghost town), Oracle of Delphi, Mount Parnassus, Clemoutsi (Crusader castle), and Delos (sacred island of Apollo).


LATIN AMERICA BRAZIL (BRASILIA, MANAUS) BRAZIL: A VIABLE AND SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURAL AND BUSINESS MODEL? Led by Cinzia Fissore, Professor of Biology, and Dan Duran, Professor of Business Administration

Term Offered: January Term Length of Travel: 11 Days Accommodations: Hotel Prerequisites: None Class Year Restrictions: Not open to First-year students Other Restrictions: None Max. Academic Credits: 4 Applicable to Whittier Students Only: Fulfills CUL3 or CON II Lib-Ed Requirements Course Overview: The largest Latin American country in the world, Brazil is home to many ancient cultures and traditions, the Amazon River, and the Iguacu Falls. In this course, students will explore the ecological and economic challenges associated with Brazil’s land use change and resource depletion, through tours of local businesses and nonprofit organizations, and meetings with key contributors in the field of sustainability and land use in and around the locations of Manaus and Brasilia. Note: This course has previously been offered in Argentina, Mexico, Spain, and The Netherlands. Course Format: Lectures and discussions, readings, independent research projects and presentations, facility site visits, ecological tours, meetings with local leaders, and participation in relevant cultural activities. Excursions may include boat tours of the River Negro, River Solimoes, and the Amazon, Science Museum, January Ecological Park, Itiquira Falls, Tres Poderse Square, among others.


CUBA (HAVANA) MUSIC AND CULTURE OF LATIN AMERICA: CUBA

Led by Danilo Lozano, Professor of Music (Ethnomusicology) May Term Term Offered: Length of Travel: 12–16 Days Accommodations: Hotel Prerequisites: None Class Year Restrictions: None Other Restrictions: None Max. Academic Credits: 4 Applicable to Whittier Students Only: Fulfills CUL3 Lib-Ed Requirements Course Overview: Through musical performance, contextual readings, cultural immersion, artist exchange, and other activities, this course provides a historical and philosophical survey of music in Latin America, in addition to a basic analysis of generic aspects of origins, influences, style, and development within Cuba. Central to discussion will be topics such as regional folk styles, the Afro-Cuban factor and popular trends (both traditional and progressive), and the state of music among the Latin populations of the United States. This class will offer an overall understanding of Latin American music aesthetic and culture, in addition to its focus on Cuba. Course Format: Group discussions and readings, walking tours, independent projects, site visits, private musical performances and academic & artist lectures, and participation in cultural activities. Excursions may include Revolution Square, Plaza de Armas, Plaza de San Francisco de Assis, and de la Catedral, Hotel Nacional, Museum of Popular Music, and Valle de Vinales National Park, among others.


POLICIES & PROCEDURES For the most up-to-date course offerings and travel dates, as well as details on fees, application requirements, deadlines, and other pertinent information, please visit the Poet World Portal (www.whittier.edu/PoetWorldPortal).

PROGRAM INFORMATION

Program Dates: Faculty-Led Programs travel abroad during Whittier College’s two, shortened academic cycles: January Term and May Term. Each course journeys on average between 8–19 days total in the specified region; however, the total number of travel days may vary each time a given course is offered, depending on the most current itinerary and in-country opportunities, holidays, and travel advisories. Faculty Leaders: While each course in the Faculty-Led Travel Program will be conducted by a Whittier College faculty member, the actual professor assigned may differ from those listed in this catalog, due to cyclical sabbatical leaves and other factors. Additionally, when industry, in-country, or other relevant experience warrants, alumni and/or parent professionals may be invited to participate—in an auxiliary or co-leadership capacity— in any travel course noted herein. Passports and Visas: Participants are responsible for obtaining and paying for their passports by the program’s specified due date. Depending on the program, visa arrangements may or may not be included in the Program Fee, and participants will be advised accordingly. Accommodations: Whittier College strives to meet its participants’ accommodation requests, but local constraints can be a limiting factor. Depending on program location, disability, dietary, and medical accommodations may or may not be possible. Please contact Shari Henderson with individual requests.

ACADEMIC CREDIT

For-Credit Participants: Upon acceptance into a faculty-led course, all Whittier College and non-Whittier College students will be registered for the appropriate course section during the relevant term (January or May). Non-Whittier students, who complete all required coursework and pay the tuition fee, will receive an official transcript upon completion of a faculty-led course; it is the responsibility of the student to find out—prior to enrolling—if his/her home institution will accept the transfer credit from Whittier College. No-Credit Participants: Applicants who would like to enroll in a program but do not wish to receive academic credit will still be required to complete the full application process, will be responsible to pay all program fees, and will be expected to participate in daily discussion, lectures, tours, and other scheduled course elements. No official transcript will be issued to these participants. For more information, please contact Shari Henderson in the Office of International Programs.


FEES AND PAYMENTS The program cost for each faculty-led program varies by location. For participants seeking academic credit, a Program Fee and a Tuition Fee will apply; for participants not seeking academic credit, only the Program Fee will apply. All payments will be collected online in the form of electronic check or credit card. Please note, Program and Tuition Fees do not cover transportation other than indicated on the itinerary, expenses of a personal nature, or international cell phone usage charges. Depending on the program, international transportation and visa arrangements may or may not be included in the Program Fee. Non-refundable Deposit: Upon confirmation of acceptance into a faculty-led course, each participant must submit a non-refundable deposit online of $250 to secure a place in the program. Program Fee: The Program Fee typically includes the following arrangements within the study location: accommodations, domestic transportation, local guide and other support services, course-related site visits and cultural activities (as stated on the itinerary), international health and natural/political disaster evacuation insurance, breakfast each day and other meals (as stated on the itinerary), and international cell phone & SIM card rental (not usage charges). Depending on the program, international transportation and visa arrangements may or may not be included in the Program Fee. Tuition Fee: The Tuition Fee includes semester course credit and processing of the official transcript. Full-time Whittier Students should inquire with the Office of International Programs if they have met requirements to apply a tuition waiver in payment of this fee. All NonWhittier student, for-credit participants must remit the tuition fee payment. This fee does not apply to participants, who do not wish to receive academic credit. Cancellation and Refunds: The Whittier College Cancellation and Refund Policy will be provided to each applicant during the application process, or upon request. Please note, per Whittier College Faculty-Led Travel Program policies, the $250 required enrollment deposit is non-refundable, except in the case that Whittier College cancels the course.

FINANCIAL AID Limited to enrolled college students, financial aid—in the form of loans, private grants, or other auxiliary funding—may be available to offset travel, tuition, and other costs associated with a study abroad program. Consult your Financial Aid Office as early as possible to learn about financial aid options, requirements, and deadlines. Annually, the Office of International Programs (OIP) has a limited number of need or merit-based scholarships available for eligible Whittier College students. Interested students should contact Shari Henderson, OIP Assistant Director, as early as possible in the semester preceding the scheduled desired program.


To learn more about current faculty-led offerings or to apply, visit the Poet World Portal:

www.whittier.edu/PoetWorldPortal

APPLICATION DEADLINES Typically, the deadline to apply for all January Term travel courses is mid-September; for May Term, the deadline is early February. For the most current academic year’s course dates, descriptions, and application and fee deadlines, please consult the “Faculty-Led Programs” webpage, located within the Poet World Portal.

APPLY NOW All applications for Faculty-Led Travel Programs must be submitted online at the Poet World Portal (www.whittier.edu/PoetWorldPortal) To begin the application process, visit the portal homepage: • Click on “Faculty-Led Programs” • Select from the list of current course offerings/destinations • Review all course information, deadlines, and cost breakdown (includes airfare and food estimates) • Click on “Apply Now” •C  omplete the applicant “Profile” form A user name and password will be sent to the email address submit on the Profile form, which enables secure access for completion of a course application, as well as online payment of deposit and all course fees. Following, all applicants will be notified by the Office of International Programs regarding next steps.


ABOUT THE OFFICE OF INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS (OIP) Cultural exchange, foreign language immersion, unique academic endeavors­—all of these are hallmarks of the international study experience at Whittier College. For the last 50 years, in keeping with its mission to prepare students for a global society and evolving workplace, Whittier College has sponsored study abroad opportunities, placing qualified students in locations throughout five continents. There, students engage with the curriculum and experience a range of cultural perspective, language immersion, local custom, and real-world context. The primary mission of the OIP is to facilitate study abroad for students at high-quality academic programs in countries other than the United States, allowing students the opportunity to enhance their education through exposure to different points of view and, in turn, improve their cultural sensitivity and critical thinking skills.

ABOUT WHITTIER COLLEGE Founded by Quakers in 1887, Whittier College is a residential four-year college, offering a traditional liberal arts program integrated with both professional and pre-professional courses of study. With an emphasis on diversity, community, and curricular innovation, the College’s primary mission is to endow students with the education, skills, and values appropriate for global leadership and service. Located in the heart of Southern California between bustling Los Angeles and Beautiful Orange County, Whittier is distinguished by its small size, pioneering faculty, and nationally recognized curriculum.

CONTACT

Shari Henderson Assistant Director/Faculty-Led Programs Coordinator Office of International Programs shenders@whittier.edu (562) 907-4200, ext. 4308

www.whittier.edu/PoetWorldPortal


Faculty-Led Travel Program