Page 1

WHITIREIA COMMUNITY POLYTECHNIC

YOUTH STRATEGY

1


CONTENTS CONTEXT .................................................................................................................. 3 VISION FOR YOUTH ................................................................................................. 4 Vision Description ............................................................................................................. 4

CURRENT SITUATION .............................................................................................. 5 Our Communities .............................................................................................................. 5 Our Youth Enrolments ...................................................................................................... 5

STRATEGIC PRIORITIES.......................................................................................... 7 Understanding the strategic priorities ................................................................................ 7

DESIRED OUTCOMES .............................................................................................. 8 OPERATIONAL OBJECTIVES AND IMPLEMENTATION PLAN ............................. 8 Draft Operational Objectives ............................................................................................. 8

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN YOUTH, MแพนORI AND PACIFIC STRATEGIES .......... 9 BACKGROUND ....................................................................................................... 12 Government Priorities ..................................................................................................... 12 2.1 The Government's tertiary education priorities for the next 3-5 years..................... 12 Definitions ....................................................................................................................... 13 Data on enrolments and success .................................................................................... 14

REFERENCES ......................................................................................................... 16

2


CONTEXT

The Whitireia vision is to lead and illuminate our communities through tertiary education. The core purpose of Whitireia is to build futures for our students and communities. (Whitireia Strategic Plan 2011-2016)

The Youth Strategy attempts to set out how Whitireia can build futures for our young students. Its outcome will be to increase the numbers of youth participating and succeeding in vocational education at Whitireia. The Youth Strategy guides and informs the Whitireia programme of provision for youth, linking directly to our institutional values and meeting government (p11) and institutional goals. Whitireia Community Polytechnic has a diverse population including the second largest proportion of Pacific students in the country. The community it serves is young, multi-ethnic and growing and makes Whitireia unique. It also means Whitireia is the ideal place to develop innovative programmes that meet a variety of needs and improve the educational success of its students. This requires Whitireia to clearly understand its whole community; as well as the needs, expectations and issues for each group within that community. For this organisation it means an in-depth understanding of our MÄ ori, Pacific, Youth and Foundation student populations. The Youth Strategy is influenced by the MÄ ori and Pacific strategies and is the overarching strategy for Whitireia with regards to youth. The Foundation provision will be influenced in turn by the Youth Strategy.

3


VISION FOR YOUTH Whitireia enables young people to gain vocational knowledge and skills, make confident choices about their future, progress successfully to employment and/or further education, thereby setting them on the pathway to realising their dreams.

Vision Description Whitireia has the reputation for doing well with second chance adult learners and we can be proud of this important contribution to our community. The youth strategy compliments the work we do with second chance adult learners. Our vision for the youth strategy is that young people in our community won’t delay participating in tertiary education until they are older but will engage now, improving their and the country’s economic future and enabling them to contribute to their communities. We envisage young people in our community being able to make confident choices about their future, have high expectations and progress successfully to employment and/or further education. They and their families will understand the benefits of vocational education. Our programmes will provide clear pathways to higher level qualifications, increasing the number of young people achieving at levels 4 and above. Young Māori participate in increasing numbers at Whitireia and are successful as Māori. Young Pacific people have their cultural identity confirmed and participate at the same rate as and achieve as well as, other students. We acknowledge that there are challenges that come with increasing the number of youth enrolments; that young learners may have attitudes and behaviour which challenge our ways of doing things (e.g. programme content, teaching strategies, responding to incidents on campus). While there will be challenges, we know that young people bring huge potential, energy, ideals and aspirations. Our vision is that Whitireia recognises that each student brings potential, treats each student with respect and supports them to realise their potential.

4


CURRENT SITUATION Our Communities Our community has a pressing need to improve the futures of our young people. In 2009: ● 48% (226) of school leavers in Porirua City left school with a qualification less than NCEA Level 2; ● 32% (190) of school leavers in Kapiti left school with a qualification less than NCEA Level 2; ● 15% (370) of school leavers in Wellington City left school with a qualification less than NCEA Level 2. Source: School leavers by highest attainment and Territorial Local Authority 2009, Ministry of Education, http://www.educationcounts.govt.nz/statistics/schooling/school_leavers2/highestattainment-numbers-2009 A capped EFTS (equivalent full-time student) environment; the driver to improve success rates and increase numbers studying at level 4 and above, and higher demand for tertiary education mean that programmes are able to and will, select students based on likelihood of success. The risk to our community is that those students who are disengaged from education continue to miss out on obtaining a qualification and lose the opportunity to progress to studying at level 4 and above. This is why provision of education in the whole community is of concern to Whitireia and why Whitireia needs to take a leadership role across providers.

OUR YOUTH ENROLMENTS Youth1 enrolments at Whitireia have been growing steadily over the last five years: ● EFTS consumed by youth enrolments increased 43% between 2006 and 2010 (excluding International the increase is 35%);2 ● the number of students under 25 has increased 54% from 2006 to 2010 (excluding International the increase is 51%). Youth enrolments are a significant proportion of the student body. ● 54% of EFTS are consumed by students under 25; ● 50% of all students are under 25 (comprising 23% under 20 and 27% 20-24).

1

This strategy uses the definition of youth from the Tertiary Education Strategy 2010-2015, in which youth is defined as under 25. (Tertiary Education Strategy 2010-2015, http://www.minedu.govt.nz/NZEducation/EducationPolicies/TertiaryEducation/PolicyAndStrategy/Ter tiaryEducationStrategy/)

2

All data in this section has been supplied by Whitireia Business Information Centre except where another source is named.

5


Youth is a broad category and includes students who have experienced success at Secondary school and entered degree programmes, through to those who have elected to study a trade, to 16-17 year olds who have left school with little or no qualifications and are unsure about what they want for their future. The youth strategy is focussed on meeting the needs of these students. The definition of youth as ‘under 25’ also captures those schoolleavers who have gone on to a three-year or longer degree programme and includes learners who have been out of school for a few years and are motivated to now get a qualification. This wide range of motivations and varied levels of success with previous study means that we have a diverse youth population. In 2010 the government introduced the Youth Guarantee initiative for targeted 16 and 17 year olds to have the opportunity to participate in a range of vocational courses free of charge. These courses are at Levels 1-3 and the EFTS are additional to SAC funded EFTS, so could continue to be an important area of growth for Whitireia. Whitireia won additional Youth Guarantee places in 2011, with 179 students currently enrolled (Source: Youth Guarantee team report, 28 March 2011). Enrolments of 16-17 year olds also include students still enrolled at Secondary School but undertaking STAR programmes. In 2010, 951 students were enrolled in STAR courses (29 EFTS). The experience for faculties and staff involved with the Youth Guarantee initiative has highlighted the need to ensure tutors are equipped to motivate learners and help them develop competencies for life-long learning, as well as teach subject matter. It has also raised issues about the wider environment such as the need for sporting and social facilities suited to youth and for technology to match young people’s expectations. These issues are not exclusive to 16-17 year olds and need to be addressed for all youth learners. Our data about success rates show that youth success rates are lower than that of older learners and that Māori and Pacific success is of particular concern. For example: ● 16-17 year olds success rates in 2009 averaged 58%, with 55% success for Māori students, 36% for Pacific students and 61% for NZ European students ● Success for all youth averaged 73.99% whereas success for all students regardless of age was 77.43%. The Māori and Pacific strategies have been designed to address the issue of achievement and this strategy will work alongside those strategic initiatives.

6


STRATEGIC PRIORITIES 1.

Lead and shape the network of foundation provision in our community so that there is an increased demand for tertiary education from those under 25.

2.

Build capability within Whitireia to attract and retain young learners, increasing the number of students transitioning successfully from secondary education and progressing to higher levels.

3.

Significantly increase the success rates of youth at Whitireia, particularly those of MÄ ori and Pacific learners.

Understanding the strategic priorities Leading and shaping the network of foundation provision in our community so that there is an increased demand for tertiary education from those under 25. In order to ensure youth participate in increasing numbers in tertiary education in our community, vocational education needs to be understood to be valuable. Whitireia will take a leadership role in ensuring that the community understands the value of vocational education and families and students see this as a worthwhile choice. Whitireia will lead and shape what is provided in the community, ensuring that good vocational pathways are provided and promoted and that provision is not accidental but planned. This requires Whitireia to work closely with other providers and with industry Build capability within Whitireia to attract and retain young learners, increasing the number of students transitioning successfully from secondary education and progressing to higher levels. Successful transition to tertiary and subsequent retention within programmes and progression to higher levels requires a supportive environment that welcomes and includes youth learners. This requires a shift in organisational culture from Whitireia seeing itself as an institution suited primarily for mature learners to one that also recognises and responds to the potential of youth. This strategic priority has implications for Whitireia regarding the physical environment, technology provision and staff recruitment and development. Significantly increase the success rates of youth at Whitireia, particularly those of MÄ ori and Pacific learners. Whitiriea can build on existing good practice and programmes that are proven to be successful and conduct its own research into what is effective. Whitireia needs to respond to the needs of youth learners; particularly MÄ ori and Pacific learners; to help them develop into successful learners. This requires Whitireia to work with families to understand their aspirations for their children; provide careers advice and support and work collaboratively with other agencies involved in the lives of our students. Students need opportunities to build a strong sense of identity of themselves as learners; to develop resilience and the ability to make good decisions.

7


DESIRED OUTCOMES ● ● ●

Young people aged 16-19 participate in programmes at Whitireia in increasing numbers. More young people aged under 25 achieve qualifications at level 4 and above at Whitireia. Young Māori and Pacific people participate at the same rate as; and achieve as well as; other students.

OPERATIONAL OBJECTIVE AND IMPLEMENTATION PLAN The three strategic priorities each have a different focus. The first has an external focus and addresses where Whitireia is placed within the community; the second has an internal and organisational focus; and the third a focus on the individual student. The Youth Strategy is a whole-of-organisation strategy and the operational objectives and implementation plan will reflect this, with responsibilities for action being at all levels of the organisation. A three-year implementation plan will be developed through further consultation within the organisation once the strategy direction has been agreed.

Draft Operational Objectives Whitireia will: ● ● ● ●

Create a coherent picture of local provision including providing good ‘product’ vocational pathways that work Promote the value of vocational education in the community so that it is understood to be a worthwhile choice Promote a shared understanding of the importance of youth to our organisation Provide a learning environment that meets the needs of youth Teaching environment Physical environment Provision of services to youth Develop our young people into successful learners Working with the individual Working with families

8


Youth Strategic Priorities

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN YOUTH, MĀORI AND PACIFIC STRATEGIES

9

Leading and shaping the network of foundation provision in our community so that there is an increased demand for tertiary education from those under 25.

Links to Māori Strategy Goals

Links to Pacific Strategy Goals

How this Broad operational implications of supports Youth Strategy Foundation

4. Relevant monitoring and reporting framework 5.Programmes that contribute to Māori knowledge - identifying programmes that contribute to the future development of Māori, as Māori

1.Improved Educational Outcomes - developing school-to-tertiary education-to workforce transitions; implementing robust monitoring and accountability processes; programmes that reflect and respond to community aspirations. 3.Foster Pacific Identity and Leadershipresponding to Pacific community development aspirations 4.Develop Collaborative Partnerships - Build strong collaborative links across the Pacific academic community; foster opportunities to connect Pacific peoples

Foundation pathways improved to ensure coherent and sound picture

- build on the work done successfully with schools to promote the value of vocational education in the wider community - use the Government’s big picture of Pathways once it is available, to provide good ‘product’ vocational pathways that work (need to understand profile of the market, what’s happening, what coherent picture can we create for youth) - lead what’s provided in the community, working with current providers of youth education (ie collaborative picture of region’s provision) - monitor, analyse and report on recruitment, retention and success of youth


Youth Strategic Priorities

10

Build capability within Whitireia to attract and retain young learners, increasing the number of students transitioning successfully from secondary education and progressing to higher levels.

Links to MÄ ori Strategy Goals

Links to Pacific Strategy Goals

How this Broad operational implications of supports Youth Strategy Foundation

1.Effective and appropriate teaching and learning practices 2.Appropriate recruitment, development and promotion of staff-

1. Improved educational outcomes- fostering a high quality Pacific research environment 2.Effective Learning Environment- facilitate staff development; develop Pacific staff capacity 3.Foster Pacific Identity and Leadershipresources and places of gathering

Foundation students benefit from improved capability for example, improved enrolment practices.

- improve enrolment so that information is accessible and processes don’t create barriers to entry -recruitment and staff development ensure tutors have the knowledge and skills to effectively work with young learners -provide an appropriate physical environment that engages youth, eg spaces for sport and social interaction - meet youth expectations for the use and availability of technology -ensure the learning environment is a safe place for all learners


Youth Strategic Priorities

11

Significantly increase the success rates of youth at Whitireia, particularly those of Māori and Pacific learners.

Links to Māori Strategy Goals

Links to Pacific Strategy Goals

How this Broad operational implications of supports Youth Strategy Foundation

3.Effective student support services- develop appropriate communication and information strategy for Māori students, their families and the wider Māori community; identification of the student support services related ‘drivers’.

1. Improved Educational Outcomes 2.Effective Learning Environment -changing the deficit talk 3.Foster Pacific Identity and Leadershippreparation of future leaders

Foundation students benefit from focus on improving success of learners.

-ensure programmes meet learning needs of youth; build literacy and numeracy skills and are focussed on employment outcomes - provide appropriate personal development in youth programmes, e.g. setting goals, making choices -work with families to understand their aspirations for their children and help them understand how they can assist their child to succeed in tertiary education -provide careers advice, build students ability to make decisions and take choices -provide appropriate pastoral support


BACKGROUND Government Priorities 2.1 The Government's tertiary education priorities for the next 3-5 years The economy has contracted significantly due to the global downturn and local recession, curtailing government income at the same time as increasing the costs of social welfare and debt servicing. The recession is also raising demand for tertiary education. In this economic environment the Government will ensure the tertiary system achieves the best return on the public’s investment. We will do this by: ● increasing the number of young people (aged under 25) achieving qualifications at levels four and above, particularly degrees ● increasing the number of Māori students enjoying success at higher levels ● increasing the number of Pacific students achieving at higher levels ● increasing the number of young people moving successfully from school into tertiary education ● improving literacy, language, numeracy and skills outcomes from levels one to three study ● improving the educational and financial performance of providers ● strengthening research outcomes. From Tertiary Education Strategy 2010-15: http://www.minedu.govt.nz/NZEducation/EducationPolicies/TertiaryEducation/PolicyAndStrat egy/TertiaryEducationStrategy/PartTwoPriorities.aspx

12


Definitions Youth In this strategy we use the definition of youth from the Tertiary Education Strategy 20102015, in which youth is defined as under 25. (Tertiary Education Strategy 2010-2015, http://www.minedu.govt.nz/NZEducation/EducationPolicies/TertiaryEducation/PolicyAndStrat egy/TertiaryEducationStrategy/) This strategy recognises that ‘under 25’ represents a wide range of students from those in Youth Guarantee programmes through to young adults studying for degrees; to those who may be returning to education after several years in the workforce. This diversity means that outcomes, goals and activities in the strategy may at times define a narrower age range or other sub-group within the definition of Youth. Vocation: A career, specified profession or trade. Vocational Education: Education that is concerned with skills and knowledge needed for an occupation, trade, industry, or profession. It includes both academic and applied learning.

13


Data on enrolments and success From Whitireia Business Information Centre, April 2011 Trend of Youth Enrolment at Whitireia a) all students EFTS 2006 Under 16 12.17 16-17 175.75 18-19 421.01 20-24 1083.88 Total 1692.81

2007 13.04 184.21 495.96 1047.51 1740.72

2008 15.07 199.59 508.68 1210.01 1933.35

2009 8.87 158.22 561.88 1350.86 2079.83

2010 3.99 185.68 637.50 1597.48 2424.65

2011 1.08 117.87 467.91 1045.26 1632.12

2007 155 625 774 1662 3216

2008 96 757 870 1897 3620

2009 120 973 1037 2068 4198

2010 67 903 1069 2300 4339

2011 18 253 666 1703 2640

b) excluding International EFTS 2006 2007 Under 16 12.17 12.65 16-17 168.58 175.57 18-19 319.57 376.66 20-24 514.65 558.71 Total 1014.97 1123.59

2008 13.13 189.82 348.45 631.97 1183.37

2009 8.00 150.06 415.59 650.29 1223.94

2010 3.99 163.27 447.61 750.45 1365.32

2011 1.08 116.36 386.89 652.49 1156.82

2008 73 744 653 1078 2548

2009 115 959 842 1128 3044

2010 67 870 804 1129 2870

2011 18 250 505 833 1606

Students Under 16 16-17 18-19 20-24 Total

Students Under 16 16-17 18-19 20-24 Total

2006 164 413 618 1620 2815

2006 164 402 482 852 1900

2007 154 614 604 1011 2383

What are the success rates for youth Students Under 16 16-17 18-19 20-24 Total

14

2008

2009

84% 57% 64% 63%

68% 66% 71% 70%

2010 86% 57% 70% 78% 74%


What are success rates 2010 by ethnic group for domestic youth? Age group 16-17 18-19 20-24

15

MÄ ori students 55% 68% 67%

Pacific students 36% 65% 69%

NZ European 61% 75% 79%


REFERENCES Whitireia Community Polytechnic Youth Programme - draft. Arthur Graves, 2010. Whitireia Community Polytechnic MÄ ori Strategy - draft. Willis Katene, 2011. Whitireia Community Polytechnic Pacific Strategy. Louise Falepau and Laura van Peer, 2010. Whitireia Community Polytechnic Strategic Plan 2011-2016. Whitireia Community Polytechnic Foundation Educational Programmes’ Review. Helen Gardiner, 2010. A Collaborative Strategy for Young Learners: Whitireia Community Polytechnic and Wellington Institute of Technology. Helen Gardiner and Alan Cadwallader, 2011 Direction paper: Youth Strategy. Paper to Council, Oct 2010. Progress paper: Youth Strategy. Paper to Council, Nov 2010.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Draft Youth Strategy was prepared by Gillian Candler from discussions with Louise Falepou, Willlis Katene, Helen Gardiner, Stephen Wickens, Lawrence Arps, Arthur Graves, Tim Renner, Paul MacGuiness, Trish Brimblecombe, Fiona Wain, Mary Manderson, Mary Silvester, Mariekura Brightwell, Justin Puna, Maria Uluilelata, Leisha Williams, Leigh Gravestock, and many other staff at Whitireia.

16

Youth Strategy  

The Youth Strategy attempts to set out how Whitireia can build futures for our young students. Its outcome will be to increase the numbers o...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you