Page 1


PAUL SUMMERFIELD a moment with

Painter / Paul Summerfield - Tree House

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


Name:

Over the past 10 years I’ve been working on a goal, To create, paint and make a living from my art practice.

eld

Paul Summerfi

tal Arti g i D g n i s i t c a r 28, Canberra, P hic design p a r g l l a m s a g ist .Runnin nd i are a er n t r a P y M . business ary 2011. u n a J n i y b a b expecting a

My work is constantly inspired by places iv been to in Japan, Australia, memories and own imagination. As a child I loved looking at story books and this interest has grown ever since, I often have wacky ideas for stories that sometimes make their way into my work. I use a computer for my work at the moment, because I enjoy the freedom that it gives me as an artist. I can carry a 3 meter artwork in my backpack and work in many different environments.One of my favourite places to work is in Cafes, I find the surrounding chatter of voices in English & many other languages a fantastic ingredient for creativity. I like to illustrate the relationship between nature and urban environments and their peaceful existence together. I often day dream of a place where nature is a integral part of a human city, perhaps structures and houses are growing and technologies are sustainable and we are more self sustaining, this green dream fuels my inner creativity and often gives me ideas for themes and stories which I can incorporate into my digital paintings. Visiting new cities, cultures and historic places i find my self bustled up in their significance, they give me new ideas and combined with my own experiences help me weave and craft new works.


Painter / Paul Summerfield - Night Settles Over Otaru

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


Painter / Paul Summerfield - My Secret Garden

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


childhood? r u o y e b i r desc 1) Can you

I had great parents that didn’t believe in TV. They believed in Boardgames, playing outside, playing music, drawing and painting, books.

in your art pratice.. 4). The essential items 1. Inspiration 2. Laptop or desktop computer & computer tablet 3. Working space & Environment 4. Time 5. Power Point

2). In your opin ion, what should an ideal art world to be like? I wish public spaces could be transformed into bright, colourful and creative spaces. I wish that street artists and musicians where given plenty of space all over cities. Street Art inspires us all in our own lifes, it keeps a city looking fresh and active.

t? to create ar u o y s e r i p s 5). What in

Big cities, the rainforest, my partner, old places falling apart, live music, dreams, new experiences, traveling, friends, movies, poetry, nature, scienceand the world around us and stories.

3). Tell u s more abo ut your ar t..

My art is what inspires me, ideas & stories i want to tell. Combining nature and urban environments meshed & woven together, places where people live & laugh. Happy places of dreams, memories and possible futures.

6). What is the biggest challenge of being an artist these days?

It really depends on how you want to approach your career...If you are lucky enough you can support yourself through your art practice. Sometimes you might have to take other jobs or even have a different career so you can keep doing what you love. If you work fulltime, then you have less time for art making, so its about finding the right balance that works for you.

Painter / Paul Summerfield - The Night Flyer

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


n yourself i e e s u o y do 7). Where ime? 10 years t

I will have ... 10y old kid, illustrated story books, a few more solo exhibitions, work in collections all over the worls, traveled back to Japan, still dreaming, creating stories and works and putting my art out there.

in time and meet one 9) If you could go back who would you choose of the old time artists, to see? I would go back to the 1980’s and meet Douglas Adams.

8). Five words to describe yourself...

Imaginative, generous, musical, sensitive, passionate! Painter / Paul Summerfield - The Night Flyer

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


Painter / Paul Summerfield - Fishing For Dreams

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


Painter / Paul Summerfield - The Last Scientists

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


Painter / Paul Summerfield - Tree House Garden

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


Painter / Paul Summerfield - The Jam Makers

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


JODEE TAYLAH

Painter / Jodee Taylah - The Others Now White

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


Name:

Jodee Taylah

alternative e h t es r o l p ex k “My wor with the l a c i s m i h w e h t by blending d adding some dark fantastical, an he mix..” undertones to t

Since the day Jodee could hold a pencil, she has never let it go. She spent her childhood writing and illustrating her own books (some she still has!), and creating pictures for friends and family. It wasn’t until recently that Jodee realised she could make a career out of making art. She studied illustration at NMIT in Melbourne where she received help in refining, and moulding her skills, technique and style. Jodee has won several awards, including ‘Best Children’s Illustration’, ‘Illustration Excellence’, and was second runner-up for a 2009 Create Award for ‘Emerging Talent’. Jodee currently has work on display at Tumbulgum Gallery in Northern NSW, and is working on some character design commissions and a graphic novel for adults.


Painter / Jodee Taylah - Game Masters Garden

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


Painter / Jodee Taylah - 12 Brothers

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


Painter / Jodee Taylah - Imagination

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


Painter / Jodee Taylah - Swan Princess

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


“My work explores the alternative by blending the whimsical with the fantastical, and adding some dark undertones to the mix. I wouldn’t say my work is gothic, but more so haunting and a little bit sinister. Strangely, I don’t like trying to explain every little detail of what my work is all about. Some may call it selfish, but I like to keep my work somewhat mysterious. Pick it apart, and it would become just another painting.” Painter / Jodee Taylah - Alice

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


ESP Gallery is all about seizing opportunities and going for it. In 2009 a group of emerging

artists took an opportunity to have a gallery space in Marrickville – an up and coming art district of Sydney’s inner west and nearly a year on this artist run initiative is providing gallery spaces for emerging artists at an affordable cost.


Partly funded by Marrickville Council curator and glass sculptor Mark Wotherspoon and colleagues submit-

ted a development proposal to get the space up and running. Mr Wotherspoon states that the gallery’s overall aim is to eventually “…provide our artists an exhibition space for free of charge and to have high quality art being shown in Marrickville.” The gallery is divided into four different sizes of rooms and spaces, starting from only $50 per week, artists can apply to have their own solo shows. ESP is now accepting proposals from all types of artists. It goes without saying that with all the commercial galleries in Sydney, artists are facing huge challenges not only having to seek and submit their proposals to the suitable galleries but also to afford the expensive rent required. ESP Project truly is a hidden gem to help and support the artists at a much more affordable cost.

We Heart Inner West - ESP Gallery

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


CURRENT SHOW

Tom Isaacs / Sach Catts - Critical Tension Dylan Quirk - Video / Painting 29th July – 15 Aug 2010

We Heart Inner West - ESP Gallery

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


ESP Gallery Opening Hours - Thur - Fri 3-6pm, Sat - Sun 11am-4pm 228 Illawarra Rd, Marrickville NSW 2204 To submit your proposal, application forms can be accessed through their website. www.esprojects.com.au

We Heart Inner West - ESP Gallery

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


SIMON HEWSON HOPE


o ne of Australia’s largest open-entry annual competition and exhibition of photography – the Kodak Salon. Over 300 talented photographers have shown their works in this year competition and over 400 beautiful works have been exhibited in the Centre of Contemporary Photography located in Fitzroy VIC.

Kodak Salon has played an important role of promoting Australian contemporary photography. There are 16 prize categories with the total worth of over $16,000, it is certainly one of the best opportunities for emerging and established photographers to showcase their unique talents. Photographer Simon Hewson who is also one of WhiteSpac3’s artist members has won the “Epson Excellence in the use of color” category with his amazing work Hope 2010. Kodak Salon 2010 - Hope by Simon Hewson

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


Hope (2010) Simon Hewson

Kodak Salon 2010 - Hope by Simon Hewson

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


T

he Exhibition itself is based around the Parisian idea of displaying artworks from floor to ceiling. This is very overwhelming to view. We did at least four laps of the gallery before we felt like we had seen everything and even then we still missed the odd gem. When I entered my images I thought about the categories that might fit well with my work.I decided to enter one of my favorite portraits and an image that has been pestering me for a while... The image I refer to is ‘Hope’ it won ‘Excellence in the use of color’. I have always loved this image, it really was a moment in time. I dragged out the roll of film that the image was shot on and there is only one single frame of this scenario. I do recall watching for a short time and waiting for things to fall into place. With shots like this you have no control over the elements, however you can compose and capture the moment when you feel the time is right. I took ‘Hope’ on new years day on the island of Lido, which is just a short boat ride from Venice. Each year they have a beach party, there is a bunch of hardened swimmers that go for the first chilly dip of the year in the Golfo di Venezia. The locals give out free wine and food to passers by, a lovely Italian mumma gave me the biggest plate of delicious pasta you have ever seen.

Kadak Salon 2010 Exhibition Centre for Contemporary Photography Gallery 2

- Simon Hewson

Showing until 25th Sept

Kodak Salon 2010 - Hope by Simon Hewson

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


AMY BUCKLE a moment with

Painter / Amy Buckle

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


Name:

Amy Bu “I an wh

ckle

at I crea

Amy Rose Buckle has primarily established herself as Songwriter and Performer in Sydney and around Australia however more recently has been inspired to peruse a more holistic career in the arts, rekindling her love for charcoal drawing and mixed medium arts. Exhibiting in Whitespaces “rather be naked” earlier this month at Mils Gallery Surry Hills, people were refreshed and intrigued with her pure and raw expression of texture and colour. She is busy creating more works and is looking to launch her first solo exhibition before the end of the year.

te”


Painter / Amy Buckle

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


childhood? r u o y e b i descr 1) Can you

We moved around a lot as a family, my childhood was a lot of fun and pretty diverse. From living on an awesome peach orchid to living in a weird cult community, when I was really young, there was definitely no lack of contrast. We were always making little hide outs, or tree houses with little compartments and inventing games and characters to play. I started getting into music pretty young, always working on some little tune. I have a lot of memories going on painting days with dad, watching him and trying to figure it all out.

2). In your opin ion, what should an ideal art world to be like?

I think art is a fundamental, it’s not additional, a leisure or separate from the world, I think the more we create the more we become ourselves. So my ideal ‘art’ world would be one where art is recognized as necessary.

ur art.. 3). Tell us more about yo I have spent more time creating music than other art forms but am recently getting back into fine arts, there is a very blurred line between them both. I like to make my ideas feel as tangible as possible so I experiment with texture a fair bit, mixing mediums and layering materials. Most of my works come from charcoal sketches and evolve from there. I like to contrast the black tones of charcoal with bright and rich paints and chalk pastels and other mediums.

4). The essentia l items in your art pratice.. I don’t always follow a formula however usually something very small and simple can spark an idea so I try have a charcoal pencil and paper handy always. Usually at my disposal I’ll have a ton of scrap paper, felt pen, shellac, glue, blade…. I would really like to start using ink. I’ll have a result in mind but like to allow freedom in the work, and for them to feel fluid so often one idea will morf into another. I also find writing helps me form a concept or artwork, so I tend to write, then sketch, then start playing with form and texture using materials that suit my concept.

Painter / Amy Buckle

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


5). What inspires

you to c reate ar t?

I was first inspired by my dad as an oil painter, I love the rich colour and thick texture, but many things, fabric, a beautiful composition, architecture, a great conversation, obviously other artists work…I recently was introduced to some works by, New York Artist , Alex Asher Daniel and was so excited to see how he expressed the human body. If your senses are alert, I think anything can inspire you.

nge t challe s e g g i b ? is the ese days h 6). What t t s i t an ar of being As a full time artist, writing & performing music & creating all kinds of art works. Owning a store in Sydney city full of art works, trinkets, furniture, paints, coffee and other bits and bobs … Travelling to find new treasures and sharing my art with people all over the globe.

7). Where do you see yourself i 10 years t n ime?

As a full time artist, writing & performing music & creating all kinds of art works. Owning a store in Sydney city full of art works, trinkets, furniture, paints, coffee and other bits and bobs … Travelling to find new treasures and sharing my art with people all over the globe.

Painter / Amy Buckle

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


Painter / Amy Buckle

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


Painter / Amy Buckle

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


lf... cribe yourse s e d o t s d r o 8). Five w

Bright, empathetic, sensual, clumsy & inspired

9) If you co uld go of the back i old ti n time me art to see and me ists, ? et one who wo uld yo u choo se Right now, Antoni Gaudi , his designs make me so excited

Painter / Amy Buckle

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


Painter / Amy Buckle

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


MARK WELSH a moment with

Painter / Mark Welsh - Monsure

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


Name:

Mark Wels

h

Currently live in Freman s and works tle, Western Au stralia. Painter, illustrator, pano driver, night striver, snail pinstriper, thick steak eater, nice to meet cha, tender of sick plants, dreamer with pants, itch scratcher, bird caller, scone craver, stone carver, veneer peeler, doco crawler, dog whisperer, life explorer‌


Painter / Mark Welsh - Aka

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


Painter / Mark Welsh - Aka Cha

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


od?

ldho our chi y e b i r esc

you d 1) Can

When I was 8 years old my family moved to Perth from Northern England. I remember walking across the taxiway tarmac melting in the heat of the Australian summer, wondering which alien planet i had landed on. Years later I still feel like an alien, only now I can appreciate the vantage this has afforded me... and now i wear a hat.

2). In you r opinion, what shoul ideal art d an world to b e like?

I find it quite hard to define what the ‘art world’ actually is, where it is located and how it is made up. Everyone has an opinion on art in it’s many forms and I enjoy these points of difference, though i think I’m more interested in the world in all it’s variety.

4).

3). Faces have pl ayed a very impo rtant in your current work, is there a story of theme behind them? In my recent work I was interested in the initial repulsion I sometimes have to difference, revolt that with time turns to curiosity, acceptance, then awe. The AKA characters attempt to create common moments that allow the viewer time to contemplate, that give permission to stare into the face of discomfort and question our own consciousness. At first glance we see a disfigured face but within each there is also a certain fragility. I love the honest innocence of the child’s mind that is forgotten, a mind not yet moulded by peers, ‘teachers’, the mainstream media, the narrow casted views that we rely upon so heavily. I have attempted to reawaken this mind state. We all have our own take on what is beautiful, it truly is in the eye of the beholder, that interests me.

Painter / Mark Welsh

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


art.. . Tell us more about your I like to work in a variety of mediums and I usually let the thought dictate the process. Sometimes my thoughts are charcoal, rubbed out and redrawn. Other times they’re totally permanent in oil. If i haven’t had a coffee it’s all a bit pastel. For me art is something i have always naturally turned to, to sort things out in my head. Once i can see it in front of me as a physical object i can say that is definitely that and move on. It’s a very personal endeavor.

? o create art t u o y s e r i p 5). What ins

6). W h of be at is the ing a n art biggest c h ist t hese allenge days? I think there are many challenges in being an artist, but for me it is remembering to get out and about. Creating art is a solitary process, one which i enjoy immensely. I love the meditation involved and the close dissection of thought. I love the intensity involved with honing right into a subject. Luckily I have a lot of supportive friends that recognise this and drag me out of my own little microcosm.

It’s hard to know where an initial idea comes from. Usually i just start working on something i’ve seen, an element that has inspired or annoyed on some level. As the work grows many other things are introduced on an aesthetic level, an intellectual level, a stylistic level. It’s a mishmash that kind of takes on a life of it’s own. This is the part i enjoy the most, the evolution of a construct. Creating the balance and structure, the tone and feel. I rarely work an idea through on one piece. Contextual elements flip from one canvas to the next, it is only in the later stages that the works are finalised into particular tangents of the complete concept. Usually the overall undercurrents of a series only make sense six months down the track. Of course! ...that’s where that came from. Sometimes it’s quite embarrassing. Painter / Mark Welsh

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


Painter / Mark Welsh - Locals

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


Painter / Mark Welsh - Locals

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


yourself e e s u o e do y 7). Wher time? 10 years

in

I hope to keep creating and exploring, redefining and developing. Preferably in a lighter studio space, one with a window. I would also like to find representation in the eastern states. Like most artists I’d like to see my work travel and find a larger audience.Â

Painter / Mark Welsh - Territories

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


. e yourself.. b i r c s e d o t ds 8). Five wor

explorer, documenter, dreamer, scratcher, collector ... innumerate!

9) If you co uld go of the back i old ti n time me art to see and me ists, ? et one who wo uld yo u choo se There are so many and for so many reasons. Can i choose more than one? ...Ingres for his astounding technical genius. Schiele for his command of line. Bacon and Freud for their love of pure paint. The photographs of Roger Balen. Roald Dahl for his humour and ability to twist a story. Kafka for his ability to survive in a constant nuclear winter. But if I had to choose just one it would have to be Hitler. Id tell him I thought his water colours were brilliant and to keep on painting! Painter / Mark Welsh - Black Dog

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


Painter / Mark Welsh - Aka Boy

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


A

rguably the most difficult thing about being an emerging artist is finding

affordable and adequate exhibition space for your work.

The term ‘starving art-

ist’ is not far from reality with many artists struggling to make ends meet to purchase materials, network and exhibit.

Below are a few cost effective ideas to

getting your art seen!

Korting Art - Exhibition Wanted, Cosr Effective Ways To Exhibit Your Art

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


urrounding yourself with like minded people who create is not just a great

source of motivation but can hold opportunities to exhibit relatively cheaply.

At the fraction of the price of a solo – arranging collaborative exhibitions can make commercial gallery spaces with commercial gallery perks (eg lighting, press releases and invitations to name a few) more accessible. There is often an application process and deposit required. Be aware that the more artists you have in an exhibition the less room you will have in the gallery to display your work – this can be problematic especially if you have special requirements; however, the more people in the space the less it will cost you. Keep in mind there are often commissions to all works sold. To find about future collaborations you can check art sites such as ArtsHub.com, your local art institutions, art shops and community notice boards.

Korting Art - Exhibition Wanted, Cosr Effective Ways To Exhibit Your Art

COLLABORATIONS

S

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


ART WEBSITES

T

he internet is now arguably the most accessible information hub in the world.

With literally hundreds of millions of people utilizing online potential why wouldn’t you want to use it? With hundreds of art online sites you can store images of your work, create blogs, participate in online exhibitions and even sell your art- in most cases FOR FREE! However

selling your art from

Art

sites such as redbubble.com and etsy.com.au

can often incur a commission.

There are some rare sites such as Whit3space.com where for an annual fee you will be given an online art profile, access to up and coming art events and they will even help organise a group exhibition! Sites such as Noise.com is free of charge and available for artists all over the world – a great networking site you can look at what artists are up to all over the world.

Korting Art - Exhibition Wanted, Cosr Effective Ways To Exhibit Your Art

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


Korting Art - Exhibition Wanted, Cosr Effective Ways To Exhibit Your Art

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


PUBLIC SPACES

P

ublic spaces can be a cost effective way to expose the general public to your

work, contribute to your local community and develop your creative process. There are often weekly local markets throughout the country and hiring a stall can cost

$20 and there is no commission on works sold! This can require commitment- a lot of planning can be involved for possibly little to no return. However markets are always fun, you can meet new interesting people and pick up some awesome finds while you’re there! from as little as

If you are more into having your work seen in a more public forum you can volunteer to beautify your community (eg painting bus stops, bare walls etc). However, you can take your work to a further level and apply for community based grants to create works that can permanently reside within the community.

Keep

in mind

that these grants require commitment and attention to detail (eg financial plans, concepts, sketches are often already required).

Korting Art - Exhibition Wanted, Cosr Effective Ways To Exhibit Your Art

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


rt grants and competitions are a regular part of an artist’s life.

Winning these can make an emerging artist into an established one and help pave new and exciting careers. Winning grants and competitions often bring with it plenty of funds to set up an exhibition or as part of the selection process you get to exhibit your work. If successful this can be a fantastic name to show your work and network!

Grants and comps often require a lengthy application process and an entry fee (which you do not get back if you are unsuccessful). Grants can range from travel scholarships to something as simple as a grant to get your artwork framed.

O

ne of the hardest parts about grants and competitions is finding out about them!

Checking art sites such as nava.com.au, artshub.com or the Australian Council web-

site will advise you of any grants or competitions coming up with access to application forms and information sites!

The Australian Council website even has interviews with successful artists on their applications and how they approached it! Nava brings out an annual publication called ‘Money for Visual Artists’ that documents all the up and coming grants, scholarships and competitions there are to offer for the coming year. The 10th edition has been released and is available at most gallery bookshops and from Nava’s website.

Korting Art - Exhibition Wanted, Cosr Effective Ways To Exhibit Your Art

ART COMPS & GRANTS

A

ISSUE III/ PEN & PAPER


ADVERTISE HERE

ADVERTISMENTS

click for more details

ADVERTISE HERE click for more details


Pen & Paper Issue 3  

Free e-zine for discovering and promoting Australian emerging visual artists , published by Whitespac3, Australian newly launched arts commu...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you