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THE DREAM TRAIL Worca’s High Alpine Ambitions

SACRED GATHERINGS Eleven years of Chromag Bikes SETTING THE STAGE FOR ROAD BIKING

New Road club picks up pace

WHISTLER’S BIKE MAGAZINE VOLUME 1 / ISSUE 1 2014

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Contents

Crank’d Whistler’s Bike Magazine

he Dream 06 TTrail

12

hasing the 28 CDirt Seasons

in the 32 WBikeomen Park

S  etting the Stage



WORCA’s 25-year high alpine ambitions coming true with new Sproatt project.

for Road Riding

The Whistler Cycling Club is gearing up for a future of huge success.





Kovarik Racing duo find endless summers in Whistler and Australia.

Women’s only nights are a growing business.

Crank’d Volume 01 / Issue 01 2014 produced by publisher editor

Alison Taylor

art director/designer sales manager sales

marketing

John Magill Susan Hutchinson Andrew Daly, Tessa Sweeney, Amy Allen

Crank’d Bike Magazine is Layared. Follow these instructions to discover additional interactive content …

Kate Whitley

INTERACTIVE PRINT

get.layar.com

Download the free Layar App

Scan where you see the Layar logo

crankdbikemag.com In association with:

4

Crank’d Whistler’s Bike Magazine

at Chromag Bikes

Eleven years on the trail with the Whistler-based bike company.

inkbike Events 34 PCalendar 

Find out everything that’s going down this summer.

Up in 24 Gtherowing Saddle 

Whistler kids have an edge in the world of competitive mountain biking.

ocal Buyer’s 36 LGuide 

Support Whistler businesses by shopping local. Check out our selection of shoes, seats, shirts and more.

WRITERS

Chris Armstrong, Seb Kemp, Andrew Mitchell, Vince Shuley, Alison Taylor

Sarah Strother

S  acred Gatherings

Contributors Writers and Photographers

Whistler Publishing LP A division of Glacier Media Group

16

Discover interactive content

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Tim Bardsley-Smith, Todd Hellinga, Justa Jeskova, Reuben Krabbe, Bruno Long, Amy McDermid, Petri Miniotas, Robin O’Neill, Brian Park, Clayton Racicot, Margus Riga, Sean St. Denis, Sam Wiebe, Mitchell Winton/Coast Photo

crankdbikemag

ON THE COVER

Andrew Gunn on a rock roll in the high alpine on Sproatt Mountain. Photo by Reuben Krabbe reubenkrabbe.com

©2014, Glacier Media Group. All rights reserved. All photos are copyright of the credited photographer.

Printed in Canada

Volume 1 / Issue 1 2014


P: Robin ONeill

DEMO CENTRE The Official Demo Centre of the

DEMO BIKES AVAILABLE FROM :

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Carleton Lodge 604.905.2076

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The

Dream Trail

WORCA’s 25-year high alpine ambitions coming true with new Sproatt project By ANDREW MITCHELL

S

PACE MAY BE THE FINAL FRONTIER FOR THE CREW OF THE STARSHIP ENTERPRISE, BUT FOR WHISTLER’S HARD-CHARGING MOUNTAIN BIKE COMMUNITY, THE LAST FRONTIER IS ABOUT 1,200 METRES HIGHER THAN THE VALLEY BOTTOM.

6

Finding a way back into the alpine has been a core goal for local riders for the past 25 years, ever since BC Parks banned mountain bikes on Singing Pass Trail over safety concerns. After years of lobbying and working behind the scenes, it’s finally coming together. This spring, when the province is expected to sign off on the project, work will begin on a new alpine experience on Whistler’s west side, starting and finishing on the Mid Flank Trail. The Whistler Off-Road Cycling Association (WORCA) is working with the Resort Municipality of Whistler, Recreation Sites and Trails B.C., the local chapter of the Alpine Club of Canada and other

Crank’d Whistler’s Bike Magazine

stakeholders to create a roughly 18 kilometre loop to the alpine on Sproatt Mountain that could one day link to a larger alpine trail network.

It’s really the beginning of something that we know could be a lot bigger. JEROME DAVID PRESIDENT, WORCA

As currently planned, the municipality will build the roughly 10km climb to the alpine, while WORCA will build the descent — a “mellow” 8km singletrack ride for intermediate

riders. There will be a loop in the alpine that goes as far as Hanging Lake. WORCA president Jerome David says the project will take about three years to complete. He can’t wait to get started. “It’s super exciting for us as a club, and one of the biggest reasons is the way it’s all coming together,” David says. “It’s been a lot of work to get this far, a lot of discussions — but everybody is working together and wants the same things. “It’s really the beginning of something that we know could be a lot bigger. I know that BC Parks is going to look at the success of this project as an example of how mountain bikers and hikers can co-exist, and

Above: Locals Carlos Zavarce, Chris Johnston, Dave Anderson and Dylan Wolsky on Sproatt Mountain, Whistler. PHOTO BY TODD HELLINGA FLICKR.COM/FLIPFANTASIA Volume 1 / Issue 1 2014


for hours when there’s so much great riding in the valley, David says it’s all about the experience. “Mountain bikers like to go into the alpine for all the same reasons that hikers enjoy it, the same reasons that backcountry

Mountain bikers like to go into the alpine for all the same reasons that hikers enjoy it, the same reasons that backcountry skiers enjoy it. Above: Jinya Nishiwaki dropping in on Sproatt Mountain. PHOTO BY REUBEN KRABBE REUBENKRABBE.COM

how we can manage the impact to the alpine. “As an advocacy group, it’s important to lead the way and show that it can be done.” In the meantime, he’s asking mountain bikers to avoid impacting the alpine area while the trails are being built. As for why mountain bikers would want to climb

JEROME DAVID PRESIDENT, WORCA

skiers enjoy it,” he says. “It’s all about getting outside, getting some exercise, enjoying nature and being in a beautiful area. It’s the views and being in the mountains.” To get the still unnamed trail built, the municipality

plans to contribute most of its $250,000 trail budget for this year, plus additional funds over the next two years. The municipality has committed a quarter of a million dollars every year from 2013-2017 to fix up existing alpine trails and build a few new ones. Most of last year’s funding was reinvested into trails such as the Flank Trail, Blueberry Trail, Crater Rim Trail, Rainbow Loop Trail and Rainbow Trail. Mayor Nancy WilhelmMorden emphasizes that the new trail will be open to hikers as well, and says the current council has identified the trail work as a priority. “Whistler has some incredible alpine terrain, but the reality is that over the years the trails have become somewhat dilapidated,” she says, adding that a world-class mountain resort should have world-class alpine trails.

Clipped out: Alpine Trail Location

Sproatt Mountain

Trail Head

Mid Flank Trail

Skill Level

Intermediate

Stats

18Km Loop 10Km Climb / 8KM Descent

Estimated Completion Date Spring 2017

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Volume 1 / Issue 1 2014 Crank’d

Whistler’s Bike Magazine

7


Hundreds turn out every week for the Thursday night WORCA Toonie races, which include a well-deserved postrace dinner and beer, all for the price of a Toonie.

Clipped out: Who is WORCA?

PHOTO BY SEAN ST. DENIS SEANSTDENISPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

The Whistler Off-Road Cycling Association has grown from the first 15 members in 1989 to more than 1,800 in the past two seasons. WORCA also does a lot more these days than advocate for trails and a route back into the alpine.

WORCA will be using its annual trail budget, about $67,000 this year, to get the work started on the descent. They have also applied for grants and will be hosting fundraisers over the summer as the club celebrates its 25th anniversary. As well, WORCA will be leveraging its massive membership to put hundreds, and maybe even thousands, of volunteer hours into the build.

From April to October, the club hosts dozens of races and events, puts on clinics and week-long summer camps for youth as young as six, supports the Whistler Secondary high school team, and maintains and builds trails with a combination of paid and volunteer labour. They also help people get into the sport through the annual WORCA Bike Swap every spring, and the beginner-friendly Monday Night Rides that run through the summer.

It’s going to be a hefty ride, but for a long time this has been something that’s been lacking here – the fact that there’s no alpine access for mountain bikes.

For more on WORCA, visit www.worca.com.

Scan this page with to watch a promo video about WORCA 8

Jinya Nishiwaki and Andrew Gunn riding high alpine trails on Sproatt Mountain, Whistler.

CHARLIE DOYLE FOUNDING MEMBER, WORCA

PHOTO BY REUBEN KRABBE REUBENKRABBE.COM

Crank’d Whistler’s Bike Magazine

For Charlie Doyle, a founding member of

WORCA, it’s a case of “better late than never.” “Any trail to the alpine is a good trail,” he laughs. “It’s going to be a hefty ride, but for a long time this has been something that’s been lacking here — the fact that there’s no alpine access for mountain bikes. “When you consider that we’re a mountain resort, it just seems like a no-brainer.” While a return to Singing Pass was the original goal when WORCA was established, Doyle says the new location won’t disappoint. “The area up there is beautiful, and there are some beautiful meadows. It will be worth the climb.” There’s no question that a lot has happened in the two-and-a-half decades since steel-framed mountain bikes with twoinch tires, caliper brakes and forks with three inches of travel — if you were lucky — were banned on Singing Pass. Volume 1 / Issue 1 2014


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Adam Billinghurst and Jimmy Pollard on Sproatt Mountain, Whistler. PHOTO BY TODD HELLINGA FLICKR.COM/FLIPFANTASIA

For one thing, the once renegade sport of mountain biking has become mainstream. Olympic. A wholesome family activity on par with cross-country skiing. More teens at Whistler Secondary School are racing mountain bikes in the North Shore League

than participating in other school sports, with the exception of soccer. The trail network has also grown over the last 25 years. Whistler’s forests and mountainsides are lined with hundreds of kilometres of singletrack trails, most of them built by volunteers. The Whistler

Mountain Bike Park has also exploded in size and popularity, with the park adding its own alpine descent — Top of the World — to the mix in 2012. WORCA itself has grown from the first 15 members in 1989 to more than 1,800 members over each of the past two years. If WORCA

Trail Pass Whistler’s world-class network of mountain bike trails is enjoyed by thousands of local and visiting riders every year.

isn’t the largest mountain bike club in the world, then it’s definitely the largest per capita. Whistler’s international reputation as a mountain bike destination has grown by leaps and bounds, and Crankworx Whistler is the biggest mountain bike festival in the world.

There hasn’t been a recent study of the economic impact of the sport, but a 2006 report suggested that mountain biking was already an almost $40 million industry for Sea to Sky — and the sport has grown hugely since then. David says he expects the new trail will be instantly popular with both visitors and locals as soon as it’s ready to ride. “I’ve hiked up there (scouting routes) and I can tell you that there’s a great view of Black Tusk, and a different view of Whistler and Blackcomb than you can see from anywhere else. The alpine is really nice. I know this trail will be as spectacular as anything else that’s out there.”

Whistler’s BEST EQUIPPED bike shop Expert KNOWLEDGEABLE staff In-house CNC MILLING for bespoke or hard to find parts

The Whistler Off Road Cycling Association (WORCA) has been involved in mountain biking stewardship in the Whistler Valley for 25 years. The organization employs professional trail builders to ensure trails are built and maintained to the highest environmental standards. Help support local trails by purchasing the WORCA Trail Pass. All funding from the trail pass goes directly towards WORCA’s trail program.

Scan this ad with to purchase a trail pass

Display the trail pass sticker on your BIKE or HELMET to show your contribution

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Cool A/C in the heat of summer Whistlers newest patio opening July 1st

Full Keg menu nightly after 5pm

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Whistler’s Bike Magazine

11


grow local road riding Members flock to new Whistler club and get ready to hit the road By ALISON TAYLOR

Cyclists cruise past Black Tusk, one of the perks of riding the road in Sea to Sky country. PHOTO BY MITCHELL WINTON COASTPHOTO.COM

I

F FIRST-DAY TURNOUT IS ANYTHING TO GO BY, THE WHISTLER CYCLING CLUB IS SETTING UP FOR A FUTURE OF HUGE SUCCESS.

12

Inaugural club president Frank Savage had hoped to entice 20 fellow road riders to the first club meeting this winter; more than 70 showed up in a groundswell of support for Whistler’s newest club. Consider just over a dozen mountain bikers came to the first Whistler Off Road Cycling Association 25 years ago; last year WORCA logged 1,800 members. The future of road riding in Whistler is looking bright. “We were just blown away by the response,” says Savage. “It obviously shows there’s the interest out there.” It used to be there was just Tony Routley out there!

Crank’d Whistler’s Bike Magazine

That was more than a decade ago. “There was nobody on the road,” says Routley.

We were just blown away by the response. It obviously shows there’s the interest out there. FRANK SAVAGE PRESIDENT, WHISTLER CYCLING CLUB

Not long after, there was father and son — Will Routley riding his dad’s coattails and then… Well, the younger Routley is now a national road champion. But that’s another story. Things have come a long way since it was the

Routleys’ road. Nowadays, on sunny summer afternoons, there can be dozens if not hundreds of road riders travelling the Sea to Sky Highway. In a few short years road riding has exploded onto the Whistler scene, and for a bike-crazed community keen on all things cycling — commuting, hitting the bike park, cross country mountain biking, and now road riding — that only spells good news for the future. They’re flocking here for a number of reasons but don’t doubt the impact that two new events in particular have had on the road riding scene —

first the RBC GranFondo Whistler, then Ironman. “If you take a look back to 2010 (the first year of the GranFondo Whistler), most road cycling was all positioned around people watching the Tour de France and Lance Armstrong,” says GranFondo co-founder Neil McKinnon. “Nobody really participated in it. “The beauty of what the RBC GranFondo Whistler has been and, I think its legacy will prove, is that it was that event that got people off the couch and on the bike.” And its impacts were right there for all to see — on training rides up and down the highway that year, and at the event itself. Volume 1 / Issue 1 2014


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Clipped Out: Riding the Road T here’s more than just a north/south highway to ride in Whistler. Go beyond the obvious. Here are three road routes not to miss!

Some Routes

1 Ironman Canada Route Test your metal on the 180 km route and keep in mind, this is just ONE leg of Ironman. Throw in a swim and a marathon on either side of this road ride to call yourself an Ironman. The journey begins at Rainbow Park in Whistler. Ride north out of the park on Alta Lake Rd to Hwy 99. Turn south before going west up to Whistler Olympic Park. Go back down to the highway and turn north to Pemberton, along the out-and-back section on Pemberton Meadows Rd. before heading back to Whistler Village. You’ve just done 180 km in length, with 2,632 metres of accumulated elevation gain and 2,624 metres of accumulated elevation loss. You can call yourself an Ironman, in your own mind!

2 Tour de Whistler

3 GranFondo Whistler

Do it the way the locals do it… if you feel like some hills climbs. This ride takes in a loop of the valley with nine big climbs. From the village head north to Alpine and then Alta Lake Rd. Climb to the top of Stonebridge. Descend to Alta Lake Rd. and head across the highway to climb through Bayshores and Kadenwood. Head back to the village but don’t forget Bear Ridge, Taluswood, Panorama Ridge, Base 2 and up Painted Cliff Rd. You’ve just done 52 km with 1,300 metres of accumulation elevation gain. You can call yourself a local.

It begins in downtown Vancouver and takes you along the majestic Sea to Sky Highway to Whistler. You’ve just done 122 km with the start and mid-point at sea level. Most of the 1,700 metres of total elevation gain comes after Squamish. You can count yourself among the thousands who have tackled this iconic ride. Or, be a contrarian and do it in reverse. With the elevation decline, it’s a slightly easier challenge.

122KM 52KM

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In its second year, 7,000 riders participated. Whistler’s GranFondo remains one of the biggest road rides in North America. “It was the catalyst in North America that really got the ball rolling on road cycling,” adds McKinnon. “The story of road cycling, to a big extent in North America, starts with the RBC GranFondo Whistler.” Talk about tapping into something big. McKinnon maintains that Ironman would have been hard pressed to come here had GranFondo not paved the way — proving that road riding was viable in Whistler. Last year’s inaugural Ironman in Whistler brought thousands more riders to the local roads, this time training for the 180 kilometres riding portion of the event that took riders south to the Callaghan Valley climb, north to Pemberton and back to Whistler.

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The other factor playing a major role in this shift from the trails to the roads are the changing demographics. Savage is perhaps the quintessential Whistler road rider. He used to be a mountain biker but, as he got older, the more he started to think twice about that sport. “With aging knees and injuries and all those sorts of things, I’ve just found road biking easier and it just works better for me,” says Savage, who rides between 200 to 250 kms per week in the summer. Take the typical GranFondo rider: male, 47 years old, with a family, and a household income above $150,000. This is right up Whistler’s alley as it establishes the resort as a family-friendly, safe, active, and fun destination for all ages. Events like GranFondo and Ironman are bringing millions into the local

economy. Needless to say, Whistler is welcoming road riders with open arms, and embracing this organic growth.

The story of road cycling, to a big extent in North America, starts with the RBC GranFondo Whistler. NEIL MCKINNON CO-FOUNDER, RBC GRANFONDO WHISTLER

This is the backdrop for the new Whistler Cycling Club, which will be hosting regular weekly Tuesday night rides and Sunday rides twice per month this summer. The regular club rides will include groups based on riding ability and there is a plan to help “emerging riders,” those who lack the

skills and the experience of riding in a group. Safety is paramount. “Educating cyclists, and motorists, is a huge need and challenge,” says Savage. “We are trying to do our part.” The other key is advocating for the safety of the road infrastructure. Admittedly, that has improved in recent years after $600 million in highway upgrades before the 2010 Olympic Games, but there is still a long way to go, particularly between Whistler and Pemberton, where cyclists must cross the white fog line and ride on the highway for short periods because of things like pavement cracks. With a larger cohesive voice in an organized club however, road riders are set to be a growing force to be reckoned with in Whistler, giving even more reason to fill in those roadway cracks… and then some.

Clipped Out: Sharing the road Safety is a two way street on the road. Both cyclists and drivers need to understand and respect the rules of the road. “From a cyclists standpoint, we need to sharpen up and we need to abide by the rules of the road,” says Tony Routley. “And the rules of the road are the same as an automobile. Blowing through a red light is not kosher.” On the other hand, drivers are still aggressive out there.

So consider … CYCLISTS

• Ride single file • Follow traffic direction • Be predictable • Be visible • Use hand signals • Use shoulder area

DRIVERS

• Pass carefully • Turn cautiously • Make safety your priority • Give as much room as Safely possible when passing

“Pushing them (cyclists) off the road, which has happened to me numerous times, is not safe or legal,” he says. This is scary stuff, he adds. “Until it happens to you, you can’t really understand.”

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Volume 1 / Issue 1 2014 Crank’d

Whistler’s Bike Magazine

15


Sacred Gatherings on Chromag bikes

Ian Ritz, founder and owner of Chromag Bikes and Evolution Whistler. PHOTO BY ROBIN O’NEILL ROBINONEILLPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

Eleven years on the trail with the Whistler based bike company By SEB KEMP

C

HROMAG OWNERS ARE CHROMAG RIDERS.

16

Never is this more apparent than at the annual Show and Shine, the Chromag sponsored Toonie ride held at the company HQ in Function Junction each summer. Chromag riders come together to show off their custom painted machines, to beam with pride at their bikes’ adaptability, or to dress their bike up in costume, just for laughs. Here you get a taste of the Chromag rider; their bikes have been ridden way past the point where the rubber still gleams and the cables are slick, and you realize: this is something far more than just a bike. After years of admiring

Crank’d Whistler’s Bike Magazine

Chromag products, last year I finally pulled the trigger and made a matte green Stylus model my own, but throughout those years of arm’s length appreciation what really fascinated me was the folklore surrounding some of Chromag’s frontline riders. I’d see Ian Ritz, Julian Hine, Sean Dinwoodie, Kevin Phelps and Jinya Nishiwaki out on the trails and immediately knew they were genuine, lifelong mountain bikers. I wanted to be a part of it. Mountain biking has fast become a technological arms race caught up in the rhetoric of marketers and engineers, while the

poems of experience are overlooked. Chromag, however, has always been about more than the sum of the parts it produces.

The people I work with I ride with so we spend a lot of time talking about the business from the perspective of being on a ride. IAN RITZ OWNER, CHROMAG BIKES

“The people I work with I ride with so we spend a lot of time talking

about the business from the perspective of being on a ride,” says Ritz. “It’s crucial to our business to reevaluate our products in this way.” When Ritz founded the legendary Evolution Whistler bike, board and ski shop in 1994, the local trails were just as wild as they are today and there was a growing community of trailblazing hooligans pushing their limits. “It was much the same as it is now, in the sense that there was a core riding community that was really progressive — people were riding gnarly trails everyday,” recalls Ritz. “In terms of feedback, people Volume 1 / Issue 1 2014


Bikes and components designed and made in Whistler, BC since 2003. Born from a passion for mountain biking, inspired by the terrain and people of Whistler.

1208 Alpha Lake Road. Mon-Thurs 9-5. Fridays gone riding. www.chromagbikes.com


Above: Show and Shine, one of Chromag’s annual events for owners.

It was much the same as it is now, in the sense that there was a core riding community that was really progressive — people were riding gnarly trails everyday.

PHOTOS COURTESY CHROMAG CHROMAGBIKES.COM

Above Right and Right: Chromag’s products include parts and apparel.

IAN RITZ OWNER, CHROMAG BIKES

PHOTOS BY ROBIN O’NEILL ROBINONEILLPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

to ride with and miles put on bikes, Whistler was a great place to be.” Bike products, however, weren’t keeping pace. Whistler trails then, just as they do today, consisted of relentless climbs and steep, rocky, rooty descents, spiced with all kinds of burly moves that require power and finesse in equal measures. This predated fullsuspension, hydraulic brakes, dropper posts and all of the other clever technological wizardry we take for granted these days. By the early 2000s 18

full-suspension bikes were being developed but they were expensive and unreliable, and hardtails were relegated to lightweight XC racing duties; neither type of bike was appropriate for the kinds of abuse that riders could put them through locally. Ritz, looking for a solid, dependable, versatile bike that he could ride uphill and then down — in much the same vein as a full-suspension downhill — opted to try and build his own frame. At the time he and a group of friends were living in an old, cedar shingle house on a rock bluff in the Emerald neighbourhood of Whistler. It had a big kitchen with a long table around which the six residents (mainly of Evolution employees) and their friends gathered each night to cook and share

Crank’d Whistler’s Bike Magazine

dinner. When Ritz came to build his own frame, he sat at this table studying the geometries and features of numerous frames, soliciting insight from the household and configuring the shape and character of his own dream ride. He produced a one-to-one diagram of the bike, and somewhat fortuitously he was put in contact with Squamish-based welder, Mike Truelove. For 15 years Truelove had worked for Paul Brodie, probably one of the most innovative frame builders in B.C. and originator of many design features that we take for granted these days.

The frame they produced had beefy dropouts, disc brakes, good tire clearance and geometry with a bias towards descending and corrected for front suspension. Close friends saw this bike and wanted one, so the next spring eight more were welded and sold right away. Twelve more were produced and they sold just as fast. It was then, around 2003, that Ritz took this part-time pastime and made it a fullfledged business. Now in its eleventh year, the Chromag product lineup has expanded considerably. It offers

nine types of steel hardtail frames (developed from friends asking for modified designs to the original that would suit their specific needs and cater to the growing number of niches within mountain biking), as well as a bounty of components, all of which are designed by Ritz himself. There are also licensing deals with SRAM, one of the world’s biggest bicycle component manufacturers, and a collaborative line of components with Whistler local and Freeride Mountain Bike World Tour overall champion, Brandon Semenuk. Volume 1 / Issue 1 2014


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This ride is a sacred gathering; where riding and friendship is combined. The Chromag Team at their Function Junction HQ. Left to right: Sean Dinwoodie, Rebecca Ritz, Ian Ritz, Julian Hine and Cookie Losee.

IAN RITZ OWNER, CHROMAG BIKES

Semenuk grew up just a few houses down the street from the Evolution house. Ritz and Jennie Bourbonnais (the other owner of Evolution) started helping Semenuk out when he was 7 years old, racing cross-country. Now Semenuk is as much a part of the family tree as the clawing bear insignia that distinguishes the brand. “Chromag has some of the best products out

PHOTO BY ROBIN O’NEILL ROBINONEILLPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

there, plain and simple,” says Semenuk. “Ian Ritz’s attention to detail well exceeds what’s necessary, (and) I think this is why the brand is so strong, along with the tight crew at Chromag that keeps the ship moving… Chromag’s brand has this tight knit family vibe and I think people connect with this.” The Chromag clan is inclusive and welcoming to anyone who shares the joy

of seeking smiles upon two wheels. Each Friday Ritz shuts the company doors, puts the phone on hold and goes out to ride bikes. This has happened every week for eight years now, even though there’s a business to run. Ritz justifies this not-for-profit imperative thus: “This ride is a sacred gathering; where riding and friendship is combined.” He wasn’t trying to sell me anything but I was sold.

Chromag has some of the best products out there, plain and simple. BRANDON SEMENUK CHROMAG SPONSORED RIDER

PHOTO COURTESY CHROMAGBIKES.COM

fineline bike shop 3-1040 millar creek road www.finelinewhistler.net

22

Crank’d Whistler’s Bike Magazine

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Jesse Melamed Whistler kids have an edge in the world of competitive mountain biking By VINCE SHULEY

I

F YOU’VE SPENT ANY TIME ON TRAILS IN WHISTLER, YOU’VE LIKELY WONDERED WHAT IT WOULD BE LIKE TO GROW UP HERE SURROUNDED BY THE WORLD’S PREMIER BIKE PARK IN A VALLEY FILLED WITH SINGLETRACK FROM END TO END. Consider, for a second, if you had started riding here when you were five years old, instead of 25 like the rest of us. For the kids who grew up here, having the mountain bike Mecca in their own backyard, surrounded by an all-embracing mountain biking culture, is giving them the competitive edge.

24

Crank’d Whistler’s Bike Magazine

“I think my first race was when I was three years old, it was a (criterium) around Whistler Village and I’ve been racing ever since,” says Jesse Melamed, 22, who now competes in the Enduro World Series (EWS).

When enduro came around it was the perfect format … It’s the most fun form of mountain biking in my opinion. JESSE MELAMED

Like a lot of Whistler youth, Melamed’s parents were heavily into outdoor recreation and would spend summer weekend’s road tripping around the province following the BC Cup series. Melamed quickly rose through the ranks as a teenager and was soon scoring consistent podiums in XC racing. “For me it was the only racing I wanted to do,

downhill was just too fast and I was too scared to do it,” says Melamed. “So I suffered up the climbs so I could have fun on the downhills. When enduro came around it was the perfect format because I could go at an easier pace uphill and just rip the downhills. It’s the most fun form of mountain biking in my opinion.” After placing sixth in the Pro Men category at last year’s Crankworx EWS stop, Melamed was invited by his sponsors to attend the EWS final in Finale Ligure, Italy. His result was hampered by a crash that separated his shoulder, but he found the experience of racing against a 600-strong field of competitors was still worth the trip. “(The Finale course) was super rugged and raw, but luckily Whistler has a lot of that so it wasn’t too much of a surprise for me,” he says. “I was super stoked to be there, it amped me up so I was just went out and had fun.” Volume 1 / Issue 1 2014


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Whistler’s Bike Magazine

25


PHOTO SUBMITTED

PHOTO BY CLAYTON RACICOT CLAYTONRACICOT.COM

PHOTO BY MARGUS RIGA MARGUSRIGA.COM

Nick Geddes The lure of enduro has courted mountain bikers from both the XC and downhill end of the riding spectrum. Nick Geddes, 20, has been racing downhill for six years and is making the switch to enduro for the 2014 season. After being provided an all-mountain bike by his sponsor Norco, the progression towards enduro came naturally. “I used to just have a XC and downhill bike and I started riding that inbetweener bike more and more,” says Geddes. “It suited me because I have raced XC in the past and I do race downhill, and it’s a mixture of both. Up steep climbs for good descent is what I was enjoying the most. I was 26

having so much more fun on that all-mountain bike than I was on my downhill bike.” Geddes’ family had been coming to Whistler on the weekends for years but made the permanent move in 2009. The transition from an academic-focused private school in Vancouver to the sport-friendly Whistler Secondary school was an instant boost for Geddes.

In Vancouver I would have to beg and plead my way to get a week off school just so I could go race. NICK GEDDES

“The high school in Whistler is unbelievably supportive of all athletic endeavours on any level,

Crank’d Whistler’s Bike Magazine

you can see that from the athletes that come out of the school,” he says. “In Vancouver I would have to beg and plead my way to get a week off school just so I could go race. In Whistler they would be accommodating, they understood there was something bigger going on than Grade 12 math or whatever.” Juggling academia with a race schedule is challenging, but both Geddes and Melamed have managed it into their university years. “Over this winter it’s been pretty tough, I actually dropped a few courses and extended my degree to five years just so I can train more,” says Melamed, who is studying software engineering at UBC. “For racing I’ve had to get some special exceptions from my profs to move midterms and finals around so I can make my races.” In order to make the first EWS in Chile last April, Melamed had to fly out two hours after one exam, fly back to Vancouver two hours before another exam and postpone one exam entirely. It’s a hectic schedule, but a necessary one in order to attain a university education and still race at an international level.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Jennifer McTavish Convincing profs to reschedule exams is one hurdle Jennifer McTavish has yet to be faced with. The 17-year-old Whistler Secondary School student is in her graduation year and has big plans to break into national level XC.

My really big goal this year is to be U19 national champion at the nationals race in Ontario. JENNIFER MCTAVISH

“My really big goal this year is to be U19 national champion at the nationals race in Ontario,” says McTavish. “I haven’t raced against the girls that will be competing there, which does make it kind of

interesting, but I think if I put in as much effort as I can into my training, I can accomplish that goal.” A frequent participant in the weekly Toonie races put on by the Whistler Off Road Cycling Association (WORCA), McTavish can be found near the front of the pack on the heels of some of Whistler’s female mountain bike veterans. “Toonie races are one of the best things to do for training,” she says. “You can mock a race for training but that’s an actual race. “The older female riders are faster than I am, but they give me someone to chase. My coach says it’s better to be the fox than to be the rabbit.” Blessed with an upbringing in Whistler, the next generation of local competitors are training hard to take on the rest of Canada and the world. Unfair advantage? Possibly. Recipe for success? Definitely. Volume 1 / Issue 1 2014


PHOTO BY SAM WIEBE COURTESY OPTUMPROCYCLING.COM

Will Routley The popularity of road cycling in Whistler pales in comparison to that of mountain biking, but there is still a dedicated group of individuals who prefer to spin wheels on the pavement rather than the dirt. Take 30-year-old Will Routley. After mountain biking with his father Tony for most of his life, and working his way up to the national XC team, Routley was looking for a reliable racing career and decided to switch to road at age 21. “I wanted to be a professional cyclist and

It only took one season to realize that that’s where I was meant to be. WILL ROUTLEY

(road cycling) is an infinitely larger sport internationally,” he explains. “Back then I was training on the road (in) preparation for mountain biking and it opened my eyes.” Routley’s coach at the time was involved with Symmetrics, a young Canadian start up road team and the young Whistlerite was invited to train with them during his off-season. “It only took one season to realize that that’s where

I was meant to be,” says Routley. “I also really like the tactical side of it and I started to realize I was more suited to road than mountain biking from a competition standpoint.” There are two chief reasons why Whistler only has a handful of youths getting into the road discipline; first, there aren’t very many roads and the ones that are suitable for longer rides, such as Highway 99, Alta Lake Road and Olympic Road in the Callaghan, are all busy with traffic most days of the week. The second reason is that professional cyclists in the Pacific Northwest tend to migrate to road and track disciplines after years of racing mountain bikes in junior divisions. “That’s sort of a typical trajectory on the west coast, but in the rest of the country and in the States everyone is on road bikes,” says Routley. But as much as he prefers the dynamics of road racing and the potential to make a professional career from the sport, Routley still finds time to ride his mountain bike for fun. “For me, mountain biking is an activity whereas road is my profession,” he says. “I don’t miss mountain bike racing per se, but I definitely want to ride my mountain bike for as long as I live.”

Volume 1 / Issue 1 2014 Crank’d

Whistler’s Bike Magazine

27


Chasing

the dirt

Seasons Chris Kovarik and Claire Buchar follow the endless summer. By ALISON TAYLOR

S

AME KIND OF STORY. HEATWAVE, 35-PLUS DEGREES, BUT DIDN’T SEEM AS BAD AS TOOWOOMBA FOR SOME REASON. MAYBE HAVING THE LAKE CLOSE BY HELPED A BIT, COOLER AIR OFF THE WATER? WE DID GET A NICE BREEZE FROM TIME TO TIME TOO, WHICH WAS SOME RELIEF. EITHER WAY, TRAILS WERE DRY, DUSTY, BLOWN OUT AND SLIDY. MADE FOR SOME SCARY MOMENTS AND ALSO SOME GOOD FUN.”

CLAIRE BUCHAR WWW.KOVARIKRACING.COM

 can this page S with to watch videos of Claire and Chris 28

That’s one way to spend a Whistler winter — hitting up select enduro and downhill races in Australia, like the SEQ Gravity Enduro Mt. Joyce before heading back to summer in the northern hemisphere for more of the same. Following the dirt seasons, chasing the thrill of the ride, coaching on the side to help pay the bills. The endless summer. Crank’d caught up with Claire Buchar and Chris Kovarik in the middle of their Australian summer. Some would say Kovarik and Buchar — one of fastest couples on two wheels — have it dialed. A rock-star life carved out on their bikes. Others would say: grow up, get a real job, buy a

Crank’d Whistler’s Bike Magazine

house, have kids, settle down. “They don’t understand what we really do and the responsibilities we have,” says Kovarik. “We are grown up, we do have important jobs and we’ll get there with the rest when it fits into our lives.” In the meantime, life is all about Kovarik Racing, their business — an endeavour that spans all aspects of their riding life, from racing and coaching, to rider development and being sport ambassadors. “We have a lot of experience, knowledge, stories, love for the sport and inspiration to share,” says Buchar. “And gaining more of these things still every day.”

Life sounds… sublime, racing against the clock, shaving off seconds, doing it with your best friend. And it is.

We have a lot of experience, knowledge, stories, love for the sport and inspiration to share, And gaining more of these things still every day. CLAIRE BUCHAR

But don’t be fooled — this is not easy. Kovarik and Buchar are carving out a niche in the highly competitive world of mountain biking,

trying to stay relevant and current in a sport they are passionate about. Kovarik, an Australian, is the record holder for the largest win margin in World Cup Pro Men history; Buchar is an 11time Canadian National Team Member, a World Championships bronze medallist. They capped off their time in Australia at the World Cup in Cairns, April 25 – 27. Cairns didn’t go quite as planned but the thrill of the ride still never gets old. Crank’d: How was the World Cup? Claire Buchar: It was such a great atmosphere up in Cairns and that’s Volume 1 / Issue 1 2014


Previous Page: Claire Buchar taking in the views from the Top of the World trail on Whistler Mountain. PHOTO BY SEAN ST. DENIS SEANSTDENISPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

Right: Chris Kovarik riding high on a wooden wall ride near his hometown in Australia. PHOTO BY TIM BARDSLEY-SMITH TBSPHOTOGRAPHY.COM.AU COURTESY INTENSE CYCLES

Right: Claire Buchar and Chris Kovarik take a break between practice laps at the 2014 UCI World Cup in Cairns. PHOTO BY PETRI MINIOTAS PETRIFILMS.COM

what made it a rad weekend. I didn’t perform how I wanted to, I don’t think most racers did. The weather we had made for the toughest race conditions I’ve ever experienced. Despite this, I was riding really well until I had a big crash in qualifying. I barely remember getting down the hill, I was just in robot mode. I knew the clock was ticking and that was it. I flared up a bunch of injuries and was sore and fuzzy headed for race day. Wasn’t sure how I’d go but I just wanted to be a part if it, the energy was awesome. My race run was a mess, as most peoples were, and I stopped counting after crash four. So I’m obviously disappointed. Sure 10th is great but it’s not the time or performance I was after. Chris Kovarik: Every rider will have a story about their Cairns World Cup experience that’s for sure. I finished 31st after a run off the track, the conditions were pretty insane, one slightly wrong line and it was over. And sometimes there just wasn’t a right line to take. Glad to at least have the fastest speed trap so I know I was going fast somewhere! Crank’d: What is it about Whistler that keeps you coming back? CB: I grew up in North Vancouver and I’ve been shredding up these snowy slopes since I was two years old. I followed my older brother and moved up here straight after I was

finished school, so Whistler is very much my home. My family and friends are here, my community. And, of course, Chris is part of that. We love the healthy lifestyle, the access to the best riding out there and just living on nature’s doorstep. So, yes, the bike park, trails and backcountry are the reasons why we keep coming back — but Whistler is so much more than that to us. Crank’d: How do you make a life like this — following the dirt seasons? Chris Kovarik: Training and racing is not our only job. We aren’t on a big world-cup team and we don’t have the monetary backing to be on the World Cup circuit. And these days, with the level of competition, to travel and get a result at a World Cup without that premium support

is extremely difficult. We still get to whatever big races we can fit into our budget, but we’ve had to adjust our goals a little bit. We have had to turn our focus and energy to other things such as coaching, media projects, and being brand ambassadors to stay within this industry we are so passionate

about. When that is slow, we have regular jobs to fill in the gaps. It takes a lot of creativity, hard work, commitment. A lot of responsibility, business and management. But when you can be a part of a company’s success or be an influence in someone’s life by being on your bike, then it’s worth it.

Evolution Whistler, home of Whistler’s Bike Culture home of Whistler’s Best Bike Rentals (Santa Cruz & GT) home of Whistler’s Best Service 604-932-2967 evolutionwhistler.com home of the World’s Best Shop Team! fb.com/evolutionwhistler

Brandon Semenuk

Claire Buchar

Finn Finestone

Thomas Vanderham Matt Hunter

Ian Morrison

Katrina Strand photo credits: visit evolutionwhistler.com

Volume 1 / Issue 1 2014 Crank’d

Whistler’s Bike Magazine

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… you can’t let results become the commentary on who you are. CLAIRE BUCHAR

Chris Kovarik hits a wall ride (above left) while Claire Buchar tackles a rock roll (above right) in Whistler. The couple were part of Bruno Long’s riding team during shooting for the Deep Summer Photo Challenge at Crankworx 2013. PHOTOS BY BRUNO LONG BRUNOLONG.COM

Crank’d: What’s it like travelling/racing with your husband/wife? CK: I guess, as husband and wife, we are already a team. So we work well together. It’s great for us to travel and race together, but it can be a challenge, as in all team situations or relationships, when we’re not on the same page. CB: It’s pretty rad that we can do this stuff together: work, train, ride, travel, race, adventure. It just takes balance. We both have other interests that keep us independent from each other as well. Crank’d: What does it feel like when you see Claire having a bad race, and vice versa? CK: I always want her to do well because I know her story and I know she has what it takes to do well. But you can’t get too wrapped up in it, and you can’t internalize it or it can become destructive. CB: It’s hard. Especially when you travel a long way to be there. And Chris has had some ups and 30

down the last couple years. He seems to either nail it or blow something up. But you can’t let results become the commentary on who you are.

But you can’t get too wrapped up in it, and you can’t internalize it or it can become destructive. CHRIS KOVARIK

Crank’d: Describe your perfect Whistler day on your bike. CB: Maybe a few quiet laps of the bike park after a bit of rain on a mid-week, sunny morning, stop in at Evolution for a break, hop on the trail bikes and get lost up the Flank for a while, then meet up with my brother and his dog at the lake. Head to the Dubh Linn (Gate Irish Pub) for some good food and a few beers, or have a backyard bonfire. All spent with close friends Katrina Strand and Sarah

Crank’d Whistler’s Bike Magazine

Leishman, Dylan Forbes and the boys, Kenny Smith, Billinghurst, maybe a bit of Ian Morrison. Then just whomever you pick up along the way. That’s a pretty perfect day. CK: Train laps down Bear Cub with the crew. All day. Then the rest of the above. Crank’d: To all those potential athletes pushing to be the best in Whistler, what’s your advice for success? CB: Don’t just be a result on a piece of paper — build your athlete brand. Work towards being a wellrounded athlete and being of value to a potential sponsor. Work ethic, talent, personality, getting noticed in the media and getting race/competition results. Crank’d: What are the biggest challenges to being successful at this life? CK: Juggling all the different jobs and expectations while making a living. CB: Sacrificing some of our personal racing goals is really hard because racing is our passion; it’s our

roots in this sport. We race for fun and try our best no matter what because we love it and can’t stay away from it. But it’s hard showing up at a World Cup and knowing inside that you have the potential, but it can’t be fully realized because you have so much else on the go and we can’t fully focus on racing. Crank’d: What does the future hold for Kovarik Racing? CB: It would be great to be able to grow to the point where we can focus solely on Kovarik Racing. Get ourselves set up enough to have a solid platform from which we can run the best riderdevelopment program and rider-development team in this part of the world. Help bridge that gap between local, regional, and national riders to worldlevel rider. Keep feeding the sport with talent, and keep inspiring young and old, (people) of all ages and abilities to ride. And, maybe reach a few more personal goals.

Clipped out: Kovarik Racing Kovarik Racing is a progression of Chris and Claire’s riding careers, offering courses in racing, coaching and rider development. Visit the Kovarik Racing website to learn more about the clinics and programs. Follow Kovarik Racing on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to stay up-to-date.

kovarikracing.com

Volume 1 / Issue 1 2014


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Volume 1 / Issue 1 2014 Crank’d

Whistler’s Bike Magazine

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More women in the bike park than ever before Women’s only nights are a growing business By CHRIS ARMSTRONG

E

VERY CHAIR HEADING UP WHISTLER MOUNTAIN LAST SUMMER, MOUNTAIN BIKES DANGLING FROM BEHIND, HAD A WOMAN ON IT READY TO RIP DOWN THE MOUNTAIN.

32

Just look at the stats: over the last two years female ridership in the park has grown by nine per cent, to finish out at a record 28 per cent in 2013. That’s more than a quarter of all park riders – one on every chair lift. Women are a growing force to be reckoned with at the Whistler Mountain Bike Park. “I’ve seen it go from me being one of the only girls… to being in a line up with about 30 per cent of us,” says Bethany Parsons, who knows the park like the back of her hand, spending her summer there as patrol. She’s also the first female coach for the Camp of Champions. Things have come a long way since Parsons started riding. Several years ago industry insiders noticed that women were taking

Crank’d Whistler’s Bike Magazine

an active interest in gravity fed riding; they knew it wasn’t just going to be a passing fad. They put on their thinking caps and started to design products with women in mind. Next thing you know, there were long travel bikes that didn’t consist of shrunken frames, pink paint and flower graphics.

I’ve seen it go from me being one of the only girls… to being in a line up with about 30 per cent of us. BETHANY PARSONS COACH, CAMP OF CHAMPIONS

Bikes were built that made downhill riding for women fun. “Companies like Scott Bikes and their line of

women’s specific models, and Raceface being a huge supporter of women in DH riding, have always pushed to feature women in their videos and ads,” adds Parsons. “It makes a big difference because women start to see all kinds of riding styles that they are capable of.” No doubt the emergence of bikes specifically designed for the female demographic made getting into the park easier and more fun, but Whistler Blackcomb deserves some serious kudos too for taking the lead in creating women’s nights and the affordable package price for bike and gear rental, lesson and lift ticket. Obviously

it was what the market wanted: Whistler Blackcomb reports that participation in women’s nights increased by over 8 per cent in 2013. “I would have to say that the Women’s Wednesdays were a huge part of it (the growth in women mountain biking), and they got so big they had to make a Women’s Monday too,” says Parsons. Whistler Blackcomb has also spent considerable time and energy to develop new trails that are designed for the beginner to intermediate rider. Long gone are the days of being sent down runs that get overwhelming, quickly. There’s a trail for every rider up there. Volume 1 / Issue 1 2014


Previous Page (Main): Women getting ready to drop into Top of the World in Whistler Mountain Bike Park.

Clipped out: Women’s Nights

PHOTO BY SEAN ST. DENIS SEANSTDENISPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

Location

Whistler Mountain Bike Park

Previous Page (Inset): Sarah Leishman competing in one of last year’s Phat Wednesday DH races.

Skill Level

Beginner to Advanced

PHOTO BY JUSTA JESKOVA JUSTAJESKOVA.COM

Times

Mondays & Wednesdays 5:30 - 7:30PM

Right: Women’s Nights in Whistler Mountain Bike Park. PHOTO BY AMY MCDERMID AMYJMCDERMID.WORDPRESS.COM

Dates Sylvie Allen knows a couple things about the bike park. Former national champ and all around ripper, Allen has spent her fair share of time heading up the lift, and coming down the mountain faster than most men. “One of my fondest memories of coaching in the bike park is taking a group of women to learn how to ride jumps and corners for their first time… only because they had signed up for a race

They stole gear from their kids and ventured into a new world of riding. SYLVIE ALLEN FORMER NATIONAL CHAMPION AND BIKE PARK COACH

that made them ride in the park,” recalls Allen. “They stole gear from their kids and ventured into a new world of riding. I warned them: ‘you are going to get addicted

to Crank it Up and you might need to buy your own downhill bike after the lesson!’ They didn’t believe me, they were so nervous and intimidated, standing at the bottom of the mountain. After three runs and a whole bunch of valuable tips to keep them safe, they were hooked. Hopefully they are now ripping up the park with their kids!” If the stats are anything to go by, they are. And so are their girlfriends.

May 19 - Sept. 1, 2014

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Volume 1 / Issue 1 2014 Crank’d

Whistler’s Bike Magazine

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Crank’d Calendar

In Association with

2014 Above: Brandon Semenuk performing in the RedBull Joyride slopestyle contest in front of a record crowd at Crankworx 2013. PHOTO BY SEAN ST. DENIS SEANSTDENISPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

crankdbikemag.com Follow us online for regular updates on Sea to Sky bike events.

crankdbikemag

More Information Some of the events listed on this page may be subject to change. Please visit the relevant website to confirm events details. worca.com bike.whistlerblackcomb.com whistlercyclingclub.ca

Bike Events WORCA Annual Bike Swap Date TBC (Spring 2015) PVTA Pemberton Trail Clean-up Date TBC (Spring 2015) WORCA Trail Days Check out worca.com/trails/traildays for 2014 dates. Pique Pedal Parade July 1. Chromag Show and Shine July 3. 34

Crank’d Whistler’s Bike Magazine

Race Events

Weekly Rides

Sea to Sky Enduro Series May 3, Squamish; May 17, Pemberton; May 24, North Vancouver; June 28, Whistler; July 5, Squamish; July 26, Whistler.

Women’s Night (DH) Every Monday night, 5:30pm-7:30pm, May 19 - Sept. 1.

Crud 2 Mud Whistler Mountain Bike Park (WMBP), May 24.

Monday Night Ride (XC) Every Monday, 6pm (Bike Co.), May 26 - Sept. 15.

Phat Wednesday DH Races WMBP: May 28, June 4, 11, 25, July 2, 9, 16, 30, Aug. 27.

Mondays

Tuesdays

Phat Kidz DH Races Select Wednesdays, WMBP: see whistlerbike.com for info.

Men’s Night (DH) Every Tuesday night, 5:30pm-7:30pm, May 19 - Sept. 1.

Enduro Fridays (TBC) WMBP: May 30, June 6, 13.

Tuesday Night Road Ride Every Tuesday, May 13 - Sept. 30.

NIMBY 50 Pemberton, May 31. Summer Fun’Raiser Pemberton, June 14. Solstice (TBC) WMBP, June 21. BC Bike Race June 29 – July 5. Wonder Woman Race Whistler, July 12. Subaru IRONMAN® Whistler Whistler, July 27. Crankworx Whistler, Aug. 8-17. RBC GranFondo Vancouver – Whistler, Sept. 6.

Wednesdays Women’s Night (DH) Every Wednesday night (WMBP), 5:30pm-7:30pm, May 19 - Sept. 1. Phat Wednesday Race Series (DH) Select dates – see event info opposite.

Thursdays Toonie Rides (XC) Every Thursday, May 1 - Sept. 11. Youth Toonie Rides (XC) Select Thursdays, May 1 - Sept. 11.

Sundays Sunday Road Ride Every other Sunday, starting June 8. Volume 1 / Issue 1 2014


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Whistler’s Bike Magazine

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Buyer’s Guide EARLY RIDER RUN BIKES

EVOC CC 10L HYDRATION PACK

Early Rider run bikes are the best in all categories: weight, width (narrow), height (adjusts lowest to highest), saddle position (rocked to keep child in place), stability, and position (riser bars).

It’s slim and extremely lightweight with additional helmet holder and tool compartment. It also includes a 2L Bladder and Air Pad System for increased back ventilation.

$129-$199

$135

Available at Evolution Whistler

Available at Whistler Village Sports

8-4122 Village Green, Whistler evolutionwhistler.com

4254 Village Stroll, Whistler whistlervillagesports.com

BRAVEN BRV-1 PORTABLE SPEAKER This ultra-rugged, water-resistant, portable speaker has a 12-hour battery life, can charge your phone or iPod and connects with Bluetooth or the provided cable.

$164.99

Garbanzo Bike & Bean carries a wide range of Whistler Mountain Bike Park souvenirs including the ever popular “A-Line” collection. These T-shirts and hats have a cult following in their own right.

$24.99 – $39.99

Available at Lordco

Available at Garbanzo Bike & Bean

5-1200 Alpha Lake Road, Whistler lordco.com

Carleton Lodge, Whistler whistlerblackcomb.com/gbb

DZR SENSE & TERRA SPD SHOES

LYNX DT SADDLE

Rider tested and rider approved. DZR shoes are durable, stiff and stylish to boot. Official dealer for the Sea to Sky region.

Ideal for all mountain setups. The low profile design is also popular with freeride and downhill riders. Features a synthetic top and Chromo rails. 275 grams. Black, Red, Blue, Matt Grey/Blue, Matte Grey/Red.

From $119

$96.00

Available at Arbutus Routes

Available at Chromag Bikes

4557 Blackcomb Way, Whistler arbutusroutes.com

2-1208 Alpha Lake Road, Whistler chromagbikes.com

BIKE CO. LOGO WEAR

WORCA 2014 TRAIL PASS

The perfect reminder of your Sea to Sky cycling vacation, the Bike Co. has a variety of custom socks, toques, T-shirts, trucker hats and sublimated jerseys, all with original artwork.

Help support local trails by purchasing the WORCA 2014 Trail Pass. All funding from the trail pass goes directly towards WORCA’s trail program.

$15

$15-$75 Available at Bike Co. 101–4205 Village Square, Whistler and 1–1392 Portage Road, Pemberton bikeco.ca

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Available online and at most local bike shops worca.com

Support Whistler businesses

Shop local when you can!

Volume 1 / Issue 1 2014


SHOOTING DAILY IN WHISTLER BIKE PARK

BIKEPARKPHOTOS.COM TO VIEW YOUR PHOTOS

Check out Pique Newsmagazine and the Whistler Question for all your biking news and event coverage throughout the summer.

Ready for Ironman P.12

Flag Stop Theatre

Two acre shaker

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2013

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www.whistlerquestion.com w.whistlerquestion.com Serving ng Whistler & Pemberton Sincee 1976 76 76

CULTURE

SIXTY

SPORTS

Ash Grunwald won’t let his style settle

Semenuk with record-setting Joyride

Aussie roots artist returns to the GLC Friday P35

Whistler rider does it again at Crankworx P27 IRONMAN

Whistler welcomes Ironman Check out The Question’s guide to Ironman Pull-Out

CHUG-A-LUG: Australian rider Mitch Delfs stops for a drink at Heckler’s Rock on Sunday (Aug. 18) during the Canadian Open DH at Crankworx. Photo by David Buzzard / www.davidbuzzard.com

TRAGEDIES

Rollover kills Whistler man, 29 H SC

EDUL

Accident during Slow Food Cycle hospitalizes three; narrowly avoiding cyclists

E

Quinn Bender quinn@whistlerquestion.com

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whistlerquestion.com

PA G E 5

man, hospitalizing three and narrowly avoiding further casualty with roadside cyclists. The accident occurred during the Pemberton Slow Food Cycle, a food-tasting event where thousands of

participants pedal form one farm to another along a 25-kilometre stretch of road in the Pemberton Valley. At around 11 a.m. police received several calls from cyclists reporting a black pickup swerving

at high speeds down the wrong side of Pemberton Meadows Road. As the driver tried to navigate a turn near Collins Road, he lost control and left the pavement to the right-hand side, narrowly missing a

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WHISTLER’S WEEKLY NEWSMAGAZINE

and found dead at the scene. Two females, 21 and 29, and one male, 21, were eventually airlifted to Vancouver hospital with serious injuries. The fifth, ALCOHOL P4

Bayshores

REAL-ESTATE-WHISTLER.COM STEVE@WREC.COM

» 4 Bed / 4 Bath » Custom built cedar home » Plenty of natural light » Minutes to Creekside » Provate roof terrace

WELCOME & GOOD LUCK TO ALL IRONMAN COMPETITORS S

August 15th, 2013

group of cyclists, according to RCMP. The truck rolled several times before coming to rest in a field. Of the five occupants, all Whistler residents, the 29-year-old male driver was ejected from the cab

2856 Clifftop Lane

STEVE LEGGE 27 YEARS OF LOCAL KNOWLEDGE WORKING FOR YOU

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Following an all-night music festival, a reckless drive to a friend’s house has led to a tragic accident, claiming the life of one

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Volume 1 / Issue 1 2014 Crank’d

Whistler’s Bike Magazine

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Lenses

Showcasing the rising talent of photographers in B.C.

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3

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BY JON ANTHONY FACEBOOK.COM/JONANTHONYPHOTO

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BY PETER OPRSAL BIKEPIRATE.COM

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BY RAFFAELLA DICE RAFFAELLAPHOTO.COM

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BY RONIA NASH FLICKR.COM/RONIANASH

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BY ERIC POULIN ERICPOULINPHOTO.COM

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Profile for Whistler Publishing

Crank'd Bike Magazine 2014  

Whistler's only dedicated bike magazine – covering mountain, downhill, road and tri biking in Whistler and the surrounding area.

Crank'd Bike Magazine 2014  

Whistler's only dedicated bike magazine – covering mountain, downhill, road and tri biking in Whistler and the surrounding area.