Whidbey Weekly, December 14, 2017

Page 1

December 14 through December 20, 2017

Whidbey Island Community Orchestra Cynthia Morrow, Music Director Karl Olsen, Soloist

Holiday Concert 7:00 pm Friday, December 15th Trinity Lutheran, Freeland 3:00 pm Sunday, December 17th St. Augustine’s-in-the-Woods, Freeland

Admission is free. Donations supporting Whidbey Island Orchestras’ mission are encouraged. For more information about the orchestra or how to join: membership@whidbeyorchestras.org A 501(c)(3) organization More Local Events inside

Harvest Fest Races Coupeville Green Coupeville Page 6

Proud supporter of Whidbey Island

Zumba & Hula by Ate Flo SW Syrian Refugee Project community events and your source for Knights of Columbus Langley United Methodist Church What’s Happening on Whidbey Oak Harbor Langley Island www.whidbeyweekly.com Page 6 Page 9 390 NE Midway Blvd #B203 • Oak Harbor • 360-682-2341


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The priest responded, “Giuseppe, you are an amazing inspiration to all the husbands here! Please tell us what you are planning for your wife for your 50th anniversary?” Giuseppe proudly replied, "I gonna go picka her up." Party at the Farm While I was unable last Saturday to help celebrate the paying off of the mortgage at the Greenbank Farm, I was fortunate enough to have Linda Good of Island Strings share her experience. “Yesterday, Island Strings played at the Lighthouse. Afterward, I stopped at the Greenbank Farm for the celebration. They had a raffle to fund a new roof for the Barn. I was looking at one of the Farm scrapbooks and reading an article from the Record, saying that Island Strings had played. I was remembering all the Loganberry Festivals with you. Kristi O’Donnell gave an excellent presentation on the history of the farm since Chateau St. Michelle put it up for sale. Michael & Prescott were there too, plus Karl Olsen and Vern and Martha. Remarkable what the persistence of a few folks can do. Next on the list, after fixing the roof, they want to have an irrigation system for gardening projects. Maybe a Loganberry Festival could happen again! Happy Winter Solstice!”

No stocking by mantle, Just boots filled with sand, On the wall hung pictures Of far distant lands. With medals and badges, Awards of all kinds, A sober thought Came through my mind. For this house was different, It was dark and dreary, I found the home of a soldier, Once i could see clearly. The soldier lay sleeping, Silent, alone, Curled up on the floor In this one bedroom home. The face was so gentle, The room in such disorder, Not how I pictured A United States soldier. Was this the hero Of whom I'd just read? Curled up on a poncho, The floor for a bed? I realized the families That i saw this night, Owed their lives to these soldiers Who were willing to fight.

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I kept watch for hours, So silent and still And we both shivered From the cold night's chill.

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I didn't want to leave On that cold, dark, night, This guardian of honor So willing to fight.

Publisher & Editor.......................................................... Eric Marshall Marketing Representatives................Penny Hill, Roosevelt Rumble Graphic Design............................................................. Teresa Besaw

Then the soldier rolled over, With a voice soft and pure, Whispered, "carry on Santa, It's Christmas day, all is secure."

Production Manager......................................................TJ Pierzchala Circulation Manager.................................................... Noah Marshall

PUBLISHED and distributed every week. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The Whidbey Weekly cannot be held responsible for the quality of goods or services supplied by advertisers in this publication. Articles, unless otherwise stated, are by contribution and therefore the Whidbey Weekly is not in a position to validate any comments, recommendations or suggestions made in these articles. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published.

According to Truth or Fiction's web site, www. truthorfiction.com, the above poem “has been said to have been written by a soldier stationed in Okinawa. Yet, this poem has been popular on the Internet for several years and occasionally makes a fresh appearance when there is a fresh attitude of support for the armed forces. There are several versions and several different names listed as author. The name most often associated with the poem is that of Air Force Lt. Col. Bruce W. Lovely. He says he wrote it in 1993 while stationed In Korea. An article on www.specialoperations.com says the poem was actually written by Corporal James M. Schmidt, a former U.S. Marine scout sniper, and published in Leatherneck Magazine in December, 1991.”

DEADLINES: The Whidbey Weekly is a submission based editorial with contributing writers. Please feel free to submit any information (please limit to 200 words) that you would like to share with the Whidbey Weekly. You may submit by email to editor@whidbeyweekly.com, by fax to (360)682-2344 or by postal mail to PO Box 1098, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date. For more information, please visit www.whidbeyweekly.com.

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"We must know you will follow your instructions no matter what the circumstances. Inside the room you will find your wife sitting in a chair. Take her out." The man said, "You can't be serious. I could never harm my wife." The agent said, "Then you are not the right man for this job. Take your wife and go home."

To read past columns of On Track in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

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Women in the CIA The CIA had an opening for an assassin. After all the background checks, interviews and testing were done, there were three finalists: two men and a woman. For the final test, the CIA agents took one of the men to a large metal door and handed him a gun.

Hope that one works for this week's bridge club.

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Defollicalization set in long ago.

"The gun was loaded with blanks," she said. "I had to kill him with the chair."

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Regardless of when and who penned the poem, here at Whidbey Weekly we thank all of our troops, in all of our branches, all over the world. I would shave my head again, but now there is no need.

Finally, it was the woman's turn. She was given the same instructions to shoot her husband. She took the gun and went into the room. Shots were heard, one after another. Then they heard screaming, crashing, and banging on the walls. After a few minutes, all was quiet. The door opened slowly and there stood the woman, wiping sweat from her brow.

Contributing Writers Jim Freeman Wesley Hallock Kae Harris Tracy Loescher Kathy Reed Carey Ross

Volume 9, Issue 50 | © MMXVII Whidbey Weekly

One look at my watch, And i knew he was right. "Merry Christmas my friend, And to all a good night."

The second man was given the same instructions. He took the gun and went into the room. All was quiet for about five minutes. The man came out with tears in his eyes, "I tried, but I can't shoot my wife." The agent said, "You don't have what it takes, so take your wife and go home."

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

ICE

I looked all about, A strange sight i did see, No tinsel, no presents, Not even a tree.

The soldier rolled over And drifted to sleep, I couldn't control it, I continued to weep.

R | P

I had come down the chimney With presents to give, And to see just who In this home did live.

Skagit River Bald Eagle Interpretive Center • 360-853-7626 • http://skagiteagle.org Howard Miller Steelhead Park • 52809 Rockport Park Road • Rockport, WA

I fight for freedom, I don't ask for more, My life is my god, My country, my corps."

CA

'Twas the night before Christmas, He lived all alone, In a one bedroom house Made of plaster and stone.

The soldier awakened And i heard a rough voice, "Santa don't cry, This life is my choice;

LO

A New Christmas Poem A grade school chum asked me to share this poem with our Whidbey Weekly readers. After reading this prose, you will know why.

The very thought Brought a tear to my eye, I dropped to my knees And started to cry.

E

Agreed! Thanks Linda for sharing your observations. Do I have your permission to share the above? If not, my forgiveness seeking e-mail is at the ready.

Join local awardwinning guidebook author Craig Romano for a special presentation on Saturday, December 16 at 11am followed by a guided hike at 1pm.

S

Giuseppe replied to the assembled husbands, “Wella, I'va tried to treat her nicea, spenda da money on her, but besta of all is, I tooka her to Italy for the 25th anniversary!”

I couldn't help wonder How many lay alone, On a cold Christmas eve In a land far from home.

ND

Old joke of da week At St. Peter's Catholic Church, they have weekly husbands' marriage seminars. At the session last week, the priest asked Giuseppe, who said he was approaching his 50th wedding anniversary, to take a few minutes and share some insight into how he had managed to stay married to the same woman all these years.

They all enjoyed freedom Each month of the year, Because of the soldiers, Like the one lying here.

BRA

Due to the unavailability of artificial intelligence, this week's column will be written with the assistance of artificial sweeteners.

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Soon round the world, The children would play, And grown ups would celebrate A bright Christmas day.

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Customer Approved Ratings based on SearsHometown.com customer ratings as of 5/12/17. (1) Exclusions apply. See The Details section. Offer good thru 12/24/17. On all appliances: Colors, connectors, ice maker hook-up and installation extra. †Total capacity. ‡Advertised savings range from 5%-50%. Sears Hometown Stores may be independently operated by authorized dealers of Sears Authorized Hometown Stores, LLC or by authorized franchisees of Sears Home Appliance Showrooms, LLC. The SEARS mark is a service mark of Sears Brands, LLC.

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Bits & Pieces George Frederick Handel’s beloved oratorio— like you’ve never heard it before! This enchanting evening of music and celebration is best shared with friends and family.

Letters to the Editor Editor, The South Whidbey Parent Teacher Student Association (SW PTSA) would like to thank the following businesses and people who donated to The Elf Chase fundraising event. The money, gift certificates, advertising and food you donated, helped us raise over $4,000 for teacher and staff grants to help them purchase classroom supplies, field trips, college preparation and outdoor education. THANK YOU: Clinton Foodmart, Critters and Co Pet Center, FrontRow Creative, Good Cheer Thrift Stores, J & D Wallace General Contractors, Jade Design Build, Joan Johnson, Langley Motel, Layman and Associates, Mukilteo Coffee Roasters, Next Generation Design and Build, Payless Foods, Peoples Bank (Mary Eaton), Reboot Center for Innovative Medicine, Richard S. Epstein Custom Homes, Rocket Taco, Saratoga Dental & Orthodontics, Soundesign Group, Southern Cross II, Spyhop Public House, The Clyde Theater, The Goose Community Grocer, Useless Bay Coffee Company,Useless Bay Golf and Country Club, Village Pizzeria, Whidbey Children’s Theater, Whidbey Donuts, Whidbey Island Bagel Factory, Whidbey Island Center for the Arts, Whidbey Telecom, Whidbey Weekly. Danielle Klein, SW PTSA Volunteer

Editor, Island Transit wants to thank everyone that contributed to our Birthday on the Bus party on December 1st. Island Transit celebrated 30 years of service by having music, comedy and a clown onboard our busiest buses. Thanks to our performers Deano the Clown, Jim Freeman, Randy Hudson, Joe Jeszeck, David Ossman, Dana Moffett’s Sarungano trio, the Saratoga Sirens, the Shifty Sailors, Julie Pigott, David Maiderias and Camano Island’s Ukulele Band. We also passed out over $1,000 in prizes donated by businesses along our bus routes including, from Camano Island: Movement Arts, Brooklyn Brothers Pizza, Island Girl Paint, Il Granaio, Shambala Bakery, Empire Ale House, Camano Island Coffee Roasters, Rockway Bar and Grill, Pub 282. Donations from Whidbey Island businesses were received from: Ace Freeland, Alaska USA Mortgage Company, Art Escape, Bayleaf, Bayview Bicycles, Casey’s Crafts, Color Box, Coupeville Bistro, Deb’s & Co. Hair Care, Donut Master, Freeland Café, Greenbank Cheese Shop, Heritage Bank, Island Nosh, Ivars, Jim’s Hardware, Lavender Wind, Little Caesars, Louie-G’s NY Style Pizza, Nails with a View, Paint Your World, Pizza Factory, Prairie Perks, Premier Title Co., PSE, Red Apple Prairie Center, Ruby’s Closet, Rustica, Salty Mug, Sebo’s Hardware, Side Market@Bayview Cash Store, Starbucks, The BBQ Joint, The Clyde Theatre, Timbuktu, Webb’s Department Store, Whidbey Playhouse, Safeway, Whidbey Pies, Popsies. Thanks so much for your support. Come see us on the bus! Maribeth Crandell Island Transit Mobility Specialist

Seattle Mandolin Orchestra Presents Mandolin Messiah Whidbey Island Center for the Arts (WICA) welcomes Mandolin Messiah on December 17. Looking for the perfect dose of holiday spirit? This Christmas season, experience Messiah,

“Messiah is one of the most popular and well-known pieces of music in the world,” said Joseph Pollard White, SMO Artistic Advisor and conductor for the evening’s performance. “Changing the instrumentation can help us hear it with fresh ears, as if for the first time.” Joining the orchestra will be four topflight vocalists from Seattle’s choral and operatic community. Soloists Julie Finch, soprano; Elizabeth Peterson, mezzo-soprano; Derek Sellers, tenor; and Gustave Blazek, bass, will sing with the orchestra. All seats $22 adults. The piano bar opens one hour before the performance. For tickets or more information, call (360) 221-8262 or visit www.wicaonline.org [Submitted by Fritha Strand, Marketing Manager, WICA]

The Skagit River Bald Eagle Interpretive Center Prepares for the 21st Eagle Watching Season

As eagles begin to congregate, eagle watchers from across the region make their own trek to the Upper Skagit to catch a glimpse of these regal creatures. Many of these hopefuls visit the Skagit River Bald Eagle Interpretive Center in Rockport, WA. About the time that bald eagles are migrating from Alaska toward the Skagit River there is another group preparing for their arrival, the Skagit River Bald Eagle Awareness Team (SRBEAT), the nonprofit that operates the Interpretive Center. They work to advocate for the conservation of bald eagles and their habitat which includes the Skagit River Watershed. The Interpretive Center is open every Saturday and Sunday from 10:00am to 4:00pm until the end of January, and weekdays December 26-30. It provides a host of services including eagle watching site information, local information, environmental presentation, guided river walks, special programs for school groups, interpretative displays, cultural presentations, and a gift shop. Visit the skagiteagle.org site and calendar for times and dates of speakers and guided hikes. On Saturday, December 16, local award-winning guidebook author Craig Romano will give a presentation at 11:00am followed by a guided tour at 1:00pm. For more information, call (360) 853-7626 or visit skagiteagle.org Catherine Wessels is the new Coordinator of the Interpretive Center this season. Although new to the Center, she has previously served as a volunteer with the Forest Service’s Eagle Watcher program, and will enjoy returning to Rockport to collaborate with the Center’s many partner organizations in her new role. A recent graduate of Skagit Valley College’s fouryear environmental conservation program, she is looking forward to working with the dedicated SRBEAT directors and Interpretive Center volunteers to share the beauty and natural history of the Skagit River ecosystem with the thousands of visitors who come to the Center each December and January. Please stop by the Center and say “hi” – she’d enjoy meeting you and hearing about your experiences with eagles, salmon and the Skagit ecosystem.

Migratory eagles begin to arrive in October from northern breeding territories in Alaska and Canada. The Skagit River supports all five salmon species and hosts the largest population of wintering bald eagles in the lower 48. Threats to bald eagles are degradation of natural habitat, reduction of salmon populations, and shrinking locations of prime nest trees. The Skagit River Watershed encompasses the river, its tributaries (Baker, Cascade, Sauk-Suiattle rivers), and all that depend on this central water source. John Wesley Powell, a scientist geographer, described a watershed to be “that area of land, a bounded hydrologic system within which all living things are inextricably linked by their common water course that they become part of a community.” Our “common water course” is the Skagit River and our natural community is what we set out to share with others. Many people that visit the Interpretive Center have never seen an eagle in the wild and are awed at what they find there. The Interpretive Center offers a platform for exploration and education, a perch to see a broader view of an ecosystem and its interconnected parts. Minds will soar with new ideas about environmental stewardship. The Skagit River Bald Eagle Interpretive Center hopes that after being exposed to the wilderness of the Upper Skagit Valley, a spark ignites in people’s minds and hearts about how we can preserve this ecosystem and fragile cycle of life. For more information, contact the Skagit River Bald Eagle Interpretive Center at (360) 853-7626 or visit skagiteagle.org [Submitted by Stephanie Lynn]

Public Invited to Launch Party of Rough Cut: Lessons from Endangered Species On Saturday, December 16, from 6:00pm to 8:00pm, join Orca Network and the Langley Whale Center in celebrating the release of Rick Wood’s latest book, Rough Cut: Lessons from Endangered Species. The event will be held at the Langley Whale Center, 105 Anthes Ave., and will include a reading, refreshments, book signing, and much more! Rough Cut combines the journey of an environmental film-maker with stories of endangered marine wildlife. Author Rick Wood has been filming in the wild for years, focusing his lens on human threats to marine life. His work includes three documentaries, and Rough Cut touches on Wood’s experiences filming them. Journey Home: On a Mission to Save a Species (2013) brings attention to the plight of sea turtles and their rehabilitation in Florida. Fragile Waters (2014), made in collaboration with the Orca Network and filmmaker Shari Macy, describes the perils facing Pacific Northwest orcas and salmon. Deconstructing Eden (2017) tells of the sea otters who live in the unique ecosystem of Elkhorn Slough in Monterey Bay, California, threatened by pollution and other human impacts on the surrounding land. Written in Wood’s personable and accessible style, Rough Cut touches on turtles, orcas, salmon, sea otters, and the many other creatures who share our oceans. The author’s scientific insight draws attention to the many ways that human actions on land threaten the delicate balance of marine ecosystems. More than that, Rough Cut is Wood’s call to arms for those who love the planet as he does to take action while there is still time to save it.

Time to Review Your Investment Strategy for the Year

As the year draws to a close, it’s a good time to review your progress toward your financial goals. But on what areas should you focus your attention? Of course, you may immediately think about whether your investments have done well. When evaluating the performance of their investments for a given year, many people mistakenly think their portfolios should have done just as well as a common market index, such as the Standard & Poor’s 500. But the S&P 500 is essentially a measure of large-company, domestic stocks, and your portfolio probably doesn’t look like that – nor should it, because it’s important to own an investment mix that aligns with your goals, risk tolerance and return objectives. It’s this return objective that you should evaluate over time – not the return of an arbitrary benchmark that isn’t personalized to your goals and risk tolerance. Your return objective will likely evolve. If you are starting out in your career, you may need your portfolio to be oriented primarily toward growth, which means it may need to be more heavily weighted toward stocks. But if you are retiring in a few years, you may need a more balanced allocation between stocks and bonds, which can address your needs for growth and income. So, assuming you have created a long-term investment strategy that has a target rate of return for each year, you can review your progress accordingly. If you matched or exceeded that rate this past year, you’re staying on track, but if your return fell short of your desired target, you may need to make some changes. Before doing so, though, you need to understand just why your return was lower than anticipated. For example, if you owned some stocks that underperformed due to unusual circumstances – and even events such as Hurricanes Harvey and Irma can affect the stock prices of some companies – you may not need to be overly concerned, especially if the fundamentals of the stocks are still sound. On the other hand, if you own some investments that have underperformed for several years, you may need to consider selling them and using the proceeds to explore new investment opportunities. Investment performance isn’t the only thing you should consider when looking at your financial picture over this past year. What changed in your life? Did you welcome a new child to your family? If so, you may need to respond by increasing your life insurance coverage or opening a college savings account. Did you or your spouse change jobs? You may now have access to a new employer-sponsored retirement account, such as a 401(k), so you’ll need to decide how much money to put into the various investments within this plan. And one change certainly happened this past year: You moved one year closer to retirement. By itself, this may cause you to re-evaluate how much risk you’re willing to tolerate in your investment portfolio, especially if you are within a few years of your planned retirement. Whether it is the performance of your portfolio or changes in your life, you will find that you always have some reasons to look back at your investment and financial strategies for one year – and to look ahead at moves you can make for the next. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Jeffery C. Pleet, CLU®, ChFC®

Financial Advisor 630 SE Midway Blvd. Oak Harbor, WA 98277 (360) 679-2558 jeffery.pleet@edwardjones.com

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

[Submitted by Wendy Sines, Langley Whale Center Manager] BITS & PIECES

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GUEST COLUMN By Ron Newberry Special to the Whidbey Weekly

Retired Coupeville schoolteacher looks out for forest friends by protecting her wooded property When Linda Bartlett spotted surveyors setting boundary markers next to the woods behind her farm, she got a sinking feeling in her stomach. “I hoped it wasn’t for development,” she said. Bartlett, co-owner of Rosehip Farm & Garden near Coupeville, approached the surveyors and asked why they were there. To her relief, they told her they were working with the Whidbey Camano Land Trust, marking the boundaries of forested property on the ridge — not for development, but for protection. “I was thrilled,” Bartlett said. The forest is being protected because of the lifetime of joy one woman has experienced from living next to it. Lidabeth Hicks owns a mostly wooded patch of 10 acres on the ridge overlooking Ebey’s Prairie. Her house is nestled right up against the small forest. Hicks, 96, a retired Coupeville schoolteacher, has lived on the property 67 years. She developed such a love for the wildlife on her land that she donated a conservation easement to the Whidbey Camano Land Trust that will prevent the forest from ever being cut down. The woods, which include a wetland, not only provide diverse habitat for wildlife but also serve as an important windbreak for neighboring farms. After tending to children, including two of her own, Hicks has

spent recent decades developing a deeper connection to the critters around her. “I want to protect the wildlife,” Hicks said. “We have a lot of deer here. I see coyotes occasionally and lots of squirrels and chipmunks. There are all kinds of birds. It’s quiet.” So quiet she can hear the owls at night. “They talk to each other,” she said. Without the conservation easement, Hicks could have placed another home on her property, one with a sweeping view of Ebey’s Prairie and the Salish Sea. But the forest was too important to her. Hicks’ property serves as a wildlife oasis in the middle of hundreds of acres of protected farmland. Protecting such wooded sites is part of a greater vision to create a wildlife corridor along the island that provides refuge and other benefits to birds, small mammals and other wild creatures, according to Pat Powell, Land Trust executive director. “It’s a sweet stretch of woods back there,” Bartlett said. “There are deer and pileated woodpeckers. There’s quite a little ecosystem. That could have potentially been an amazing spot if it were to be developed. We’re very excited that it wasn’t.” Hicks felt strongly that protecting the woods was the right thing to do. But “I haven’t done anything heroic,” she said.

Danielle Bishop, left, land protection specialist with the Whidbey Camano Land Trust, and Lidabeth Hicks in front of Hicks’ protected woods. Photo by Whidbey Camano Land Trust Danielle Bishop, WCLT land protection specialist, feels differently. She’s inspired by Hicks, with whom she’s developed quite an attachment.

From his home, Hancock can see the stand of woods that Hicks has protected. They’re the same woods he and Hopkins played in often as kids. They even rowed a boat around the pond in those days.

“Meeting and working with landowners like Lidabeth is my favorite part of my job,” Bishop said. “I go home feeling most fulfilled when I’ve met landowners and learned a little bit more about their personal stories and why protecting their property means so much to them.”

“I think it’s a wonderful thing she’s done there,” Hancock said.

Alan Hancock, now an Island County Superior Court judge, grew up as a neighbor of Hicks and close friend of her son, Eric Hopkins. He also was a student in Hicks’ fourth-grade class, and has held her in deep respect and admiration since childhood. “I have nothing but the fondest memories of her as a teacher and as a person in general,” he said. “She was very soft-spoken but she commanded respect for the dignity she showed and the even temperament she had. She’s a highly intelligent person and was a great teacher. I learned a lot from her.”

Although she loves to watch the wildlife on her property, Hicks rarely sits still. She practices every week in the bell choir at her church and is active with her walking club. “The secret to a long life is to keep moving,” she said. “I have many blessings.” And many friends in her forest. Ron Newberry is the communication specialist with the Whidbey Camano Land Trust The Whidbey Camano Land Trust actively involves the community in protecting, restoring, and appreciating the important natural habitats and resource lands that support the diversity of life on our islands and in the waters of Puget Sound. For more information, visit HYPERLINK "http://www.wclt.org/"www.wclt.org, email HYPERLINK "mailto:info@wclt.org" info@wclt.org, or call (360) 222-3310.

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DECEMBER 14 - DECEMBER 20, 2017 LOCALLY OWNED.

Whidbey Weekly

What’s Going On All entries are listed chronologically, unless there are multiple entries for the same venue or are connected to a specific organization (such as Sno-Isle Libraries) in which case all entries for that venue or organization are listed collectively in chronological order under one heading.

Holiday Market on Pioneer Saturday, December 16, 10:00am-5:00pm Sunday, December 17, 10:00am-5:00pm 749 SE Pioneer Way, Oak Harbor

mandocello and mandobass, as well as guitar, the group performs throughout the Seattle area. For tickets or more information, call (360) 221-8268 or visit www.wicaonline.org

Live Music: Original Jim

Island Herb Vendor Day

Arts, crafts, food, and Santa! Check the Oak Harbor Main Street Facebook for dates and times.

Friday, December 15, 3:00pm-6:00pm Island Herb, Freeland

Saratoga Orchestra Presents Peter and the Wolf

Representatives from Sticky Budz will be on site with product displays and information. Island Herb is located at 5565 Vanbarr Pl, Unit F. For more information, call (360) 331-0140 or visit whidbeyislandherb.com

Saturday, December 16, 10:00am Coupeville HS Commons

Forged from the vocal jazz and a cappella scenes, and honed on pop, rock, folk, country and blues, Jim sets up a solid foundation for his tunes with creative arrangements, tasty improvisation, a little keyboard, strong vocals, rhythmic guitars and a fresh approach to percussion. No cover.

Star Party Friday, December 15, begins at dark Fort Nugent Park, Oak Harbor Explore the night sky and view distant galaxies, planets and nebulas at this free public Star Party hosted by the Island County Astronomical Society (ICAS). No telescope is needed and people of all ages are welcome to attend. Be sure and dress warmly and note that the event will be canceled if the weather is cloudy. For more information, contact Bob Scott at ICAS_ President@outlook.com, or visit www.icas-wa. org.

Music in the Barn: Small Town Poets Band Friday, December 15, 5:30pm Dancing Fish Vineyards, Freeland Hors d’oeuvres on the House, great wine by the glass or bottle, no cover. DancingFishVineyards.com

Feliz Navidad Holiday Party Friday, December 15, 6:00pm-9:00pm Elks Lodge, 155 NE Ernst St., Oak Harbor Tickets: $40 Join friends and neighbors for dinner, dancing, and live music. This year’s theme is Feliz Navidad, complete with great “South of the Border Cuisine”. Entertainment includes vocalist Valetta Faye, the Just-N-Time band, and singersongwriter Steve DeHaven. Trish Rose (USAF Major General, retired) will talk on “Diversity & Inclusion”. RSVP and buy on line for a discount. For details, visit www.WhidbeyIslandDemocrats.org/HolidayGathering2017 or call (360) 678-6788. Sponsored by the Whidbey Island Democratic Club.

WICO Holiday Concert

Saturday, December 16, 2:00pm Oak Harbor First Reformed Church Saratoga Orchestra of Whidbey Island presents a family friendly musical event during the month of December featuring an Instrument Petting Zoo (IPZ) and performance of the timeless classic, “Peter and the Wolf.” For more information, visit www.sowhidbey.com or call (360) 929-3045.

Santa at the Farm Saturdays, December 16 & 23, 12:00pm-2:30pm Greenbank Farm, 765 Wonn Road Santa will be stopping by the farm and visiting with kids in the hallway at the rear (or back) of the Big Red Barn. Bring your camera for a great shot, all for free!

A Very Merry $1000 Giveaway Saturday, December 16, 1:30pm Boy and Dog Park, Langley Downtown Langley shops are handing out white raffle tickets (one white ticket for each $20 spent). Tickets are available until December 15 at local retailers. One grand prize of $1000 will be given away, as well as five themed baskets. Must be present to win. Sponsors for this event are: Heritage Bank, Whidbey Tel, Nancy Rowan of Windermere, and Fair Trade Outfitters.

The Ballet Slipper Conservatory’s The Nutcracker

Island Herb Vendor Day Friday, December 22, 3:00pm-6:00pm Island Herb, Freeland Representatives from Avitas will be on site with product displays and information. Island Herb is located at 5565 Vanbarr Pl, Unit F. For more information, call (360) 331-0140 or visit whidbeyislandherb.com

CHWA Red Ticket Drawing Sunday, December 24, 1:00pm Island County Museum, Coupeville

Book Launch Party

Live Music: Original Jim Saturday, December 16, 6:00pm-9:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville Forged from the vocal jazz and a cappella scenes, and honed on pop, rock, folk, country and blues, Jim sets up a solid foundation for his tunes with creative arrangements, tasty improvisation, a little keyboard, strong vocals, rhythmic guitars and a fresh approach to percussion. No cover. For more information, call (360) 682-5747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

Seattle Mandolin Orchestra: Mandolin Messiah Sunday, December 17, 7:30pm Whidbey Island Center for the Arts, Langley All Seats $22 This holiday season, experience George Frederick Handel’s beloved oratorio “Messiah,” like you’ve never heard it before. Founded in 1968, the Seattle Mandolin Orchestra is dedicated to revitalizing America’s mandolin ensemble tradition. Featuring the entire mandolin family of instruments, including mandolin, mandola,

LOCALLY OPERATED. library’s educational toys. This informal, drop-in playtime is for children ages 0-4 years old with their parent or caregiver. South Whidbey at Home Book Discussion Group: “Doughnut Economics” Thursday, December 21, 3:00pm-4:15pm Freeland Library Join us for a discussion of “Doughnut Economics” by Kate Raworth. Discussion led by Shirley Owen.

Religious Services “Sing Noel!” Sunday, December 17, 11:00am Coupeville United Methodist Church The public is invited to a special Christmas worship celebration featuring the Chancel Choir. “Sing Noel!” combines old and new carols and includes a selection of songs and readings. The service includes a number of solos, and the music is accompanied by organ, strings, percussion and handbells. It includes an arrangement of “The Angel Gabriel From Heaven Came” for women, and “March of the Kings” for men’s voices. An additional highlight will be “Rejoice, O Virgin” sung in Russian, from “All-Night Vigil” by Rachmaninoff. The church is located at at 608 N Main St. For more information, visit www. coupevilleumc.com.

Prayer Group Every Tuesday, 4:00pm-5:30pm St. Hubert Catholic Church, Langley Charismatic Prayer and Praise group. Everyone welcome. For more information, call Bill at (360) 222-4080 or email Sobico@comcast.net.

Filipino Christian Fellowship Sundays, 2:00pm Meets at Church on the Rock, 1780 SE 4th Ave., Oak Harbor. www.ohcfellowship.com

Remember, for every $20 you spend in historic downtown Coupeville you will receive a Red Ticket! Must be present to win.

Healing Rooms

Upcoming Sno-Isle Library Events

The Healing Rooms are open to anyone desiring personal prayer for physical, emotional, or spiritual needs. There is a team of Christians from several local churches that are dedicated to praying for healing the sick in our community. All ministry is private, confidential, and free. Teams are available to pray for individuals who drop by on a first-come, first-serve basis.

See schedule below Cost: Free Lit for Fun Book Discussion Group Thursday, December 14, 9:00am-11:00am Freeland Library

Oak Harbor Poetry Project Sunday, December 17, 3:00pm-4:30pm Oak Harbor Library

Join Orca Network and Langley Whale Center in celebrating the release of environmental filmmaker Rick Wood’s latest book “Rough Cut-Lessons from Endangered Species”. Reading, refreshments and book signing.

Whidbey Island Dance Theatre’s 25th season of The Nutcracker is sure to delight the whole family! The production features many of the beloved characters and themes that are traditional with this classic holiday ballet, with special twists added to make it special for Whidbey. Tickets are $15 online or $20 at the door. Discounts for seniors, veterans, and children. Tickets are on sale online at https://www. eventbrite.com/d/wa--langley/the-nutcracker/

10% of proceeds will be donated to the Community Foundation for Coupeville Public Schools.

Tickets are available for purchase at tbscoh.org or at Pacific Grace Tax and Accounting in Oak Harbor. For more information, visit tbscoh.org or call (360) 929-5828.

Sunday, December 17, 3:00pm St. Augustine’s-in-the Woods, Freeland

Friday, December 15, 7:00pm Saturday, December 16, 2:00pm & 7:00pm Sunday, December 17, 2:00pm South Whidbey High School, PAC, Langley

Thursday, December 21, 11:00am-5:00pm Aqua Gifts, Coupeville

Join us for a discussion of J.G. Ballard’s “Empire of the Sun.” The classic, awardwinning novel, made famous by Steven Spielberg’s film, tells of a young boy’s struggle to survive World War II in China. For adults.

Saturday, December 16, 6:00pm-8:00pm Langley Whale Center, 105 Anthes Ave.

25th Anniversary of WIDT’s The Nutcracker

Shop Out for Kids

Saturday, December 16, 2:00pm & 7:00pm Sunday, December 17, 2:00pm Oak Harbor High School Auditorium Tickets: Adults $15; Seniors (60+) $10; Child (up to 18) $10

Friday, December 15, 7:00pm Trinity Lutheran Church, Freeland

Whidbey Island Community Orchestra, Cynthia Morrow, Conductor, celebrate the sounds of Christmas with holiday favorites; Karl Olsen, Baritone Soloist and special choral performance of Ralph Vaughn Williams’ “Fantasia on Christmas Carols”. A reception with orchestra & refreshments will follow. Admission is free, although donations are accepted and greatly appreciated. For more information, visit www. whidbeyorchestras.org or email cnewman@ whidbey.com

Wednesday, December 20, 6:00pm Flyers Restaurant & Brewery, Oak Harbor

www.whidbeyweekly.com

The Oak Harbor Poetry Project meets the third Sunday of each month to provide the poetry community of Whidbey Island an open mic to share their work, and a chance to hear and hopefully become a featured poet. How Santa Claus Came to America: A Cultural History Monday, December 18, 5:30pm Coupeville Library Holiday historian, Michael Ferri, will present a narrated slide show on the origins of Santa Claus. He will trace Santa Claus’ family tree from earliest times to present. This fun presentation will also include a dramatic reading of “’Twas the Night Before Chanukah” by Chanukah Claus - a reenacted annual holiday family event, which warmly illustrates an American melding of the Chanukah and Christmas traditions. For adults. Seasonal snacks and beverages provided. 3rd Tuesday Book Discussion Group Tuesday, December 19, 9:30am-11:00am Freeland Library Join us for a great book discussion of Blake Crouch’s “Dark Matter,” a mind-bending, relentlessly surprising thriller from the author of the bestselling Wayward Pines trilogy. Baby and Toddler Stay and Play Tuesdays, December 19 & 26, 10:00am-11:00am Freeland Library Under their parent’s supervision, babies and toddlers can socialize and play with the

Every Thursday, 6:30pm-8:30pm 5200 Honeymoon Bay Road, Freeland

For more information, contact Ann at (425) 263-2704, email healingwhidbey.com, or visit the International Association of Healing Rooms at healingrooms.com.

Teaching Through God’s Word Sundays, 9:00am & 11:00am Calvary Chapel, 3821 French Road, Clinton For more information, visit ccwhidbey.com.

Unitarian Universalist Sunday Service Sundays, 10:00am Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland All are welcome. Values-based children’s religious exploration classes and childcare will be provided. Visit www.uucwi.org for more information. The Unitarian Universalist Congregation building is located at 20103 Highway 525, two miles north of Freeland.

Unity of Whidbey Sundays, 10:00am 5671 Crawford Road, Langley If you’re one of the “spiritual but not religious” people who questions your childhood faith or is looking for something more, Unity of Whidbey may feel like a homecoming. Visit our website: unityofwhidbeyisland.org

Whidbey Quakers Sundays, 4:00pm-5:00pm Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland Whidbey Islands Friends Meeting (also known as Quakers) meet in silent worship and community, with occasional spoken messages, every Sunday at the Unitarian Universalist building. For more information, contact Tom Ewell at tewell@whidbey.com or go to www. whidbeyquakers.org. WHAT'S GOING ON

continued on page

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DECEMBER 14 - DECEMBER 20, 2017 www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALL LOCALL Y OWNED. Y OWNED.

Whidbey Weekly

Island Angler

7

www.whidbeyweekly.com DECEMBER 14 - DECEMBER 20, 2017

CASCADIA EYE COMES TO WHIDBEY ISLAND

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TALKING TROUT Whichever species you’re trying to catch, there is something very special about fishing for trout. They live in some of the most spectacular and scenic areas in the country. They are an incredible sport fish and wild fish are generally plentiful in most streams and rivers, along with the many man-made lakes and reservoirs which get planted with calculated numbers of healthy hard fighting hatchery trout. One of the great things about trout is they are active, aggressive hunters; they prefer their food live and lifelike. They may travel in schools in search of small swimming prey, however, they will not pass on a chance to devour worms, bugs, larva, and nymphs that inhabit the body of water they live in. Because of this natural hunt and feed instinct they can be caught using all of the proven techniques - trolling, still fishing, and streaming flies. Where you plan to fish will dictate the biggest majority of the bait or lures to be used. Finding trout in the lakes can be intimidating at first glance due to the size of the lake and the amount of water the fish have to hide in. Each lake will have its own characteristics but there are some basic rules that hold true almost everywhere. The trout will be doing their best to satisfy their physical needs – this includes shelter or protection from predators, comfortable or acceptable water temperatures, and the possibility of traveling upstream to spawn. Take a visual scan of the lake and use these few common rules of thumb to help find the fish a little quicker. RISING WATER: When lakes are filling quickly after rain or snow melt, the rising water will be covering new ground, grass, and possibly fallen trees. During this high water level the trout will be feeding on worms, insects, grubs, and other bits and pieces forced out of hiding by higher than normal water. Be sure to use caution when troll fishing the high water, there will be more limbs and debris to get hung up on. Mornings and evenings will be most productive, as the sun rises higher in the sky the fish will retreat to deeper water. Worms, sand shrimp, and flies that imitate grubs like a black or olive color wooly bugger will work best. DEEP SHORES: Deep, steep shorelines will be most productive during the middle of the day; the trout have moved to the deeper water to feed where they do not feel threatened. Fingers and points of land can also have deep slopes and will hold fish. Picture the point of land’s shape continuing under the water, “points point to fish” is a good thing to remember. Drift along the slopes using small to medium size darts like the “crippled herring” or a “castmaster.” These heavy lures will sink quickly into the 10 to 30 foot strike zone. SHALLOW BAYS: Particularly those with good aquatic weed growth, as the fish will use the grass as a grazing area, eating snails, grass shrimp, insects, and small fish. Trolling could be a challenge because of the amount of foliage to hang up on, but still fishing with a float and suspended worm or soft rubber bait imitation will make it easier to fish these shallows. Start early or stay late because the mid-day sun will drive most of the fish deep to find cooler, safer water.

Exploring and learning the bottom topography is part of the joy of fishing lakes. Reading and understanding water movement and patterns is the key to finding fish in streams and rivers. Similar to lake trout, river and stream fish will take a variety of baits and flies. Finding fish can be easy, finding the fish without spooking them out of the pools and cut banks is the tricky part. Stream fish are very aware of what is happening above water. They can see surprisingly well, their eyes are naturally situated to look slightly upward, they do not know what we are but if the fish see shadows, silhouettes, or bright colors it will send them in all different directions. Keep this hide and seek profile in mind when stalking the stream's edge. Trout will use the flow of water, available cover, and time of day to provide for themselves. River trout always face upstream when feeding; they are expecting the water to bring the food to them. Because of this behavior, cast your bait or offering slightly upstream making sure the bait has time to sink or suspend down in the fish's face. By doing this, the fish will either feed or flee around the object but often stay in the immediate area, so keep feeding your offering to the fish – he may bite out of anger eventually.

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By reading the stream or river you can concentrate on the fishy spots. Most fish will not be hanging out in the fast or riffled water (riffled water can be very helpful to the angler, the broken and unsettled water will help mask your approach). This type of water takes a quick toll on the fish's energy; instead look for slow, deeper water pools. The upper end of the pool will hold fish because as the stream begins to dip and deepen, this change slows the water and begins to let food settle where it is easily picked up by the trout. The downriver end of the pool, or “tail-out,” is where the pool starts to disappear and get shallow once again. This area is great to get a strike as the bait or lure pushes the fish back to the tail-out and pressures the fish to make a decision. At this point many trout will often strike instead of leaving the pool, especially Steelhead trout. SUNKEN LOGS AND BOULDERS: There is almost always a fish or two hiding under and around submerged logs. Pull the lure or float the suspended bait parallel with the log and watch what happens. Boulders are your friend when the majority of the stream is fast as the boulders slow the fast current for the fish. The trout will swim in the slower water behind the boulder then dart out to strike at food. Keep drifting your bait or lure alongside the boulder, letting it sweep behind the boulder before starting your retrieve. Learn to read the water, watch where the current meets the stream bank in a corner, throw a leaf into the water and watch where the water pushes the leaf, it will be pushing your bait in the same general direction and help you determine where to start your cast. Watch where fast and slow water converge; fish love this sweet spot. Look for the slow back eddies, fish normally do not like strong back eddies, but softer eddies will hold fish if it’s the only slow water around. Trout can be found in almost every county in the state, which makes them a favorite sport fish, not to mention they taste great. Be safe on the water. I wish all of you a Merry Christmas and God Bless.

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DECEMBER 14 - DECEMBER 20, 2017 LOCALLY OWNED.

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Holiday Happenings Promote your holiday events and bazaars island wide with Whidbey Weekly! 1/8-Page $75, 1/16-Page $40, 1/32-Page $25 ADD FULL COLOR TO ANY SIZE AD FOR ONLY $25! This section will publish every Thursday through December 14. Deadline is the Thursday prior to publication. To learn more about advertising in Whidbey Weekly Call: 360-682-2341 or email: publisher@whidbeyweekly.com

WHAT’S GOING ON

LOCALLY OPERATED. continued from page

6

First Church of Christ, Scientist

Thursday, December 21, 4pm in the Fellowship Hall

Readings, prayers, and a time of meditation on this longest night of the year. Claudia Walker on Harp

Christmas Eve Services on December 24

4:30pm Family Service with the Christmas story & carols 10pm Candlelight Communion Service offerings will be taken at both services for Whidbey Homeless Coalition

LANGLEY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

301 Anthes • Langley • 360-221-4233 www.langleyumc • lumc@whidbey.com • Rev. Mary Boyd

Social Bridge Game. Bring your own brown bag lunch. RSVP required. Call (360) 720-2727 or email dcb601@comcast.net

The church and Reading Room are located at 721 SW 20th Court at Scenic Heights Street, Oak Harbor. Call (360) 675-0621 or visit christianscience.com

The club is ACBL sanctioned and we encourage anyone interested to come with or without a partner. For more information, contact one of the directors: Mardi Dennis at (360) 675-5044, Sue Thomas at (360) 678-7047, or Peter Wolff at (360) 678-3019.

Services and Sunday School are also held at 10:30am on South Whidbey at 15910 Highway 525, just north of Bayview and across from Useless Bay Road; testimony meetings are held the first Wednesday of each month at 7:30pm.

Meetings & Organizations Greenbank Progressive Club Holiday Potluck Dinner

Meet and greet will begin at 6:00pm with dinner at 6:30pm. Please bring your own tableware and a dish to share for the potluck. There will be no speaker for the evening, just time to share with fellow members and background music of the season. For more information, call (360) 678-5562. For rental of the Greenbank Hall, call (360) 678-4813.

Whidbey Island Camera Club Tuesday, December 19, 6:30pm-8:00pm Oak Hall, Room 306, SVC, Oak Harbor

ARTS, CRAFTS FOOD & MORE!

Duplicate Bridge Club Every Tuesday, 10:30am Sierra Country Club Clubhouse, Coupeville

National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Whidbey Island Fourth Thursday, 7:00pm-8:30pm Trinity Lutheran Church, Freeland NAMI is the largest grassroots organization dedicated to making life better for people with a mental illness and their friends and loved ones. The group is nonreligious but meets at Trinity Lutheran Church, 18341 State Route 525. It isn’t necessary to preregister. Please contact Kathy Chiles, (206) 218-6449 or k.chiles22@live.com for more information.

NAR-ANON Every Tuesday, 7:00pm-8:00pm St. Peter’s Lutheran Church, Clinton NAR-ANON family groups are world-wide for those affected by someone else’s addiction. St. Peter’s Lutheran Church is located at 6309 Wilson Place.

Overeaters Anonymous

The theme for December is “Patterns”. You may submit up to 3 photographs for discussion during the meeting to absolutescience@ hotmail.com. Whidbey Island Camera Club, a community club, is open to the public. If you have questions, please email tina31543@ comcast.net

Every Monday, 6:00pm-7:00pm Langley Fellowship Hall, Langley

Al-Anon

TOPS® (Take Off Pounds Sensibly®)

Every Wednesday, 9:30am-10:30am 432 2nd St., Langley If a friend or relative has a problem with alcohol, you can find solutions for yourself at Alanon.

Holiday Market on Pioneer

Every Thursday, 11:30am

Worship, 10:00am Sunday School to age 20, 10:00am Wednesday Testimony Meeting, 7:30pm Christian Science Reading Room Tuesday & Friday, 11:00am-3:00pm Wednesday 5:30pm-7:00pm

Thursday, December 14, 6:00pm Greenbank Hall, Bakken & Firehouse Roads

Longest Night Service

Dugualla Bay Bridge Club

Al-Anon Group Oak Harbor Are you troubled by someone’s drinking? Al-Anon group can help. Call Laurie at (360) 675-4430 for meeting information.

Alcoholics Anonymous Every Day, 12:00pm & 8:00pm 432 2nd Street, Langley For more information, call (360) 221-2070

Bingo

Is food a problem for you? Do you eat when you’re not hungry? Do you binge, purge or restrict? No dues and no fees! No weigh-ins, no diets, no judggments. Just caring support, hope and abstinence.

Every Thursday, 9:00am-11:00am Family Bible Church, Oak Harbor TOPS® is the short name for TOPS Club, Inc., the original, nonprofit, noncommercial network of weight-loss support groups. TOPS® offers tools and programs for healthy living and weight management, with exceptional group fellowship and recognition. Weigh-in from 9:00am-10:00am, meeting is 10:00am-11:00am. For more information, call Shelly Weeks at (360) 207-9039 or (360) 240-1770. For more Meetings and Organizations, visit www.whidbeyweekly.com

Every Monday, 7:00pm Elks Lodge, Oak Harbor

Classes, Seminars and Workshops

Open to the public. For more information, call (360) 675-7111.

749 SE Pioneer Way • Oak Harbor

Learn to Dance at Dan’s Classic Ballroom.Com!

Coupeville Chess Club

LAST WEEKEND DECEMBER 16-17 10AM-5PM

Ballroom, Latin, Swing, Club Dances Groups, Privates, Wedding Prep (360) 720-2727 - dcb601@comcast.net

All skill levels welcomed. Please bring a board if possible. Spread the word and come down for some leisurely play. For information, call (631) 357-1941.

NRA Home Firearms Safety Class

Debtors Anonymous

This class is designed to present the basic knowledge and skills and explain the attitude necessary for the safe handling and storing of guns in the home. The course will also familiarize participants with safe gun handling procedures and guidelines for storing pistols, rifles, and shotguns in the home. This is a NONfiring course; the emphasis is on safe handling, not marksmanship. For questions or to register, call NRA instructor John Hellmann at (360) 675-8397 or email NWSA.Training@gmail. com. Additional information can be found at www.northwhidbeysportsmen.org.

With special appearances from

Santa!

Check out our facebook page for dates and times

Second and Fourth Fridays, 6:45pm-9:00pm Coupeville Library

Every Sunday, 6:00pm WGH Board Room, Coupeville If you are having problems with money and debt and think that you may be a compulsive debtor, the program of Debtors Anonymous can help you. No situation is hopeless. Find the solution that leads to solvency and serenity. Debtors Anonymous is a 12-step program based upon the 12-steps first developed and used by Alcoholics Anonymous. Call (515) 451-3749 for directions to location or for more information.

Divorce Care and DC4kids Every Sunday, 5:00pm Living Word Church, Oak Harbor A support group for people dealing with separation and divorce. For more information, call Larry at (360) 969-0552 or Lisa - DC4kids at (360) 672-4239. Living Word Church is located at 490 NW Crosby Ave.

Saturday, December 16, 9:00am-5:00pm NWSA Range, Oak Harbor Cost: $25, includes a book

DUI/Underage Drinking Prevention Panel Saturday, December 16, 12:45pm Oak Harbor Library Meeting Room No pre-registration required, no late admittance allowed. Open to all and required by local driving schools for driver’s education students and parents. For more information, call (360) 672-8219 or visit idipic.org

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Oak Harbor teacher edges closer to Grammy

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Community orchestra brings holiday spirit to Whidbey

By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly

Oak Harbor High School choir instructor Darren McCoy is one of ten music educators nationwide chosen as finalists for the 2018 Grammy Music Educator Award. McCoy, who had earlier made the list of 25 semifinalists (see story in the Nov. 16 issue of Whidbey Weekly) got the news last week. “I was super excited to hear that I was accepted to the final round,” McCoy said in an email. “The idea of winning a Grammy is surreal. Part of me doesn’t believe I’ve made the top ten. “It will probably hit me after our concerts are over and I go on break,” he continued. “I’ll be sitting there drinking hot cider or something and then BAM!, it’ll finally sink in.” When it does sink in, McCoy said he will likely cycle through feelings of joy and nervousness. But concern is also in the mix, should he need to travel to New York City for the awards show on Jan. 28. “Concern about missing the classes right before our big Valentine’s concert,” he said. “But hey, if a concert doesn’t work just because I miss two days, I don’t deserve a Grammy.” The Grammy Music Educator Award was established in 2014 to recognize the educators who inspire young singers and musicians every day, impacting the lives of those who may already have or may one day win their own Grammy. For McCoy, who has been with the Oak Harbor School District for ten years, the nomination and a potential win serve as further confirmation he chose the right career. “Winning a Grammy would mean that I should continue to build on what I already do as a teacher,” he said. “I think any musician

See GRAMMY continued on page 10

Photo Courtesy of Whidbey Island Community Orchestra The Whidbey Island Community Orchestra presents its annual holiday concerts Friday and Sunday in Freeland.

By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly If, by some strange twist of fate, you have not yet succumbed to the spirit of the holidays, Whidbey Island Community Orchestra has just the thing to get you in the mood. The orchestra will be presenting its annual holiday concert at 7 p.m. Friday at Trinity Lutheran Church in Freeland and again at 3 p.m. Sunday at St. Augustine’s-in-the-Woods, also in Freeland. The performances will feature all the classic, magical pieces associated with Christmas, and then some. “This upcoming weekend of concerts is the first time that Whidbey Island Community Orchestra has performed with a vocal soloist and a choir,” explained conductor Cynthia Morrow. “We are excited to be joined by Karl Olsen, music director of Trinity Lutheran Church in Freeland, as our baritone soloist, and members of Trinity Lutheran’s choir and members of Island Consort Choir as well.” The choirs will join in the performance of Ralph Vaughn Williams’ “Variations on Christmas Carols,” which Morrow said “truly sets the tone of Christmas in the English countryside.” The holiday concert is one orchestra members and the community look forward to each year. And these upcoming performances are sure to serve up a holiday treat for everyone.

Photo Courtesy of Darren McCoy Oak Harbor High School choral director Darren McCoy is one of 25 finalists from across the nation nominated to receive the Grammy Music Educator Award.

repertoire of holiday music, orchestra members prepare and donate all the food served following each concert. “One of the nicest and most fulfilling aspects of conducting the orchestra is realizing just how much the members are willing and eager to do as preparation for each concert,” Morrow said. The Whidbey Island Community Orchestra is open to performers of all ages. While it is a pay-to-play group, no students under the age of 18 pay anything to belong. “Since there is no longer any classical orchestral music in the Whidbey Island schools, we are the only orchestra on the island that accepts young players without auditions and has a full-time mentoring program,” said Morrow. “This means that every young person sits alongside a seasoned musician and gets coaching and helpful feedback along the way. We would like to encourage even more youngsters to take advantage of this opportunity.” There is no charge to attend the holiday concerts, but donations are accepted. In addition, copies of Morrow’s books “Unstrung” and “Domestic Violins” will be sold to raise money for youth scholarships.

“We are also featuring two works by Leroy Photo Courtesy of Whidbey Island Community Orchestra Anderson: “Christmas Festival Overture” Conductor Cynthia Morrow has been with the Whidbey Island contains many beloved and popular Christmas Carols, while “Sleigh Ride” has become Community Orchestra since 2014. a fun winter classic that we enjoy performIf you can’t make Whidbey Island Coming year after year,” Morrow said. “We also decided to get a jump munity Orchestra’s holiday concerts, the group will next perform on the New Year with Franz Lehar’s wonderful “Gold and Silver “Greats of American Jazz” on March 2nd. The orchestra’s season Waltz,” which is traditionally performed by the Vienna Philharmonic wraps up with a Mother’s Day concert in May, which features on New Year’s Day in Austria. young musicians performing solo pieces and concertos. “There’s something for everyone, including “And the Glory” from “This is a point of special pride for our orchestra and for the comthe Messiah, a rousing rendition of “Tidings of Comfort and Joy” munity of Whidbey Island,” said Morrow. “There must be somebased on “God Rest Ye Merry, Gentlemen;” “A Mad Russian’s thing in the water, because we produce amazingly talented young Christmas,” which is the Trans Siberian’s tribute to Tchaikovsky’s musicians here, and this year will be no exception.” “Nutcracker;” and the very beautiful “Gesu Bambino,” performed by our string section,” she continued. More information on Whidbey Island Community Orchestra can be This is a true community orchestra. In addition to providing a full

found online at whidbeyorchestras.org.

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Community provides feedback on affordable housing for Whidbey By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly After months of work, members of the community have had the first look at a list of 40 recommendations put forward to help deal with Whidbey Island’s affordable housing shortage. The recommendations by the North Whidbey Affordable Housing Task Force were presented at an open house Thursday, Dec. 7 at the Oak Harbor Senior Center, and represent the culmination of more than a year’s work.

income. Monthly housing costs, such as rent and utilities, should not exceed 30-percent of a family’s total monthly income to meet the standard. For example, a family making $24,000 a year, or $2,000 a month, would have to spend $600 per month on rent and utilities to be at the 30-percent, affordable rent threshold. Current market rent for a one-bedroom unit is $900 a month, roughly 55-percent of monthly income, which is considered an extremely high burden.

The task force grew out of initial discussions between Island County Commissioner Jill Johnson and Oak Harbor Mayor Bob Severns, and was based on Seattle’s Housing Affordability and Livability Agenda. The group included members of the community with expertise and an interest in housing on North Whidbey.

“Those rising housing costs mean that a majority of people on Whidbey Island don’t make enough money to afford housing,” said George Saul, one of the task force members. “Our group identified specific ordinances to which we could make changes tomorrow, that would quickly affect change. But obviously we’re hoping for the ability to affect change for the long term.”

“The recommendations you’re going to see today are an output of that,” said Johnson. “What we focused on primarily was workforce housing – when we say workforce…we mean people who are making below $20 an hour. There’s a lot of people like that in our community.

Oak Harbor resident Katheryn Howell just returned to the city after a three-year absence. She said she was surprised by the population growth and increased density in such a short period of time.

“This isn’t about providing subsidized and supportive housing,” she continued, adding the meeting was focused on beginning a legislative framework. “Our goal is to hear your thoughts on these ideas before we get too excited about keeping them.” Those attending were given a handout with the 40 recommendations and a sheet of 15 round stickers. The recommendations were posted on easels around the room, and community members were asked to mark the 15 items they felt were most important. “If your community reaction is 'That’s the worst idea we’ve ever heard,' well then, that’s not going to be a high priority,” said Johnson. “Some of the recommendations are very policy-driven. Policy changes take a while to implement and then they take a while to work, but they have to start, or the changes never happen.” Affordable housing refers to that which is available to residents whose income is 80-percent or less of the area median

“Affordable housing is so important, it’s such a basic human right and something we need to make work,” she said. “These are all great ideas and I like that we are changing the way we think about space and looking at how to share it.”

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly Innovative ideas for providing affordable housing in the future were also included for feedback at an open house held last week in Oak Harbor to reveal a list of recommendations put forth by the North Whidbey Affordable Housing Task Force.

The feedback and recommendations received last week will be brought before both the city of Oak Harbor and Island County for consideration in future planning. The county is currently working on an update to the housing portion of its comprehensive plan and will pass the recommendations on to a consultant hired to work on the plan. “All of this feedback will go to those consultants,” Johnson said. “Our recommendations have to be county wide, so if a recommendation doesn’t work in any [one area], it doesn’t work for the county. “But the county also knows in order to provide affordable housing, we have to have partnerships with the municipalities,” she continued. Just what will come of it all has yet to be determined. “I think most of us on the task force are pleased with the work that’s been done,” said Saul. “But we’re all curious to see if the city or county will be willing to follow through with it.”

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly Oak Harbor residents attending an open house on recommendations from the North Whidbey Affordable Housing Task Force were asked to mark their favorites with small stickers.

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly Oak Harbor residents pour over lists of recommendations made by the North Whidbey Affordable Housing Task force at an open house last week. Those attending were asked to choose the recommendations they felt were the most important. Recommendations will be turned over to the city of Oak Harbor and Island County for future consideration.

GRAMMY continued from page 9 likes to hear the applause, but it’s a different kind of affirmation when the people giving you the award don’t know you. They judge you based on your work. Winning a Grammy means that while I shouldn’t feel proud, since we all know where that leads, I should feel confident.”

Photo Courtesy of Grammy Awards Oak Harbor High School choir instructor Darren McCoy, top row, center, is one of ten finalists in the running to win the 2018 Grammy Music Educator Award.

McCoy is up against nine other music educators from across the country. There were more than 2,300 instructors nominated, so to make the top ten is already an honor. To be eligible, nominees must be current, full-time educators in the U.S. who teach music in public or private schools, kindergarten through college. All finalists receive an honorarium of $1,000 and their respective schools receive a grant of the same amount. The Grammy winner and school will receive $10,000. Whether he wins or not, McCoy feels gratitude to have come this far.

“While I feel honored, I still feel overwhelmingly grateful to the community that makes it possible to do what I love to do,” McCoy said. “I’m proud of the work my students have done to bring our program so far and it’s touching to be recognized for work that I would probably do even if I weren’t recognized for it.” For now, McCoy will have to simply wait and see how it all turns out. The winner will be announced in January, but as yet it’s unknown whether they will be notified in advance or simply learn who the winner is on the night of the awards. “I’m guessing the winner will be the kind of person who encourages music learning in the classroom but also contributes in other walks of life,” said McCoy. The 60th annual Grammy Awards will air Sunday, Jan. 28 on CBS.

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Bipartisan Congressional Bus Caucus Launches, Co-led by WA U.S. Rep. Rick Larsen The Washington State Transit Association (WSTA) is pleased to announce the formation of the Bipartisan Congressional Bus Caucus to be Co-Chaired by Congressmen Rick Larsen from Washington’s 2nd Congressional District in Northwest Washington and Congressman David Young, (R-IA). “As someone who uses public transportation every day, I understand just how critical safe and reliable bus systems are for working Americans,” said Larsen. “With more than 195 million passenger trips in Washington state annually, I am thrilled to co-chair the Congressional Bus Caucus – robust investment in buses and transportation will keep the economy thriving.” The purpose of the Bus Caucus is to give a stronger voice to more than 1,100 bus transit systems across the country, 31 in Washington State, and highlight the need for adequate federal funding of bus transit programs. As federal spending for public transportation has been limited, transit agencies have expressed frustration that there is not enough money to fund the needs of both heavy rail systems and bus agencies. The Bus Caucus seeks to highlight the benefits of investing in bus systems, the challenges accompanying aging bus fleets and facilities, and encourage innovation in a rapidly changing transportation climate. The Caucus will raise awareness on Capitol Hill by holding occasional events to highlight the importance of transit agencies striving to deliver reliable service and meet a state of good repair. “There is a mountain of need by every transit agency in our state for expansion and replacement of their fleets and facilities so we are pleased to see Rep. Larsen take the lead on the Bus Caucus as our agencies and passengers need a strong voice on Capitol Hill,” said Justin D. Leighton, WSTA Executive Director,

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which represents every transit agency in Washington State. Buses are the unsung hero in our nation’s transportation network, providing more than 51% of transit trips per year. They have an even greater role in Washington State as they provide over 85% of the total 230 million public transportation trips taken in the state. “As President of The Bus Coalition and General Manager of Link Transit, I see how funding cuts at the federal, state and local level are impacting bus systems of all sizes,” said Wenatchee transit executive Richard DeRock. The Bus Coalition is a transit industry advocacy group focused on issues specific to bus agencies. “Many agencies are struggling to keep up with aging fleets and crumbling transit facilities. We know when systems age and service is cut, the rider experience suffers and ridership declines. That’s why I’m so excited about the formation of a new Congressional Caucus that will shine light on the needs of the bus transit community and give voice to a transportation asset that is so important to our local and national economy,” DeRock said. Rep. Denny Heck (WA-10) joins Larsen as a founding member of the Bus Caucus. A total of nine members of Congress have joined. “We encourage the remaining members of the Washington State Congressional Delegation to join their colleagues in this effort,” said Leighton. “This issue is vitally important to Washington’s transit agencies and their customers. [Submitted by Meghan Meppner, Island Transit]

Sno-Isle Libraries Board of Trustees Vote to Put Levy on April 24 Ballot Sno-Isle Libraries will ask voters to maintain funding with a ballot measure in April, 2018. “Going to the voters is not a decision we take lightly,” Board of Trustees President Marti BITS & PIECES

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THANK YOU!

Open B Tues., oard Meetin Dec. 1 9, 6:30 g pm Oak Ha rbor Ch of Com amber merce

The Oak Harbor Football & Cheer League would like to thank their 2017 Season Sponsors:

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Let’s Dish! with Kae Harris

SIPPING THE SEASON THE HOLIDAY STYLE! This time of year is completely steeped in tradition. Everything about the season is brimming with things we readily associate with it. From the decorations to the scents and even the foods – all seem to have sprung to life. It’s as if they wait all year to be let loose and let loose they do. One thing I have yet to cover in all the merriment, is the drinks. I mean, you can’t have a party without drinks, right? You could always do the usual - soda, water, juice, cider, perhaps a wine or some beer. Nothing wrong with those options at all. But why don’t we get creative with libations? There are so many different kinds of cocktails to enjoy this time of year, and like all things food AND drink, each has a story to tell. The very first drink whose story really pulled me in, is wassail. It is a warm beverage, a hot mulled cider aptly named after the ancient tradition of ‘wassailing.’ There are two different ways in which people partook in this event: The door-to-door version where people literally do just that, singing songs whilst offering a drink from a wassail bowl in hopes of a gift exchange (not

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too unlike caroling today, with a couple of minor differences). The other version is the one where people visit apple orchards and sing to the trees in the hope of encouraging a good harvest in the year to come. Apples abound right now, and there are a wealth of ways in which we can enjoy them, so let’s make one of those ways with wassail. For those who are familiar with the practice, it would seem it is very much about a connection with history and tradition, a oneness with neighbors and friends, and a wish that is put out into the universe that might hearken good vibes into the orchards which have wassailing visitors. I’ll toast to good vibes any day! With apples roasted in sugar, dunked in a mixture of cider, cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, cloves, brandy orange juice, lemon juice and even eggs (though not all recipes include them), what’s not to like about wassail? This is a modified version of the original recipe from times long since passed, nonetheless it is delicious! In a large pot or a slow cooker, mix 2 quarts apple cider, 2 cups of orange juice and lemon juice together and warm over a low heat. Season with the spices and bring to a simmer, add a half cup of brandy if you like, at this point. If a slow cooker is

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used, allow it to simmer for a few hours – preferably all day - and when it’s ready, serve nice and warm! While wassail would go down as a treat at any yuletide get-together, it is but one of many other cocktails that can make a gathering absolutely great. Hot buttered rum is another equally tasty drink to mark an occasion. Its very essence says it all – the rich buttery flavor, mingling with sweetness and spice is enough to envelope you in a blanket of seasonal warmth and delectability. The great thing about this cocktail is it can be whipped up on a moment’s notice, and can be made into a one- or two-person event or modified for larger crowds. All you need is 5 or 6 ounces of hot water, 1 small slice of butter, 2 ounces of dark rum, 1 teaspoon of brown sugar, a little allspice, a little nutmeg, a smidgen of cinnamon and a dash of vanilla. In order to make this mixed goodie, put the butter, spices and sugar into the bottom of a coffee glass or mug and mix well. It’s also called muddling if you have a muddler (or pestle, if you will) to smash and mix these ingredients together. Add the rum to this and top it off with the hot water. Stir it well and drink it up – slowly, of course! Savor those rich, buttered rum sips! If you want to move away from the thicker, warm drinks, then I have just the thing for you. Heard of a poinsettia? Not the plant, to be sure, but this delightful sparkling drink which requires only three ingredients: champagne, cranberry juice and orange liqueur. Now, most certainly you could play with the ingredients and use sparkling wine, and perhaps a different fruit liqueur, but for an easier version of the traditional one, the aforementioned items would make it just so. Pour into a chilled champagne glass, a half-ounce of triple sec orange liqueur, 3 to 4 ounces of cranberry juice, stir very well and fill it up

with the bubbly. There you have it! Christmas elegance with a zesty citrus twist! If you really want to stick with something you know a bit better, have a Holiday Glogg. Not so familiar? It’s basically a mulled wine and while many countries have their own version of a mulled wine, this one is of Nordic descent. It tends to be a good crowd pleaser due to it being easy to make in large quantities. Essentially, all you need to do is mix together a gallon of dry red wine with 5 whole cardamom pods, 5 or 6 whole cloves, an inch of fresh peeled ginger, a stick of cinnamon, 1 orange peel, 1 and ½ cups brown sugar, in a large plastic or glass bowl. Refrigerate this overnight and strain through a muslin cloth into a pot the next morning and simmer it until warm. When it’s time to serve, add some raisins and slivered almonds to each cup or mug and then spoon in the glogg goodness! You can add a tablespoon of bitters to the mixture if you like, as they will accentuate the flavors within the cocktail whilst simultaneously bringing a little something of their own to the party. Dear readers, this season is about celebrating – each other mostly, but anything else you feel is well worth a celebration, too! The best way to celebrate is in the company of those we love, with good food and good drink as well. I hope you try a traditional holiday cocktail, any one you fancy of course, and you enjoy not only the drink, but the merriment of the moment! Please send any and all comments, questions, information and any recipes you might like to share to letsdish.whidbeyweekly@gmail.com, because I’d love to hear from you so, let’s do just that and dish! www.thespruce.com www.theartofmanliness.com www.nourishedkitchen.com To read past columns of Let's Dish in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

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fortune of a dedicated and cooperative team at your side, a lot stands to be accomplished. This is even more true if you don’t mind sharing the credit for good work. The 15th tells which it’s likely to be.

CHICKEN LITTLE & THE ASTROLOGER By Wesley Hallock

ARIES (March 21-April 19) It may surprise you to learn that your highly-charged and energetic lifestyle could be the topic of much conversation. Your easy pursuit of new interests and what are viewed as unusual activities are a threat to some. Don’t let their whisperings cramp your style. Pursuing changing interests is normal and healthy, even essential, for you at present. The 15th promises to be unusually busy in that regard. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Ordinarily reliable people may surprise you this week by becoming suddenly and inexplicably unreliable. They might even seem to be going out of their way to be predictably unpredictable. You may feel inconvenienced, but there is a bright side. The end result of a surprise let-down is usually increased self-reliance, and that is always a good thing. Travel plans and purchase agreements are subject to revision on the 15th. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) You may find yourself wishing you had paid more attention to the details of some issues that have chosen this, of all weeks, to come back to haunt you. This time you’ll want to pay more attention to the fine print that escaped your notice the first time around. This is your chance to streamline your life in anticipation of finally being free to move forward unhindered. Take steps on the 15th to escape the squeeze play that’s binding you. CANCER (June 22-July 22) Your interests are naturally going to carry you hither and yon this week, exasperating all who want to make demands on your attention span. Your present inability to focus on a single issue for longer than absolutely necessary is no cause for concern. Follow where your interests lead. The reason for your flights of fancy will soon enough be made clear. The 15th marks the beginnings of several potential paths. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Should you find yourself pinched between a rock and a hard spot this week, it’s very likely a blessing in disguise. It may force you into that creative leap of faith that you’re braced for, but haven’t quite worked up the nerve to take. If it’s moral support you’re lacking, the good news is that it appears you have the necessary backing to see you through. Watch the 15th to see who your friends are in this matter. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) If you want it done right this week, you’ll probably have to do it yourself. Hands-on projects that involve others are likely to manifest more supervisors than real workers. On the other hand, if you have the good

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You’ll necessarily present a public face in sharp contrast to how you feel in private this week. The two contradictory versions of you may be difficult to reconcile for those who must interact with both personas. Patience is advised in dealing with those who have trouble keeping up. Family members are your allies here, even when their actions seem purposely abrasive. Go out of your way to be kind to them on the 15th. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) The lines of communication this week are open to you in ways that could enhance your dealings with the wealthy and powerful. This bodes well for you in working directly with those authority figures whose say is important to your financial affairs. Any contacts you make with those above your personal station in life can be expected to be fruitful. Watch the 15th for ways to advance yourself and be ready to act. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) An attitude of, “easy come, easy go,” is the ideal approach for handling unavoidable expenditures this week. You’ll find that life responds best to a simple, no-frills approach to everything that you do. You may be amazed at how much you can accomplish when you’re relaxed and detached. The inner you benefits as much as the outer from events on the 15th. Children have much to teach on that day. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Enticements beckon to you from afar this week. Anything holding promise of more interesting and successful ways of doing business likely holds a special attraction. That these seem to be just beyond your reach only increases their appeal. Anything that takes you outside of your normal sphere on the 15th is a likely step in the right direction. To understand where your interests lead, you must pursue them. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb 18) It’s easy these days to lose sight of what you’re working toward, so key events this week should come as welcome reminders. Don’t let problems demanding solutions rob you of the joys of being in the moment. Answers to your questions come more quickly when you open yourself to what the problems have to teach you. Listen inwardly as well as outwardly on the 15th and don’t place limits on yourself. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) If you need answers this week, your own inner knowing and the outside counsel of someone you hold in high regard are equally good sources. Neither source is likely to be complete in itself, making it important that you consult with both. You may be called upon to change your approach to the matter in question, so don’t set your course too soon. The 15th is good for any changes that need to be made.

Chicken Little looks at what is and fears the sky is falling. Wesley Hallock, as a professional astrologer looks at what is and sees what could be. Read Wesley’s monthly forecast with links to Facebook and Twitter, at www. chickenlittleandtheastrologer.com. To read past columns of Chicken Little and the Astrologer in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

CLUES ACROSS 1. Large jug 5. Anwar __, Egyptian statesman 10. Punjab province capital 12. Evoke 14. Data 16. Exists

50. Franz van __, German diplomat 52. Vineyard 53. Elk or moose

18. Opponent 21. Professionals might need one 23. Captures geographical data (abbr.)

55. Moved quickly

24. Senior officer

56. Swiss river 57. Rhode Island

27. Sacred Islamic site

58. Fall into disrepair

29. Egyptian unit of capacity

18. Supervises flying

63. Ancient Roman virtue

19. Having eight

65. Removes

20. Right-handed page

66. Slovenly women

22. NHL great Bobby

67. Comedian Rogen

23. German municipality

CLUES DOWN

25. Negotiate

1. Extremely high frequency

36. Cleft lip

2. Court

40. Prohibit

3. Make a mistake

43. Stroke

4. Change the appearance of

44. Does not acknowledge

5. Long-haired dog

46. Hillsides

6. The Greatest of All Time

47. Austrian river

26. Keyboard key 27. Youngster 28. Medical decision (abbr.) 30. Ribonucleic acid 31. One-time Levi’s chairman Walter 33. Cold region 35. Type of plywood 37. A way to unfreeze 38. Winter melon 40. Dispute 41. An expression of imagination 42. Human gene 44. Touch lightly 45. Computer giant 48. Garlands

32. Comedienne Gasteyer 34. Performer __ Lo Green 35. Having only magnitude, not direction 39. Payroll company

7. Designer Christian

49. Passover feast and ceremony

8. Blemished

51. Golf score

9. Atlanta-based rapper

54. Hair-like structure

10. Deceivers

59. Check

11. One who supports disorder

60. Extract metal from this

13. Colossal

61. Tell on

15. A team’s best pitcher

62. Powdery residue

17. Comfort in a time of sadness

64. A part of the mind Answers on page 19

YOUR GUESS IS AS GOOD AS OURS WEATHER FORECAST Thurs, Dec. 14

Fri, Dec. 15

Sat, Dec. 16

Sun, Dec. 17

Mon, Dec. 18

Tues, Dec. 19

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

H-51°/L-40°

H-46°/L-36°

H-48°/L-38°

H-47°/L-37°

H-48°/L-41°

H-43°/L-34°

H-46°/L-40°

Mostly Sunny High Clouds

Rain and Drizzle Possible

Rain

Cloudy AM Rain

Cloudy Rain Possible

Rain and Drizzle Possible

Wed, Dec. 20

Mostly Sunny

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

H-50°/L-39°

H-48°/L-37°

H-47°/L-38°

H-46°/L-37°

H-47°/L-41°

H-43°/L-32°

H-47°/L-39°

Mostly Sunny High Clouds

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Anamosa said before a unanimous vote at the December 11 regular meeting. “Libraries are vital to our communities. Addressing the levy rate now enables the library to continue providing the resources that are so important to our communities and customers.”

“The predictability of property-tax revenue helps in budgeting, but unfortunately costs often rise more rapidly than revenue,” Sno-Isle Libraries Executive Director Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory said. The library district’s strategy, she said, is to do what most people do; budget carefully and put some away in savings.

The resolution passed by the trustees calls for asking the voters to consider restoring 9 cents to the library district’s regular operating levy. The 2018 levy rate is expected to be 38 cents per $1,000 of assessed property value. If voters approve the ballot measure scheduled for April 24, 2018, the levy rate would go to 47 cents in 2019.

“We last went to the voters in 2009,” WoolfIvory said. “Those were tough times and we promised that if our communities said ‘yes,’ we wouldn’t come back for at least five years and we’ve stretched that five years to nine. We made good on our promise by using what was necessary to maintain services and reserved the rest until needed.”

Sno-Isle Libraries receives 98 percent of its funding from a property-tax levy across most of Snohomish and all of Island counties.

Woolf-Ivory said the need to draw from reserves began three years ago and was used again to balance the 2018 budget. “By the

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2019 budget, there won’t be enough in regular funding and the levy stabilization reserve to maintain current services.” Board President Anamosa said the combination of the library district’s history of “careful, thoughtful and practical” budgeting with recent community survey results made the decision to go to voters a reasonable choice. “The results from phone, email and online surveys, as well as three open-house events, indicate to me that the community wants an opportunity to vote,” Anamosa said. Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation President Terry Lippincott thanked the trustees for bringing the levy question to the voters. “The Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation partners with Sno-Isle Libraries to bring strong

programming to community libraries,” Lippincott said. “We’re excited to be part of the community support that includes corporate partners, friends-of-the-library organizations and a huge group of dedicated library volunteers.” Voter approval of a library operations levy means library services would continue at current levels. If voters do not approve the ballot measure in April, the next step would be budget cuts for 2019 and service reductions. “We project that the 2019 budget would need to be cut by $2 million,” said Woolf-Ivory, adding that additional reductions would be needed in 2020 and subsequent years. BITS & PIECES

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15 DECEMBER 14 - DECEMBER 20, 2017 www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALL LOCALL Y OWNED. Y OWNED.

Film Shorts Courtesy of Cascadia Weekly

Daddy’s Home 2: The unlikely comedy team of Mark Wahlberg and Will Ferrell are back to bring you seasonal cheer and they’re bringing Mel Gibson with them. Remember when Gibson was the most problematic man in Hollywood? Boy, that really seems like a simpler time.  (PG-13 • 1 hr. 38 min.) Ferdinand: I guess this is the movie you take your kids to if they’re not old enough for "Star Wars."  (PG • 1 hr. 48 min.)

www.whidbeyweekly.com DECEMBER 14 - DECEMBER 20, 2017 LOCALL LOCALL Y OPERA Y OPERA TED.TED.

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By Carey Ross Coco: As a creative filmmaking force, Pixar is unmatched. The unstoppable animation juggernaut rolls out another instant classic, this time centering its story on budding musician Miguel, who takes a stunning journey of sight and sound in the Land of the Dead in order to unlock the secrets of his family history. Bring a hanky–this one packs an emotional punch.  (PG • 1 hr. 45 min.)

15

Whidbey Weekly

Hollywood to come up with original stories, so I guess this is what I get.  (PG • 1 hr. 26 min.)

STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI PG-13 JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE PG-13 MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS PG-13 PITCH PERFECT 3 PG-13

Like us on:

Star Wars: The Last Jedi: My only prediction concerning this movie is I will probably cry when it bids adieu to Carrie Fisher. Princess Leia 4eva.  (PG-13) Thor: Ragnarok: So much of the enormous success of the Marvel Cinematic Universe can be tied to savvy hiring practices. From taking a huge risk in choosing Robert Downey Jr. to anchor the franchise as "Iron Man" to tapping Joss Whedon to helm its first two "Avengers" movies, Marvel knows how to find and foster superheroes. They’re back at it again, picking "What We Do in the Shadows’" Taika Waititi to take some of the Shakespearean starch out of Thor and give him the sense of humor he’s been sorely lacking.  (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 10 min.)

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Just Getting Started: Two old men–Morgan Freeman and Tommy Lee Jones–have a pissing contest to determine who is the most alpha of the alpha males and their prize is Rene Russo. Just what the world needs right now: a cinematic celebration of toxic masculinity.  (PG-13 • 1 hr. 30 min.) Justice League: Go for Gal Gadot. Stay for Jason Momoa. Take or leave Ben Affleck. ^^ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 50 min.) Lady Bird: Written and directed by Greta Gerwig and starring Saoirse Ronan (both of which will no doubt earn Oscar nominations), this tiny indie film is currently the bestreviewed film in the history of movie-review aggregator Rotton Tomatoes. Everyone who has watched it, loves it. Come see what all the fuss is about.  (R • 1 hr. 33 min.) Murder on the Orient Express: Kenneth Branagh dons the most magnificent mustache ever seen on the big screen to play Agatha Christie’s Hercule Poirot, who must solve the author’s most famous mystery amid a cast that includes Johnny Depp, Penelope Cruz, Willem Dafoe, Michelle Pfeiffer, and the inimitable Judi Dench.  (PG • 2 hrs. 7 min.)

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri: Never mind this movie’s unwieldy title, this pitch-black dramedy about a mother searching for answers in her daughter’s murder case comes to us via writer/director Martin McDonagh ("In Bruges") and stars Frances McDormand, Woody Harrelson, Sam Rockwell, Peter Dinklage, and Lucas Hedges. Gimme.  (R • 1 hr. 55 min.)

Thursday, December 14

STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) @ 7PM & 10PM

Fri., December 15 & Sat., December 16

STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) @ 6PM & 10:15PM COCO (PG) @ 8:30PM

Wonder: It’s been a minute since Julia Roberts had a film role that reminded us why she’ll always be America’s Sweetheart, and she gets a huge assist in that effort from Jacob Tremblay as her son Auggie, whose singular spirit cannot be hidden by a congenital facial deformity.  (PG • 1 hr. 53 min.)

Sunday, December 17

STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (PG-13) @ 6PM COCO (PG) @ 8:30PM

The Star: This is an animated adventure about the first Christmas (no room at the inn, the Star of Bethlehem, etc.) told from the For Anacortes theater showings, please see www.fandango.com. For Blue Fox and Oak point of view of the animals involved, includHarbor Cinemas showings see ads on this ing a brave donkey named Bo who yearns for page. a life of adventure. I know I saidPuzzle I wanted 1 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.47)

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Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/sudoku on Thu Nov 30 22:22:56 2017 GMT. Enjoy!

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16

DECEMBER 14 - DECEMBER 20, 2017 LOCALLY OWNED.

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WEDNESDAY, NOV. 1 10:39 am, S Main St. Caller reporting female was just in caller's trailer and throwing things around. 12:46 pm, Dodge Rd. Caller advising he found three pounds of marijuana growing in attic; caller has boxed it all up and needs it picked up.

Island 911

Seriously, we do not make this stuff up! SUNDAY, OCT. 29 12:55 am, SW Erie St. Male subject on the line stating someone is trying to kill him; states “just send them now.” When asked name, subject disconnected. 10:39 am, Orchard Loop Reporting party states she is separating from her husband and things have been civil until Friday. Concerned, as male is wanting to introduce new girlfriend to their children. Reporting party not wanting her children around new girlfriend as she has a history of not being stable. 11:08 am, SR 20 Caller reporting male subject standing at location talking to himself, carrying bags of toys. 11:14 am, Evening Glory Ct. Party requesting call. Advising he is being threatened by community members; threats of bodily harm and they've put a sign on one of his vehicles. 1:32 pm, NE Midway Blvd. Reporting party advising customer got upset when reporting party began helping another customer. 3:53 pm, Flaming Meadow Ln. Caller reporting they were selling a car on Craigslist. Guy came by to look at the car and left female at edge of the road. 5:07 pm, Main St. Third party report of a ram loose in woods behind location; owner unknown. Another caller reporting ram. 8:22 pm, Casey St. Caller reporting squatters are out on the street and all over, throwing things at each other and yelling. Caller is watching from her porch. 9:48 pm, Essex St. Reporting party advising male subject was outside front door, standing on porch getting dressed. 10:08 pm, Columbia Beach Dr. Caller advising she unplugged her heating pad and is requesting assistance. MONDAY, OCT. 30 3:11 am, NE Barron Dr. Caller requesting contact because husband is being rude.

4:47 am, Zurich Ct. Reporting party requesting call in reference to “sonic attack” that occurred at her house again; party is not at location. 8:45 am, SR 525 Reporting party advising male sitting in the middle of the highway; caller asked if he was okay and he said he was waiting for bus, but there is no bus stop there. 9:08 am, Arnold Rd. Caller reporting cat in the neighborhood is “terrorizing” her cat and injured her cat. Has not been able to trap it, thinks it could belong in area of Tanner Rd. 11:53 am, N Pheasant Run Rd. Party requesting call in reference to seeing coyote on the fence line approximately 10 minutes ago; caller would like to know what she is able to do if she sees it again. 2:36 pm, Snowflake Rd. Reporting party advising male walking down Fakkema carrying an axe. 4:29 pm, El Mar St. Caller reporting a vehicle speeding in area. Vehicle turned 360-degrees at location; two occupants got out and dumped an espresso sign in the roadway. Reporting party has removed it from the road. 6:23 pm, W North Camano Dr. Party reporting that while he was in the hospital, a neighbor came into the house and took phone numbers; has been calling his lady friend and harassing her. Neighbor does not have a key. TUESDAY, OCT. 31 1:12 pm, SW Robertson Dr. Reporting party advising money was sent to Portugal and feels it may be a scam. 1:45 pm, SR 20 Caller advising subject yelled at her as she was driving by. 2:39 pm, Wildcat Way Reporting party advising she is locked in women's bathroom at location. 6:30 pm, SW Erie St. Caller reporting male subject dressed like a clown scaring customers as they leave the store. 7:41 pm, SW 16th Ave. Party reporting male subject chasing people through the neighborhood.

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3:04 pm, Degraff Rd. Caller advising they were walking on Degraff, heard cracking in bushes and bullet went past; believes someone is target-practicing in wooded area. No longer walking in area and is safe inside residence. 6:14 pm, SW Erie St. Caller advising two male transients are chasing each other with spears. 7:47 pm, Penn Cove Rd. Reporting party states officers and emergency medical technicians that came to house when reporting party was taken to hospital jumped on reporting party and forced reporting party to go to the hospital. Party states bed was broken in the process.

THURSDAY, NOV. 2 6:22 am, SR 20 Party reporting a scruffy-looking gentleman with a “weird tool” in his pocket walking up and down the aisle of cars. 11:03 am, Cascade Ln. Reporting party is physical therapist for subject; advising when he got there, wife answered and said she is bi-polar and can't handle this anymore. Wife had a gun pointed at him. 12:08 pm, Arrowhead Rd. Caller reporting they put brakes on a friend's truck; now it isn't working. Friend is upset and was threatening caller. 3:58 pm, Garrison Rd. Reporting sheep followed caller to location; was behind the back of house. Sees sheep at side of the house. 6:51 pm, SR 20 Reporting party advising transient with cart throwing and running shopping cart into things. 7:48 pm, NW Clipper Dr. Caller reporting she found her ex-boyfriend's dog tied up to her front door. Report provided by OHPD & Island County Sheriff’s Dept.

Life Tributes JILL ALLGIRE SCHACHT March 18, 1950 – December 1, 2017 Jill Allgire Schacht passed away surrounded by the love of friends and family December 1, 2017 after a courageous fight against cancer. She was 67 years of age. Jill was born March 18,1950 in Oak Harbor, WA. She and her older brother Steve spent their early childhood in Japan, where their father John Allgire, and mother Myrtle, were stationed in the Navy. The family then moved back to Oak Harbor, where Jill would begin her lifelong love of Whidbey Island. Jill’s childhood was filled with the small-town stories shared by many of her friends – summers at Cranberry Lake and school years spent at Oak Harbor Elementary, Middle and High Schools, where she graduated with the OHHS Class of 1968. Jill’s love of music was an essential part of her school life and her participation in band and choir nurtured her enduring passion for music. In her early 20’s, Jill moved to Bellingham, where she met and married her late husband, William Frederick Schacht. By the early 1980’s, Oak Harbor drew Jill and her young family back to Oak Harbor, where they raised two children, Sarah Patricia and William John Schacht. Jill took on the role as manager for The Casual House, a women’s clothing store her parents founded nearly 60 years ago. She became an advocate for the growth and small business vibrancy of downtown Oak Harbor, serving on numerous boards and working groups to keep businesses and community moving forward. Jill’s sense of community saw her as a member of the PEO and frequent contributor to OHHS teams, activities, and community organizations. As her children moved on to college and careers, Jill began to spend more time with her first love: music. Through vocal lessons, singing at student showcases in Seattle jazz clubs, participating in Centrum’s jazz intensive workshops during Port Townsend Jazz Fest, and going on jazz cruises, Jill pursued her love of jazz while making new groups of friends from all over the world. In summer 2016, Jill topped off her sale of the Casual House with a music-filled retirement party at her home in Oak Harbor with some of her favorite jazz artists, friends, and family. That same year, Jill watched as her daughter Sarah married her husband, Guillaume. She was there when her son Bill married his wife Hannah and also for the birth of her grandson, William T. Schacht. In the last years of her life, Jill packed in an amazing amount of jazz, travel, friendship, and love of family. Jill is survived by her children Sarah (Guillaume) and Bill (Hannah). Also surviving are three grandchildren and her brother Steve (Sandy) and their children. She was preceded in death by her husband Bill and her parents. A funeral mass was celebrated Saturday, December 9, 2017 at St. Augustine Catholic Church. Inurnment followed at Maple Leaf Cemetery. At Jill’s request, the reception following at the Oak Harbor Yacht Club was filled with her favorite jazz music. The family suggests memorials in Jill’s name to the “Jill Schacht Jazz Vocalist Scholarship” with Centrum (http:// centrum.org/donate-to-centrum/), the nonprofit jazz education program Jill loved so much. Her family is grateful and moved by the tremendous love and support her friends and the Oak Harbor community have shown to Jill and her family. Funeral arrangements were entrusted to Wallin Funeral Home. Family and friends are encouraged to share memories or condolences at www.wallinfuneralhome.com.

Life Tributes can now be found online at www.whidbeyweekly.com

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www.whidbeyweekly.com DECEMBER 14 - DECEMBER 20, 2017 LOCALL LOCALL Y OPERA Y OPERA TED.TED.

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“If cuts are necessary, the only way you get to $2 million is examining reductions in personnel and materials costs,” Woolf-Ivory said. Such budget reductions would: Fewer open hours, fewer library services and fewer librarians would be hired as current staff members depart. Fewer new titles, a smaller collection and longer customer wait time for print and digital books, movies and music. Without additional revenue, budget reductions in 2019 would be followed by additional cuts in 2020 and beyond, reducing the library district’s ability to meet requests and expectations of communities and customers each year. Sno-Isle Libraries operates 22 community libraries, bookmobile, outreach and online services available to more than 743,000 people across Snohomish and Island counties. More than 476,000 library cardholders use a variety of services annually. Children and families attended 7,280 library programs, drawing 221,000 attendees in 2016.

Battleship Island - Michael Maxwell: “Battleship Island would like to recognize Michael Maxwell as Shipmate-of-the-Month. Michael is modest about the excellence he displays on classwork. His even temper and positive attitude show a passion for his interests. Michael’s quiet, passionate, dedication to those interests will propel him to excellence in all his endeavors.”

[Submitted by Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, Sno-Isle Libraries]

Oak Harbor High School Shipmates-of-the-Month Oak Harbor High School’s 9th grade transition program is called the Island Program. Each island is comprised of an English teacher, a math teacher and a science teacher. They share a total of 90 students who rotate together in classes of thirty for three periods each day. The vision of the Island Program is to have all 9th grade students ready for 10th grade and on track to a 4-year graduation. A student recognition program, called the Shipmates-of-the-Month, recognizes one student per month based on demonstrable gains in the areas of academic or behavioral growth, community contribution(s), and/or acts of altruism. The following students earned the recognition for November:

Tree Sponsor

Garland Sponsors

Castle Island - Keziah Rennes: “Castle Shipmate, Keziah Rennes, is a kind and caring student who demonstrates PRIDE on a daily basis. She is passionate about school and the school’s culture. She is always respectful in her interactions with her teachers and her peers. Keziah displays integrity in her relationships with others and shows determination in her efforts to do well in her academics. She is an example of excellence as a shipmate on Castle Island.”

Local Business News Eat, Shop and Save at Whimsies Whimsies, an eclectic shop filled with handcrafted mosaics, art, gifts, jewelry and specialty teas located in the historic Harborside Mall in Oak Harbor, is offering $1 off of any purchase when Noe Jose Cafe diners bring in their receipt. The fabulous Noe Jose Cafe is just across the hallway from the shop. What a pleasant shopping experience to have a delicious lunch and shop in a charming historic building. Wondering what to buy for that special person? Whimsies is now offering gift certificates. Just drop into the shop to purchase a gift certificate for a wide variety of fanciful and artful choices. The gift certificate can also be used to pay for a mosaic class! Experience a bit of artistic creativity by taking a mosaic class! Make a small (6 inch square) mosaic mirror. The cost for the class is $30, takes approximately 2 house and includes all of the supplies need to make a finished product. Call or drop in to set up a time. Skull Island - Rishi Madrid: “Rishi Madrid is one of our most creative and hardest working students. He dedicates himself to activities and assignments in all of his classes. Rishi has really come a ways with his confidence as a high schooler. He actively asks questions and participates in class. He shows a lot of maturity to always stay caught up in class and on all assignments. Rishi is a positive presence in all of his classes, showing enthusiasm and encouraging his peers

Presented by Soroptimist of South Whidbey Island Supporting Big Brothers Big Sisters of Island County We would like to thank our Event Sponsors and Donors

Whidbey Island Bank a Division of Heritage Bank

[Submitted by Jennifer DePrey, OHHS]

Justice Island - Kelly Breniser: ‘Kelly Breniser is a quiet student but is kind to her peers and teachers. She is a hardworking student and has really challenged herself this quarter to improve in all her classes. She has discovered her voice and has improved her confidence as a high schooler and has overcome her fear of asking for help. In turn, she has been able to help her classmates as well. She has grown a lot and is a great student to have in our classes.”

Holidays in the Vineyard Windermere South Whidbey John Joynt, Broker Keller Williams South Whidbey

Wreath Sponsors

Marlane Harrington, Broker Windermere South Whidbey Whidbey Telecom

Tree Decoration Sponsors Randy & Barb Enberg Verna Lawsen

Donors

Savi Bank • Building Source • Diamond Rentals • Dancing Fish Vineyards

Live Auction Donors

Blooms Winery • Boatyard Inn • Coho Cottage Inn at Langley • Island County Sheriff Marlane Harrington • Maryhill Winery Main Street Christmas Trees • Nancy Thompson Penn Cove Shellfish • Randy & Barb Enberg • Rob Brown Sebo’s Do-It Center • Skamania Lodge South Whidbey Garden Club • Spyhop Public House Suzette Montano • Tamra Sipes • Total Wine & More Village Pizzeria • Verna Lawsen

Silent Auction Donors

2nd Street Wine Shop • Ace Hardware Anthony’s Homeport • Bayview Farm & Gardens Cary Loopuyt Jurriaans • Casey’s Crafts Catherine De Witt Framing • China City Cynthia Nims • Dancing Fish Vineyards Front Street Grill • Harbor Physical Therapy Island Athletic Club • Jim’s Hardware Joe’s Wood Fired Pizza • Lotus Tea Bar & Garden Marcia Marks • Payless Food Store • Prima Bistro Robyn Meehan • Rotary Club Whidbey Westside Savour Seattle • Seabolt’s Smokhouse • Studio A Salon Sweet Mona’s • Timbuktu Java Bar & Gallery Tom Douglas • Verna Lawsen • Whidbey Art Escape Whidbey Coffee Company • Whidbey Sea-Tac Shuttle

Media Sponsor Whidbey Weekly

Also, stop by the shop on Fridays and Saturdays to sample some of the teas available at the shop, including teas from Pike Place Market Spice, Tea Spot, and the Good Medicine Company teas. Whimsies is located at 830 SE Pioneer Way, Suite 104 and is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10:00am to 5:00pm or by chance or appointment. For more information or to sign up for a mosaics class, call (360) 720-2283.

www.bbbsislandcounty.org • www.sisouthwhidbeyisland.org

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DECEMBER 14 - DECEMBER 20, 2017 LOCALLY OWNED.

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DECEMBER 14 - DECEMBER 20, 2017 LOCALLY OWNED.

Property Management You Can Count On!

Whidbey Residential Rentals, Inc. We Manage Your Home As If It Were Our Own. 360-675-9596 • www.whidbeyres.com 285 NE Midway Blvd • Suite #2 • Oak Harbor ANNOUNCEMENTS Pregnant? Need baby clothes? We have them and the price is right–FREE. Pregnancy Care Clinic, open most Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10am to 4pm. Call (360) 221-2909 or stop by 6th and Cascade in Langley. Be the difference in a child's life and become a foster parent today! Service Alternatives is looking for caring, loving, and supportive families to support foster children. (425) 923-0451 or mostermick@ servalt-cfs.com The Whidbey Island community is encouraged to try out the paddling sport of dragon boating with the Stayin' Alive team. Our team's mission is to promote the physical, social, and emotional benefits of dragon boating. It has been shown to be especially beneficial to cancer survivors. Practice with us for up to 3 times for free. Life-jackets and paddles provided. Saturdays at the Oak Harbor Marina, 8:45am. Contact njlish@ gmail.com. More info at our Facebook Page: https://www. facebook.com/NorthPugetSou ndDragonBoatClub?ref=hl Medical Marijuana patients unite; If you need assistance, advice, etc. please contact at 420patientnetworking@gmail. com. Local Whidbey Island help. If you or someone you know has been a victim of Homicide, Burglary, Robbery, Assault, Identity Theft, Fraud, Human Trafficking, Home Invasion and other crimes not listed. Victim Support Services has Advocates ready to help. Please

call the 24-hr Crisis Line (888) 388-9221. Free Service. Visit our web site at http://victimsupportservices.org

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Looking for Board Members to join the dynamic Board of Island Senior Resources and serve the needs of Island County Seniors. Of particular interest are representatives from North Whidbey. For more information please contact: reception@islandseniorservices.org

JOB MARKET Need help with light yard, handyman and house work in coupeville. Lost previous phone numbers so please call again. Hank (360) 678-7591 (0) DRIVERS: Drivers wanted for Whidbey SeaTac Shuttle. CDL/ P2 Preferred, Training available for those without. Full Time, Part Time and weekend openings available. Details at www. seatacshuttle.com or call (360) 679-4003

JEWELRY Oval amethyst ring set in sterling silver, $50 OBO; White button pearl earrings, 8mm, Puzzle 1 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.47)

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www.whidbeyweekly.com

Whidbey Weekly

$35 OBO; Pale blue Baroque pearl earrings, 9-10mm, $45 OBO. Call (360) 331-1063 (2)

HOME FURNISHINGS Tan upright chair with large ottoman, $25; Coffee table with glass top, walnut color, $10. (360) 675-8576 (1)

LAWN AND GARDEN 25 aluminum silver deck post caps, $3 each; 200 feet new 8” heavy waterline, $4 a foot, obo. Can be used for waterline or drain line. (360) 321-1624 Natural Barnyard Topsoil: Good for gardens, flower beds, etc. Unscreened, 10 yard loads, $225 delivered. South Whidbey (360) 321-1624

MISCELLANEOUS Large, Fisher wood-burning fireplace insert, $75. In Clinton. Please call (360) 3411894 (0) No Cheating!

Over 50 LP (vinyl) albums for sale, various artists, $3 ea. Call (360) 331-1063 (2) A Lehmann Gross Bahn electric “The Big Train” set. Includes train cars and tracks, in original box. Made in West Germany. Please call for details; we can send photos. Best offer. (360) 678-1167 (3) Terrarium: Stained glass (clear glass and green glass panels). 26-1/2 “ tall; diameter of bottom is approximately 16”; diameter of glass top is 10”. Please call for details; we can send photos. Best offer. (360) 678-1167 (34) Looking for Xmas, Bday, Father's Day, or just Gifts in general? These are LOCAL made crafts, I have about 50-60 of these available. They are $16.00/ea, plus shipping if you want them mailed. CASH preferred. Dimensions are:

LOCALLY OPERATED.

ADOPT!! DON'T SHOP!

This is Belle, 2 yr. old, spayed female, terrier mix. She came from a high kill shelter in southern CA. She would do great in a younger retired person's home, she loves to snuggle, give and receive love, she gets along with other dogs, cats ok. No young kids. For a lot more info, call 360-969-2014 or email at familytailsdogrescue@gmail.com or check her out at http://awos.petfinder.com/sheters/WA584.html

WE ARE ALWAYS LOOKING FOR FOSTER HOMES!!

5-6"W X 17”L. Contact me at ljohn60@gmail.com.

RECREATION Good used bicycles for sale: four adult bikes for men and women, $40 each; Three boys or girls bikes in good condition, $30 each. In Clinton. Please call (360) 341-1894 (0)

Midway Blvd) and Freeland (1660 Roberta Ave) and are generously stocked by donations from the community. If you need assistance, please stop by.

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ANIMALS/SUPPLIES Need Christmas Presents? New & Used Horse Tack and Giftware. Call for info (360) 678-4124 (1) If you or someone you know needs help in feeding pet(s), WAIF Pet Food Banks may be able to help. Pet Food Banks are located at WAIF thrift stores in Oak Harbor (50 NE

360-682-2341 www.whidbeyweekly.com

CLASSIFIED INFORMATION US Postal Mail

Whidbey Weekly Classified Department PO Box 1098 Oak Harbor, WA 98277

E-Mail............classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com Telephone..................................(360)682-2341 Fax.............................................(360)682-2344 PLEASE CALL WHEN YOUR ITEMS HAVE SOLD.

Please try to limit your classified to 30 words or less, (amounts and phone numbers are counted as words) we will help edit if necessary. We charge $10/week for Vehicles, Boats, Motorcycles, RVs, Real Estate Rental/Sales, Business Classifieds and any items selling $1,000 and above. We do charge $25 to include a photo. The FREE classified space is not for business use. No classified is accepted without phone number. We reserve the right to not publish classifieds that are in bad taste or of questionable content. All free classifieds will be published twice consecutively. If you would like your ad to be published more often, you must resubmit it. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date.

DID YOU KNOW MOST CLASSIFIED ADS ARE FREE? Contact us for more info! classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


Business Spotlight Merry Christmas! Make sure your home is Crystal Clean for the holidays!

Give us a call today for Window Cleaning Gutter Cleaning Roof Cleaning /Moss Removal

CRYSTAL CLEAN

W NDOWS & MORE LLC

360-675-3005 - Anywhere on Whidbey FREE ESTIMATES • LICENSED & INSURED www.crystalcleanwindowswhidbey.com

Whidbey Memorial Staff L-R: Marnie Marcus, Lyndell Collins, Paul Kuzina, Heidi Kuzina, Edie Silvey

Helping Hearts and Quality Service at Whidbey Memorial By Kae Harris In an industry where a strong and giving heart comes first, and compassion for others fuels the desire to do the work they do, Whidbey Memorial epitomizes the ethic it takes to involve themselves so fully in helping loved ones navigate the murky waters of bereavement. Owner Paul Kuzina is undoubtedly Whidbey Island’s most experienced funeral director. His experience extends far and wide, covering many avenues of end-of-life events including, but not limited to, embalming, ceremonies, rituals, death certificates, headstones and so much more. Paul cares for all who come through his doors with nothing but the utmost respect and is humbled to be of service to the wonderful people of Whidbey Island and beyond. While his ability to deliver on their promise by ‘putting heart into quality service’ is due to his insurmountable drive to serve the bereaved, his wife, Heidi, has played a crucial role in the ongoing ceaseless efforts Paul always puts into his work. In fact, Paul is a licensed advanced planning specialist, and will discuss and record with people their end-of-life wishes far ahead of when the services, traditions and rituals are needed. Many of Whidbey Memorial’s clients have found peace of mind through the advance planning process, knowing they and their loved ones can rest assured that all end-of-life details will be adhered to and honored. This is one of the most priceless gifts one can give to a family member, as it can lighten the heavy load of grief and allow healing to begin without added stress.

2 pc. Uniform Cleaning Special

8.50

$

w/coupon

2 day regular turnaround RUSH service available

Whidbey Cleaners A Division of Galbraith Investments, Inc.

We also sew patches, hems, repairs

360-675-7182

www.whidbeycleaners.com

1025 NE 7th Ave, Oak Harbor, WA Hours Mon-Fri 7:30am - 5:30pm Offer expires December 29th, 2017

HARADA PHYSICAL THERAPY Your Hometown Therapists

• Sports Rehab • Post-Op Treatment • MVA/L&I Claims • Injury Screening • Concussion Rehab • BikeFit

And Paul isn’t alone in his passion for the work. Whidbey Memorial staff have helped to lay the foundation of the indispensable services provided here by always giving selflessly of themselves and ensuring decedents and their loved ones are at the forefront of the planning processes. Each Whidbey Memorial staff member has dedicated their lives to the communities in and around Whidbey Island. Edie Silvey’s expertise has seen this establishment grow and become a pillar of support for the grieving and Lyndell Collins' and Marnie Marcus’ tireless efforts demonstrate the commitment Whidbey Memorial makes to all who pass through their doors. With attention to detail second to none, Whidbey Memorial staff are careful to carry out decedents’ precise wishes with caring hearts and a gentle touch for all concerned, and with December 10 marking their 10 year anniversary, it’s easy to see just how important Whidbey Memorial is on the Island and off. For more information about the essential services provided, call Whidbey Memorial at (360) 675-5777, visit their website at www.whidbeymemorial.com or stop in on 746 NE Midway Blvd, Oak Harbor, 98277.

+tax

Philipp Hoog, PT, DPT, CSCS Oak Harbor

Coupeville

210 SE Pioneer Way #2 101 S Main Street www.HaradaPT.com 360-679-8600 360-678-2770 Your Hometown Therapists

www.HaradaPT.com

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Women’s Care in Oak Harbor! We are proud to announce the expansion of our OB/GYN and Midwifery services to our 1300 NE Goldie Street, Oak Harbor location. Call 360.240.4055 to schedule an appointment. www.whidbeyhealth.org

Putting heart into quality service

Proudly serving the community of Whidbey Island and beyond for 10 years with integrity and compassion.

Thank you to all the families who have entrusted us with the care of your loved ones. We look forward to serving you for many years to come.

Mosaics - Art - Gifts Jewelry - Teas Filled with fanciful art & gifts made by local & regional artisans

Paul and Heidi Kuzina, Owners

746 NE Midway Blvd • Oak Harbor 360-675-5777 info@whidbeymemorial.com www.whidbeymemorial.com

Gift Certificates Available! In Historic Downtown Oak Harbor 830 SE Pioneer Way - 360-682-2468 HOURS: Tues-Sat 10am-5pm