Whidbey Weekly, August 3, 2017

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August 3 through August 9, 2017

More Local Events inside

Harvest Fest Races Coupeville Green Coupeville Page 6

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Zumba & Hula by Ate Flo SW Syrian Refugee Project community events and your source for Knights of Columbus Langley United Methodist Church What’s Happening on Whidbey Oak Harbor Langley Island www.whidbeyweekly.com Page 6 Page 9 390 NE Midway Blvd #B203 • Oak Harbor • 360-682-2341


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AUGUST 3 - AUGUST 9, 2017 LOCALLY OWNED.

ACROSS THE POND by Miss Windsor

Memories of a Lancashire Lass! Hello, darlings! By a sheer stroke of serendipity Miss Windsor discovered this wonderful lady - Patricia Matthews - of Bolton, Greater Manchester, England via Social Media! Whom at the grand age of 67 years old became an author of her first cookery book, a YouTube sensation, and local celebrity – well, would you ‘Adam and Eve it’ (believe it)! Suffice to say, Patricia and Miss Windsor have many things in common, one being they’re extremely gung-ho at reviving recipes and cooking practices from a bygone era! Patricia entered this world in 1946 and grew up in Bolton, which during such time was considered part of Lancashire. Along with a plethora of siblings, she was raised in a red brick, two up two down terraced house, which One would lovingly describe as a ‘bijou’ residence! Also, it boasted a cosy yet quaint backyard, which of course, is where One employed a washing line to hang out their ‘smalls’ (underwear) - oh, I say! Oh, and let’s not forget the rather ‘staid’ yet memorable coloured front door of - ‘conker brown!’ Patricia fondly recalled, “Friday night was bath night, in the proverbial tin bath, which was dragged in from the backyard into the kitchen by Mother, filled up with kettles and pans of hot water, then one by one in we got!” During ‘post-war’ England, Patricia and her ‘kinsfolk’ were brought up within a traditional environment. Darlings, One should never underestimate the ‘hard graft’ of a woman’ because, back in those days, the duties of a ‘housewife’ were as equally taxing as the ‘manual work’ of a man! Also, Patricia’s upbringing being typical of that era, “We were very strictly brought up, no swearing, no answering back, respect to elders” – Oh my, now haven’t times changed! With a slight ‘grin’ and ‘twinkle’ in her eye, Patricia continued to reminisce about her childhood days. “Every year the owners of the local ‘chippy’ (fish & chip shop) organised a trip for us kids to the ‘Grande Theatre’ in Bolton town centre to see a pantomime!” Apparently, “It was a real treat,” she gushed!

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Indeed, those care-free times evoked pleasant memories of a true ‘community spirit’ where her local Independent Methodist Church held Christmas parties, concerts, plays, and ‘Rose Queen’ events! Having risen to the rather commendable position of ‘head girl’ at Castle Hill Girls School, Patricia started her working life as a seamstress instead of joining her sisters at the local ‘cotton mill.’ She soon changed careers and worked as an admin clerk at William Walker & Sons leather factory and there, at the tender age of 20 years old, she met her beloved husband to be - Ronnie! Miss Windsor dared to ask, “Darling, was it love at first sight?” Patricia quipped, “Nope, but it was for Ronnie!” You see darlings, now hopelessly in love and during those glorious days of ‘courting’ (American translation: dating), Ronnie introduced his ‘sweetheart’ to his legendary grandmother Sarah, who was born in Salford, Lancashire during the reign of Queen Victoria! Patricia affectionately described Grandmother Sarah as, “Straight laced, but with a ‘wicked’ sense of humour!” Patricia ‘giggled’ as she began to reveal a chucklesome memory of Grandmother Sarah, “If she didn’t like anyone on the TV, like ‘McDonald Hobley,’ Grandmother Sarah would make a funny gesture with her face by sucking in her cheeks and lips then moving them up and down like a duck” – how comical! Whilst Patricia’s mind swarmed with a warm sense of nostalgia, she indulged Miss Windsor with yet another humorous story of Grandmother Sarah, “Following an excellent Sunday dinner, and having washed and returned all the best china to the dresser, we were beckoned around the TV to watch ‘Songs of Praise’ which is still aired today!” With a wide smile, Patricia uttered, “Grandmother Sarah would sing along in her little ‘trill voice’ to the hymns she had already sung earlier that day in church, whilst sporting a big box, battery operated ‘hearing aid’ which was a tad similar to a transistor radio!” Patricia then proceeded to take Miss Windsor on a ‘culinary jaunt’ down memory lane! You see darlings, Grandmother Sarah was an excellent cook and would lavish her grandson Ronnie and ‘wife to be’ with a pageantry of homemade scones, strawberry jam, and freshly baked bread adorned with tender slices of ‘ham-on-the-bone’ which was purchased from the local ‘Co-Op’ supermarket! Also, Grandmother Sarah would ‘whip up’ an abundance of culinary delights in her 1950’s style ‘scullery’ which was painted in duck egg blue and dressed with red checked curtains! She used a ‘New World’ gas cooker and would cook and bake using blue and white enamel pans and pie dishes. Such vessels were used for the likes of Simnel Cake, Potato Cakes, Fruit Cake, and Potato Pie! Darlings, these are just a ‘handful’ of Patricia’s best-loved recipes from Grandmother Sarah’s book, which she regularly recreates for her family! In fact, Grandmother Sarah hand wrote a ‘gem of a book’ which includes recipes

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A proud Patricia Matthews holds a copy of Grandma’s Antique Recipes handed down from relatives, friends, and neighbours for young wives to use in the future. This book comprises 160 recipes for cakes, cures, medicines, furniture polishes, and handy hints – well, what do ya know! But sadly, Grandmother Sarah passed away a few months before Ronnie and Patricia were joined in ‘holy matrimony.’ Thus, she left this ‘well-thumbed’ book of historical importance to Patricia in her ‘will’ along with her wedding ring, trifle dishes, rolling pin, and weighing scales! Darlings, Miss Windsor expects you’re all dying to know what happened to this ‘gem of a book’? Well, for 40 years or so it laid safely tucked away within the comfortable surroundings of Patricia’s most appealing ‘drawers’ – oh, I say! Patricia had always longed to share the contents of this book, as it “gives an insight into the lives of women from Grandmother Sarah’s era.” So, following retirement, Patricia made plans to revive Grandmother Sarah’s handwritten legacy, and to share it with those culinary ‘enthusiasts’ of yesteryear! The question is, ‘how the ‘heck’ did Patricia achieve such a thing?’ Well, with a little encouragement from her family, Patricia contacted SHN Publishing who relished

the opportunity and in 2013 published: Grandma’s Antique Recipes, The Legacy of a Lancashire Lass. At long last, a selection of Grandmother Sarah’s recipes for cakes, cures and medicines was finally available for our very own delectation! Darlings, Miss Windsor recently purchased a copy from Amazon and she’s pleased to announce she thoroughly enjoyed the nostalgic content of such a delightful culinary read – what a beautiful way to pay homage to Grandmother Sarah. Also, don’t forget that Patricia has her very own YouTube channel – ‘Grandma’s Antique Recipes’, where you’ll learn how to cook in the tradition of Grandmother Sarah! Darlings, Miss Windsor must retire now to her kitchen of ‘grandeur’ to try out a dish or two from her newly acquired cookery book! Please do visit my ‘blog’ via www. misswindsor.uk to read more about Patricia Matthews. Until we meet again darlings, One would be delighted to make your acquaintance via Instagram, Twitter and Facebook (@ misswindsoruk). Toodle-oo for now, Miss Windsor X

Blooming Season Concerts 2017

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390 NE MIDWAY BLVD | PO BOX 1098 | OAK HARBOR, WASHINGTON 98277 Publisher & Editor.......................................................... Eric Marshall Marketing Representatives................Penny Hill, Roosevelt Rumble Graphic Design............................................................. Teresa Besaw Production Manager......................................................TJ Pierzchala Circulation Manager............................................................ Jon Wynn

Contributing Writers Jim Freeman Wesley Hallock Kae Harris Tracy Loescher Kathy Reed Carey Ross

Volume 9, Issue 31 | © MMXVII Whidbey Weekly

PUBLISHED and distributed every week. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The Whidbey Weekly cannot be held responsible for the quality of goods or services supplied by advertisers in this publication. Articles, unless otherwise stated, are by contribution and therefore the Whidbey Weekly is not in a position to validate any comments, recommendations or suggestions made in these articles. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. DEADLINES: The Whidbey Weekly is a submission based editorial with contributing writers. Please feel free to submit any information (please limit to 200 words) that you would like to share with the Whidbey Weekly. You may submit by email to editor@whidbeyweekly.com, by fax to (360)682-2344 or by postal mail to PO Box 1098, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date. For more information, please visit www.whidbeyweekly.com.

4th Annual

Triptych August 5 1-3pm Lavender Wind Farm 2530 Darst Rd, Coupeville 360-544-4132

Bring your blankets, beverages & picnics or get sandwiches at the farm. Ice cream & lavender lemonade available while you relax and enjoy the music.

Friday, August 11, 5 PM - 8 PM Saturday, August 12, 9 AM - 4 PM VIP Friday Night kicks off an early shopping party with wine tasting & chocolate pairing at the Schoolhouse. Purchase VIP tickets at our Garden Store or: www.tickettailor.com/all-tickets/29529/8d34 Saturday is open and free to the public! Antique Fair at the Schoolhouse & North Meadow Field. 360-466-3821 • www.christiansonsnursery.com 15806 Best Road • Mount Vernon

Free ~ donations accepted.

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ON TRACK with Jim Freeman

Over the weekend, I was asked by a friend if dogs can read lips. Good question, I thought. If one's tone of voice is the most telling communication to our four legged friends, lip reading may not matter.

I asked the vet many years ago if my basset hound Norton knew when he last barked. “Jim, Norton doesn't even know that he does bark.” Just in case Norton could read the vet's lips, I covered Norton's big brown eyes. Even with cooking gloves, my hands were never long enough to cover Norton's ears. Turnaround time One of the fun aspects of visiting the Coupeville recycling and waste dump site is the detailed information one receives on the receipt after paying for the load. Why would we expect anything less from our dedicated Island County custodians of community excess? Mind boggling and land filling it is. The transparency of this county transaction provides the details of being weighed, before and aft, as well as one's turnaround time for the experience. In fact, the receipt provides so much information it's transparency was much greater than that of my flattened cardboard and half gallon Darigold 2% milk jugs. I need to rinse better. Old milk in plastic jugs gets rather gaggy. Over the weekend, from check in until check out, my turnaround times for my three trips were nine minutes for 140 pounds of garbage, thirteen minutes for 180 pounds, and 13 minutes again for 160 pounds. I attribute my lesser efficiency unloading on

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round three to our wonderful weekend's warmer weather and the beautiful blue sky which umbrella-ed the dump. For me, the Coupeville dump is a park without swings and slides. What is it about emptying trash that still thrills?

them so we put them on the roof. It has snowed twice since you left. That's all our trash from the last two weeks you have yet to empty, and you're also two weeks behind on buying us the TV Guide. Merry Christmas. We're glad you are home.”

In college, my roommate Skeeter got married his sophomore year. Given the rules against co-ed dorm life at a southern Baptist college in the Bible belt, cinched to about the third hole, Skeeter and wife Bebe had to get off campus housing. No married student apartments were available in those days, but we were able to drink 3.2% beer by driving a few miles passed the state line of Kansas.

Maybe that's why I enjoy the dump. It reminds me of how great friendship really is. Yep, it is time to take a friend to lunch. Time to go the extra mile. Time to empty their trash.

My job to get a free home cooked meal at Skeeter and Bebe's was to empty their trash and buy their weekly TV Guide. Such efforts and economic burdens sure beat eating the mystery meat at the fraternity house. At least Bebe knew to use S&W Fine Foods for our evening meals. Of course, that had much to do with her father-in-law Forrest. Skeeter's Dad worked for an S&W distributor in St. Louis. Apparently, there were often dented cans in the warehouse. The dented cans with vertical packed green beans were my favorite.

Watch out It is this time of year when the spiders run amuck at the loose caboose. Maybe all my recycling has disrupted their homelands. This morning, while making my bed, I saw a little arachnid liberate itself from underneath one of the pillows. Like a frightened six year old in a haunted house, I threw my pillow and the pillow case down on the ground and started stomping.

One winter, after a week of Christmas vacation following semester exams, Skeeter and Bebe picked me up at the Kansas City Municipal Airport. I always loved that airport. Every landing was a thrill ride over the city, with great views of the train tracks. Since the fraternity house was empty for semester break, I was invited to stay at their apartment for a couple days. While I did not have my own room, I did have my own drawer for socks, skivvies, and magazines. When I went to the back porch of their apartment to empty my first beer can, I noticed the trash was out of control. “Skeet, what's the deal with the garbage? It stinks. It's everywhere. And whose shoes are those on your roof?” “Well, Ace, they are your shoes. You left them here. We got tired of tripping over

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My suggestion-ask permission first. Some folks take offense if you take their trash when you leave.

Sensing a rise in blood pressure, I grabbed a flashlight to see if my stomping had created any success. No spider, or the remains thereof, was visible. Where was that jointlegged invertebrate from the sub phylum Chelicerata? Can you tell I majored in biology for a year? Later in the afternoon, I felt some movement about my graying hairs. It was not the wind. There were footsteps on my follicles. Quickly, I swept my hand above my head, not wanting to damage any of the remaining fine waxed dental floss sized hairs. No luck. Something was still moving on my head. Why look in a mirror? I attacked again. Looking at my right hand, once registered, I saw no spider legs or spider head or spider anything. Moments later, I felt something crawling on my upper lip. Holy arachnid, Batman. Mouth spider alert! It wasn't pretty. And, it still is not so pretty. Only the right side of my lip is bruised. At

LOCALL LOCALL Y OPERA Y OPERA TED.TED.

my new age, I must have forgotten I was hitting myself. Just call me Grandpa Spiderman. Never argue with a woman One morning, a husband returns the family boat to their lakeside cottage after several hours of fishing and decides to take a nap. Although not familiar with the lake, his wife decides to take the boat out. She motors out a short distance, anchors, puts her feet up, and begins to read her book. The peace and solitude are magnificent until a fish and game warden comes along in his boat. He pulls up alongside the woman and says, “Good morning, Ma'am. What are you doing?” “Reading a book,” she replies, thinking that what she is doing appears very obvious. “You're in a restricted fishing area,” he informs her. “I'm sorry, officer, but I'm not fishing. I'm reading.” “Yes, but I see you have all the equipment. For all I know you could start at any moment. I'll have to take you in and write you up.” “If you do that, I'll have to charge you with sexual assault,” says the woman. “But I haven't even touched you,” says the game warden. “That's true, but you have all the equipment. For all I know, you could start at any moment.” “Have a nice day ma'am,” and he left. MORAL: Never argue with a woman who reads. It's likely she can also think. Thanks much to the woman from the library who sent me this jocular conclusion to today's musings. Have a great week. To read past columns of On Track in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

GRAND OPENING AUGUST 5TH • 10AM - 6PM 13 LANES AT 25 YARDS SHOOT UP TO A .308 FREE COFFEE BAR

“Welcome to the P.I.T.” 951 NE 21st Court • Oak Harbor 360-720-2619 PacificIndoorTactical.com

SHOOTING COMPETITION WITH A CHANCE TO WIN A NEW .22 LONG RIFLE. VIRTUAL REALITY WITH 30’ SCREEN, 180 DEGREE OPTIONS AND HUNDREDS OF SCENARIOS.

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Bits & Pieces Since 1962, St. Augustine’s Trash & Treasure Sale has raised approximately a quarter of a million dollars for Whidbey charities. For more information, contact the Church office at (360) 321-4887, or Susan Sandri at (360) 914-2020.

Eye on the Island: Artists of South Whidbey 43rd Annual Art Show

Type II Burn Ban in Effect as of 12:00pm, August 3, 2017 The use of barbeque grills using propane or briquettes, or self-contained camp stoves are exempt from a Type II Burn Ban Proclamation and Public Notice WHEREAS, by August 3, 2017, atmospheric conditions of reduced moisture levels, low humidity, and warmer weather; combined with the reduced availability of fire-fighting resources, have increased the risk of fire within the confines of Island County, THEREFORE, in concurrence with the Fire Protection Districts of Whidbey and Camano Islands and the Northwest Clean Air Agency, I, Sheriff Mark C. Brown, serving as the Island County Fire Marshal, do hereby proclaim a BAN on ALL outdoor burning within the entirety of Island County Report Violations to 911 This Ban will remain in effect until further notice. Sheriff Mark C. Brown Island County Fire Marshal

New App Delivers Digital Magazines at Sno-Isle Libraries Real news, at your fingertips, no charge. Popular magazines to read online have been available to Sno-Isle Libraries customers for some time. Now, there’s a new app to make getting the latest on everything from healthy recipes to global economic analysis easier and faster. The new app is called RBdigital and is available at no charge to Sno-Isle Libraries customers through Android and iOS app stores. The RBdigital service is also available at snoisle libraries.org. The new app consolidates two existing apps from the same vendor, Recorded Books. Sno-Isle Libraries customers have been using the soon-to-be retired Zinio app. Customers are being prompted to make the switch and can use their Zinio login. The change is scheduled to become permanent on Sept. 8. Recorded Books supplies an extensive collection digital magazines to Sno-Isle Libraries customers including complete, downloadable, full-color version digital editions and many with interactive features. Among the titles available are The New Yorker, Newsweek, bon appétit and Vanity Fair. [Submitted by Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries Public Information Manager]

Proceeds from Trash & Treasure Sale Benefit Local Charities

L-R: Susan Sandri - 2017 Trash & Treasure Chair, Mel Watson for Time Together (a program within Island Co. Senior Services), Claire Creighton for WAIF, Art Taylor for the MobileTurkey Unit, Jane Bothel for Mother Mentors, and Jean Matheny for the Soup's On! soup kitchen at Island Church, Langley

St. Augustine’s in-the-Woods Episcopal Church presented each of the beneficiaries of this year’s Trash & Treasure Sale with a check for just over $1,000.00 in July. The 55th annual event was held April 29 at the church on Honeymoon Bay Road in Freeland. All profits from the sale were divided evenly between the 5 organizations.

The Artists of South Whidbey are proud to present their 43rd annual art show and sale, “Eye on the Island,” Friday-Sunday, August 4-6. Come enjoy little bites, wine, and art at the opening reception on Friday, August 4 from 5:00pm to 7:00pm. The art show remains open Saturday, August 5 from 10:00am to 7:00pm, with a Langley ARTWALK reception from 5:00pm to 7:00pm, and Sunday, August 6 from 10:00am to 4:00pm. “Eye on the Island” will feature original paintings, prints, and cards of ferry boats, seaside scenes and all things “Island,” showcased at Whidbey Island Center for the Arts’ intimate Zech Hall. Free and open to the public Whidbey Island Center for the Arts is located at 565 Camano Avenue, Langley, WA. For more information, call (360) 221-8262 or visit www.wicaonline.org [Submitted by Fritha Strand, WICA]

Register Today for 2nd Annual Golf Tournament Join Penn Cove Brewing Company and the WhidbeyHealth Foundation for their second annual fundraising golf tournament to be held Sunday, August 13 at Whidbey Golf Club in Oak Harbor. The Tournament Fee is $100 per person and includes a box lunch, green fees, cart rental, prizes and use of the practice facilities. Proceeds from the event are donated to the WhidbeyHealth Foundation and used to help support local patients and their families. The deadline to register is July 28. Sign up forms are available at the Penn Cove Taproom, 103 S. Main St., Coupeville. Send questions to mitch@penncovebrewing.com Sponsors Needed This is a great opportunity to advertise your business, support the local community and raise funds for people who are in need of assistance. Hole sponsorships are available: $400 Platinum, $250 Gold, $175 Silver. For more information on sponsorship, contact Mitch Aparicio at mitch@penncovebrewing. com or call the Taproom at (360) 682-5747.

The Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) will also recognize Colleen McKimmie, Benefits & Payroll Analyst, with the 2017 Wall of Fame Spirit Award at the WSDOT Wall of Fame Banquet. This will be Colleen’s second time receiving the award during the course of her 24-year career with Island Transit. Colleen has provided the corporate knowledge and expertise regarding benefits and payroll systems that has been fundamental for nearly every activity of the finance department over the last year. She continually takes on additional responsibilities and handles every aspect of her role efficiently and effectively and sets the example for financial and professional accountability. Employees, peers and management alike routinely sought out her guidance as a result of her detailed knowledge and genuine concern for employees that enables her to handle even the most difficult situations in a sensitive and confidential manner. [Submitted by Meg Heppner, Island Transit]

WICA Announces Theatre Season Auditions and Audition Workshop Whidbey Island Center for the Arts announces auditions for its 18th Theatre season. The five productions include The Fantasticks, Peter and the Starcatcher, Sherlock Holmes and the American Problem, Glass Menagerie, and When We Were Young and Unafraid. For full show descriptions and character breakdowns please see the website at WICAonline.org. Auditions will be held by appointment on Monday and Tuesday, August 14 and 15 with 5 minutes each, scheduled from 6-8:30pm. Callbacks are scheduled throughout the week. Walk-in auditions will be accepted if time permits. To schedule your audition and for more information please call (360) 221-8262 or go to WICAonline.org WICA is also offering an audition workshop taught by local director Phil Jordan on August 8 and 9 for $10. Please register by calling the front office at (360) 221-8262.

[Submitted by Mitch Aparicio]

[Submitted by Fritha Strand, WICA]

Island Transit 2017 Wall of Fame Recipients

The Cutest Introduction to Business Ever On August 19, all around Whidbey Island, the newest—and cutest—entrepreneurs will be ready to serve you. Lemonade.

The Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) will recognize the Island Transit Service Planning Team with the 2017 Wall of Fame Team Spirit Award at the WSDOT Wall of Fame Banquet in Everett, Washington on August 8. Odis Jenkins, Linda Nienhuis, Nick Pinch, and Stefano Argenziano (from left to right) were recognized for their work over the past year to create a Service Improvement Plan for Island County Public Transportation Benefit Area (Island Transit). They worked to improve and maximize service within the constraints of limited resources and high expectations. The Team worked with surrounding agencies, including Washington State Ferries, and Skagit, Everett, and Community Transits to improve connection times and opportunities. The efforts resulted in changes to route structure that improved connections between routes, ferries and County Connector Partners.

LOCALLY OPERATED. the boss of their own lemonade stand. They make and decorate the stand, find the tastiest lemonade recipe, and put on their little business hats. Local businesses support the program by hosting stands in high-traffic areas throughout every community on Whidbey Island (a complete list will be available on the Lemonade Day website). Kids keep the money they make, with encouragement to Save Some, Spend Some, and Donate Some. Thanks to the sponsors of Lemonade Day: Wells Fargo, Whidbey Island Bank, The Goose Grocery, Sweet Mona’s Chocolate Boutique, US Bank Freeland, Meg Mishasek, Coupe’s Last Stand, and Marshall & Jan Bronson. You can support this and other young entrepreneur programs at YouHereNowNW.com.

[Submitted by Susan Sandri]

Outdoor Burning Ban in Island County

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Lemonade Day is a national program that introduces young kids to business. The Economic Development Foundation has organized a program that has introduced more than 70 kids to the basics of business. Kids ages 8-12 are encouraged to sign up at no cost to them. Everyone gets a backpack and a workbook to teach them the important parts of Lemonade Day, like marketing, customer service, pricing, and health. There are roleplaying games, interactive activities, and worksheets to get them ready for the big day. Free workshops help kids learn the basics of a lemonade stand. To learn about the dates and places, check Whidbey.LemonadeDay.org. Kids get a test run of their lemonade at the Tasting Competition. On August 17 at the Coupeville Rec Hall, expert judges will taste their way to the best lemonade on Whidbey Island. The winner gets the coveted “Best Tasting Lemonade!” ribbon to hang on their stand. Then on Saturday, August 19, each kid is

More information about Lemonade Day can be found at Whidbey.LemonadeDay.org [Submitted by Sami Postma, Economic Development Foundation]

Woodworkers Guild Presents the 14th Annual “Art + Wood = Woodpalooza” Exhibition The Whidbey Island Woodworkers Guild presents the “Art + Wood = Woodpalooza @ WICA” Exhibition – the 14th Annual Show of Whidbey’s Finest Woodwork now at WICA (Whidbey Island Center for the Arts). This year’s show promises exceptional work by twenty of Whidbey’s best! The free exhibition is open September 2 - 4, 2017, from Noon to 5:00pm daily; plus a reception Friday, September 1, from 6:00pm to 9:00pm. A color program will be available at the door and online at www.Woodpalooza.com. During the Exhibition, you are invited to spend quality time with woodworking artisans while you experience the beauty of their creations. You’ll learn firsthand the inspiration and process that go into each artist’s work, while enjoying many scenic island views as you discover Langley. The Guild seeks to support professional woodworkers as well as inspire and educate the budding amateur and provide awareness to the general public of the skills available locally from its talented members. In 2001, the Whidbey Island Woodworkers Guild was formed to bring together the woodworking community of Whidbey. Now in its fifteenth year, the Guild includes makers of furniture, cabinetry, architectural woodwork, turners, clock makers, sawyers, carvers, restorers, musical instrument makers, boat builders and refinishers. Please visit: www.woodpalooza.com for more information. [Submitted by Gary A. Leake, Guild Secretary]

Fishers on Track for Reintroduction in North Cascades National Park $80,000 needed to complete the project Washington’s National Park Fund, in partnership with North Cascades National Park, is planning re-introduction of a population of fishers (Martes pennanti) into the park next winter. This follows successful re-introduction programs in Olympic (2008-9) and Mount Rainier National Parks (2015-16). $80,000 is needed by October 1 to pay for trapping, boarding, and veterinary expertise for 40 fishers. To date, $15,000 has been raised for the project. The project: The fisher is a medium-sized carnivore in the weasel family native to Washington State’s forests. Fishers were extinct in Washington State due to over-hunting, habitat loss and fragmentation of habitat. The first stage of this project released and monitored approximately 80 fishers in the south Cascades of Washington (2015-2018). This project is the second stage and will eventually release and monitor 80 fishers in the North Cascades. Monitoring and research efforts associated with the project will involve aerial- and ground-telemetry tracking of fishers to allow park and wildlife officials to monitor location, survival status, and movements. What funding will pay for: Procuring the fishers costs $2,000 each from capture to placement. Trappers are paid cash

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AUGUST 3 - AUGUST 9, 2017 www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALL LOCALL Y OWNED. Y OWNED. for each live animal procured. Forty fishers are needed for the scheduled winter release dates. This funding will also support an existing facility in central BC which processes the live animals, including health checks, vaccinations, and having veterinarians on duty to monitor the animals daily. The project supports the National Park Service mission to preserve unimpaired the natural and cultural resources and values for the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of this and future generations. What’s the urgency? The funding is needed to continue an uninterrupted working relationship with the trappers in central BC who supply the animals. If the program cannot pay for live fishers, the trappers will either return to lethal trapping for fur or permits will be re-allocated for other states’ own fisher reintroduction projects. Why do we need fishers in our forests? Fishers play an important role in ecological function. Because they typically are more abundant than other large carnivores, they have the potential to influence the abundance and distribution of other species through predation, competition and dispersal of seeds and pollen when transported in fur. Because they prey on many important seed predators in western coniferous forests, they may indirectly shape forest plant communities through their influence on the population dynamics of these species. Repatriation of the species will contribute toward restoring ecosystem function in the Pacific Northwest. A healthy ecosystem has all its members in attendance. Past successes: Olympic National Park, 2008-09, released 90 fishers, documented mothers with kits: http:// wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/fisher/gallery.html Mount Rainier National Park, 2015-16, released 80 fishers, June 2017 documented mother with kit: https://www.nps.gov/mora/ learn/news/fishergrowth.htm

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The project is a partnership with the following organizations: National Park Service, US Forest Service, WA Dept. of Fish & Wildlife, US Fish & Wildlife Svc., BC Ministry of Environment, Conservation Northwest, Tribes & First Nations. Washington’s National Park Fund has contributed funds for past fisher releases of $40,000 to Mount Rainier and $60,000 to Olympic National Park. Video of last year’s release at Mount Rainier: www.youtube.com/watch?v=ahuQ6d8EjMk About Washington’s National Parks Fund Washington’s National Park Fund (WNPF) is the official philanthropic partner of Mount Rainier, North Cascades, and Olympic National Parks, which span more than 1.6 million acres of the Evergreen state. Annually, WNPF allocates monies to more than 75 otherwise unfunded projects with the goal of deepening the public’s love for, understanding of, and experiences in Washington’s National Parks. Get involved at www.wnpf.org.

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commercial and recreational marine users, ports, planners, engineers, agriculture, conservation groups, NGOs, education, economic interests, as well as members-at-large. Applicants should submit a completed application by mail or email to: Anna Toledo, MRC Coordinator, PO Box 5000, Coupeville, WA 98239. Email applications should be sent to a.toledo@co.island.wa.us. Application forms can be found at http://www.islandcountymrc. org/media/1812/mrc-applicant-questionnaire-20151026.pdf Application materials should be received no later than 4:30pm on Tuesday, August 8, 2017. For additional information, please phone Pam Dill at (360) 679-7353 or e-mail Anna Toledo at the above address. [Submitted by Pam Dill]

Local Business News Pacific Indoor Tactical Now Open

[Submitted by Kelly Sanderbeck, Washington’s National Park Fund]

Seeking Applicants for Marine Resources Committee (MRC) The Island County Board of Commissioners is seeking applicants to serve on the Island County Marine Resources Committee to fill a term that expires on December 31, 2018. The Board of County Commissioners invites applicants from Whidbey and Camano islands to express interest and request appointment. Members of this voluntary, advisory committee serve a three-year term. The 16 member committee meets on the first and third Tuesday afternoons of each month in the Board of County Commissioners Hearing Room (Room 102B Basement), Island County Annex Bldg., 1 NE 6th Street, Coupeville, WA. More information on the MRC can be obtained on their website at www.islandcountymrc.org The Board of County Commissioners seeks members representing a diverse array of stakeholders, including tribes, science, military,

stall walls are AR500 to help insure the maximum amount of safety for participants. Each stall is equipped with an automated target retrieval system that has four distance presets, edging capability, and 180 degrees of rotation to allow “shoot-no-shoot” training. The PIT owners went the extra mile to insure the range would be a step above the rest. The typical ceiling height of ranges is eight feet. The owners felt this was too low to provide a comfortable and functional shooting environment. The ceiling height at The PIT is 9’ 3” to allow an open feeling, and to help avoid bullet strikes to the ceiling. The HVAC was also specifically engineered to insure proper air movement no matter the shooting position in the range. To the rear of the shooter is an 8’ tall “Air Wall” that distributes air evenly from floor to ceiling. “The health and safety of both our employees, and our customers is our highest priority” said Yonkman. “Another feature that our guests are sure to enjoy is our bullet proof glass viewing windows to the rear of the shooting stalls. There are three 4’x’8’ level III bullet proof glass windows that allow viewing of the entire range from our customer lounge.” The retail space brings a new level of atmosphere to the firearm industry. The owners wanted to change the perspective of gun stores, and ranges by providing a top notch retail environment. From the “gun smoke” epoxy floor finish to the “heavy metal” slat board display walls, this space is something you will have to see in person to really take it all in. Come on by, have a free cup of coffee, and relax in the customer lounge while you watch your fellow Americans enjoy their freedom.

Pacific Indoor Tactical is owned and operated by three local owners; Mike Fletcher, Lucas Yonkman, and Ryan Wallin. Mike is a retired U.S. Navy veteran, and firefighter. Lucas is a service disabled combat veteran of the U.S. Army Infantry, Whidbey Island native, and owner of Ronsons Design and Construction, LLC. Ryan is a Whidbey Island native, and also an owner of Ronsons Design and Construction. Pacific Indoor Tactical (aka The P.I.T.) is a half tactical, indoor gun range located in Oak Harbor, WA. The tactical portion of the range has full AR500 Armor coverage in the ceiling to allow advanced “move-and-shoot” training, and completion down range. The range has 13 shooting stalls that are four feet, or wider. The

Pacific Indoor Tactical, located at 951 NE 21st Court in Oak Harbor, will be celebrating their Grand Opening on Saturday, August 5 from 10:00am to 6:00pm. The Grand Opening will include a shooting competition with a chance to win a .22 Long Rifle. For details and more information, call (360) 720-2619 or visit pacificindoortactical.com

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What’s Going On All entries are listed chronologically, unless there are multiple entries for the same venue or are connected to a specific organization (such as Sno-Isle Libraries) in which case all entries for that venue or organization are listed collectively in chronological order under one heading.

Live Music: Ronnie Nix Friday, August 4, 7:00pm-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville Ronnie Nix plays solo guitar and a variety of music from all decades. No cover. For more information, call (360) 682-5747 or visit www. penncovebrewing.com

All You Can Eat Breakfast Saturday, August 5, 8:00am-12:00pm Whidbey Masonic Lodge 15, 804 N. Main, Coupeville Breakfast includes eggs, bacon, sausage, pancakes, juice & tea or coffee. $8/Adults, $4/ Children 12 & under, 3 and under free.

Blooming Season Concerts: Triptych Saturday, August 5, 1:00pm-3:00pm Lavender Wind Farm, Coupeville Bring your blankets, beverages & picnics or get sandwiches at the farm. Ice cream and lavender lemonade available while you relax and enjoy the music. Free - donations accepted. Lavender Wind Farm is located at 2530 Darst Road. For more information, call (360) 544-4132.

Saratoga Orchestra’s Summer Concert Saturday, August 5, 2:00pm South Whidbey High School, Langley Saratoga Orchestra of Whidbey Island, in partnership with Pacific Northwest Conducting Institute, presents A Summer Festival Concert. Orchestra conductors from across the country will participate in a six-day PNWCI workshop, refining and learning conducting techniques from internationally acclaimed conductor and composer Diane Wittry. The workshop’s culmination will feature the PNWCI’s 2017 Conducting Fellows leading the orchestra in a program to include Dvorak’s Symphony No. 9 “From the New World”, Wittry’s own composition entitled, “Mist”, and Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 5. A pre-concert chat will begin at 1:15pm. General Admission tickets are $25/Adult and $20/Senior-Military. Students under 18 admitted free. Premium Seating tickets are available online for $50 and includes seating in the Conductor’s Circle and a post-concert reception with the participants. General Admission tickets are available at Moonraker Books-Langley, bayleaf-Coupeville, and Click Music-Oak Harbor and online. Cash/check/CC accepted at the door. www.sowhidbey.com or call (360) 929-3045.

Live Music: The Winterlings Saturday, August 5, 7:00pm-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville With songs as vivid as feature films, The Winterlings take listeners on unexpected journeys through flooded barns and cedar forests, chemistry labs and ferries crossing Puget Sound. No cover. For more information, call (360) 682-5747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

Main Street Market Sunday, August 6, 11:00am-3:00pm Flintstone Park, Oak Harbor Great vendors and live music. Stop by and Spin to Win a coupon from downtown merchants. Take advantage of this coupon on Sunday and see what the merchants have to offer. Call (360) 279-8995 or visit oakharbormainstreet. com for more information.

Job Fair Monday, August 7, 9:00am-2:00pm Trident Seafoods, 1400 4th St, Anacortes Trident Seafoods will be having walk-in inter-

views, with the first 15 candidates interviewed to be entered into a drawing for a $25 gift card. Bring a guest for the chance to earn a $50 referral bonus.

Penn Cove Orca Capture Anniversary Commemoration Tuesday, August 8, 1:00pm Coupeville Orca Network will sponsor a series of events in Coupeville to commemorate the 47th anniversary of the 1970 Penn Cove Orca Capture. Program information and schedule of events can be found on Orca Network’s website at www.orcanetwork.org. The events on the Wharf are free to the public, though contributions to support Orca Network’s educational programs and work on orca captivity issues are appreciated. Registration for the boat trip on the Cutty Sark or Suva is available on the Orca Network website at www.orcanetwork.org. For questions, please contact Cindy Hansen at cindy@orcanetwork. org.

Beat the Heat Waterworks Wednesday, August 9, 1:00pm-2:00pm Community Park, Langley Free If it’s nice and hot outside SWPRD will turn on the waterworks (sprinklers) for a quick afternoon cool-off and set up their super-duper water slide. New this year: Hansons’s Building Supply is providing the sheeting for two slides! Youth must be supervised by parents/ guardians. Those who participate consent to SWPRD’s standard waiver/release by participating. Coordinators: SWPRD and the South Whidbey Parks & Aquatics Foundation Board. For more information, call (360) 221-5484.

Bayview Corner Summer Street Dances

the Garden Store or on-line: https://www.tickettailor.com/all-tickets/29529/8d34/ The Antique Fair & Vintage Market is free opens to the public! Lots of treasures to be found! Four event sites in two days: Schoolhouse, Christianson’s Nursery, Primrose Antiques & Gifts and new location, North Meadow Field. For more information, or to request registration materials, call (360) 466-3821 or email Stephanie.Christiansons@gmail.com

Live Music: Skinny Tie Jazz Friday, August 11, 7:00pm-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville Playing a blend of jazz standards and not so standards, tunes you grew up with and great tunes you’ve never heard before. No cover. For more information, call (360) 682-5747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

Coupeville Arts & Crafts Festival Saturday, August 12, 10:00am-6:00pm Sunday, August 13, 10:00am-5:00pm Downtown Coupeville Each August this festival fills the streets of Coupeville with the region’s best artists and crafts people along with great food & entertainment. For more information, visit http:// coupevillefestival.com

Wine & Rhodies Benefit Gala Saturday, August 12, 6:30pm-9:00pm Dancing Fish Winery, Freeland $75 per person Come out and support Meerkerk Gardens and enjoy delicious food, delectable wine, and entertainment for the evening. Music by Skinny Tie Jazz. Tickets online at www. meerkerkgardens.org or call (360) 678-1912.

Live Music: JP Falcon

Wednesday, August 9, 6:00pm-8:00pm Bayview Cash Store, Langley

Saturday, August 12, 7:00pm-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville

This week’s dance will feature PETE, a rough & ready little rock combo playing covers for fun & getting pretty good at it. This community dance is free and family friendly. Beer, wine and soft drinks will be available for purchase. Rain or shine, dances move inside Bayview Hall if necessary. For more information, visit www. goosefoot.org or call (360) 321-4145.

J.P. Falcon Grady is a self taught acoustic guitarist, singer, songwriter and a proud member of the Blackfeet Nation. He performs originals and covers all over the Pacific Northwest, Montana, Hawaii and British Columbia, Canada as both a solo artist and with his band “J.P. Falcon Band”. No cover. For more information, call (360) 682-5747 or visit www. penncovebrewing.com

Island Herb Vendor Day Thursday, August 10, 2:00pm-5:00pm Island Herb, Freeland

Upcoming Sno-Isle Library Events

A representative from Skagit Organics will be on site with product displays and information. Island Herb is located at 5565 Vanbarr Pl, Unit F. For more information, call (360) 331-0140 or visit islandherb.com

Ready Readers: Family Storytime Thursdays, August 3 & 10, 9:30am Coupeville Library

Island Herb Vendor Day Friday, August 11, 2:00pm-5:00pm Island Herb, Freeland A representative from Smokey Point Productions will be on site with product displays and information. Island Herb is located at 5565 Vanbarr Pl, Unit F. For more information, call (360) 331-0140 or visit islandherb.com

4th Annual Antique Fair & Vintage Market at Christianson’s Nursery Friday, August 11, 5:00pm-8:00pm Saturday, August 12, 9:00am-4:00pm Christianson’s Nursery, Mount Vernon Christianson’s is proud to present the Northwest’s top dealers showcasing the best in antiques, vintage and collectibles. The dealers are individually selected for their quality of hard-to-find goods and creative displays. The fair includes antiques (100+ years old), retro and vintage. Friday Night V.I.P. will kick off with a fun early shopping party of wine tasting and chocolate pairing from Hellam’s Vineyard and Evolve Chocolate at the Schoolhouse and North Meadow Field from 5:00pm to 8:00pm. Friday Night $10 V.I.P. tickets on sale now at

See schedule below Cost: Free

Funny stories and action songs will make you giggle and move while getting your little ones ready to read. Playtime or craft may follow. For ages 18 months and up with a caregiver. Explore Summer: Solar Science Thursday, August 3, 1:00pm-2:30pm Coupeville Library Explore the extraordinary universe around you! Learn about the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse happening on August 21. Andy and Ruth Nielsen from the Island County Astronomical Society (ICAS) will join us to talk about how solar eclipses happen and how to view them safely. Take home protective eclipse glasses and create a nebula in a bottle to decorate your space! For teens and tweens. Making Kimchi with Trap Landry, Part2 Thursday, August 3, 4:00pm-5:00pm Clinton Community Hall, 6411 S. Central Ave. Join Trap Landry in the last of the Clinton Library at the Market series for this year. Participants of Trap’s first kimchi class are invited to bring in the kimchi they’ve made, along with their questions. New comers are welcome to attend and bring their questions along, too!

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED. WIHHA Presents: Mala and Mantra Thursday, August 3, 4:00pm-6:00pm Freeland Library Learn the significance of using a mala for chanting mantra or in meditation. Discover practical techniques for making your own mala prayer beads. Presented by Michele Duncan King. Everyone is welcome. For more information about WIHHA visit www.wihha.com Friends of the Freeland Library Used Book Sale Saturday, August 5, 10:00am-2:00pm Freeland Library Large selection of great books for all ages at bargain prices. Proceeds support the Friends of the Freeland Library. Write Now: Writing Poetry Inside Out Saturday, August 5, 10:30am-12:00pm Clinton Community Hall, 6411 S. Central Ave. In this class you will explore and deepen your practice of reading and writing poetry through the internal development of your own voice, translation of that inner voice to the written page, polishing your work through critique and the art of revision, creating and sustaining your personal connection to the publishing market, while celebrating acceptances and rejections. Limited space. Please register online at www.sno-isle.org or call (360) 341-4280. Clinton Book Group: The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend Wednesday, August 9, 10:00am-11:00am Clinton Library Everyone is welcome to join our discussion of “The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend” by Katrina Bivald. Books are available to check out a month prior to the discussion at the Clinton Library. Next month’s selection is “”Little Paris Bookshop” by Nina George. See The Sun Up Close! Wednesday, August 9, 1:00pm-3:00pm Coupeville Library Safely observe the sun with a variety of filtered telescopes that will not harm your eyes. Browse the current information boards describing the sun and the electromagnetic spectrum. Talk with our solar expert. Every visitor will receive their own pair of solar glasses (while supplies last) suitable for viewing the upcoming solar eclipse. Presented by the Charlie Bates Solar Astronomy Project. Weather permitting. For children ages 5 and above, and preschoolers when accompanied by an adult. Literature & Laughter Book Group: “The Last Bus to Wisdom” Wednesday, August 9, 6:15pm-7:45pm Coupeville Library Join us for a discussion of “The Last Bus to Wisdom” by Ivan Doig. All are welcome!

Religious Services Prayer Group Every Tuesday, 4:00pm-5:30pm St. Hubert Catholic Church, Langley Charismatic Prayer and Praise group. Everyone welcome. For more information, call Bill at (360) 222-4080 or email Sobico@comcast.net.

Filipino Christian Fellowship Sundays, 2:00pm Meets at Church on the Rock, 1780 SE 4th Ave., Oak Harbor. www.ohcfellowship.com

Healing Rooms Every Thursday, 6:30pm-8:30pm 5200 Honeymoon Bay Road, Freeland The Healing Rooms are open to anyone desiring personal prayer for physical, emotional, or spiritual needs. There is a team of Christians from several local churches that are dedicated to praying for healing the sick in our community. All ministry is private, confidential, and free. Teams are available to pray for individuals who drop by on a first-come, first-serve basis. For more information, contact Ann at (425) 263-2704, email healingwhidbey.com, or visit the International Association of Healing Rooms at healingrooms.com.

Teaching Through God’s Word Sundays, 9:00am & 11:00am Calvary Chapel, 3821 French Road, Clinton For more information, visit ccwhidbey.com.

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AUGUST 3 - AUGUST 9, 2017 www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALL LOCALL Y OWNED. Y OWNED. Unitarian Universalist Sunday Service Sundays, 10:00am Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland All are welcome. Values-based children’s religious exploration classes and childcare will be provided. Visit www.uucwi.org for more information. The Unitarian Universalist Congregation building is located at 20103 Highway 525, two miles north of Freeland.

Unity of Whidbey Sundays, 10:00am 5671 Crawford Road, Langley If you’re one of the “spiritual but not religious” people who questions your childhood faith or is looking for something more, Unity of Whidbey may feel like a homecoming. Visit our website: unityofwhidbeyisland.org

Whidbey Quakers Sundays, 4:00pm-5:00pm Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland Whidbey Islands Friends Meeting (also known as Quakers) meet in silent worship and community, with occasional spoken messages, every Sunday at the Unitarian Universalist building. For more information, contact Tom Ewell at tewell@whidbey.com or go to www. whidbeyquakers.org.

Galleries & Art Shows Featured Artists: Judith Burns & Christine Crowell Artists’ Reception: Friday, August 4, 5:00pm-7:30pm Artworks Gallery, Greenbank Farm During the reception there will be light snacks and beverages and live entertainment by Violinist Bev Heising. Other Artworks Gallery artists will be on hand to greet visitors.

CACF Juried Gallery Accepting Entries Saturday-Monday, August 5-7, 11:00am-5:00pm Coupeville Rec Hall, 901 NW Alexander St. The Coupeville Arts & Crafts Festival Juried Gallery will be accepting entries. A prospectus can be downloaded at www.coupevillefestival.com.

Swimming Through - new oil paintings by Jacob Kohn Artist’s Reception: Saturday, August 5, 5:00pm-7:00pm Show continues through August 29 Rob Schouten Gallery, Langley Painter Jacob Kohn’s fascination with the transparent and reflective qualities of water, koi, and lily ponds have been the signature of his oeuvre. Newly retired after a 30 year teaching career at Cornish College of the Arts in Seattle, Kohn set to work on a new series of paintings that take his work the next step further. The Swimming Through show opens in conjunction with “Langley’s First Saturday Art Walk” when Langley’s galleries and shops are open until 7:00pm. Featured artist, Jacob Kohn, will be in attendance and light refreshments will be served.

Featured Artists: Meg Holgate & Brian O’Neill Opening Reception: Saturday, August 5, 5:00pm-7:00pm Show continues through August 27 Museo Gallery, Langley Meg Holgate paints fluid, ethereal, semiabstract “landscape” paintings. Brian O’Neill creates classic and contemporary ceramic vessels.

Meetings & Organizations 13 Hours: The True Story of Benghazi Tuesday, August 8, 6:00pm-9:00pm Coupeville Library Join like-minded friends to see the full movie of 13 Hours as told by those who lived through that terrible ordeal. What happened at Benghazi was not in retaliation for an obscure video that nobody had heard of - the story circulated by the Obama Administration. The truth is the attack was carefully planned and executed by members of the Islamic militant group Ansar al-Sharia. If you have seen it before, you’ll appreciate it more the 2nd time.

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Presented by the Pacific Northwest Coalition, admission is $15 for adults, $10 for students; includes coffee, tea and snacks. Must RSVP, space is limited. Email rsvp2PNwC@mail.com. For more Meetings and Organizations, visit www.whidbeyweekly.com

Classes, Seminars and Workshops Learn to Dance at Dan’s Classic Ballroom.Com! Ballroom, Latin, Swing, Club Dances Groups, Privates, Wedding Prep (360) 720-2727 - dcb601@comcast.net

DUI/Underage Drinking Prevention Panel Saturday, August 5, 12:45pm Trinity Lutheran Church, Freeland No pre-registration required. No late admittance allowed. Open to all and required by local driving schools for driver’s education students and parents. For more information, call (360) 672-8219 or visit idipic.org

VBS 2017 - Hero Headquarters: Where Kids Join Forces with God Monday, Aug. 7 thru Friday, Aug. 11, 9:00am-12:00pm Langley United Methodist Church, Langley A joint project between LUMC and St. Hubert Catholic Church. Join them for a week of music, games, crafts, service projects, and more! Make new friends and experience how fun it is to live in community on Whidbey. This program is open to all children ages 4 through 5th grade. To register, please contact Angie Ramsey (LUMC), at family.lumc@gmail.com or call the church office at (360) 221-4233. Fee: $10 per child or $15 per family (covers supplies and snacks for the week). Tuition assistance happily accommodated upon request.

Hunter Safety Class at CWSA Central Whidbey Sportsman’s Association will be conducting Hunter Safety Classes as follows: Mondays, Aug 7 & 21, Sept 5, 6:00pm-9:00pm Wednesdays, Aug 9 & 23, Sept 7, 6:00pm-9:00pm Fridays, Aug 11 & 25, Sept 9, 6:00pm-9:00pm Saturdays, Aug 12 & 26, Sept 10, 9:00am-12:00pm You must complete all classes (4-M,W,F,S) to fulfill the Washington State requirements. Please contact John Boling at (360) 969-2440 for instructions on registration, pre-registration is required by WA State.

Got Boxes of Pictures? Saturday, August 12, 10:00am-5:00pm Private Residence, Oak Harbor Spend a day preserving your precious memories by getting some of your favorite photos into an album. All levels of scrapbookers welcome, from beginners to experienced. Cost is $10, which includes lunch, a special gift (or project), use of my cool tools, ideas, encouragement, inspiration, fun and help if you need it. Bring what you have or supplies are available for purchase. Space is limited so call today to reserve your seat. Contact Nancy Cunningham, Creative Memories Independent Advisor, (808) 779-8280 or picsonapage@gmail.com.

NRA Basics of Pistol Shooting Course Friday, August 18, 6:00pm-9:00pm Saturday, August 19, 9:00am-5:00pm NWSA Range, Oak Harbor Cost: $35 This course introduces students to the knowledge, skills and attitude necessary for owning and using a pistol safely. Then the pistol handling and shooting portion is completed at the NWSA range, located at 886 Gun Club Road, where students will learn about safe gun handling, pistol shooting fundamentals, and pistol shooting activities. The Basics of Pistol Course will also help prepare the student for participation in other NRA courses. This class includes shooting on the NWSA Pistol Range. Students can register online at nrainstructors.org For questions or to register, call NRA instructor John Hellmann at (360) 675-8397 or email NWSA.Training@gmail.com. Additional information can be found at www.northwhidbeysportsmen.org.

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"BIG" VOLUNTEERS NEEDED AUGUST 3 - AUGUST 9, 2017

Photo Courtesy of WhidbeyHealth Foundation Riders of all ages are welcome to participate in the 10-mile family friendly ride offered as part of the Tour de Whidbey, to be held Saturday, Aug. 19. Riders ages 12 and up can take part in the 100, 67 or 33-mile rides. All minor riders must be accompanied by an adult.

Tour de Whidbey ventures north this year By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly The annual Tour de Whidbey, set for Saturday, Aug. 19, will send bikers pedaling along a new northern route this year, giving participants a different – but still spectacular - view of Whidbey Island. With the northern route comes a new starting point as well, said organizers. “It’s a little different this year. We’ll be starting and ending at Coupeville Elementary School,” said Heather Zustiak, events and volunteer coordinator for WhidbeyHealth Foundation, which puts on this fundraising event. “We’re going north this year, so we’ll go through downtown Oak Harbor all the way to Cornet Bay and come back down. The 100-mile ride will head as far south as Greenbank Farm.

itself,” she said. “And everyone can just go at their own pace and enjoy the day with family and friends.”

phone for emergencies, a repair kit, and layers of clothing in the event of inclement weather.

Another popular feature of the event are the break stations, positioned every 12 to 15 miles along the routes.

There will be children’s activities in the parking lot of Harada Physical Therapy, 101 S. Main Street in Coupeville, throughout the day, including face painting and games. When riders finish at Coupeville Elementary School, they are encouraged to head across the street to the Penn Cove Taproom, which will have discounts on food and refreshments (with or without alcohol) and live music later.

“We’ve got seven break stations that provide shade and have food and water – riders love that,” said Zustiak. Helmets are mandatory for all riders and anyone age 12 and over may participate in the three longer rides. Minors must be accompanied by an adult rider over 18. No more than three minors per adult are allowed. All roads are open to normal traffic, so riders are expected to be courteous to drivers, ride in single file and obey the rules of the road. It’s also recommended participants bring a cell

“We usually have some kind of fun event after, so I think that’s going to be a huge draw,” Zustiak said.

See TOUR continued on page 10

“My idea behind changing the route was to be able to involve the whole island,” continued Zustiak, who is coordinating the Tour for the first time this year. “The thought for now is to do one year on the north end, one year on the south, as a way of keeping the whole island involved. I want this to feel like a community event, like the whole island is coming together for this.” It’s good to note the Tour de Whidbey is not a race. People ride at their own pace, choosing from several different ride options. The Whidbey Century ride is a 100-mile route through north and central Whidbey Island. The Metric Century Plus is a 67-mile route through the north and central part of the island. The Half Metric Century route winds through 33 miles of central Whidbey. The last option is a family-friendly, 10-mile ride in and around Coupeville. Zustiak expects about 300 riders, give or take, to participate in this year’s Tour. Weather plays a significant role in the final tally. Participants include those who call Whidbey Island home, and plenty of riders who come to visit. As in real estate, location, location, location plays a huge role in the popularity of this ride. “The island is just so beautiful. People really enjoy the route

Photo Courtesy of WhidbeyHealth Foundation Hundreds of biking enthusiasts are expected to take place in the annual Tour de Whidbey, set for Saturday, Aug. 19. This year’s route will take riders through the north and central part of Whidbey Island.

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Fire temporarily closes Senior Thrift store in Freeland By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly

A fire at Senior Thrift store in Freeland has forced Island Senior Resources to close the store for business until further notice. The store’s manager was called to the site about 2 a.m. Sunday, July 23 to find South Whidbey Fire District firefighters on scene. “We’ve had some attempted break-ins in the past and she thought it was one of those calls,” said Cheryn Weiser, executive director of Island Senior Resources. “She was not expecting a parking lot full of fire trucks.” While an exact cause of the fire is unknown at this time, it is suspected the blaze may have been sparked by electrical wiring. “It happened in a location just above the second floor that had serious fire walls around three sides,” Weiser said. “It could not have happened in a better location in one sense, because it was somewhat contained.

“However, it did short out our furnace and it did serious damage to four trusses that support the attic,” she continued. “That’s the big issue. The other is smoke damage.”

According to Weiser, much of the store’s contents have been ruined and items like clothing and books that are porous and absorbed the odor will have to be discarded. In addition, smoke damage in the administrative offices on the second floor was among the worst in the building. “The vent flows over into that part of the building,” she said. “It’s just a mess in there. And the smell – it’s much better now, but it was pretty bad.” Those offices have been relocated to a smaller space at the senior center in Bayview. Currently, Weiser said they are waiting for structural engineers to tell them what needs to be done to repair the damage. At this point, the public cannot be allowed into the building. Early estimates – and this is only a guess, said Weiser – is it will be at least four months before it’s back to business as usual for Senior Thrift. That is a huge financial blow to the nonprofit, which provides resources, information and activities for senior citizens on Whidbey and Camano Islands. Some of those services include a nutrition program, medical transportation, adult day services and much more.

Photos courtesy of Island Senior Resources Smoke from a fire in the attic at Senior Thrift in Freeland caused damage to the entire contents of the store.

“The flow of cash for many nonprofits is typically low in the first part of the year, and summer is the time we most depend on the income from the thrift store,” said Weiser. “This is a large chunk of our operating budget. We do have some revenue stream protection in our insurance, but we’re looking at a tremendous amount of outlay. We operate on a pretty narrow margin to begin with.” But even with the store temporarily closed, services will not be disrupted.

Photo courtesy of Island Senior Resources A fire in the attic of Senior Thrift in Freeland caused structural damage to several trusses in the roof. Senior Thrift store will be closed until further notice.

“Our services will continue as they always have. Nothing on the service side changes – absolutely nothing,” stressed Weiser. With this unexpected project to contend with, Weiser said they are already trying to look at ways to not only get things up and running again, but to keep things going to a certain extent during the closure. Senior Thrift employs about 15 people and relies heavily on a regular volunteer force of between 35 and 40 people. “We’re keeping all our staff and trying to repurpose them, essentially,” Weiser said. “We hope to have containers on site within a week to be able to accept donations. We may be able to do some parking lot sales or something, we’re just not sure yet. “People need to know we’re doing our best to do everything we can to be back up and running as quickly as possible,” she continued. “But it’s going to require some

patience. It’s a lot to manage. There are a lot of different parts that will be making this whole again and we want to make sure we manage this effectively.” While they have run across some people who are angry the store is closed, Weiser said the community has been supportive for the most part. “I want to thank all the mayors, county commissioners, the port of commissioners – they’ve all been great,” she said. “And I have to acknowledge that I am very thankful to the South Whidbey Fire District, fire and rescue and WhidbeyTel, who helped us get our finance office back up and running in no time at all.” Anyone who needs information on Island Senior Resources can go to www.seniorresources.org or call 360-321-1600 or 360678-3373 from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday.

August 19 & 20

2017

VIP Yacht Experience Food & Retail Vendors Beer Garden Live Music Pit Party

History in the Making with 8 Grand Prix’s racing this year!

www.hydrosforheroes.com Sponsored in part by:

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“Big” volunteers needed in South Whidbey By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly Big Brothers Big Sisters of Island County is looking for a few good Bigs to make a huge impact on some very special Littles. In other words, the organization is looking for adult volunteers interested in becoming a Big Brother or Big Sister for children in South Whidbey. BBBS of Island County had to cut back services in South Whidbey a couple of years ago. But the demand and the need have never gone away. “There was a funding issue that lead to the decision to cut back there, so we never went away fully, we just weren’t actively recruiting,” said Julie Langrock, executive director of BBBS of Island County. “We always hoped to be back and now we are going to refocus our volunteer recruiting efforts there.” The program currently has 100 matches on Whidbey Island. While existing matches have been maintained on the south end of the island, there haven’t been a lot of new matches made there, despite continued interest from children. “We currently have a list of 50 kids, so we do know the need has always been there,” said program coordinator Anita Joseph. “The kids in our program come from many different backgrounds, so we’re looking for a diverse group of Bigs. We don’t put any limitations on it, because we have kids that are so unique. We just want volunteers who have the time to commit, which usually means two to three times a month.” For anyone who is unfamiliar with Big Brothers Big Sisters, it’s a program that has been around for more than 100 years and it operates on a very simple premise: to provide children facing adversity with positive, one-on-one relationships that can change their lives.

Photo Courtesy of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Island County Big Brothers Big Sisters of Island County is once again looking for volunteers on South Whidbey to become Bigs. The program matches children facing adversity with adult volunteers to form positive one-on-one relationships.

“Big Brothers Big Sisters partners with parents or guardians, volunteers and others in the community and is accountable for each child in our program achieving higher aspirations, greater confidence, better relationships, avoidance of risky behaviors and educational success,” Langrock said.

“I think sometimes we can overlook the power of friendship,” said Joseph. “Our program provides multiple benefits. That relationship can build a child’s confidence, motivate them, encourage them. With that boost of confidence, kids are more likely to attend school, they are pushed toward achieving academic goals and it reduces at-risk behavior.” Anyone over the age of 18 can volunteer to become a Big Brother or Big Sister. There is an application and screening process to ensure safety, but any adult is welcome to apply. But becoming a “Big” does not have any age limits – in fact, some life experience can help pave the road to success. “The national Big Brothers Big Sisters organization did some research and found that the older the volunteer, the longer the match,” said Langrock. “For our community on Whidbey Island, with so many retirees, we are hoping we can pique their interest.” Those who become volunteers will be matched with Littles who have similar interests. And Bigs aren’t expected to make any special plans for the time they spend with their Littles. “We just ask our volunteers to continue to do their regular activities, but take a child with you to do them as well,” said Joseph. “We do want our volunteers to have the time available to do this and to be consistent. We ask for a year-long commitment. But in relationships that are positive, it doesn’t even seem like a year. The time flies by.” Langrock shared this comment from a current Big: “Being a Big is not rocket science. Kids need friendship and a lot of encouragement. It is truly a joy to be able to provide that.” Anyone interested in becoming a Big or a Little anywhere on Whidbey Island can contact the BBBS of Island County office by calling 360-2790644. More information is also available online at www.bbbsislandcounty.org.

TOUR continued from page 8 Of course, the overriding reason for the Tour de Whidbey is to raise money for WhidbeyHealth Foundation and its projects. “The WhidbeyHealth Foundation funds equipment, facilities, and employee scholarships to maintain top standards in patient care and to support excellence in healthcare for every person on Whidbey Island,” Zustiak said. Cost to participate in the 100, 67 or 33 mile rides is $60 per rider, $95 for a tandem team. Cost for military riders is $50 per adult. For the 10-mile family ride, cost for an adult rider with up to three children under age 14 is $25, $20 for military riders. Tandem teams are $40. Those interested in registering in advance

may do so online at active.com; registration forms can be downloaded from the webpage at whidbeyhealth.org/giving/tour-de-whidbey or they can picked up in person at Dean’s Sports Plus or Skagit Cycle in Oak Harbor, Bayview Bicycles in Langley or in the lobby of the WhidbeyHealth Medical Center in Coupeville. Forms can be mailed to WhidbeyHealth Foundation, P.O. Box 641, Coupeville, WA 98239. Same-day registration is also available the morning of Aug. 19. Registration and checkin begins at 7 a.m. and all riders should be pedaling by 9 a.m. “I’m so excited to be involved with the Tour de Whidbey this year. It’s going to be amazing,” Zustiak said.

Photo Courtesy of WhidbeyHealth Foundation As long as you can pedal it, you can ride it in the annual Tour de Whidbey, a fundraising event for the WhidbeyHealth Foundation. This year’s ride is scheduled for Saturday, Aug. 19. Puzzle 1 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.47)

8

7 5

2

9 5

On a scale from 1 to 10...4.7 Every row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every column of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9

Answers on page 15

9

8

3

4

8

1

6

6

4

9 6

5

1

6

4

3

2

2

1

9

3 8 9

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/sudoku on Mon Jul 31 20:48:25 2017 GMT. Enjoy!

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Film Shorts Courtesy of Cascadia Weekly

By Carey Ross Atomic Blonde: While we await the return of Furiosa, Charlize Theron kicks butt all over 1980s Berlin in this actioner directed by "John Wick’s" David Leitch. And lo, another film franchise for Theron is born. Get it, ladies of Hollywood.  (R • 1 hr. 55 min.) Baby Driver: The title here is appropriate, as it seems a bit like the stylish upstart kid brother of "Drive," starring YA heartthrob Ansel Elgort, directed by "Shaun of the Dead’s" Edgar Wright and featuring a killer soundtrack. Is this shaping up to be summer’s most unlikely blockbuster?  (R • 1 hr. 30 min.) The Big Sick: A movie based on the real-life romance between my new favorite comedian Kumail Nanjiani and Emily V. Gordon about the time when they first started dating and were forced to deal with his traditional Pakistani parents and her being stricken with a mysterious illness. This is my kind of rom-com.  (R • 1 hr. 59 min.) The Dark Tower: Is it too much to ask of this long-gestating Stephen King adaptation that it not be utter garbage so Idris Elba can finally realize his potential as my future movie-star boyfriend?  (PG-13) Despicable Me 3: The fact this franchise is three movies in and hasn’t made a horrifying misstep yet is just another sign one should never question the bizarrely relatable comedic gifts of Steve Carell. I bow down to you, Gru.  (PG • 1 hr. 30 min.) Detroit: The writing/directing team of Mark Boal and Kathryn Bigelow ("The Hurt Locker, Zero Dark Thirty") are back with this searing and critically acclaimed dramatization of events that happened in July 1967 at Detroit’s Algiers Motel.  (R • 2 hrs. 22 min.) Dunkirk: My love for director Christopher Nolan is no secret, and I feel like I have been waiting for this movie about the WWII battle and evacuation of Dunkirk just this side of forever. Nolan never lets me down, but I need this to be the one that finally gets him the Best Director Oscar nomination he should’ve gotten for "The Dark Knight." Or "Inception." Or "Interstellar."  (PG-13 • 1 hr. 47 min.) The Emoji Movie: This movie is at 7 percent on Rotten Tomatoes and I have never felt so validated in my life.  (PG • 1 hr. 26 min)

360-679-4003 877-679-4003 www.seatacshuttle.com

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KONA BEER

Girls Trip: Starring Jada Pinkett Smith, Queen Latifah, Regina Hall, and Tiffany Haddish as four friends having a wild weekend in New Orleans, this is the best female ensemble comedy since "Bridesmaids." Finally.  (R • 2 hrs. 2 min.) Kidnap: Halle Berry stars as the determined single mother of a kidnapped child in this disposable action flick that is getting a courtesy run in mainstream theaters before its inevitable repeat showings on the Lifetime Movie Network.  (R • 1 hr. 40 min.) Spider-Man: Homecoming: Spider-Man has always been sort of the stepchild of the juggernaut that is the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Finally, he gets the right star (Tom Holland), the right villain (played by Michael Keaton), the right mentor (Tony Stark/Robert Downey Jr.) to be the web-slinging superhero we’ve all been waiting for.  (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 14 min.) Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets: Like you, the only things I know about this movie is it’s some futuristic sci-fi thing based on a comic book series and Rihanna is in it. Like you, I’ll probably see this movie because of Rihanna.  (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 27 min.) War for the Planet of the Apes: The end chapter in a surprisingly excellent trio of "Apes" movies? Or a near-future parable in which man fights beast for planetary supremacy? Only time and nature will decide.  (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 20 min.) Wish Upon: Maybe what you most want on Earth is to see a horror movie about a possessed doll bent on murder, which is kind of a coincidence because what I least want on Earth is to see a horror movie about a possessed doll bent on murder. Hell to the hell no. Over my doll-murdered body.  (R • 1 hr. 49 min.) Wonder Woman: Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman continues to own the hearts and minds of critics as well as the box office, proving not only that representation matters, but it can also be highly lucrative. One superhero to rule them all.  (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 21 min.) For Anacortes theater showings, please see www.fandango.com. For Blue Fox and Oak Harbor Cinemas showings see ads on this page.

GUEST HAWAIIAN MIXOLOGIST RON SAVOY

End of Summer Cajun Luau Great Hawaiian & Cajun Food! Saturday, August 26 • 3pm-8pm Advance Tickets $30 - At the door $35 (Advance purchase highly recommended) Tickets include one complimentary beer or Mai Tai Call For Details

LIVE MUSIC! Filé Gumbo & Guest Flight Deck Open! Dog Friendly Patio - weather permitting 32295 SR 20 • Oak Harbor • 360-675-5858 • www.eatatflyers.com

Now Showing! Thursday, August 3 thru Wednesday, August 9

THE EMOJI MOVIE (PG) THE DARK TOWER (PG-13)

THIS WEEKS SPECIAL: LARGE CHEESE PIZZA $11 - ADDITIONAL TOPPINGS $1 EACH

FARAWAY ENTERTAINMENT YOUR LOCAL MOVIE THEATER NOW SHOWING:

DETROIT R THE NUT JOB 2: NUTTY BY NATURE PG THE EMOJI MOVIE PG ATOMIC BLONDE R

NOW OPEN 7 NIGHTS A WEEK! Box Office, Snack Bar and Go Karts Open at 5pm Mon-Thurs Box Office and Snack Bar Open at 4pm Friday-Sunday Go Karts Friday-Sunday: Fri 4pm, Sat 11am, Sun 12:30pm 1st Movie Begins At Dusk *Admission 11 & Over $6.50; Kids 5-10 $1.00; 4 & Under Free

Movie Hotline 360-279-2226 Book A Party or Special Showing 360-279-0526 1321 SW Barlow St • Oak Harbor www.farawayentertainment.com

*Cash prices

360-675-5667 • www.bluefoxdrivein.com

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Let’s Dish! with Kae Harris

Tour de Taste Buds The Tour de France just finished and I’m quite certain participants are catching up on much needed and well deserved R and R. Twenty one stages beginning in Dusseldorf, Germany and concluding in Paris, France, covering approximately 2,200 miles – I imagine some serious fuel was needed to keep the cyclists going! This race has been an annual event for over a century and, while the first Tour de France might not have included 21 grueling stages like it does today, each of its six stages were about 249 miles long. Just a few dozen mostly French natives, with Swiss, Italians, and German participants, put their endurance to the test in the first race of its kind which persisted throughout the last century. Of course it would be amazing to cycle through any European countryside, and take in all the sights, sounds, and of course food! I dare not say I’d be anywhere near fit enough to embark on a Tour de France style holiday just yet, but with practice, patience, and determination, I think I could get there! The idea of a cycling holiday through a beautiful French countryside elicits dreams and imaginings of rustic French fare. French food seems to ooze sophistication, even in the most basic outdoorsy setting. A picnic comprised of French food conjures up images of nibbling little bits of crusty French bread with little morsels of cheese, perhaps some camembert and a sommelier appears, as if by magic out of nowhere, to pour wine for the picnic attendees. After all, picnics are a French invention too. I may have spoken about French food briefly before but I think it is most certainly worth a better look. The depth of the flavors which create French dishes, often coupled with a simplicity that heighten the sophistication the cuisine is famed for, is just astounding. The crux of French food is simple combinations which are in turn enhanced using fresh, natural ingredients. It is thought by many people, professional chefs and enthusiastic foodies alike, the best introduction to French food is with their wines and cheeses. This is such a fluid combo, it is a course

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in and of itself. And honestly, it could appear anywhere on a menu – as an appetizer, in between the main course and dessert, or even to finish the meal off. As with any other cuisine, French fare and the dishes which comprise it is subject to regional variations, each having undoubtedly simmered a while in History’s stew pot. What are some of the best French dishes for us here in the United States to try? First on my list is beef bourguinon (remember, this is just a personal list with meals I think really epitomize the gastronomic fame and prowess of France and her people). This stew is hearty and rustic and rich yet light. Made from beef which is braised in red wine, beef bourguinon takes simple to a whole new level. Pearl onions, beef broth, garlic, mushrooms, and herbs add to its simple appeal. The wine not only lends its flavor but is thought to have been used to help tenderize the meat, especially if tougher or cheaper cuts were used. It’s a basic dish which earned itself a spot on the hauté cuisine ladder and for good reason – It’s delicious! But it's not the only basically elegant dish on my list. Coq au Vin is next. It is a wonderful mixture of braised chicken, mushrooms, garlic, onions, and – yes you guessed it – wine. Brandy is also sometimes used although it doesn’t then hold true to its name – ‘Rooster in wine.’ Again, it is the utter straightforwardness of the ingredients which make the dish not only tasty but a fairly simple meal to make. How about Ratatouille? Not the movie, but the dish featured in it! Its versatility again makes it a prime mealtime inclusion in that it can be made as a side, a stuffing or the main dish itself. Ratatouille inspires a little controversy in the way it’s made with chefs often disagreeing about whether or not the vegetables used to make it should be sautéed all together before putting them into the oven, or if they should be cooked separately first and then set in layers in the baking dish. I wonder if it makes a difference…I will have to experiment and see for myself. I encourage you to as well, if the fancy takes you! The sound of tomatoes, zucchini, onions, bell peppers, eggplant, garlic, carrots and herbs such as marjoram and thyme, all amalgam-

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ating to create gastronomic matrimony sounds divine. Simple, easy and elegant. Easy and elegant is often what I’m after, most definitely when I’m entertaining dinner guests at times. I want my guests, friends and family to enjoy a little ‘sophistication’ when I cook for them sometimes and French cuisine embodies this, in my opinion. You know I am not leaving dessert off my list. It’s always intriguing to know what other cultures consider delectable when it comes to their sweeties and treats. Nothing screams ‘French cuisine’ to me more than chocolate soufflé. The light, fluffy, airy wisp of chocolate decadence has a centuries old history actually - in the early 1700s or there about. In fact, this dessert’s name comes from the French word for ‘puff’ or ‘breath.’ While soufflé doesn’t have to be sweet, and can instead take on savory notes, nothing is as French to my taste buds as a chocolate soufflé. Dear readers, perhaps we can enjoy a taste of France given the Tour de France just wrapped up and we have our own version here on Whidbey Island. Let’s indulge our taste buds in some rustic hauté cuisine. I’m including a recipe for ratatouille. I hope you enjoy it as much as my family and I do. If you try it, let me know how you like it! Please send any and all comments, questions, information and most definitely any recipes you would like to share to letsdish.whidbeyweekly@gmail.com because as always, I’d love to hear from you, so Lets Dish! Easy Ratatouille 2 cans diced tomatoes 8 oz eggplant, rinsed and diced into 1-in. cubes 2 cloves peeled, minced garlic ½ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon pepper 1 medium onion, diced 1 lb yellow, orange and/or red bell pepper (rinsed, destemmed, deseeded and diced) 8 oz yellow squash (Summer squash) 8 oz zucchini, diced ¾ cup fresh basil, chopped 1 teaspoon dried thyme 2 tablespoons olive oil In a large frying pan with higher edges, heat 1 ½ tablespoons of olive oil over medium/high heat. Add the garlic and onion and stir frequently, cooking until the onion is soft. Add the tomatoes, eggplant, ½ cup of water, salt and pepper, and thyme. Cover and reduce heat to simmer the eggplant and stir occasionally until it is soft. Stir in the bell peppers, yellow squash, and zucchini and cook until the squash is tender. Stir in the basil and remaining half tablespoon of olive oil. Season with more salt and pepper to taste if desired, et voila! Serve over pasta, inside crepes, or by itself as a side to some fish perhaps? Your options are endless so I hope you enjoy! To read past columns of Let's Dish in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

Quiet Sighs Whisper on the Wind A poem submitted by Laura Tarasoff

The farmer and the fisherman Look to the easterly sky For a sign from the rising sun, To tell them how the day will go. The wind whispers gently over the tops Of the pine, the oak, the cedar, the madrone. Words of wisdom from by gone days. Hot embers streak across the sky, Like warning flares from a far. The founders of our feasts Drain the last drop of promise from The hot cup of potential they hold. Sighing deeply, they turn; “Well, might as well get to it.” Slipping into boots waiting by the door, Standing like soldiers at the ready, They head out to work in the shadow Of the purple mountain majesty. Bowing in reverence to the baptism The morning sky foretold. The power of nature to control their lives Is understood and respected by the Captains of those called to guide the The plow and the rudder. As the day’s light grow dim, They return to the window for a hint Of what lies ahead. A silver lining reminds them Tomorrow is a new day, Filled with hope and promise. With a heavy sigh they bow in thanks And rest.

Dining Guide CRAFT - COMMUNITY - COLLABORATION FEATURING CRAFT BEER, WINE & CIDER DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS

Breakfast & Lunch on the Water - Daily Fresh Baked Treats Homemade Soups & Sandwiches 360.678.5431 • 4 Front Street • Coupeville

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Weddings, Retreats, Restaurant & Romantic Inn Dinner: Wednesday through Sunday 4pm to 8pm. Lunch: Noon to 4pm Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

2072 W. Captain Whidbey Inn Road • Coupeville 360-678-4097 • www.captainwhidbey.com

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of opinion arise from a brand of emotionalism that is largely lacking in your own thinking. Much give and take is going to be involved in establishing harmony with those parties. The 5th is helpful to the process.

CHICKEN LITTLE & THE ASTROLOGER By Wesley Hallock

ARIES (March 21-April 19) It’s very possible that you are too wrapped up in principles this week to remember the importance of balance. Intellect is a ruthless commander when divorced from the emotions, as is likely the case for you now. Great gains are currently possible on many fronts, especially those related to home and vehicles, but don’t let yourself get overheated. Heed the voice that warns of overachieving on the 5th, in whatever form it comes. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) If time is your enemy because it seems there’s not enough of it, look again. There may be a hidden factor that has to do with you. Unhappiness with time’s progression, whether it be too fast or too slow, is your clue that it’s really you who is out of step. Getting back in the groove is going to take some hustle and bustle on your part. A little double-time won’t hurt on the 5th and may actually be fun. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) Surface appearances can be deceiving this week. Treat every situation with the suspicion that there’s more to the story than meets the eye. If you keep probing, your subject of special interest is likely to yield the hidden scoop that will cast matters in a much different light. This is especially true with regard to mechanical devices. What you thought at first was bad on the 5th may conceal some hidden blessings. CANCER (June 22-July 22) If life’s road has been bumpy, if the gravel detours seem too many, fear not. The most wonderfully interesting locales lie often at the end of such rough hewn byways. You are due for a rest stop this week, or at the very least, a scenic overlook. Used as reminder of why you undertook your journey in the first place, it is proof enough that you do not travel alone. Let the little coincidences be your guide on the 5th. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Every word of encouragement and support you can muster for others is important this week. Rest assured that your well-intended deliveries do much good, even if the recipients are too often a fast moving target. The important thing on the 5th is not who is right, but that you use the occasion as an exercise in finding the common ground. Your great allies on that day are numbers and logic. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Self-reliance plays a large role in your financial successes this week, but it’s not the only factor. You are not operating in a vacuum. Complicating your situation is the fact that troublesome opposing views and differences

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Be quick this week to seize the opportunity to help another. The good that can come of a little timely philanthropy by far outweighs the expense to you. Your gift of time or money to a worthy cause is only the first act. The benefits will continue to ripple outward long after you’ve shared whatever bounty you can spare and turned your attention to other things. Watch the 5th for clues. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Travel for the sake of adding wealth and substance to your life is a distinct possibility this week. You may travel far in another sense without ever leaving your chair. In either case, memories of the past bear strongly on your current decisions. Trips down memory lane aren’t as good for renewing your connections to home and family, but they may have to suffice. Look to the 5th for clues. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) What you do this week matters less than why you do it. Fast moves made with only yourself in mind may have the desired effect short-term, and a much less desirable effect long-term. In working to better your home life, make sure that you consider what is best for the family. That may not be the same as what you desire purely for yourself. If you need help making the distinction, watch the 5th for clues. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Watch the week’s events carefully. You may find them giving useful insights into the reasonings that drive the beliefs and behaviors of others. Of the greatest value are people whose life views are very different from your own. If you understand their fears on the 5th, you have found the point from which you can resolve major differences between you. This translates into dollars and cents at the negotiating table. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb 18) Think carefully before giving your word this week. Agreements both written and verbal should be examined closely to be sure that they really do what you want them to do. In the renegotiation of old pacts, look for ways to sweeten the deal for all parties. The 5th is a day when emotions subside and the powers of reasoning are at their strongest. Use it to maximize your chances of being understood. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You will probably find it easier than usual to rid your life of the non-useful this week. For that reason, you may find yourself leading by example for a troubled friend who lacks your ability to release the past. There’s no need to overthink what this means. All that is asked is that you simply be who and what you are at all times. Be sure this is true in dicey situations on the 5th. © 2017, Wesley Hallock, All Rights Reserved

ACROSS

53. Jail, slangily

25. Account

1. 007, for one

56. Barley bristle

26. Fairy

4. “Be quiet!”

58. Calling

27. Focal point

7. ___ Fyne, Scotland

60. “Malcolm X” director

28. Command to a dog

61. Winner

30. Fed. construction overseer

11. ___ vera 12. “Beat it!”

64. Halt

13. Acoustic 15. Having foresight 17. Correspond 18. Absorbed, as a cost 19. Check 21. After expenses 22. Cabernet, e.g. 23. Takes a seat 24. “Not to mention ...” 27. “The Catcher in the ___” 28. Ado 30. Bronx cheer 33. Fill 36. To grate or wear down 38. Breed 39. ___ v. Wade 40. “What’s gotten ___ you?” 41. Anticipate

66. Kitchen counter?

29. A chip, maybe

31. “Field of Dreams” setting

67. Acad.

32. Designer

68. During 69. Allocate, with “out”

34. Kind of dealer

70. “Can’t Help Lovin’ ___ Man”

35. “___ bad!” 37. Family head

71. Drone, e.g.

42. Sylvester, to Tweety

DOWN

44. Most recent

1. Bluish gray

47. Anita Brookner’s “Hotel du ___”

2. Meditated or pondered on

49. Apple leftover

3. “Absolutely!”

51. “Gladiator” setting

4. Polo, e.g.

52. Minimal

5. Fine-tunes

53. Region’s prevailing weather

6. Pigs

54. Cliffside dwelling

7. Police, with “the”

55. Call for

8. “___ Gang” 9. A hoop skirt

56. Appear

10. “Unimaginable as ___ in Heav’n”: Milton

59. Battery contents

57. Fancy

11. Way, way off

62. Big Apple attraction, with “the”

46. Chronicles

12. One thing after another

63. Grand ___ (“Evangeline” setting)

48. Trick taker, often

14. Affranchise

65. Marvelous, in slang

50. Computer info

16. “Duck soup!”

51. A chorus line

20. Chinese “way”

43. Gangster’s gal 45. Freshman, probably

Answers on page 15

YOUR GUESS IS AS GOOD AS OURS WEATHER FORECAST Chicken Little looks at what is and fears the sky is falling. Wesley Hallock, as a professional astrologer looks at what is and sees what could be. Read Wesley’s monthly forecast with links to Facebook and Twitter, at www.chickenlittleandtheastrologer.com. To read past columns of Chicken Little and the Astrologer in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

Thurs, August 3

Fri, August 4

Sat, August 5

Sun, August 6

Mon, August 7

Tues, August 8

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

H-80°/L-61°

H-79°/L-62°

H-77°/L-61°

H-74°/L-54°

H-68°/L-57°

H-73°/L-58° Sunny

H-70°/L-53°

Plenty of Sunshine

H-74°/L-56°

Sunny and Warm

Sunny and Warm

Mostly Sunny

Mostly Sunny and Nice

Mostly Sunny

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

H-82°/L-61°

H-77°/L-58°

H-75°/L-60°

H-80°/L-61°

H-85°/L-63°

Sunny and Hot

H-85°/L-63°

Sunny and Hot

Mostly Sunny

Partly Sunny

Sunny and Nice

Sunny

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.

Wed, August 9

South Isle Sunny and Nice


14 AUGUST 3 - AUGUST 9, 2017 LOCALLY OWNED.

Whidbey Weekly

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED.

Island 911

Seriously, we do not make this stuff up!

PHOTO COURTESY OF DENIS HILL

SATURDAY • AUGUST 12, 2017 5:30am Check-In • 7am Marathon & Marathon Relay 7:30am Half Marathon • 8am 5K & 10K Run/Walk 10am Coupeville Arts & Crafts Festival STUNNING VIEWS OF: Puget Sound • Olympic Mountains • North Cascades Ebeyʼs Prairie & Ebeyʼs Landing National Historical Reserve • Coupeville, WA Proceeds support a safe and sober graduation night celebration for the Seniors of Coupeville High School, Class of 2018.

REGISTER NOW: RACETHERESERVE.COM Presented by Coupeville High School Senior Parents and the Class of 2018

Thursday, July 13 4:40pm, SE Pioneer Way Reporting party advising the bartender would not give her ice for her son.

9:39am, NW 1st Ave. Reporting party advising she has not heard from an individual for over a year.

7:24pm, SW 24th Ave. Caller advising their adult children tore up daughter’s bedroom and then left.

4:07pm, SE Ireland St. Caller reporting an elderly woman flagged her down and told her someone went in her house while she was asleep.

Friday, July 14 11:35am, SR 20 Reporting party would like to know if they are allowed to have a wolf hybrid.

4:34pm, SR 20 & SW Erie St. Reporting party advising male at location is “pretend shooting” at vehicles. Does not have anything in his hand.

4:28pm, NW Crosby Ave. Reporting party advising there is a raccoon with four babies in the area and wants them to be removed.

4:58pm, SW Barrington Dr. Reporting party advising transient male is throwing bread into roadway and seagulls are getting it, causing a traffic hazard.

5:18pm, S Beeksma Dr. Reporting party advising while she was in line, a male told her if she gave him cash now she would not have to pay when she got to the front of the line. Reporting party gave him money but he was not there when she got to the front of the line.

7:29pm, SR 20 Reporting party advising male subject is walking on the sidewalk having a “very animated” conversation with himself.

9:06pm, SR 20 Caller advising subject who tried to steal her buggy is now back at location. Saturday, July 15 7:51am, NE Ernst St. Reporting party advising their neighbors were vacuuming and blasting loud music. 4:33pm, SR 20 Reporting party advising a male is screaming in the bathroom. Sunday, July 16 8:18am, SR 20 Caller reporting subject who had previously been trespassed is at location attempting to steal a TV. Monday, July 17 12:19pm, SR 20 & SW 6th Ave. Caller reporting bicyclists are taking up the lane and refusing to move over. 2:31pm, SW Roodzant St. Reporting party advising a swarm of bees on a tree appear to be lost. Tuesday, July 18 3:24pm, SE Barrington Dr. Reporting party requesting call regarding a nightmare she had. 8:52, SR 20 Reporting party advising a male is outside location dancing. Wednesday, July 19 6:09am, NW 2nd Ave. Caller reporting a male is on the ground in front yard “flopping and rolling around.” 10:26am, SE 4th Ave. Caller states neighborhood cats are going to the bathroom in her yard. 2:20pm, SR 20 Reporting party advising male with a shopping cart is “spazzing out” and throwing things. 2:54pm, NE 7th Ave. Reporting party advising a male is standing in parking lot talking to himself and yelling. Thursday, July 20 9:35am, NW 1st Ave. Reporting party advising a vehicle has been at her house for over a year.

Friday, July 21 6:01am, SR 20 Caller advising male outside is yelling and walking into traffic. 9:59am, SR 20 Reporting party advising male is in middle of the road disrupting traffic. 12:28pm, SE Ely St. Caller reporting male walking back and forth in front of window making inappropriate gestures with a drink cup. Then he came inside and took candy. 4:00pm, SE City Beach St. Reporting party advising two juveniles using “extreme profanities.” 10:28pm, SR 20 Reporting party advising a short male at location with “napoleon syndrome.” Every time he comes in the store he tries to fight someone. Monday, July 24 8:17am, NE Oleary St. Caller reporting portions of his fence have been moved around so it is no longer straight. 12:11pm, NE Atalanta Way Reporting party has questions about fees for an impounded cat. 4:47pm, SE Barrington Dr. Reporting party advising roommate has been missing for two days and they just found an eviction notice. 7:03pm, SE Pioneer Way Reporting party advising male subjects are camping in truck in parking lot and urinating out in the open. Tuesday, July 25 8:37am, NE Big Berry Loop Reporting party advising subject is sleeping on the slide at location. 9:25am, SE Bayshore Dr. Caller advising saw a subject who is known to drink and drive. 10:34am, SW 8th Ave. Reporting party advising neighbor parks cars in a manner that prevents reporting party from leaving and flipping them off. 11:13am, SW Kimball Dr. Reporting party advising left stove turned on and wants it shut off. Report provided by OHPD & Island County Sheriff’s Dept.

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


15

AUGUST 3 - AUGUST 9, 2017 LOCALLY OWNED.

REAL ESTATE WANTED Seeking Small House: Wanting to purchase small 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath older rambler, cottage, or cabin on South Whidbey. One level, not in town, approximately .5 acres, a few stairs to entrance OK. No cement floor or in-floor heating. Cherish hardwood flooring, wood cabinets, electric baseboard heating, and metal roof. Please call (360) 730-3244 before you do any cleanup, repairs, flooring, painting, home improvements, etc.

MOTORCYCLES/ATVS 2013 Harley Davidson Fat Boy Low. 5 actual miles, $12,300 OBO. Call (925) 628-2546 after 5PM (0)

AUTO/PARTS FOR SALE Raider hi-rise canopy for Ford Ranger, 6 ft. bed, (19851992). $50 (360) 331-5904 (1) Lovingly maintained and garaged 1966 Ford T-Bird. Runs great! 15K. Photos available. (360) 331-1063 (2)

BOATS/PARTS FOR SALE 1978 Glasply Runabout boat, 18 ft long, inboard/outboard OMC Drive with less than 200 hours on engine. Comes with newer EZ Loader trailer, new seats and battery, downriggers, fish finder, CB radio and more. Will not start - needs work of unknown nature. $999 OBO (360) 321-6031 (1)

GARAGE/ESTATE SALES ACE FREELAND'S ANNUAL GARAGE SALE: We are cleaning out the back room! Lots of great stuff priced below cost. One Day Only, Saturday, August 5, 8am - 4pm, 1609 E. Main Street Freeland, WA. Cash or checks only - sorry, no credit cards. ALL SALES FINAL! (360) 331-6799 or freelandacehardware.com 14 GARAGE SALES in Sierra: Saturday Only, August 5, 9 am - 3 pm. Exit Route 20 at Libby Road and follow the signs. Pick up a list of participating addresses at any site. Done With All Crafts Sale: Saturday, August 5 and Sunday, August 6, 9am–4pm, 1844 Penn Cove Road (Turn at 3 Sisters - San de Fuca - left on Penn Cove. 4th house, “Lois Lane” driveway). Garage full of quilt fabric and supplies, Singer Featherweight, stamps, punches, paper, paints, ribbons, yarns, ethnic fabrics, seed & other beads, doll making supplies, books, magazines, much more! EAGLES GARAGE SALE NOW ACCEPTING DONATIONS! Sale is 9/2 & 9/3 at Freeland

Aerie #3418. We need small furniture, sporting goods, tools, toys, household goods, garden items, crafts, books, purses, scarves, decorations, etc. Sorry we cannot sell computers, electronics, large appliances or large furniture. Your tax deductible donations are truly appreciated. Call (360) 321-4830 or (360) 2223922 to drop off items (1)

ANNOUNCEMENTS Pregnant? Need baby clothes? We have them and the price is right–FREE. Pregnancy Care Clinic, open most Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10am to 4pm. Call (360) 221-2909 or stop by 6th and Cascade in Langley. Be the difference in a child's life and become a foster parent today! Service Alternatives is looking for caring, loving, and supportive families to support foster children. (425) 923-0451 or mostermick@ servalt-cfs.com The Whidbey Island community is encouraged to try out the paddling sport of dragon boating with the Stayin' Alive team. Our team's mission is to promote the physical, social, and emotional benefits of dragon boating. It has been shown to be especially beneficial to cancer survivors. Practice with us for up to 3 times for free. Life-jackets and paddles provided. Saturdays at the Oak Harbor Marina, 8:45am. Contact njlish@ gmail.com. More info at our Facebook Page: https://www. facebook.com/NorthPugetSou ndDragonBoatClub?ref=hl

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Looking for Board Members to join the dynamic Board of Island Senior Resources and serve the needs of Island County Seniors. Of particular interest are representatives from North Whidbey. For more information please contact: reception@islandseniorservices.org

JOB MARKET PT Evening Janitorial – Freeland/Clinton: Hiring IMMEDIATELY for part-time evening janitor, Monday-Saturday, 11 hours per week. Start time flexible (after 6pm/earlier on Saturday); compensation, $12 Puzzle 1 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.47)

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LOCALLY OPERATED.

Property Management You Can Count On!

Whidbey Residential Rentals, Inc. We Manage Your Home As If It Were Our Own. 360-675-9596 • www.whidbeyres.com 285 NE Midway Blvd • Suite #2 • Oak Harbor per hour, part-time; Earn parttime income of $500+ per month! Must have valid DL, cell phone, pass background/ drug screening and E-Verify (USCIS). Please provide name and phone number. Resumes welcome. E-mail: susan.valenzuela@ybswa.net (3) PT WEEKEND RECEPTIONIST: Regency on Whidbey is hiring for a PT Weekend & On-Call Receptionist. You will be responsible for answering phones, directing residents and guests in the community along with providing clerical support to the administration staff. Strong written-verbal communication, efficient in MS Office, attention to detail, and a passion working with the elderly is required. Qualified candidates need to complete an application in person at 1040 SW Kimball Drive, please bring your Cover Letter and Resume (2) FULL TIME LUBE TECH: Martin’s Auto in Oak Harbor is seeking a full time lube tech, Monday thru Friday. Apply in person at 152 NE Midway Blvd. (0) INSTRUCTORS: In Motion Dance, Learning & Recreation is hiring instructors for the following: Ballet, Tap, Belly Dancing, Salsa, and other dance instructors; Meditation, Yoga, Kids Yoga, Adult Workout, Nia, Ballet Barre, Mom & Me, Creative movement for pregnant & new moms; BilinNo Cheating!

gual educators & instructors (French, Japanese, German, other), Movement/ dance bilingual instructors, Special Needs educators (training provided). Please call 360-682-6237 for information. (0) DRIVERS: Part-time, full-time, on-call & weekend driver positions available. Must have or be willing to obtain CDL Class B with P2 passenger endorsement. If interested, please contact Brent at (360) 679-4003 or find an application online at www.seatacshuttle.com/ employment.php

MUSIC NICK’S PIANO TUNING SERVICE – Experienced, professional, reliable. Island, Skagit, Snohomish counties, (360) 679-9001 (0)

TICKETS/GETAWAYS SEAHAWKS pre-season tickets for August 18 vs. the Minnesota Vikings at 7 p.m. Also, SEAHAWKS vs. Kansas City Chiefs August 25 at 5 p.m. Section 308, 40-yard line, 14 rows up. Two tickets to each game, $75 per ticket, OBO. (360) 914-0075 (0)

HOME FURNISHINGS

8” heavy waterline, $4 a foot, obo. Can be used for waterline or drain line. (360) 321-1624 (0) Natural Barnyard Topsoil: Good for gardens, flower beds, etc. Unscreened, 10 yard loads, $225 delivered. South Whidbey (360) 321-1624

MISCELLANEOUS 8-ft jumper cables in car emergency kit; floral cloth shower curtain with 12 rings; Brita filter pitcher with 2 filters; full size bed sheets - one flat, one fitted; 20-piece fine porcelain dinnerware (4 place settings). Reasonable offers considered. (360) 675-0379 (1) 1/2 cord Fir Firewood, 12"-16" split and dry. Brad (360) 9148999 (1) Looking for Xmas, Bday, Father's Day, or just Gifts in general? These are LOCAL made crafts, I have about 50-60 of these available. They are $16.00/ea, plus shipping if you want them mailed. CASH preferred. Dimensions are: 5-6"W X 17”L. Contact me at ljohn60@gmail.com.

ANIMALS/SUPPLIES More New & Used Horse Tack for Sale: Synthetic saddles,

English & Western, $50 each OBO; Lots of miscellaneous other tack and farm equipment available. Must Sell! Call (360) 678-4124 for more information (1) Excellent Grass Hay for Sale. Good for horses, $7 per bale, 20 bale minimum. (360) 3211624 If you or someone you know needs help in feeding pet(s), WAIF Pet Food Banks may be able to help. Pet Food Banks are located at WAIF thrift stores in Oak Harbor (50 NE Midway Blvd) and Freeland (1660 Roberta Ave) and are generously stocked by donations from the community. If you need assistance, please stop by.

FREE Mated pair of Chinese RingNecked Pheasants. Hen is a prolific layer. Free to good home. Not to be eaten. (360) 321-6031 (0) King mattress set, includes box springs; Matching sofa & chair, midnight blue with very light white striping. U-Haul, Coupeville (360) 678-7591 (0)

Twin bed frame, $50 OBO. Call (360) 579-5436 after 10AM (0)

LAWN AND GARDEN 31 aluminum silver deck post caps, $3 each; 200 feet new

CLASSIFIED INFORMATION US Postal Mail

Whidbey Weekly Classified Department PO Box 1098 Oak Harbor, WA 98277

E-Mail............classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com Telephone..................................(360)682-2341 Fax.............................................(360)682-2344 PLEASE CALL WHEN YOUR ITEMS HAVE SOLD.

Please try to limit your classified to 30 words or less, (amounts and phone numbers are counted as words) we will help edit if necessary. We charge $10/week for Vehicles, Boats, Motorcycles, RVs, Real Estate Rental/Sales, Business Classifieds and any items selling $1,000 and above. We do charge $25 to include a photo. The FREE classified space is not for business use. No classified is accepted without phone number. We reserve the right to not publish classifieds that are in bad taste or of questionable content. All free classifieds will be published twice consecutively. If you would like your ad to be published more often, you must resubmit it. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date.

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


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$

95

Basic Oil & Filter

31

$

95

Includes 4X4 & SUV

Most cars up to 5 qts. 5W20, 5W30, 10W30. Other grades extra. Some filters cost extra. Vehicles with Skid Plates may be extra. Plus $1 Environmental Disposal Fee.

WE CAN SAVE YOU UP TO $250 ON BRAKE SERVICE VERSUS OUR COMPETITORS. WARRANTIED AT 30K LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE. STARTERS ALTERNATORS TIMING BELTS SERPENTINE BELTS

BRAKES TIRES TUNE-UPS EXHAUST

UP TO

1

$ 00

Flat Rate Auto Repair only $6995 per hour

PER GAL LON D ISCOUNT T ODAY!

always

Ask for De

tails

FREE ESTIMATES!

At Hilltop Service Center we only repair and replace parts that are needed. We will not oversell or install unnecessary parts. We are highly trained brake technicians, not high pressure sales people.

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4 cyl

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6 cyl

8995*

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8 cyl

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