Whidbey Weekly, July 20, 2017

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July 20 through July 26, 2017

CARNIVAL • ENTERTAINMENT • COUNTRY FAIR 819 Camano Ave • Langley • whidbeyislandfair.com

More Local Events inside

Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Harvest Fest Races Coupeville Green Coupeville Page 6

Zumba & Hula by Ate Flo Knights of Columbus Oak Harbor Emergency Vehicles Page •6 Community

SW Syrian Refugee Project Langley United Methodist Church Langley Resources Page 9

3:30pm - 7:00pm • Fort Nugent Park Interactive Displays • Food Booths • Music


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350 SE Pioneer Way • Oak Harbor 360-675-8733 www.islandcountyhabitat.org

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Oak Harbor

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600 SE Barrington Dr Oak Harbor • 360-675-1133

Discover the Treasures of Whidbey Island Thrift Store Shopping

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Upscale Resale A Thrift Store by Soroptimist International of Oak Harbor

210 SE Pioneer Way, Suite 1 Oak Harbor 360-240-0776 www.sioakharbor.org

50 NE Midway Blvd Oak Harbor 360-678-8900 7 ext. 1400 1660 Roberta Ave Freeland 6 360-321-WAIF (9243) ext. 1600

www.waifanimals.org

Good Cheer 5 Thrift Store 116 Anthes Ave Langley 360-221-6455

Greenbank 20018 SR 20 • Coupeville 360-678-8900 ext. 1800 www.waifanimals.org

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Langley

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1592 Main Street • Freeland 360-331-6272 www.islandcountyhabitat.org

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Good Cheer Two 1 Thrift Store Ken’s Korner Shopping Center

SR525 & Langley Rd Clinton

360-341-2880

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Senior Thrift www.senior-resources.org 5518 Woodard Ave Freeland, WA 98249 360-331-5701 GOOD CHEER THRIFT STORE 116 Anthes Ave • Langley 360-221-6455 www.goodcheer.org General thrift store with a large inventory of clothes, furniture, toys, books, housewares, sporting goods, antiques and collectibles. You will be greeted by a friendly atmosphere and great prices. Good Cheer was founded in 1962 to create a hunger-free community on South Whidbey through our Food Bank. GOOD CHEER TWO THRIFT STORE Ken’s Korner Shopping Center SR525 & Langley Rd • Clinton 360-341-2880 www.goodcheer.org General thrift store with a large inventory of clothes, furniture, toys, books, housewares, sporting goods, antiques and collectibles. You will be greeted by a friendly atmosphere and great prices. Good Cheer was founded in 1962 to create a hunger-free community on South Whidbey through our Food Bank.

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY STORE 592 Main Street • Freeland 360-331-6272 Gently used furniture, beds, building supplies, and appliances donated by the community to support affordable housing for low income families of Island County. Donations build houses. Purchases build houses. Houses are affordable because they are sold at no profit, homeowners must contribute sweat equity to reduce purchase costs, low interest loans are provided, and volunteers complete a majority of the construction tasks. Service area is Greenbank, Freeland, Langley, and Clinton. SENIOR THRIFT 5518 Woodard Ave • Freeland 360-331-5701 www.senior-resources.org On the corner of SR525 and Woodard Avenue, Senior Thrift houses over 14,000 square feet, making it the largest single thrift store on Whidbey Island. As a program of Island Senior Resources, we help support vital programs and services to people 50 yrs. and older, with the goal of enabling healthy, active, independent and purposeful lives.

Clinton

WAIF THRIFT STORE - FREELAND 1660 Roberta Ave • Freeland 360-321-WAIF (9243) ext. 1600 www.waifanimals.org Fun thrift store with a variety of purrfect collectables, meowvelous designer clothing, Pick of the Litter antiques and so much more! Don't miss out on the barking bargains. Proceeds go directly to help Whidbey Island’s homeless pet population. WAIF THRIFT STORE - OAK HARBOR 50 NE Midway Blvd • Oak Harbor • 360-678-8900 ext. 1400 www.waifanimals.org We have furniture, antiques and collectables plus clothing and household items. Proceeds go directly to help Whidbey Island’s homeless pet population. BARC RE-TAIL 20018 SR 20 • Coupeville • 360-678-8900 ext. 1800 www.waifanimals.org We are the “Eclectic Bargain Store.” We have everything from a vintage grape crusher to a unique barber’s chair, from a University of Washington Football locker to an

Iguana cage, doors, windows, tile, appliances, paint, recliners, and so much more. You never know what you will find at “The BaRC.” Not only do we help support the homeless cats and dogs from our “Beautiful Island,” we divert over 250,000 pounds of salvageable items from the Solid Waste Complex and don’t forget we will recycle your printers, fax machine, copiers, keyboards, mice, and other electronic items for a small fee at “The BaRC.”Y’all come down to “The BaRC” and see Bobby and boys. Proceeds go directly to help Whidbey Island’s homeless pet population. HABITAT FOR HUMANITY STORE 350 SE Pioneer Way • Oak Harbor 360-675-8733 Gently used furniture, beds, and appliances donated by the community to support affordable housing for low income families of Island County. Donations build houses. Purchases build houses. Houses are sold at no profit, homeowners must contribute sweat equity to reduce purchase costs, low interest loans are provided, and volunteers complete a majority of the construction tasks. Service area is Oak Harbor and Coupeville.

ISLAND THRIFT 600 SE Barrington Dr • Oak Harbor 360-675-1133 Island Thrift is a non-profit that was established in 1977. Proceeds go to a variety of Island County organizations and charities in the form of grants and gifts. Our store is full of great bargains on clothes, housewares, small appliances, books and much more. When you shop at Island Thrift you help your community. Open for shopping Mon thru Sat 9am to 5:30pm Donations are Mon thru Sat 9am to 4pm. UPSCALE RESALE 210 SE Pioneer Way, Suite 1 • Oak Harbor 360-240-0776 www.sioakharbor.org Soroptimist International of Oak Harbor opened their store in 2012 with the mission “Best for Women”. We supply scholarships to women and girls, support many local charitable events and support mammograms and health screenings for those who can’t afford them. We have gently used clothing, décor, books, antiques, collectibles and furniture. Friendly staff and great prices!


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ON TRACK with Jim Freeman

Get ready! The Fair is here and we aren't there...yet. The fun begins tomorrow and ends Sunday. The Whidbey Island Fair, an annual tradition, no matter how many times the name is changed.

The Difference Between Officers & NCOs A young Naval officer was severely wounded in the head by a flight deck accident but the only visible, permanent injury was both of his ears were amputated. Since his remaining hearing was sufficient, he remained in the Navy. Many years later, he eventually rose to the rank of Rear Admiral. He was, however, very sensitive about his appearance. One day the Admiral was interviewing three servicemen who were candidates for his headquarters staff. The first was a Marine Major, a helicopter pilot, and it was a great interview. At the end of the interview the Admiral asked him, “Do you notice anything different about me?” The young officer answered, “Why, yes Sir, I couldn't help but notice that you have no ears.” The Admiral was displeased with his lack of tact and threw him out. The second was with a Navy Lieutenant, and he was even better. The Admiral then asked him the same question, “Do you notice anything different about me?” He replied sheepishly, “Well, sir, you have no ears.” The Admiral also threw him out. The third interview was with an old Master Chief, an Airdale and staff-trained NCO. He was smart, articulate, fit, looked sharp, and seemed to know more than the two officers combined. The Admiral liked this guy, and went ahead with the same question, “Do you notice anything different about me?” The Master Chief said, “Yes, sir, you wear contact lenses.” The Admiral was very impressed as he thought silently, with quotation marks, “What an incredibly observant NCO, and he didn't mention my ears.” So, the Admiral then asked, “Master Chief, how do you know I wear contacts?” “Well, sir,” the salty old Master Chief replied, "it's pretty hard to wear glasses with no freeken ears!” She's Ready! A state trooper pulled an 87-year-old woman over for speeding. As he looked at her driver's license, the trooper was surprised to notice that attached to it was the lady's concealed weapon permit. Curious, the trooper couldn't help but ask, “Do you have a gun in your possession?” She replied in her crackly voice, “Indeed, I do. Why, I have a .45 automatic in the glove box.” The trooper then asked if she had any other weapons. She replied, “I have a 9 mm Glock handgun in the center console.” The shocked trooper asked, “Is that all the weapons you are transporting?” The little lady held up her purse and replied, "Well, I do keep a .38 special in my purse.” Finally, the astonished trooper asked, "Ma'am, if I might ask, what are you so afraid of?” The little old lady then smiled, and replied: "Not a freeken thing." Retiring in style After I retired, my wife insisted I accompany her on her trips to Walmart. Unfortunately, like most men, I found shopping boring and preferred to get in and get out. Equally unfortunate, my wife is like most women as she loves to browse and leaves me with endless time to fulfill. Yesterday, my dear wife received the following letter from our local Walmart.

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Dear Mrs. Harris, Over the past six months, your husband has caused quite a commotion in our store. We cannot tolerate his behavior and have been forced to ban both of you from the store. Our complaints against your husband, Mr. Harris, are listed below and are documented by our video surveillance cameras. June 15: He took 24 boxes of condoms and randomly put them in other people's carts when they weren't looking. July 2: Set all the alarm clocks in housewares to go off at five minute intervals. July 19: Walked up to an employee and told her in an official voice, “Code 3 in house wares. Get on it right away.” This caused the employee to leave her assigned station and receive a reprimand from her supervisor which in turn resulted with a union grievance, causing management to lose time and costing the company money. We don't have a Code 3. August 4: Went to the service desk and tried to put a bag of M&Ms on layaway. August 14: Moved a Caution Wet Floor sign to a carpeted area. August 15: Set up a tent in the camping department and told the children shoppers in the area he'd invite them in if they would bring pillows and blankets from the bedding department. Twenty children showed up. August 23: When a clerk asked if they could help him, your husband began crying and screamed, “Why can't you people just leave me alone?” EMTs were called. September 4: Looked right into the security camera and used it as a mirror while he picked his nose. September 10: While handling guns in the hunting department, he asked the clerk where the antidepressants were. October 3: Darted around the store suspiciously while loudly humming the theme from Mission Impossible. October 18: Hid in a clothing rack. When people browsed through, Mr. Harris yelled “pick me, pick me, pick me.”

PHONE: (360)682-2341

FAX: (360)682-2344

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Whidbey Weekly LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

390 NE MIDWAY BLVD | PO BOX 1098 | OAK HARBOR, WASHINGTON 98277 Publisher & Editor.......................................................... Eric Marshall Marketing Representatives................Penny Hill, Roosevelt Rumble Graphic Design............................................................. Teresa Besaw Production Manager......................................................TJ Pierzchala Circulation Manager............................................................ Jon Wynn

Contributing Writers Jim Freeman Wesley Hallock Kae Harris Tracy Loescher Kathy Reed Carey Ross

Volume 9, Issue 29 | © MMXVII Whidbey Weekly

PUBLISHED and distributed every week. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The Whidbey Weekly cannot be held responsible for the quality of goods or services supplied by advertisers in this publication. Articles, unless otherwise stated, are by contribution and therefore the Whidbey Weekly is not in a position to validate any comments, recommendations or suggestions made in these articles. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. DEADLINES: The Whidbey Weekly is a submission based editorial with contributing writers. Please feel free to submit any information (please limit to 200 words) that you would like to share with the Whidbey Weekly. You may submit by email to editor@whidbeyweekly.com, by fax to (360)682-2344 or by postal mail to PO Box 1098, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date. For more information, please visit www.whidbeyweekly.com.

October 22: When an announcement came over the loud speaker, he assumed a fetal position and screamed, “Oh no, it's those voices again.” October 23: Went into a fitting room, shut the door, waited awhile and then yelled very loudly, “Hey! There's no toilet paper in here.” One of the clerks passed out, Mrs. Harris. In light of the above, we here at Walmart hope you will enjoy shopping at one of the few K-Marts remaining in America. Have a nice day. The Management Fish on Fridays After thirty-five years of marriage, a husband and wife went to a local therapist for counseling. When asked what the problem was, the wife went into a tirade listing every problem they had ever had in the years they had been married. On and on and on she went, detailing neglect, lack of intimacy, emptiness, loneliness, feeling unloved and unlovable, and an entire laundry list of unmet needs she had endured. Finally, after allowing this rant for a sufficient length of time, the therapist stood up, walked around his desk, and after asking the wife to stand, he embraced and kissed her long and passionately as her husband watched with a raised eyebrow. The woman shut up and quietly sat down in a daze.

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The therapist turned to the husband and said, "This is what your wife needs at least three times a week. Can you do this?" "Well, I can drop her off here on Mondays and Wednesdays, but I fish on Fridays.” Thanks to Greenbank Wayne and Wild Bill of Green Valley, Arizona for providing the above four-pack of jokes for us to enjoy. Hopefully, these humorous anecdotes are not their true stories. Have a great week and super weekend. To read past columns of On Track in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www. whidbeyweekly.com.

“A Family Tradition Since 1912” Voted Best Furniture Store in Snohomish County "Everett Herald" 2015 Broadway, Everett • 425-259-3876 • EricksonFurniture.com Mon-Sat 9am-6pm • Sun 11am-5pm • Financing Available 12 Months Free Financing

WHIDBEY ISLAND DELIVERY AVAILABLE

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Bits & Pieces ities. Proceeds from the event are donated to the WhidbeyHealth Foundation and used to help support local patients and their families. The deadline to register is July 28. Sign up forms are available at the Penn Cove Taproom, 103 S. Main St., Coupeville. Send questions to mitch@penncovebrewing.com Sponsors Needed

Saratoga Orchestra’s Summer Concert Saratoga Orchestra of Whidbey Island, in partnership with Pacific Northwest Conducting Institute, presents A Summer Festival Concert on Saturday, August 5, 2:00pm at South Whidbey High School Auditorium. Orchestra conductors from across the country will participate in the six-day PNWCI workshop, refining and learning conducting techniques from internationally acclaimed conductor and composer, Diane Wittry. The workshop’s culmination will feature the PNWCI’s 2017 Conducting Fellows leading the orchestra in a program to include Dvorak’s Symphony No. 9 “From the New World”, Wittry’s own composition entitled, “Mist”, and Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 5. A pre-concert chat will begin at 1:15pm. Maestra Diane Wittry maintains a dual career as a music director and guest conductor throughout the world and has led performances by, among others, The Los Angeles Philharmonic, the Buffalo Philharmonic, Florida Philharmonic Orchestra, and the symphony orchestras of Milwaukee, San Diego, Houston, Sarajevo Philharmonic in Bosnia, the National Symphony Orchestra of Ukraine, Russia’s Maikop and Sochi symphony orchestras, Italy’s Sinfonia Dell’Arte di Firenze, and Japan’s Osaka Symphony Orchestra. Wittry has been a guest lecturer at the Juilliard School, the Manhattan School of Music, the Curtis Institute of Music, as well as other Universities and Colleges, and is a frequent guest speaker at national conferences such as the League of American Orchestras and the Conductor’s Guild. General Admission tickets are $25 for adults and $20 for seniors/military. Students under 18 admitted free. Premium Seating tickets are available online for $50 and includes seating in the Conductor’s Circle and a post-concert reception with the participants. General Admission tickets are available at Moonraker Books-Langley, bayleaf-Coupeville, and Click Music-Oak Harbor and online. Cash/check/CC accepted at the door. For workshop, concert information and online tickets, please visit www.sowhidbey.com or call (360) 929-3045. [Submitted by Larry Heidel, Executive Director]

Oak Harbor Emblem Club #450 Awards Scholarships The Oak Harbor Emblem Club #450 recently awarded scholarships to the following Whidbey Island high school students: Evelyn Rubi Melendrez Partida - Academic Coupeville High School Alec Braden Chinnery - Vocational - South Whidbey High School Juliann Rose Jansen - Academic - Oak Harbor High School Fiona Callahan - Academic - South Whidbey High School These students passed stringent requirements to achieve these scholarships, including remarkable community service. Awarding these scholarships is a special part of the Emblem Club. [Submitted by Harriet Dailey, Emblem Club #450]

Register Today for 2nd Annual Golf Tournament Join Penn Cove Brewing Company and the WhidbeyHealth Foundation for their second annual fundraising golf tournament to be held Sunday, August 13 at Whidbey Golf Club in Oak Harbor. The Tournament Fee is $100 per person and includes a box lunch, green fees, cart rental, prizes and use of the practice facil-

This is a great opportunity to advertise your business, support the local community and raise funds for people who are in need of assistance. Hole sponsorships are available: $400 Platinum, $250 Gold, $175 Silver. For more information on sponsorship, contact Mitch Aparicio at mitch@penncovebrewing. com or call the Taproom at (360) 682-5747.

akin to slam poetry. “I love precision, though just as much I look for raw emotion.” The start of a work is unknown until begins. One note played creates the need for the next. The work unfolds in a different way with each sitting, sometimes in ways that even Roohoff cannot predict.

For tickets or more information, visit www. wicaonline.org or call (360) 221-8262.

Sno-Isle Libraries has created a solar eclipse resource page (http://bit.ly/SILeclipse ) with information about the coming solar eclipse, the sun and other astronomical tidbits. Here are the eclipse classes scheduled at Whidbey Island libraries:

A cast of youth and adult actors are performing one of Disney’s most popular movies of all time, Mary Poppins. The show is based on the books by P.L. Travers, the classic Walt Disney film, and Cameron Mackintosh’s Broadway production that delighted Broadway audiences for over 2,500 performances and received nominations for nine Olivier and seven Tony Awards, including Best Musical.

Tickets are $16 regular admission and $8 for youth, 18 and under, and may be purchased online at www.wctmagic.org or at the WCT Box Office, one hour prior to show time. House opens 30 minutes prior to show time. Seating is general admission. Recommended for ages five and over. No late seating. Whidbey Children’s Theater is a registered 501c3 non-profit arts organization providing education through the performing arts for 35 years. [Submitted by Kathryn Lynn Morgen, WCT]

Piano Concert with Cleedys Roohooff “You Want a Happy Ending” Pittsburgh artist Cleedys Roohoff presents “You Want a Happy Ending” piano concert on Saturday, July 29 at 7:30pm at Whidbey Island Center for the Arts (WICA). The concert will take place in the intimate Zech Hall, with the WICA Piano Bar opening one hour early. Cleedys Roohoff uses the piano to study communication and language development. For 30 years he has actively sequestered himself from the rules and influences that dictate music education, honing a process and style that is idiosyncratic. “I’m not opposed to any type of music, but I’m compelled to understand forms that develop at the periphery.” While jazz improvisation is a comparison that is often made, Roohoff’s work is perhaps more

The Kennedys’ connection to Sno-Isle Libraries comes through Stanwood Library Librarian Vicky Beatty.

Fun with the sun

Get Ready for Eclipse with Classes and Glasses

The show runs for two weekends: Friday and Saturday, July 28 and 29, and Friday and Saturday, August 4 and 5 at 7:00pm and there are Sunday matinees on July 30 (which is a Family Day Matinee when all tickets are $8), and August 6 at 2:00pm at the Whidbey Children’s Theater, 723 Camano Ave, Langley.

“We make the bracelets indoors and the beads don’t change colors,” he said. “Then we go outdoors and light that is invisible to us makes them change.”

Adults $18 / $10 Senior/ Military/Youth

Mary Poppins Flies into the Whidbey Children’s Theater

The show is directed by Ty Molbak, also a WCT alumni; musical direction is provided by Andrea Frey Reineckert.

Doctorate or not, Kennedy said that after looking through the telescopes, one of the favorite activities of the classes is making bracelets of beads sensitive to ultraviolet light.

“I worked with Linda Kennedy at the library in Albuquerque,” Beatty said. “We signed them up in 2014 and it was just fantastic. This year I got in touch an asked if they were interested again. They said, ‘Oh, sure, how many can we sign up for?’ They are truly incredible people.”

[Submitted by Fritha Strand, WICA]

Mary Poppins tells the story of the Banks family in England in 1910, who are having problems finding a nanny who will stay on with the two Bank’s children, Jane and Michael. Mary Poppins arrives on their doorstep and persuades the parents to let her take on this project. Mary Poppins uses a combination of magic and common sense as she takes the children on many adventures that affect the children and their attitudes toward the world. She also helps their parents to understand one of her life lessons, “Anything can happen if you let it.”

LOCALLY OPERATED.

Cleedys was shaped by Keith Jarret, Jung, Philip Glass and even the Beastie Boys. He studied Psychology at the University of Texas and his graduate work studying visual arts was at the Rhode Island School of Design and he has worked at the Carnegie Museum of Art.

[Submitted by Mitch Aparicio]

This show is the final mainstage production of WCT’s 35th Anniversary Season, “Do You Believe in Magic?” and is a “Summer Classic,” featuring a cast of both youth and adult alumni, parents and other community artists.

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Coupeville Library Thursday, August 3, 1:00pm *Andy and Ruth Nielsen, Island County Astronomical Society Coupeville Library Wednesday, August 9, 1:00pm Clinton, Freeland and Langley Libraries Clinton Community Hall, 6411 S. Central Ave. Saturday, August 12, 3:00pm Sno-Isle Libraries Teen Librarian Kathy Smargiassi wearing the eclipse glasses and looking at the sun

You haven’t really seen the sun until you look at it through Roger and Linda Kennedy’s eyes. The New Mexico-based couple travels the country for NASA, presenting free classes about the science of the sun. The Kennedys are bringing their telescopes and other equipment to 16 Sno-Isle Libraries community libraries starting July 23 and ending on Aug. 21, the day of a rare total solar eclipse. “The classes are a free-flowing observational, Q&A sort of thing,” Roger Kennedy said recently. “We set up two telescopes and a spectroscope and a couple of tables with information about the sun. We talk about the sun, how we use light in science and how the spectrum comes into play.” The Kennedys will bring will bring free eclipse glasses that make it safe to look at the sun for participants at each class. Attendance is free. Both retired, Roger from teaching science and Linda as a librarian, the Kennedys are members of many astronomy groups including the Albuquerque Astronomical Society, the New Mexico chapter of the Charlie Bates Solar Astronomy Project and Timmy Telescope Solar Astronomy Outreach. “We go around the country now doing solar education events,” Roger Kennedy said by phone from his home. “It just happens that we have an eclipse this year.” The Kennedys were already sharing their love of the stars when NASA called. “A couple of years back, the Goddard Flight Center contacted us and said their outreach funding was getting repurposed,” Kennedy said. “They asked if we’d like to partner with them and you don’t say no when NASA calls.” Since then, more funding has come from nearby Sandia National Laboratories and other grants to buy additional equipment for classes. “Most people look through the telescope, see a red ball and say ‘What’s that?’” Kennedy said. “I tell them that’s hydrogen, then we explain the phenomenon of the sun; most people have never really seen the sun.” Kennedy said one event in Albuquerque drew a young couple with French accents. “They looked through the telescope and I start my spiel. They say ‘We know all about that, but we’ve never seen the sun before,’” Kennedy said. “Turned out they were from CERN, the particle accelerator in France. Two Ph.Ds in town talking at Sandia about subatomic particles and there I am talking about a big red ball.”

Oak Harbor Library Monday, August 21, 6:30pm *Island County Astronomical Society [Submitted by Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries]

Program Year 2018: Island County 2% Hotel-Motel Tourism Lodging Tax Application Period: July 15, 2017 -- August 31, 2017 The application packet is available for the 2018 Island County 2% Hotel-Motel Tax Tourism Promotions. Funding is generated from overnight lodging in the unincorporated areas of Island County. The purpose of this program is to support and promote the tourism economy of Island County. Island County estimates $266,000 in lodging tax revenue will be available for allocation for grants to support tourism in 2018. Historically, the program has funded approximately 20-25 proposals for Whidbey and Camano Island events, visitor centers and tourism activities. The process was updated last year with improved ranking criteria to provide transparency and predictability for applicants. The Island County Lodging Tax Advisory Committee will review all timely and complete applications, and then make their recommendations for funding to the Board oflsland County Commissioners. The review committee membership, as established by state law, is comprised of representatives from entities who collect the lodging tax, and organizations who are eligible to apply for the grant funds. For this reason a conflict of interest policy has been added to ensure public confidence in the ethical allocation of these tax dollars. Under State law RCW 67.28.080, only 501(c) (3) and 501(c)(6) non-profit organizations and government agencies are eligible to apply for funding. The Island County Lodging Tax Advisory Committee solicits proposals until the deadline of August 31 each year. The proposal form is posted on the County’s website, at https:// www.islandcountywa.gov/Commissioners/ Documents/IC%20LTAC%20Tourism%20Gra nt%20Program%20application%20final. pdf and may also be requested by contacting Pam Dill at pamd@co.island.wa.us or (360) 679-7353. [Submitted by Pam Dill]

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Whidbey Weekly

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Bayview Corner

STREET DANCES RUZIVO at Bayview Cash Store Wednesday, July 26, 2017 6-8pm Free Admission

Traditional Zimbabwean Music and Afropop PETE Western Heroes Wednesday, August 9 Wednesday, August 23 Brought to you by: Bayview Cash Store 5603 Bayview Rd • Langley www.goosefoot.org or 360-321-4145 for information

DONATIONS NEEDED! FREE PICK UP! Your donations are tax deductible! Support Habitat For Humanity With Your Gently Used Appliances & Furniture

20%

! S T A E S E V O L & S A F O S L L OFF* A

Your Support Helps Place Families In Homes of Island County

New mattresses at Both Stores!

*Blue Price

2 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU! FREELAND • 1592 Main Street

OAK HARBOR • 290 SE Pioneer

southstore@islandcountyhabitat.com

store@islandcountyhabitat.com www.habitatfurnitureandmore.info

360.331.6272

FREELAND STORE ONLY We carry building materials: Cabinets, hardware, doors and flooring. (Bring donations of building supplies to Freeland location)

360.675.8733

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED AT BOTH STORES!

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What’s Going On All entries are listed chronologically, unless there are multiple entries for the same venue or are connected to a specific organization (such as Sno-Isle Libraries) in which case all entries for that venue or organization are listed collectively in chronological order under one heading.

Music in the Barn: Rick Azim Friday, July 21, 5:30pm Dancing Fish Vineyard, Freeland Hors d ‘oeuvres on the house, no cover charge for two hours of music, plenty of two-seat tables, and some of the best wine around available by the glass or 10% off a bottle.

All You Can Eat Breakfast Saturday, July 22, 8:00am-12:00pm Whidbey Masonic Lodge 15, 804 N. Main, Coupeville Breakfast includes eggs, bacon, sausage, pancakes, juice & tea or coffee. $8/Adults, $4/ Children 12 & under, 3 and under free.

Tour the Historic Ferry House Saturday, July 22, 11:00am-1:00pm Ebey’s Landing, Coupeville The Historic Ferry House was built by Winfield Scott Ebey in 1860, and is one of the oldest Territorial Era buildings in the state of Washington. Rarely open to the public. The tour is free, but reservations are required. Call (360) 678-6084 to reserve your space.

Blooming Season Concerts: Wild Man Cooley Saturday, July 22, 1:00pm-3:00pm Lavender Wind Farm, Coupeville Bring your blankets, beverages & picnics or get sandwiches at the farm. Ice cream and lavender lemonade available while you relax and enjoy the music. Free - donations accepted. Lavender Wind Farm is located at 2530 Darst Road. For more information, call (360) 544-4132.

Main Street Market Sunday, July 22, 11:00am-3:00pm Flintstone Park, Oak Harbor Great vendors, live music and food. Stop by and Spin to Win a coupon from downtown merchants. Take advantage of this coupon on Sunday and see what the merchants have to offer. Call (360) 279-8995 or visit oakharbormainstreet.com for more information.

Live Music: Squirrel Butter Saturday, July 22, 7:00pm Deception Pass State Park The Squirrel Butter duo performs traditional and original music influenced by Appalachian, early country, jug band and blues artists from the late 1800s through the 1950s. Charlie Beck plays fiddle, banjo and guitar, and Charmaine Slaven plays fiddle, guitar—and clogs while she sings. Part of the American Roots Music Series. Admission is free, but a Discover Pass is required for vehicle access to the state park. All performances are in the West Beach amphitheater on the Whidbey Island side of the park, weather permitting. If it’s raining, the performance will move to the East Cranberry Lake picnic shelter, also on the Whidbey Island side.

Live Music: JP Falcon Saturday, July 22, 7:00pm-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville J.P. Falcon Grady is a self taught acoustic guitarist, singer, songwriter and a proud member of the Blackfeet Nation. He performs originals and covers all over the Pacific Northwest, Montana, Hawaii and British Columbia, Canada as both a solo artist and with his band “J.P. Falcon Band”. No cover. For more information, call (360) 682-5747 or visit www. penncovebrewing.com

Music in the Barn: Rusty Fender & the Melody Wranglers Friday, July 28, 5:30pm Dancing Fish Vineyard, Freeland Hors d ‘oeuvres on the house, no cover charge for two hours of music, plenty of two-seat tables, and some of the best wine around available by the glass or 10% off a bottle.

PCC Carnival Saturday, July 29, 10:00am-6:00pm Pregnancy Care Clinic, Oak Harbor The PCC is thrilled to provide a Carnival for families of Whidbey Island. There will be plenty of games, prizes, food, and fun to be had for all ages. While admission will be free, there will be tickets to purchase for games food and bounce houses. Pregnancy Care Clinic is located at 670 SE Midway Blvd.

Blooming Season Concerts: Skinny Tie Jazz Saturday, July 29, 1:00pm-3:00pm Lavender Wind Farm, Coupeville Bring your blankets, beverages & picnics or get sandwiches at the farm. Ice cream and lavender lemonade available while you relax and enjoy the music. Free - donations accepted. Lavender Wind Farm is located at 2530 Darst Road. For more information, call (360) 544-4132.

Live Music: Original Jim Saturday, July 29, 7:00pm Rustica Cafe, Oak Harbor Forged from the vocal jazz and a cappella scenes, and honed on pop, rock, folk, country and blues, Jim sets up a solid foundation for his tunes with creative arrangements, tasty improvisation, a little keyboard, strong vocals, rhythmic guitars and a fresh approach to percussion. For more information, visit www. originaljim.com

Live Music: La Famille Léger Saturday, July 29, 7:00pm Deception Pass State Park The Léger Family includes patriarch Louis Léger on accordion; his wife, Barbara, on guitar; son, Devon, on fiddle; and daughter-in-law, Dejah, on piano. Léger hails from New Brunswick and is steeped in the music of French Canada. The family also plays their feet—les pieds. Part of the American Roots Music Series. Admission is free, but a Discover Pass is required for vehicle access to the state park. All performances are in the West Beach amphitheater on the Whidbey Island side of the park, weather permitting. If it’s raining, the performance will move to the East Cranberry Lake picnic shelter, also on the Whidbey Island side.

Open Skate Fridays Every Friday, 6:00pm-8:00pm Roller Barn, 98 NE Barron Dr, Oak Harbor

Clinton Library at the Market: Fermentation 101: Making Kimchi with Trap Landry, Part 1 Thursday, July 20, 4:00pm-5:00pm Clinton Community Hall, 6411 S. Central Ave. Good for your gut: Kimchi. Join Trapp Landry and learn how to make kimchi in a two part program highlighting fermentation basics. Stories with Sonie Fridays, through July 28, 3:30pm-5:00pm Coupeville Library Read aloud to Sonie, a patient listener and certified therapy dog. Reading aloud improves children’s reading skills and confidence, and reading to a therapy dog is a fun way to encourage reading practice and avoid summer reading slump. Pre-readers and independent readers are welcome. Caregiver required.

Every Thursday, 6:30pm-8:30pm 5200 Honeymoon Bay Road, Freeland The Healing Rooms are open to anyone desiring personal prayer for physical, emotional, or spiritual needs. There is a team of Christians from several local churches that are dedicated to praying for healing the sick in our community. All ministry is private, confidential, and free. Teams are available to pray for individuals who drop by on a first-come, first-serve basis. For more information, contact Ann at (425) 263-2704, email healingwhidbey.com, or visit the International Association of Healing Rooms at healingrooms.com.

Teaching Through God’s Word Sundays, 9:00am & 11:00am Calvary Chapel, 3821 French Road, Clinton For more information, visit ccwhidbey.com.

Unitarian Universalist Sunday Service Sundays, 10:00am Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland All are welcome. Values-based children’s religious exploration classes and childcare will be provided. Visit www.uucwi.org for more information. The Unitarian Universalist Congregation building is located at 20103 Highway 525, two miles north of Freeland.

Join other writers to discuss, problem solve, share and receive feedback and work on the craft of writing. Everyone is welcome. For more information about this group visit northsoundwriters.com

If you’re one of the “spiritual but not religious” people who questions your childhood faith or is looking for something more, Unity of Whidbey may feel like a homecoming. Visit our website: unityofwhidbeyisland.org

Baby and Toddler Storytime Tuesday, July 25, 10:00am-11:00am Freeland Library

Whidbey Quakers

Wiggle and giggle with your baby or toddler through silly stories, happy songs and rhymes that inspire a love of reading. Playtime follows. For newborns through three years and their caregivers.

Whidbey Islands Friends Meeting (also known as Quakers) meet in silent worship and community, with occasional spoken messages, every Sunday at the Unitarian Universalist building. For more information, contact Tom Ewell at tewell@whidbey.com or go to www. whidbeyquakers.org.

LEGOS® in the Library Tuesday, July 25, 3:30pm-5:00pm Coupeville Library Build your best with LEGOS® in this open session for creating by yourself or with a building buddy. For ages 5 and up. Explore Summer: Bridges Wednesday, July 26, 1:00pm-2:00pm & 3:00pm-4:00pm Coupeville Library There are amazing bridges to see all around the world. We’ll look at different types of bridges, famous bridges and the monsters that live under them. Activities will include building bridges and creating your own monster. For children ages 6-11. Lit for Fun Book Discussion Group Thursday, July 27, 9:00am-11:00am Freeland Library Join us for a discussion of Peter Wohlleben’s “The Hidden Life of Trees.” Are trees social beings? In this international bestseller, forester and author Peter Wohlleben convincingly makes the case that, yes, the forest is a social network. For adults. Clinton Library at the Market: Flower Arranging with Kathryn O’Brien Thursday, July 27, 4:00pm-5:00pm Clinton Community Hall, 6411 S. Central Ave.

Upcoming Sno-Isle Library Events

Every Tuesday, 4:00pm-5:30pm St. Hubert Catholic Church, Langley

Funny stories and action songs will make you giggle and move while getting your little ones ready to read. Playtime or craft may follow. For ages 18 months and up with a caregiver.

Healing Rooms

Unity of Whidbey

Learn techniques and tips on arranging flowers from your garden or our farmers market. Clinton staff member Kathryn O’Brien has created a commercial flower cutting garden.

Ready Readers: Family Storytime Thursdays, July 20 & 27, 9:30am Coupeville Library

LOCALLY OPERATED.

North Sound Writers Group Sunday, July 23, 1:00pm-4:00pm Coupeville Library

Proceeds support Boys & Girls Club. $5 per skater and $3 for general admission. Last Friday of the month, skate with the Whidbey Island Roller Girls! Sorry, checks not accepted, credit card fees apply. For more information, call (360) 240-9273. See schedule below Cost: Free

www.whidbeyweekly.com

Sundays, 10:00am 5671 Crawford Road, Langley

Sundays, 4:00pm-5:00pm Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland

First Church of Christ, Scientist Worship, 10:00am Sunday School to age 20, 10:00am Wednesday Testimony Meeting, 7:30pm Christian Science Reading Room Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, 11:00am-3:00pm Wednesday 3:00pm-7:00pm The church and Reading Room are located at 721 SW 20th Court at Scenic Heights Street, Oak Harbor. Call (360) 675-0621 or visit JSH-Online.com Services and Sunday School are also held at 10:30am on South Whidbey at 15910 Highway 525, just north of Bayview and across fromUseless Bay Road; testimony meetings are held the first Wednesday of each month at 7:30pm

Meetings & Organizations PBY-Naval Air Museum Wednesday, July 26, 11:30am CPO Club, Oak Harbor Monthly no-host luncheon. The featured speaker will be Mr. Carl Lindberg with a general military aviation presentation and his experiences as a cadet with the Civil Air Patrol and Boeing Corporation instructor. The CPO club is located at 1080 W Ault Field Rd. Call (360) 240-9500 for more information and directions.

Al-Anon Every Wednesday, 9:30am-10:30am 432 2nd St., Langley

Religious Services

If a friend or relative has a problem with alcohol, you can find solutions for yourself at Alanon.

Prayer Group

Al-Anon Group

Charismatic Prayer and Praise group. Everyone welcome. For more information, call Bill at (360) 222-4080 or email Sobico@comcast.net.

Filipino Christian Fellowship Sundays, 2:00pm Meets at Church on the Rock, 1780 SE 4th Ave., Oak Harbor. www.ohcfellowship.com

Oak Harbor Are you troubled by someone’s drinking? Al-Anon group can help. Call Laurie at (360) 675-4430 for meeting information.

Alcoholics Anonymous Every Day, 12:00pm & 8:00pm 432 2nd Street, Langley For more information, call (360) 221-2070 WHAT'S GOING ON

continued on page

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It’s Fair time! By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly

If it’s summertime on Whidbey Island, then it’s time for the Whidbey Island Fair. The annual event opens today and runs through Sunday at the Island County Fairgrounds in Langley. As always, organizers have pulled out all the stops to make it an event to remember. “I am all about saying 'yes,'” said fair manager Carol Coble. “If I can do it, I will. We want to try to draw people in from the community, so we try to make it as easy as possible to be a part of it.” The Whidbey Island Fair, which moved the date up a little this year from early August to late July to accommodate its carnival provider, Davis Amusements, has all the traditional ingredients people expect from an event like this. There are lots of animals, lots of exhibits, food, carnival rides and plenty of entertainment.

“I think education and entertainment go hand in hand,” said Coble. “4-H is obviously a big part of it and the kids learn about hard work and commitment. But there’s a lot of other things happening, too.” Coble said she is proud of the entertainment lineup planned for this year’s fair and shows are all included with the price of admission. For instance, you could take in the Bunyon Busters Log Show Sunday, or perhaps enjoy a fun-filled juggling and comedy show with Paul Isaak Thursday. Headliners this year include up and coming country artist Megs McClean, who will take the stage Thursday and Friday evenings. The Marlin James Band will be featured Thursday and Sunday evenings, playing everything from Merle Haggard to the Rolling Stones. The Olson Brothers Band will perform Friday evening. Saturday night is all about rock n’ roll. “We’ve got a Prince tribute performer,

Photo Courtesy of Whidbey Island Fair Association Like any good country fair, there will be lots of farm animals to admire at the Whidbey Island Fair, some of them prize winners. The fair runs through Sunday at the fairgrounds in Langley.

Purple Mane, at 6:30 Saturday night and he’s really great – I love cover bands,” said Coble. “Purple Mane will be leading into Hair Nation. Hair Nation played last year as an opening band and they were so good we brought them back this year as a headliner.” Photo Courtesy of Whidbey Island Fair Association The Whidbey Island Fair is here and will run from today through Sunday at the Island County Fairgrounds in Langley.

For the third year in a row, Elvis impersonator Danny Vernon will close the fair with his performance Sunday evening.

“Danny Vernon is amazing,” Coble said. “He’s a huge draw and everyone really enjoys his show.” Other fun things to consider doing at the fair this year include having your hair sprayed different colors or perhaps adding some sparkle to yourself with a bit of glitter, which is “pretty cool,” according to Coble.

See FAIR continued on page 9

Forest Camp teaches valuable survival skills By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly

In an age of ever-increasing technology, it can be hard to motivate children to put down the gadgets and go outside for some “old fashioned” outdoor play. Forest Camp, a week-long day camp being offered by the Whidbey Institute in Clinton beginning July 31, not only helps get kids outside, it teaches them valuable skills that can last a lifetime. “We teach them ways of using things they find in nature in their daily life,” said instructor Nancye Good, one of two Forest Camp mentors facilitating the program. “Whatever they need they can find, but it takes some practice and the knowledge of how to do it.” The camp is open to children ages 7 to 13 and runs from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 31 through Aug. 4. Cost to attend is $250. While lessons can evolve organically, it is all part of a curriculum that teaches some important survival basics. “We share the sacred order of survival, which is shelter, water, fire and food, basically in that order,” said Good. “If they were to find themselves alone in nature, the first thing they would need is shelter, whether it’s stuffing leaves inside their clothes to help warm them, to make shade in the sun, cover

in the rain or build a structure to trap heat. We teach them the fundamentals of where they are and what they should think about.”

It is serious subject matter taught in a fun way that includes games and other activities to keep the children engaged. “We provide a lot of structure, but we try to make it exciting and challenging,” Good said. “Nature is the best teacher, so if something comes along that seems more important than what we’re doing, we’ll let them follow what they find.” It may seem ironic to have to teach kids about the outdoor environment when we live on an island like Whidbey, but Good believes it is necessary for some. “Surprisingly a lot of kids never really spend time outside,” she said. “We have a Nature Deficit Disorder. Kids are spending more time indoors with electronics and we don’t even realize it. They might be on the soccer team, for instance, but being outside for practice and games is different than being engaged in nature. “The underlying goal of Forest Camp is to allow kids to experience nature firsthand,” Good continued. “They can learn so much just by being out in it.”

See FOREST continued on page 9

Photo Courtesy of Nancye Good/Earth Living Skills Connecting with nature while learning valuable survival skills is the premise behind Forest Camp, a week-long day camp being offered in Clinton starting July 31.

CORRECTION: In Whidbey Weekly’s June 13 story on the Island Shakespeare Festival, the wrong name was given as the director of the festival’s production of “Seagull.” Jackie Apodaca is the director of the production, which is based on a translation by Allison Horsely, who was incorrectly listed as the director. Whidbey Weekly regrets the error.

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Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly Raising the nation’s flag and reciting the Pledge of Allegiance are one of many lessons Cub Scouts learn at Twilight Camp, held last week at the VFW in Oak Harbor.

Twilight Camp bugs area Cub Scouts By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly What do you get when you combine about 60 young boys and all kinds of creepy, crawly insects? Cub Scout Twilight Camp, of course! Mount Baker Council of the Boy Scouts of America, Island District's annual Cub Scout summer day camp was held last week at the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 7392 in Oak Harbor. “Bug Hunters” was the theme, meaning there were lots of fun activities for firstthrough-fifth graders involved in scouting, as well as their siblings. “Cub Scout camp is a great way for them to have some adventures and outdoor fun; they can turn all the screens off and get outside for play and learning,” said camp director Trent Lay. “We do include a lot of STEM activities into their play and the boys have the opportunity to earn awards while their having fun.” The boys are divided up into groups with names like the “Awesome Ants” or the “Daring Dragonflies” and after opening ceremonies they make their way to different stations, each featuring a different activity that relates in some way to the camp’s theme and also to the 12 points of scout law.

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly Cub Scouts taking part in last week’s Twilight Camp hammer their woodworking projects together, just one of many activities at the annual day camp.

“Scouting is a values-based youth program,” said Lay. “So, each activity is designed to incorporate some aspect of the Scout Law. For instance, the flag ceremony when we open the camp teaches reverence to God and to our country.” “And the kids are rewarded when we see them putting those laws into practice,” said program director Cynthia Allen. “For example, one point of scout law is being helpful, so if we see kids helping one another with something, we reward that.” The scouts earn tokens each day. They can save them up and take them to the “store” at the end of the week, or they can use them to purchase something every day. This year the stations included woodworking, where they not only made a project like a tool box or a bird feeder, they learned about how army ants and other insects use tools to help themselves. At the kite station, kids learned how a dragonfly’s wings are made up of membranes that are similar to how a kite is constructed.

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly Scouts examine owl pellets at last week’s Cub Scout Twilight Camp in Oak Harbor, looking for bones from the prey ingested by owls, one of the more unique activities in which the scouts could participate.

Finding the link between bugs and BB guns or archery may have been a little tougher, but the boys didn’t seem to mind. “I like how there are lots of options for things to do and I like how everything is planned,” said 10-year-old Jake, who was returning to Twilight Camp for a third year. “It’s fun to learn about different animals,” said Owen, 10, who was carefully sifting through an owl pellet for bones, one of the more unique activities this year. “I really like exploring new things.” Ten-year-old Paxton was back for a second time this year. “I like the BB guns, archery, cooking and woodworking,” he said. “With cooking, you get to eat what you make and with woodworking you get to use what you make. There are some really fun things to do.” “There really is something for everybody,” Lay said. “And this is a great way for them to explore that in a safe environment.” “They make their own families here,” said Allen. “Even though they might only see each other once a year at camp, they get that sense that they’re brothers in scouting.” Lay encourages anyone interested in learning more about scouting or attending Twilight Camp next year to email info@ islandscouting.org. General information on scouting can be found online at www.islandscouting.org. “My favorite part about Twilight Camp is that I get to be 10 years old again,” Lay said. “And I get to do it with my son.”

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly A Cub Scout tests out his kite at last week’s Twilight Camp in Oak Harbor. Kites were used to show how an insect’s wings are made of membranes similar to those of a kite.

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly Having fun is the main goal of the annual Cub Scout Twilight Camp, held last week in Oak Harbor.

“I love all the smiles,” said Allen. “I love to listen to the sounds of joy, laughter and fun. My favorite part is just seeing all their faces light up.”

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FAIR continued from page 7 All in all, there should be something for everyone, said Coble. There’s a teen dance at the Fiddle Faddle Barn Saturday night, for instance, and youngsters can get a taste of virtual reality in the BlackBox throughout the fair. “We try to do stuff that everyone will like,” acknowledged Coble. “But most important, the Whidbey Island Fair is about the community coming together to show off what we have to offer.”

Photo Courtesy of Hair Nation Classic rock cover band Hair Nation will headline the show Saturday night at the Whidbey Island Fair in Langley.

Gates will open daily at 9:30 a.m. and the fair will close at 10 p.m. Thursday, 10:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday and at 9 p.m. Sunday. Daily admission is $9 for adults, $5 for youth, those with military identification and senior citizens. Season tickets are also available. Carnival wristbands will be available for purchase on site once the fair opens. More information on the Whidbey Island Fair can be found online at www.whidbeyislandfair.com. “The fair is so much fun, why wouldn’t you want to come?” Coble asked.

Photo Courtesy of Nancye Good/Earth Living Skills Learning how to make a fire using friction is one of the skills children can learn at Forest Camp, a week-long day camp offered by The Whidbey Institute beginning July 31.

FOREST continued from page 7 Good, who grew up on Whidbey Island, spent a lot of time outdoors as a child. As she was raising her children in New York City, she became aware of how difficult it is for city kids in particular to learn about the natural environment and experience the kind of “nature immersion” she did as a child. After attending a summer camp with her family in 2008, it reawakened her connection with nature and prompted her to take many wilderness skills programs. Now she enjoys igniting that spark that helps connect children with their natural environment and with each other. Photo Courtesy of the Olson Brothers Band The Olson Brothers Band will take the stage Friday night at the Whidbey Island Fair in Langley.

“It’s partly about community, too, getting to know other kids,” she said. “Maybe it’s

a different crowd than they would spend time with usually, but doing things in nature with each other is a bonding experience. You learn about yourself, how you are within the group and with each other.” Those interested in learning more about Forest Camp or in registering can do so online at www.whidbeyinstitute.org. Click on the “events” tab and then click on “Forest Camp” on the calendar. Discounts are offered if you are registering more than one child. “It’s all about connecting with our natural world,” said Good. “We’re all connected to everything.”

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Military Muster NAS Whidbey Island, Washington

July 20-26, 2017

Lucky Kayaker Saved by Quick Thinking SAR Crewman A Search and Rescue (SAR) team from Naval Air Station (NAS) Whidbey Island in-route for a mission to rescue a severely distressed hiker on the Okanagan Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) the evening of July 2, temporarily postponed that mission after one of its crewmembers spotted a different potential victim in the water east of Whidbey Island. NAS Whidbey’s SAR unit departed from the base just after 7 p.m. to the PCT following notification from the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center. As the helicopter transited over Dugualla Bay, one of its crewmen spotted a man in the water near an overturned kayak. Turning toward the scene it became readily apparent the kayaker was struggling to stay afloat in the cold Puget Sound water. Once overhead the crew immediately lowered a rescue basket to the struggling man while another crewmember suited up in case he had to assist the victim in the water. The kayaker, who was suffering from hypothermia and exhaustion, was able to lift himself into the basket. The crew then hoisted him aboard and flew him back to Ault Field where base paramedics attended to him. After dropping off the injured kayaker, the crew then

resumed its original mission to Okanagan PCT around 8:15 p.m. After locating the distressed hiker who was in a remote area surrounded by tall trees at approximately 5,000 ft. above sea level, the crew intended to rappel down and assess the situation. After dropping the rappel line it became tangled in the trees, forcing the crew to cut the line and reassess their options. The crew then decided to lower a hoist down to the victim. After getting the hiker aboard the helicopter, who was suffering from severe dehydration and rhabdoomyolysis, the SAR crew flew her to Skagit Valley Hospital According to the SAR mission commander, Lt. Cmdr. Steve Hartz, the mission was challenging due to the terrain and surrounding area. “Ground crews would have taken over eight hours to reach her,” Hartz said. “And in her condition, she may not have made it through the night.” Hartz also noted that the earlier inadvertent rescue was fortunate for the hypothermic kayaker. “If it was not for the aircrews’ vigilance and constant scan this individual would not have been identified and quite possibly would not have survived.” Hartz said. “Our crewmembers did a great job

being flexible and adjusting to changing missions quickly.” These were the seventeenth and eighteenth rescues of 2017 for NAS Whidbey Island SAR, which has also conducted five searches and 14 Medical Evacuation (MEDEVAC) missions this year. The Navy SAR unit operates three MH-60S helicopters from NAS Whidbey Island as search and rescue/medical evacuation (SAR/MEDEVAC) platforms for the EA-18G aircraft as well as other squadrons and personnel assigned to the installation. Pursuant to the National SAR Plan of the United States, the unit may also be used for civil SAR/ MEDEVAC needs to the fullest extent practicable on a non-interference basis with primary military duties according to applicable national directives, plans, guidelines and agreements; specifically, the unit may launch in response to tasking by the AFRCC (based on a Washington State Memorandum of Understanding) for inland missions, and/ or tasking by the United States Coast Guard for all other aeronautical and maritime regions, when other assets are unavailable.

Larsen Successfully Shapes National Defense Authorization Act to Include Island County Priorities Rep. Rick Larsen (WA-02) yesterday helped shape the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2018 to include key priorities for Island County – including Impact Aid, remediation for ground water contamination, and resources to help solve breathing issues in Growler aircraft. “This bill makes important investments in America’s national security by investing in equipment and in our servicemembers,” said Larsen. “Still, this bill is not perfect – once again, the House Armed Services Committee is calling for increased defense spending with no plan to pay for it. But I am pleased that the bill was written with bipartisan input and priorities I advocated for are in this bill, including boosting resources for Impact Aid to help schools better serve military students and their communities.” Supporting Local Military Communities Pilot safety remains a major problem on the EA-18G Growler. Spurred by Larsen and others, the Committee authorized an additional $10 million above the budget request for development of improved pilot sensor technology in order to study and address hypoxia and related conditions. Larsen also pushed the committee to give

its supply chain. Ultimately, Larsen’s provision will help reduce waste and increase oversight of inventory.

the Navy the resources to address groundwater contamination resulting from the use of fire suppressants. The bill includes an additional $30 million for Navy perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA)/ perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) remediation.

Technology At Larsen’s urging, the NDAA reaffirms the committee’s support for accelerating the Department of Defense’s adoption of cloud computing, in order to save money, increase flexibility, and enhance security. An amendment offered by Larsen also encourages the Department of Defense to explore the benefits of large scale cloud computing for enhanced analytic capability.

Larsen continued his long advocacy for Impact Aid, a program that provides funding to school districts that educate large numbers of military-connected students. His amendment to increase resources for Impact Aid from $30 to $50 million was included in the final bill that now heads to the House floor. At Larsen’s urging, the bill also requires the Navy to update the House Armed Services Committee on all noise reduction research for F/A-18 series aircraft (including the Growler), with a focus on chevron engine attachments. Reducing Government Waste Larsen led a push for the Department of Defense to accelerate its use of high-tech bar codes. By marking parts and other assets with unique identifiers, the Department of Defense can better manage inventory, ensure spare parts are where they need to be, and improve management of

Larsen also pressed the Department of Defense to think about the next generation of threats deployed forces face. His amendment directed the Department of Defense to brief Congress on the drone threats the U.S. military faces overseas and emerging technologies to counter them, including directed energy and trained raptors. The briefing will also include an analysis of host nation regulations, and what restrictions this places on self-defense. Larsen also asked for a briefing on technologies that can remotely sense multiple types of improvised explosive devices.

Nuclear Oversight With the nation modernizing nuclear weapons and technology, Larsen pushed for increased oversight of this costly undertaking. Larsen successfully included an amendment to require the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to annually assess whether the agency’s plans are affordable. According to a 2017 GAO report, the NNSA frequently overestimated its future budgets – meaning nuclear modernization plans may not be executable. Larsen also included an amendment to extend the current prohibition on developing mobile inter-continental ballistic missiles through the end of FY 19. Lastly, Larsen pushed for an amendment authored by Rep. Suzan DelBene (WA-01), to increase accountability for child abusers. The amendment would close a loophole which currently shields military retirement pay from being paid to victims of child abuse and help ensure justice for survivors of child abuse. The bill now heads to the full House for a vote.

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Film Shorts

Blooming Season Concerts 2017

Courtesy of Cascadia Weekly

FARAWAY ENTERTAINMENT YOUR LOCAL MOVIE THEATER NOW SHOWING:

By Carey Ross Baby Driver: The title here is appropriate, as it seems a bit like the stylish upstart kid brother of "Drive," starring YA heartthrob Ansel Elgort, directed by "Shaun of the Dead’s" Edgar Wright and featuring a killer soundtrack. Is this shaping up to be summer’s most unlikely blockbuster?  (R • 1 hr. 30 min.)

Spider-Man: Homecoming: Spider-Man has always been sort of the stepchild of the juggernaut that is the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Finally, he gets the right star (Tom Holland), the right villain (played by Michael Keaton), the right mentor (Tony Stark/Robert Downey Jr.) to be the web-slinging superhero we’ve all been waiting for.  (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 14 min.) Transformers: The Last Knight: The preview for this looks exactly like what I imagine when Donald Trump describes the scorchedearth hellscape he evidently believes America to be. Except with robots.  (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 29 min.)

WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES PG-13 SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING PG-13 VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS PG-13 Movie Hotline 360-279-2226 Book A Party or Special Showing 360-279-0526 1321 SW Barlow St • Oak Harbor

www.farawayentertainment.com

Bring your blankets, beverages & picnics or get sandwiches at the farm. Ice cream & lavender lemonade available while you relax and enjoy the music. Free ~ donations accepted.

Wild Man Cooley July 22 • 1-3pm July 29 Skinny Tie Jazz Aug 5 Tryptych

Lavender Wind Farm 2530 Darst Rd, Coupeville 360-544-4132

Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets: Like you, the only things I know about this movie is that it’s some futuristic sci-fi thing based on a comic book series and Rihanna is in it. Like you, I’ll probably see this movie because of Rihanna.  (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 27 min.)

The Big Sick: A movie based on the real-life romance between my new favorite comedian Kumail Nanjiani and Emily V. Gordon about that time when they first started dating and were forced to deal with his traditional Pakistani parents and her being stricken with a mysterious illness. This is my kind of rom-com.  (R • 1 hr. 59 min.) Despicable Me 3: The fact that this franchise is three movies in and hasn’t made a horrifying misstep yet is just another sign that one should never question the bizarrely relatable comedic gifts of Steve Carell. I bow down to you, Gru.  (PG • 1 hr. 30 min.) Dunkirk: My love for director Christopher Nolan is no secret, and I feel like I have been waiting for this movie about the WWII battle and evacuation of Dunkirk just this side of forever. Nolan never lets me down, but I need this to be the one that finally gets him the Best Director Oscar nomination he should’ve gotten for "The Dark Knight." Or "Inception." Or "Interstellar."  (PG-13 • 1 hr. 47 min.)

War for the Planet of the Apes: The end chapter in a surprisingly excellent trio of "Apes" movies? Or a near-future parable in which man fights beast for planetary supremacy? Only time and nature will decide.  (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 20 min.) Wish Upon: Maybe what you most want on Earth is to see a horror movie about a possessed doll bent on murder, which is kind of a coincidence because what I least want on Earth is to see a horror movie about a possessed doll bent on murder. Hell to the hell no. Over my doll-murdered body.  (R • 1 hr. 49 min.) Wonder Woman: Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman continues to own the hearts and minds of critics as well as the box office, proving not only that representation matters, but it can also be highly lucrative. One superhero to rule them all.  (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 21 min.)

Now Showing! Thursday, July 20 thru Wednesday July 27

VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS (PG-13) WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13)

For Anacortes theater showings, please see www.fandango.com. For Blue Fox and Oak Harbor Cinemas showings see ads on this page.

Girls Trip: Starring Jada Pinkett Smith, 360-679-4003 Queen Latifah, Regina Hall, and Tiffany Haddish as four friends having a wild weekend in 877-679-4003 New Orleans, this is the best female ensemble comedy since "Bridesmaids." Finally. www.seatacshuttle.com  (R • 2 hrs. 2 min.) Puzzle 1 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.34)

8

4

5 4

On a scale from 1 to 10...3.4 Every row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every column of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9

5

6

9

8 1

9

3 8

7

7

9 4

3

3

1

2

6 6

Answers on page 15

1

THIS WEEKS SPECIAL: $2.50 CHEESEBURGERS

9

4

4

NOW OPEN 7 NIGHTS A WEEK!

8

Box Office, Snack Bar and Go Karts Open at 5pm Mon-Thurs Box Office and Snack Bar Open at 4pm Friday-Sunday Go Karts Friday-Sunday: Fri 4pm, Sat 11am, Sun 12:30pm 1st Movie Begins At Dusk *Admission 11 & Over $6.50; Kids 5-10 $1.00; 4 & Under Free

5 6

2

*Cash prices

360-675-5667 • www.bluefoxdrivein.com

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/sudoku on Thu Jun 29 16:47:42 2017 GMT. Enjoy!

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12

JULY 20 - JULY 26, 2017 LOCALLY OWNED.

Let’s Dish! with Kae Harris

FARES AT FAIRS Most of us at some point or another have been to a fair. These events have such a unique ambiance about them. The sights, sounds and smells – all of it melding together and transforming the entire experience into something so specific to the event, it is forever consigned to that part of us that comes out and remembers the previous fair and connects each subsequent experience of ‘fair’ forever. But what is it that really makes a fair what it is? This is relative to each individual, but for me, it’s the food! My favorite treat to indulge in, (and I am quite sure I have mentioned before) is funnel cake. I just love the light, crisp texture, and the almost nutty flavor the deep frying gives it. Combine this with a dusting of powdered sugar and it takes my taste buds to new heights each time. The history of fair food is positively fascinating. The way it stands right now, and if every tale told is to be believed, then the history of many foods we still find today at not just fairs, but generally in American life, should come from the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis Missouri. From ice cream cones, to hotdogs on a bun to even the hamburger – so many foods are said to have sprang out of food vendors imaginations at the World’s Fair in 1904. Unfortunately, some of the stories are just that, and there is little if any truth to their tales of how they came to be. While these stories might have been fanciful tidbits of imagination, the fact that progress and a sort of food revolution was occurring was highlighted for the first time at a fair, and namely the aforementioned World’s Fair in St. Louis. The world itself was undergoing massive transformation with established trade routes opening up pathways for the influx of all sorts of commodities, but more so in the food arena. This particular World’s Fair was said to have been the largest in history, covering a massive 1,272 acres, and America really showcased her expansion and the fact the ‘West’ had been settled so vastly by many different people from around the world, it was mirrored in the very

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international mix of food vendors and restaurants boasted by the fair. So many people, chefs and culinary ‘pioneers’ as it were, brought their fare to the fair and highlighted a new era that was being ushered in, by way of the food they made and served. One of the foremost cooking authorities of the 19th century in fact, was featured at the St. Louis World’s Fair. Sarah Tyson Rorer, who among other achievements, was the proprietor of the Philadelphia Cooking School, helped to display a change in American society that was occurring, through her wares. Gone were the days of pomp and complexity in cooking and in was the idea of cooking simply. And this is it folks, this simplicity we all seek in many aspects of life, embodied over 100 years ago in the art of cooking in a way which we still favor today! Food vendors at fairs today need to embrace quick cooking and simplicity to keep up with the thousands of hungry fair-goers. Fairs often bring out ingenuity and couples it with delectability and births exciting food fads for years to come. Belgian waffles are said to have found their place in American food history in the 1962 World’s Fair. Apparently called ‘Brussels Waffles’ in their country of origin, in the United States, they were renamed Belgian Waffles and their popularity soared in 1964. It is also said the Belgian waffles we now know and love are nothing like the original Brussels waffles, due to a misinterpretation. So here we have a fabulous breakfast favorite that has been swallowed up deliciously by our culture here in the U.S. and it isn’t even anything like the original! But it works regardless, and in oh such a tasty way. All the playing with and experimentation of ingredients gives way to some of the most unique, and occasionally the stranger foods a person can find – and it’s usually found at fairs. In Indianapolis you could pick up a Hot Beef Sundae, which is apparently the brainchild of the Indiana Beef Cattle Association. It consists of marinated beef, mashed potatoes, gravy, corn and a tomato to play the role of a cherry –

LOCALLY OPERATED.

as a real cherry would in a traditional ice cream sundae. Top the Hot Beef Sundae with cheese ‘sprinkles’ and you have yourself an unusual meal for sure! And for all the pickle lovers out there, Kansas State Fair has what you’re looking for. Combine the sour, briny flavor of pickle juice with a freezer pop and you have yourself the best of both worlds; a pickle pop. I’m not so sure I’d personally enjoy this, but I won’t knock it until I try it! There is a fair fare on my list I am chomping at the bit to try, and it’s named after a moniker the Massachusetts State Fair often goes by – the Big E. Can you guess what it is? Maybe some of you already know it. It’s Fried Jelly Beans! They’re dipped in batter and deep fried, making for a treat sure to be out of this world!

WHAT’S GOING ON

continued from page

PASS - Post Abortion Stress Syndrome Wednesday or Thursday, 10:00am-4:00pm Are you suffering from PASS--Post Abortion Stress Syndrome? Many women suffer from depression, flashbacks, suicidal thoughts, relational disfunction, and more after an abortion. We offer free lay counseling, help with healing and restoration. Call Wednesday or Thursday for an appointment, 10:00am to 4:00pm (360) 221-2909.

Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous (SLAA) Every Wednesday, 7:00pm-8:00pm Every Sunday, 7:00pm-8:00pm Trinity Lutheran Church Annex, Freeland

What is your favorite thing to eat when you go to a fair? What’s the reason for it being your favorite? When the fair is all packed up and gone, taking with it the food vendors’ delicious wares, what’s a person to do? Recreate at home of course! There are so many things you can make at home that you would find at the fair, AND you can put your own twist on it! From corn dogs wrapped with bacon for example, to deep friend jalapeño slices and a dipping sauce made from your own creative endeavors, the options are endless. Take your fair favorites and turn them into a fun meal at home!

SLAA is a 12-step fellowship for those who wish to stop living out a pattern of sex and love addiction. We offer relief for both those who suffer from a compulsive need for sex, and those with relationship-related compulsivity. We provide an environment free from shame and abuse where all can feel safe to share what they think and feel. You are not alone. For more information call (360) 989-4248.

Dear readers, I am including a recipe suggestion I found online at www.allrecipes.com this week for something I tend to associate with fair food that you can make from scratch in your own home. I will be trying it this weekend myself! Bring the essence of the fair to your own table, and if you try the recipe let me know how you like it. Please send any and all comments, questions, information and definitely recipes to letsdish.whidbeyweekly@gmail.com because as always, I’d love to hear from you, so Lets Dish!

Classes, Seminars and Workshops

Deep Fried Cheese Curds 2 quarts (corn) oil for deep frying 1 cup of all-purpose flour ¼ cup of milk ¾ cup of beer ½ teaspoon salt 2 pounds of cheese curds broken apart 2 eggs Heat the oil in a deep fryer or very large saucepan to 375° F. Mix/whisk together the milk, beer, flour, salt and eggs to a smooth batter. Toss into the batter approximately 8 curds at a time to coat well. Remove them with a wire strainer to remove excess batter. Deep fry until they are golden brown, for 1 or 2 minutes, and drain on paper towels. Serve warm and enjoy! www.seriouseats.com www.theplate.nationalgeographic.com To read past columns of Let's Dish in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www. whidbeyweekly.com.

For more Meetings and Organizations, visit www.whidbeyweekly.com

Learn to Dance at Dan’s Classic Ballroom.Com! Ballroom, Latin, Swing, Club Dances Groups, Privates, Wedding Prep (360) 720-2727 - dcb601@comcast.net

Septic 101 & 201 Classes Thursday, July 20, 5:00pm-8:00pm Nordic Lodge, Coupeville Septic Systems need TLC, from what goes down the drain inside, to protecting your drain field outside. Take Septic 101 to learn how to protect your system and avoid costly repairs. Septic 201 will teach you how to inspect it. Inspections are required by law. If you have a gravity or conventional pressure system you may get certified to inspect it yourself. Classes are free, but certification will cost $28. To register, call (360) 678-7914 or visit www. islandcountyseptictraining.com

DUI/Underage Drinking Prevention Panel Thursday, July 20, 6:45pm Oak Harbor Library Meeting Room No late admittance allowed, no pre-registration required. Open to all and required by local driving schools for driver’s education students and parents. For more information, call (360) 672-8219 or visit www.idipic.org.

Dining Guide CRAFT - COMMUNITY - COLLABORATION FEATURING CRAFT BEER, WINE & CIDER DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS Weddings, Retreats, Restaurant & Romantic Inn Dinner: Wednesday through Sunday 4pm to 8pm. Lunch: Noon to 4pm Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

2072 W. Captain Whidbey Inn Road • Coupeville 360-678-4097 • www.captainwhidbey.com

6

We've got big plans, so come check us out! Like us on Facebook and Instagram: penncovebrewingco

Like us on:

103 S. Main • Coupeville • 360.682.5747 • www.penncovebrewing.com

Breakfast & Lunch on the Water - Daily Fresh Baked Treats Homemade Soups & Sandwiches 360.678.5431 • 4 Front Street • Coupeville

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13 JULY 20 - JULY 26, 2017 www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALL LOCALL Y OWNED. Y OWNED.

13

Whidbey Weekly

www.whidbeyweekly.com JULY 20 - JULY 26, 2017

LOCALL LOCALL Y OPERA Y OPERA TED.TED.

is the probable source of your opinions here. This lends extra value to your perceptions on the 24th.

CHICKEN LITTLE & THE ASTROLOGER By Wesley Hallock

ARIES (March 21-April 19) The tools of communication are especially potent forces for good in your life this week. The spoken word, writings, recordings and visual imagery can all be weaponized in your battle to overcome negativity. Your status as a spiritual warrior benefits each time you express yourself in a way that empowers and inspires those around you. Wordless action is equally effective on the 24th. Do what you feel needs doing. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) At times this week you may feel that everyone around you knows more than you about how to solve your problems, but that is not really the case. Now is simply your time to study your situation from as many angles and different perspectives as possible without making firm judgments about any of it. Later, when you’ve had time to digest what you’ve learned, you’ll have more confidence. The 24th is a step in that direction. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) It’s not what you ask, but how you ask that decides outcomes this week. Odds are good that you will have a chance to revisit a denied request from the past, with the possibility of a different outcome this time riding on your skills of diplomacy. Honesty and frankness carry you far. Solutions win over criticism. Legacy and tradition hold special appeal. Weigh the opposing view on the 24th. CANCER (June 22-July 22) You can be a force for good this week by saying what you must say, when and where you must say it. This will not always make you popular, but your goal is not to be appreciated. It is to express yourself clearly and honestly with intent to be understood. By adhering to that objective, you earn the right of approval from the one who matters most, who in this case is yourself. Circumstance is your guide on the 24th. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) The search for truth is of major concern to you this week. Whether you are seeking truth directly, or simply following the interesting revelations of someone else’s pursuit, the path will be the same. Understandings will grow by increments, as truth’s successive layers of concealment are one by one peeled back. By keeping your eye on the total picture, the emergence of contradictions won’t become a distraction on the 24th. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Your fondness for detail will see you through the week and possible situations that would leave the less fastidious wondering whether to follow their head or their heart. In situations where you alone see the logical course of action, your own heart is unlikely to prevent your speaking out. Past experience

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) The time is right to introduce upgrades or expansions in your life, with your financial security as the first logical goal. Necessity may be the catalyst directing your hand, but you needn’t wait to be forced into action. By acting in increments on each opportunity as it appears, you can accomplish much with seemingly little effort this week. A lot can happen in a short time, so use the 24th to advantage. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) The adage that hindsight is always 20/20 can be worked to your great advantage this week. An emerging situation that is presently still on your horizon is almost certainly infused with elements of the past, meaning a second chance at something you may not have gotten right previously. It may also be a chance to turn a good thing into something even better. Keep your eyes open and use the 24th to advantage. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Expanded views of what is possible are much needed this week, and that is where you come in. Your capacity for seeing the potential that lurks beneath surface appearances stands in sharp contrast to the often gloomy outlook of the less visionary among us. Feel free to use your vision to counter the prophets of doom wherever you encounter them, whether at home or in the world at large. The 24th is key. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Your steadfast and reliable nature and your great capacity to walk a consistent path are the pivot points of your week. The wise use of those qualities is the source of the impeccable timing that must accompany your actions if they are to succeed. Let your instincts guide you in applying them. Be especially aware of your foundations on the 24th. A stable base of operation is crucial to success.

ACROSS

51. Investigative agent

23. Nonpoetic writing

1. BBs, e.g.

54. Addition symbol

5. Brews

56. Dearth

24. “Fiddler on the Roof” role

9. City on the Yamuna River

57. “___ the fields we go”

13. Earth

58. A person who withdraws from a church

14. It doesn’t hold water 15. Fused material for glazes 16. Auction cry 17. Mandatory 19. ___ Grove Village, Ill. 20. On the safe side, at sea

60. “Empedocles on ___” (Matthew Arnold poem)

26. “Malcolm X” director 29. Dynasties that ruled North China from 220-265 32. Super-duper 33. Moray, e.g.

61. Bad day for Caesar

34. Brute

62. Kind of ticket 63. Brawl

36. Computer-generated image (acronym)

64. Bungle, with “up”

37. Sweater style

65. “Trick” joint

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb 18) The abstractions of which you are so fond may prove themselves to be of great practical value this week. By applying prudent action at just the right time, your ideals become the substance that carries you through situations you could not otherwise control. A well-timed word as the voice of experience is exactly the kind of action that may be needed. Be wary of tunnel vision on the 24th and don’t hesitate to think outside the box.

22. Small wild fruit

66. #1 spot

38. Order between “ready” and “fire”

25. Architectural projection

DOWN

39. Lead

1. Declare

40. Sonora shawls

28. Female sheep

2. Slang term for moneys

43. Relating to 4 divides of a nucleus

30. “... ___ he drove out of sight”

3. Ineffectual person

44. To make poisonous

4. Aged

31. Advance, slangily

5. Archer, at times

32. Characteristic carrier

6. Colony member

34. Highlands hillside

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Material wealth and the intangible wealth of wisdom become one and the same pursuit in your week. No undertaking is without its simultaneous spiritual benefit. Dance and music are likely to be of more than casual importance, so do not assume that your leisure time is only that. Out of the most innocent of activities may come the thing of lasting significance. Be especially alert on the 24th.

35. Hidden

7. “The Three Faces of ___”

38. ___ line (major axis of an elliptical orbit)

8. Arid 9. Behind

41. Apple variety

10. Dirtier

42. Finger, in a way

11. _______ Maya

45. Anger

12. Absorbed, as a cost

46. Anger, e.g.

14. Flint

59. Elephant’s weight, maybe

47. Forward

18. ___ vera

60. Victorian, for one

49. Combine

20. Decrease

© 2017, Wesley Hallock, All Rights Reserved

21. Fragrant resin

27. Where the heart is

46. Merlin, e.g. 47. Odd-numbered page 48. Assessing a lower value 50. Ground cover 52. A-list 53. Spoonful, say 55. Chitchat 58. Actor Alastair

Answers on page 15

YOUR GUESS IS AS GOOD AS OURS WEATHER FORECAST Chicken Little looks at what is and fears the sky is falling. Wesley Hallock, as a professional astrologer looks at what is and sees what could be. Read Wesley’s monthly forecast with links to Facebook and Twitter, at www.chickenlittleandtheastrologer.com. To read past columns of Chicken Little and the Astrologer in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

Thurs, July 20

Fri, July 21

Sat, July 22

Sun, July 23

Mon, July 24

Tues, July 25

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

H-67°/L-53°

H-67°/L-52°

H-68°/L-53°

H-69°/L-54°

H-68°/L-52°

H-72°/L-59°

H-69°/L-54°

Cloudy with Showers

Cloudy with Showers

Sunny

Sunny

Pleny of Sunshine

Sunny

Wed, July 26

Sunny

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

H-69°/L-54°

H-71°/L-54°

H-73°/L-55°

H-74°/L-54°

H-77°/L-55°

H-79°/L-59°

H-74°/L-56°

Mostly Cloudy Shower Possible

Cloudy with Showers

Sunny

Sunny

Plenty of Sunshine

Sunny

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.

Sunny


14 JULY 20 - JULY 26, 2017 LOCALLY OWNED.

www.whidbeyweekly.com

Whidbey Weekly

LOCALLY OPERATED.

Island 911

Seriously, we do not make this stuff up! Thursday, June 29 2:44pm, SE Pioneer Way Reporting party requesting law enforcement watch her use ATM due to all the bushes and transients living in the area. Saturday, July 1 11:51am, SR20 Reporting party advising subject came over to his checkout lane and started “barking in his ear.” 12:53pm, SE Barrington Dr. Caller states neighbor trapped their cat and said they took the cat to the vet. Caller cannot find the cat. 7:59pm, SE Ely St. Reporting party advising they had been given a cat but now they think the cat may have been reported stolen. 11:15pm, SR20 Reporting party advising someone was angry the business was closed and was banging on the windows. Sunday, July 2 3:49pm, NW Anchor Dr. Reporting party advising someone is using their internet without permission. 5:58, SW Bayshore Dr. Caller reporting male is throwing things in the street and yelling at cars. 10:30pm, SW Erie St. Reporting party advising transient male was urinating and broke a bottle of liquor inside the store. Monday, July 3 11:07am, SE Barrington Dr. Reporting party has questions regarding

cleaning hotel rooms after drugs were smoked in them. 6:28pm, SW Erie St. Caller states they observed a male talking “AGGRESSIVELY” to a female in parking lot. 6:52pm, SR20 Reporting party advising male sitting in the corner throwing things at vehicles. 7:24pm, NE Midway Blvd. Reporting party advising a shelf was taken from location. Tuesday, July 4 6:12am, NE 3rd Ave. Caller states it sounded like someone just shot somebody and dogs were crying and things were blowing up. 4:32am, SR 20 Reporting party advising female is driving with no lights on and dragging exhaust. States female tried to give herself a sobriety test prior to leaving. 11:25am, N Oak Harbor St. Reporting party advising female is trashing the apartment. Threw tv out the window. 6:20pm, Lato Dr. Caller states neighbor was asking them if they wanted to start a fight and were unsure why. 10:37pm, NW Crosby Ave. Reporting party advising female threw a brick through their car window. Report provided by OHPD & Island County Sheriff’s Dept.

Life Tributes Charles Hassler 1940 – 2017

Lifelong Oak Harbor resident Charles “Chuck” Hassler passed away July 3, 2017 in Careage Of Whidbey, Coupeville, WA. He was 76 years of age. Chuck was born October 1, 1940 in Coupeville to Leonard and Marjorie (Armstrong) Hassler. He was raised in the San De Fuca area and then went on to open two businesses, Chuck’s Auto Rebuild and Chuck’s Mini Storage. He was an excellent body man and painter and very proud of his occupations where he worked for over 50 years.

Chuck had many hobbies and enjoyable pastimes and was very successful in his pursuits. He enjoyed hunting, fishing, and playing pool. He always looked forward to hosting pool tournaments and spending time with friends. Chuck is survived by his three children, daughter Kelly Hassler and sons Daniel and Benjamin Hassler as well as three grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Also surviving is sister, Gladys DeGraf and former wife, business partner, and friend Gayle Hassler with whom he remained close over the years. Chuck will be buried in a private ceremony at Maple Leaf Cemetery. A memorial reception will take place Saturday, July 22, 2:00 p.m. at the American Legion in Oak Harbor, WA. All are welcome to attend and celebrate Chuck’s life. Funeral arrangements were entrusted to Wallin Funeral Home.

Life Tributes can now be found online at www.whidbeyweekly.com

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15

JULY 20 - JULY 26, 2017 LOCALLY OWNED.

REAL ESTATE WANTED Seeking Small House: Wanting to purchase small 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath older rambler, cottage, or cabin on South Whidbey. One level, not in town, approximately .5 acres, a few stairs to entrance OK. No cement floor or in-floor heating. Cherish hardwood flooring, wood cabinets, electric baseboard heating, and metal roof. Please call (360) 730-3244 before you do any cleanup, repairs, flooring, painting, home improvements, etc.

AUTO/PARTS FOR SALE 1979 El Camino, new brakes, runs & drives good. Great project car, $1,700 OBO. (360) 3209164 (1) 1998 Ford F150 FourWheel-Drive Pickup. Rebuilt with a new Engine, brakes, shocks, etc. In great condition. Sale Price, $5900. (360)-3315904 (1) Lovingly maintained and garaged 1966 Ford T-Bird. Really nice looking and runs great! $14,995 OBO. Photos available. (360) 331-1063 (1)

GARAGE/ESTATE SALES Done With All Crafts Sale: Saturday, August 5 and Sunday, August 6, 9am–4pm, 1844 Penn Cove Road (Turn at 3 Sisters - San de Fuca - left on Penn Cove. 4th house, “Lois Lane” driveway). Garage full of quilt fabric and supplies, Singer Featherweight, stamps, punches, paper, paints, ribbons, yarns, ethnic fabrics, seed & other beads, doll making supplies, books, magazines, much more!

ANNOUNCEMENTS Pregnant? Need baby clothes? We have them and the price is right–FREE. Pregnancy Care Clinic, open most Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10am to 4pm. Call (360) 221-2909 or stop by 6th and Cascade in Langley. Be the difference in a child's life and become a foster parent today! Service Alternatives is looking for caring, loving, and supportive families to support foster children. (425) 923-0451 or mostermick@ servalt-cfs.com

The Whidbey Island community is encouraged to try out the paddling sport of dragon boating with the Stayin' Alive team. Our team's mission is to promote the physical, social, and emotional benefits of dragon boating. It has been shown to be especially beneficial to cancer survivors. Practice with us for up to 3 times for free. Life-jackets and paddles provided. Saturdays at the Oak Harbor Marina, 8:45am. Contact njlish@ gmail.com. More info at our Facebook Page: https://www. facebook.com/NorthPugetSou ndDragonBoatClub?ref=hl If you or someone you know has been a victim of Homicide, Burglary, Robbery, Assault, Identity Theft, Fraud, Human Trafficking, Home Invasion and other crimes not listed. Victim Support Services has Advocates ready to help. Please call the 24-hr Crisis Line (888) 388-9221. Free Service. Visit our web site at http://victimsupportservices.org

JOB MARKET FULL TIME LUBE TECH: Martin’s Auto in Oak Harbor is seeking a full time lube tech, Monday thru Friday. Apply in person at 152 NE Midway Blvd. (2) INSTRUCTORS: In Motion Dance, Learning & Recreation is hiring instructors for the following: Ballet, Tap, Belly Dancing, Salsa, and other dance instructors; Meditation, Yoga, Kids Yoga, Adult Workout, Nia, Ballet Barre, Mom & Me, Creative movement for pregnant & new moms; Bilingual educators & instructors (French, Japanese, German, other), Movement/ dance bilingual instructors, Special Needs educators (training provided). Please call 360-682-6237 for information. (2) FULL TIME LAWN AND GARDEN MANAGER – INTERIOR: Seeking an experienced lawn & garden person to join our team at Freeland Ace Hardware. Prior retail experience is required. Qualified Candidates please complete our online prescreen at: www. acehardwarejobs.com, then stop by with your resume (with references) and a cover letter, and fill out our application at: Freeland Ace Hardware,

www.whidbeyweekly.com

Whidbey Weekly

LOCALLY OPERATED.

Property Management You Can Count On!

Whidbey Residential Rentals, Inc. We Manage Your Home As If It Were Our Own. 360-675-9596 • www.whidbeyres.com 285 NE Midway Blvd • Suite #2 • Oak Harbor 1609 E Main St, Freeland, W. 98249 (0) DRIVERS: Part-time, full-time, on-call & weekend driver positions available. Must have or be willing to obtain CDL Class B with P2 passenger endorsement. If interested, please contact Brent at (360) 679-4003 or find an application online at www.seatacshuttle.com/ employment.php

MEDICAL EQUIPMENT Powered 3-wheel scooter (made by Golden Technologies, Model GC 340) in new condition. Comes with charging unit and cover, $700; Powered Lift (made by Harmar) that mounts in the car trailer hitch receptacle. Currently set up to haul the above scooter, $500; Powered wheelchair (Jazzy Select Elite made by Pride). This is their top of the line, front wheel drive. Comes with new charging unit and new batteries, $1,200. Proceeds from the sales go to the Coupeville Lions Club. Contact Mel at (360) 678-7727 (0)

HEALTH/FITNESS Kneading Fingers portable massage, new, $50. (360) 341-6473 (1)

MUSIC NICK’S PIANO TUNING SERVICE – Experienced, professional, reliable. Island, Skagit, Snohomish counties, (360) 679-9001 (1)

JEWELRY White 8 mm button pearl earrings, $95 OBO; Pale blue 9-10 mm Baroque pearl earrings, $150 OBO. Call (360) 331-1063 (1)

HOME FURNISHINGS Office Desk: wood, no particle board. You haul, $150. (360) 929-3801 (0)

LAWN AND GARDEN John Deere Riding Lawnmower. Runs good, very dependable, $250. (360) 320-9164 (1) Natural Barnyard Topsoil: Good for gardens, flower beds, etc. Unscreened, 10 yard loads, $225 delivered. South Whidbey (360) 321-1624

MISCELLANEOUS 77 assorted canning jars, 2/$1 or $30 for all; Misc. canning supplies (lids, caps strainer, jar wrench & lifter), $35 for all; Floral cloth shower curtain with 12 rings, $7.50; Brita filter pitcher with 2 filters, $10; Full size bed sheets, 1 flat, 1 fitted, $10; 20-piece fine porcelain dinnerware (4 place setting), $12.50. (360) 675-0379 Collection of Vintage 33 LP's. Classical, Opera, Modern, Broadway & Movie Musicals, and many more, $1 per record. (360) 341-6473 (1) Plastic bottles, Amber colored, mixed sizes, good for plant seed collecting or other items, 85 total. Please call Robert after 10AM (360) 579-5436, lv msg. (1)

678-4124 for more information (0) Excellent Grass Hay for Sale. Good for horses, $7 per bale, 20 bale minimum. (360) 3211624 If you or someone you know needs help in feeding pet(s), WAIF Pet Food Banks may be able to help. Pet Food Banks are located at WAIF thrift stores in Oak Harbor (50 NE Midway Blvd) and Freeland (1660 Roberta Ave) and are generously stocked by donations from the community. If

you need assistance, please stop by.

WANTED I’m looking for a professional or retired numismatist who is in the Oak Harbor area and has some time on the side to help me with my collection? Please reply to:ljohn60@ gmail.com. (0)

FREE Bantam Chickens, hand-raised from chicks and very tame. Free to good home only - not to be eaten. (360) 321-6031 (1)

No Cheating!

ANIMALS/SUPPLIES New & Used Horse Tack for Sale: Synthetic saddles, English & Western, $50 each OBO; Lots of miscellaneous other tack and farm equipment available. Must Sell! Call (360) Puzzle 1 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.34)

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DID YOU KNOW MOST CLASSIFIED ADS ARE FREE? Contact us for more info! classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com

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CLASSIFIED INFORMATION US Postal Mail

Whidbey Weekly Classified Department PO Box 1098 Oak Harbor, WA 98277

E-Mail............classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com Telephone..................................(360)682-2341 Fax.............................................(360)682-2344 PLEASE CALL WHEN YOUR ITEMS HAVE SOLD.

Please try to limit your classified to 30 words or less, (amounts and phone numbers are counted as words) we will help edit if necessary. We charge $10/week for Vehicles, Boats, Motorcycles, RVs, Real Estate Rental/Sales, Business Classifieds and any items selling $1,000 and above. We do charge $25 to include a photo. The FREE classified space is not for business use. No classified is accepted without phone number. We reserve the right to not publish classifieds that are in bad taste or of questionable content. All free classifieds will be published twice consecutively. If you would like your ad to be published more often, you must resubmit it. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date.

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


27

$

95

Basic Oil & Filter

31

$

95

Includes 4X4 & SUV

Most cars up to 5 qts. 5W20, 5W30, 10W30. Other grades extra. Some filters cost extra. Vehicles with Skid Plates may be extra. Plus $1 Environmental Disposal Fee.

WE CAN SAVE YOU UP TO $250 ON BRAKE SERVICE VERSUS OUR COMPETITORS. WARRANTIED AT 30K LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE. STARTERS ALTERNATORS TIMING BELTS SERPENTINE BELTS

BRAKES TIRES TUNE-UPS EXHAUST

UP TO

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$ 00

Flat Rate Auto Repair only $6995 per hour

PER GAL LON D ISCOUNT T ODAY!

always

Ask for De

tails

FREE ESTIMATES!

At Hilltop Service Center we only repair and replace parts that are needed. We will not oversell or install unnecessary parts. We are highly trained brake technicians, not high pressure sales people.

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