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November 28 - December 4, 2013

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Whidbey Playhouse Auditions Whidbey Playhouse Oak Harbor Page 6

Cover design by S Welch Designs

Tingstad and Rumbel WICA Langley Page 6

A Guide To Creative Photography Coupeville Middle School/High School Coupeville Page 11


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november 28 - December 4, 2013

LoCaLLy oWNED.

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LoCaLLy opEratED.

on tRaCk with Jim Freeman

Whidbey and Camano Islands are blessed with multitudinous neighborhoods of multitudinous complexities, whether it be with water systems, sewer systems, septic systems, homeowners’ associations, or conditions, covenants, or restrictions, the last CCR album I ever want to buy. Having dabbled in the enforcement and interpretation of by-laws and articles of incorporation over the years, I know how much fun those meetings can be on a Tuesday night at 7PM. Open Bar, Close Mouth In my limited experience, we might have done better with an open bar, thirty minutes prior to the yelling beginning, but, some of the neighbors were probably tanked anyway.

Private, No Outlet reads better than “Not Welcome Unless You Pay Property Tax Here”, “Your Kind Not Wanted”, or “Landscapers Only.” I always wanted to live in one of those protected communities, but I never had enough money. So, I bought acreage, adopted two wild bunnies, and joined the NRA. While I do not have any guns of my own, at least I have the NRA decals on both sides of my truck to ward off any intruders. Maybe I can put up my own sign–Corporal, Retired, Carries No Cash After Sunset. Left at the Right Station It occurred to me the other day while enjoying my AM only truck radio that my life has been one in search of the right station. My college roomie Skeeter’s profound realization was that life is like a roll of toilet paper–“the closer we get to the end, the faster it goes”. While Skeeter’s observation may be accurate insofar as it relates to quantity, my search for the right signal has to do with quality.

There is nothing more thrilling than to hear one neighbor call another a liar in a public forum.

Growing up, growing older, growing wiser, all are part of the individual growth chart.

Reminiscent of my favorite-ever 1960 Twilight Zone episode, “The Monsters are Due on Maple Street”, where Claude Akins tries to subdue the dudes of suburbia without success.

No longer do we mark our growth with a pencil, a ruler, and a kitchen wall.

Being a middle man is not as exciting as being an extremist. Extremists can yell and break things. Middlemen have to look at the big picture, listen to both sides, and be calm. As calm as a hungry dog running through a nice neighborhood, one with a provision in the homeowners’ association by-laws that homeless dogs can be fed on certain days of the week, during certain times, as long as they do their duty later in a public park.

No longer do we check our progress by seeing the date next to the horizontal line on the doorway which shows where our head used to be. Remember how we stretched our torsos to gain a ¼ inch over our little sister’s height? Or stretching to close the gap between little and big brother? I wonder how we could have measured the change of voice. Life is like trying to find the right frequency.

Recently, I was able to enjoy house sitting and dog sitting in a very upscale, down-home neighborhood. Great people. Great properties. The entrance to their neighborhood has a very colorful, hand carved sign posted that states: Private No Outlet.

Do we want classical, country, rock or hip-hop?

Being a retired notary public, I take pride in words and word structure.

If you weren’t trying to find the broadcast of a baseball game from a distant ballpark, maybe it was a high-powered 50,000 watt radio signal from Chicago or Boston or Oklahoma City.

Those three words, when read with a pause, really mean that if you come this way, you will go this way, or you will be arrested by Captain Cul-de-Sac.

PHone: (360)682-2341

Alternative, grunge, big band or honky-tonk? Remember when you used to lay in bed at night, holding your transistor radio up to your ear?

Growing up in Ohio and Pennsylvania, at night we ON TRAcK cONTINued ON pAGe 11

TABLE OF CONTENTS

FAX: (360)682-2344

LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED 390 NE MIDWAY BLVD | PO BOX 1098 | OAK HARBOR, WASHINGTON 98277 Publisher................................................................................................ Eric A. Marshall Contributing Writers ....... Eileen Brown, Jim Freeman, Helen Bates, Wesley Hallock Marketing Representatives ............................................Penny Hill, Roosevelt Rumble Production Manager, Editor ......................................................................TJ Pierzchala Graphic Design ......................................................................................... Teresa Besaw Circulation Manager........................................................................................ Jon Wynn

Volume 5, issue 48 | © mmXiii Whidbey Weekly PUBLISHED and distributed every week. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The Whidbey Weekly cannot be held responsible for the quality of goods or services supplied by advertisers in this publication. Articles, unless otherwise stated, are by contribution and therefore the Whidbey Weekly is not in a position to validate any comments, recommendations or suggestions made in these articles. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. DEADLINES: The Whidbey Weekly is a submission based editorial with contributing writers. Please feel free to submit any information (please limit to 200 words) that you would like to share with the Whidbey Weekly. You may submit by email to editor@whidbeyweekly.com, by fax to (360)682-2344 or by postal mail to PO Box 1098, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date. For more information, please visit www.whidbeyweekly.com.

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Locally owned.

Locally operated.

Oak Harbor Yacht Club Buccaneers Celebrate the ‘Season of Giving’

Each year, the Oak Harbor Yacht Club Buccaneers kick-off the ‘Season of Giving’ on the Sunday before Thanksgiving, by assembling and delivering good cheer and baskets filled with traditional Thanksgiving dinners, including a turkey and all the trimmings. For more than ten years, the Buccaneers have partnered with the local Opportunity Council to provide Thanksgiving holiday meals to neighbors and families in need in the community. This year, more than 40 dinner baskets will be assembled and delivered by the Buccaneers. In December, the Buccaneers will coordinate their annual Holiday Giving Tree at the Oak Harbor Yacht Club, to benefit local kids and families, in partnership with the local Opportunity Council. Oak Harbor Yacht Club members will take a wish list tag from the Giving Tree and contribute gifts of clothes and toys for each wish list designee. The Buccaneers are a member-based philanthropic organization of the Oak Harbor Yacht Club, conducting community outreach programs and special events for the benefit of children and families in Oak Harbor and Whidbey Island. [Submitted by Peggy Burton]

Grant Money Available to South Whidbey Organizations The South Whidbey Garden Club is looking for grant proposals. Do you have a project that would benefit the community related to environmental stewardship, community beautification, or horticultural education? The South Whidbey Garden Club offers grants for up to a maximum of $500. All proposals are due by January 31, 2014. For more information and an application form, please contact Barb Enberg at (360)579-1948 or email gonfishn@whidbey. com.

day, December 4, at Oak Harbor High School (Student Union Building), 1 Wildcat Way, Oak Harbor; and Thursday, December 5, at Anacortes Middle School (Cafeteria), 2202 M Avenue, Anacortes. All of these meetings will take place from 4:00pm to 8:00pm. The meetings will be conducted in an open house format with informational displays and materials available for public review. There will be no formal presentations. Navy staff will be present to answer general questions on the proposed action and the EIS process. Public input is very important to the process. Members of the public are encouraged to provide scoping comments to ensure the Navy is aware of all of the issues and factors to be addressed in the EIS. Scoping comments will be accepted in writing or dictated to a stenographer at these public meetings. Members of the public may also submit comments via mail to: EA-18G EIS Project Manager (Code EV21/ SS); Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Atlantic, 6506 Hampton Blvd, Norfolk, VA 23508. Comments may also be submitted to the project website: http:// www.whidbeyeis.com. Comments will be accepted throughout the scoping period, which concludes January 3, 2014. [Submitted by Mike Welding, NAS Whidbey Island]

Lions Club Selling Christmas Trees The Oak Harbor Lions Club will begin selling Christmas trees on November 30 from Noon to 7:00pm. On December 1 they will begin daily sales from 10:00am to 7:00pm through December 23 or until sold out. They will be located in the park across from the Oak Harbor Chamber of Commerce, 32630 Highway 20. Available trees are: Nobel, Douglas, Grand, Fraser, and Nordman Fir trees, cut fresh in Washington, and range in height from 4 feet up to 9 feet. Shop early for the 8-9 footers. By purchasing your Christmas tree from the Lions, you make it possible for those in need in the community to have a better quality of life through free health screenings, eye and ear exams, eyeglasses and hearing aids, the loan of medical equipment, scholarships, home access ramps and more. With your support, the Oak Harbor Lions Club is able to support organizations like Oak Harbor Help House, Relay for Life, Special Olympics, Whidbey General Hospital Foundation, Camp Horizon, a summer camping experience for special needs people and much more in the coming year. [Submitted by Sharon Ryan]

Coupeville High School Students of the Quarter

[Submitted by Barb Enberg]

Navy to Hold Public Open House Scoping Meetings to Discuss Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Growler Operations at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island The Navy plans three public scoping meetings early next month to obtain public input on an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for EA-18G Growler Airfield Operations at Naval Air Station (NAS) Whidbey Island, Oak Harbor, Wash. The EIS will evaluate the potential environmental effects associated with ongoing EA-18G Growler airfield operations at NAS Whidbey Island’s Ault Field and Outlying Landing Field (OLF) Coupeville, including the proposed introduction of two additional expeditionary Electronic Attack (VAQ) squadrons and the addition of aircraft to the Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS). The scoping process will be used to identify community concerns and local issues to be addressed in the EIS. As part of the public involvement during scoping the Navy will host three open house information sessions on the following dates: Tuesday, December 3, at Coupeville High School (Commons Area), 501 South Main Street, Coupeville; Wednes-

is involved with the Science Olympiad, received the NASA High School Aerospace Scholars Award, was the Whidbey Island Conservation Student of the Year, is co-president of the National Honor Society and has a 4.0 GPA. Future plans include college studying planetary geology. [Submitted by Deanna Rogers, Coupeville Lions]

Make Your Own Christmas Wreath at the First Annual “Holly Day” at South Whidbey State Park The Friends of South Whidbey State Park are hosting their first “Holly Day” at South Whidbey State Park on Saturday, December 7, from 9:30am to 1:00pm. Bring the family and help remove holly bushes, which are an invasive species, in the park. The cut holly and evergreen boughs will make beautiful evergreen wreaths that you can take home and display. There will be live music, cookies, cider and children’s activities. Please bring heavy gloves, clippers, loppers, hand saws, and pliers, and dress for the cold, damp weather. Friends of South Whidbey State Park also needs volunteers to help with setup, cleanup and provide cookies. The event is being co-hosted by Calyx Community Arts School, and Service, Education & Adventure (SEA). The school, located at South Whidbey State Park, will hold an open house from open house from 11:30am to 2:00pm with children’s games, arts and activities, and an opportunity to learn more about Calyx’s outdoor learning program for children ages 5-8 and about SEA, an environmental education program for grades K-12. For information about helping with this event, or to get more information about Friends of South Whidbey State Park, email foswsp@ gmail.com. Membership in Friends of South Whidbey State Park is $12 for an individual or $20 for families. You can also visit their Facebook Page, Friends of South Whidbey State Park. [Submitted by Carolyn Tamler]

Whidbey General Hospital’s Home Healthcare Department Receives Press Ganey 2013 Guardian of Excellence Award Whidbey General is proud to announce its Home Healthcare Department has been named a 2013 Guardian of Excellence Award winner by Press Ganey Associates, Inc. The Guardian of Excellence Award recognizes top-performing facilities that consistently achieved the 95th percentile of performance in Patient Satisfaction, Employee Engagement, Physician Engagement or Clinical Quality. The Press Ganey Guardian of Excellence Award is a health care industry symbol of achievement. Fewer than 5% of all Press Ganey clients reach this threshold and consistently maintain it for the one year reporting period. Press Ganey partners with more than 10,000 health care facilities, including more than half of all U.S. hospitals, to measure and improve the patient experience.

The Coupeville Lions Club recently honored Coupeville High School Students of the Quarter, who were selected by the high school teaching staff based on academic excellence, community service and school activities including student government and team sports. This quarter’s winners are Jared Dickson, son of Randy and Lisa Dickson and Heni Barnes, daughter of Craig and Wikitoria Barnes. Jared has been active in school sports, school government, National Honor Society carrying a 4.0 GPA, the Big Brothers/Big Sisters Program, Boy Scouts and his church. Future plans include attending Brigham Young University. Heni served in student government, won first place at the National History Day Competition,

“We are proud to partner with Whidbey General,” said Patrick T. Ryan, CEO of Press Ganey. “Achieving this level of excellence reflects the organization’s commitment to delivering outstanding service and quality. Whidbey General’s efforts benefit patients on Whidbey Island and will lead to improved patient experiences.” According to WGH CEO Tom Tomasino, the award represents an important recognition from the industry’s leader in measuring, understanding and improving the patient experience, Press Ganey. “Individuals who require treatment in the home are among our most vulnerable patients,” notes Tomasino. “It is important that they receive the highest quality care possible.”

Home Health Care provides support and services at home to assist patients in recovering from an illness, injury or surgery. Home Health services are offered to patients who would find it difficult to receive skilled care away from home. Whidbey General’s expert and compassionate clinicians have been providing home health services for more than 30 years. [Submitted by Trish Rose, Whidbey General Hospital]

WSF is One Step Closer to Liquefied Natural Gas Propulsion Washington State Ferries is another step closer to significantly reducing fuel costs and transportation emissions by switching a class of vessels from diesel fuel to liquefied natural gas. After more than three years of study, WSF has a plan to safely convert six Issaquah Class vessels to run on cleaner-burning LNG. The proposal was officially submitted to the U.S. Coast Guard on November 18 in a formal letter of intent (LOI) and waterways suitability assessment (WSA). The submission of the LOI and WSA marks the official starting point of the Coast Guard’s review process. WSF expects the Coast Guard to issue a finding regarding the LNG conversion proposal in 2014. “Fuel is WSF’s fastest growing operating expense,” said David Moseley, assistant secretary for the Washington State Department of Transportation, Ferries Division. “Replacing diesel with LNG on the Issaquah Class ferries could result in very substantial savings on fuel over the remaining 30 years of their service life. This will also mean a cleaner, more efficient future for our fleet by significantly decreasing emissions.” The average Issaquah Class vessel carries up to 124 cars and 1,200 passengers, serving on some of the state’s busiest ferry routes. Converting the fuel systems from ultra-low sulfur diesel to LNG would significantly reduce emissions according to WSDOT’s Air Emissions Model, including: 89 percent reduction in particulate matter; 61 percent reduction in nitrous oxide; 28 percent reduction in carbon dioxide; and 59 percent reduction in sulfur dioxide. For the proposed LNG conversions, WSF would install main propulsion engines to use natural gas and retrofit LNG fuel tanks on the top decks of the six vessels. The proposal calls for a phased approach for conversions to avoid schedule changes or delays. Once vessels are converted and back in service, they would begin a routine overnight, out-of-service refueling process similar to current diesel refueling. Since 2010, WSF has been studying the benefits of alternative fuels and evaluating the feasibility and safety of using LNG to fuel its vessels. The process included the U.S. Coast Guard, multiple agencies at the state and local level, private industry organizations, the Washington State Joint Transportation Committee and consultants including Cedar River Group and Det Norske Veritas, the world’s leading authority on LNGfueled passenger ferries. WSF concluded its study process by issuing the final waterways suitability assessment, which includes a safety and security assessment and a risk-management plan. The study found that the LNG proposal is inherently safe with risks as low as reasonably practicable. Use of LNG to power passenger ferries has been proven technically and operationally feasible worldwide for more than a decade, with Norway operating LNG-fueled passenger vessels since 2000. LNG is also fast becoming an efficient alternative fuel for buses and semi-trucks. More information about the LNG project is available at the project website: http://www. wsdot.wa.gov/Ferries/Environment/LNG.htm [Submitted by Jen Fielder, WSDOT]

Washington Trust Announces a Call for Nominations to the 2014 Most Endangered Historic Properties List The Washington Trust for Historic Preservation is seeking nominations to its 2014 Most Endangered Historic Properties List. Nomination forms may be obtained through the Trust’s website at www.preservewa.org. Washingtonians enjoy a diverse collection of historic and cultural resources found through-

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LoCaLLy oWNED. out the state. Historic buildings and sites significantly contribute to the heritage and vitality of Washington while enhancing the quality of life in small towns, large cities and across rural areas. Yet each day, these resources face a variety of challenges, including lack of funding, deferred maintenance, neglect, incompatible development, and demolition. Inclusion in the Most Endangered List is an important initial step in highlighting these threats and bringing attention to those historic resources most in need. Historic properties selected for the Most Endangered list receive advocacy support and assistance from the Washington Trust. While the focus is to remove the immediate threat facing historic properties, raising awareness of preservation issues in general remains a programmatic goal. Through proactive partnering with local organizations and concerned citizens, the Washington Trust’s Most Endangered List program has resulted in many high profile success stories across Washington since its establishment in 1992. Past case studies demonstrate the effectiveness of inclusion in our Most Endangered List. The Battelle/Talaris Campus in Seattle’s Laurelhurst neighborhood represents such an example. Redevelopment plans called for demolition of campus buildings and the associated historic landscape. Working with concerned neighbors and other advocacy groups, the campus and surrounding grounds recently received designation as a City of Seattle Landmark. The property owner, in turn, is interested in working with stakeholders on a preservation-minded redevelopment scenario. The Haller House, located in downtown Coupeville on Whidbey Island, provides another example. With the house on the market, concerned advocates feared a new owner would remove significant interior features from the 1866 house – a structure with direct ties to Civil War officer Colonel Granville Haller. The Washington Trust supported local efforts to contact the sellers, who in turn agreed to provide local advocates an opportunity to raise funds for acquisition of the site. The group, now acting officially under the auspices of Historic Whidbey, continues to work toward this goal. Communities are encouraged to take action when the historic fabric of their neighborhoods, main streets and rural landscapes are threatened. Through the Most Endangered List, the Washington Trust offers support with preservation efforts aimed at resolving these preservation challenges.

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LoCaLLy opEratED. 2nd and 4th Tuesdays, beginning at 9:00am in the Courthouse Annex Hearing Room, Coupeville. Depending on the agenda, some meetings are held in the evenings and/or on Camano. Meetings run 2 to 6 hours or more depending on the complexity of the agenda. Preparation and research is necessary. Service on the Planning Commission is unpaid; however, members may obtain reimbursement for travel expenses to and from meetings. Interested individuals should send a letter of interest including a statement of qualifications and a resume to: Island County Board of Commissioners, Attn: Pam Dill, Re: Planning Commission Vacancies, Post Office Box 5000, Coupeville, WA 98239, no later than 4:30pm, Monday, December 30, 2013. For additional information please phone (360)679-7353 or e-mail pamd@co.island.wa.us. [Submitted by Pam Dill]

Local Business News Handbag Consignment Shop Kicks Off the Holidays with a Surplus Sale Handbag Consignment Shop, LLC, an authentic designer handbag consignment shop, will be hosting a Handbag Surplus Sale on Sunday, December 1, at the Coupeville Recreation Center from 10:00am to 5:00pm. With the recent acquirement of over 200 brand new designer handbags for consignment, the Handbag Consignment Shop’s small storefront in Coupeville is unable to showcase all the new items due to its brimming capacity of other great designer handbags and accessories. The Handbag Consignment Shop team will open – for one day only – a second, temporary holiday shopping location at the Coupeville Recreation Center on NW Alexander Street in downtown Coupeville. Brands such as B. Makowsky, Coach, Tignanello, Dooney Bourke, Maxx New York, and more will be featured and readily available for holiday gifting; more holiday gift options will also be available at the storefront on the same day.

The earliest big payoff I see for your husband lies in his Venus period beginning in 2036. If he wants his money quick, as you say, he probably will not like hearing that. I leave it to you to figure how to break the news.

ChiCken little and the astRoloGeR By Wesley Hallock

Dear Astrologer, My husband, bless his heart, has a long history of falling prey to get-rich-quick schemes. He is also scornful of my interest in astrology. I was both troubled and surprised, then, when he recently said to me, “Did you know? J.P. Morgan, the great financial wizard, said, ‘Millionaires don’t use astrology. Billionaires do.’” Wesley, I trust in astrology, but my darling dearest is not J.P. Morgan. He knows nothing about astrology, and he doesn’t understand all he knows about money. The very idea of him connecting the two in yet another financial freedom ploy gives me Chicken Little moments. I know my hubby. If I question him, he will take it as encouragement to act on whatever stratagem he’s hatching. So I’m asking you. Is the Morgan quote true? And while we’re at it, is there a pot of gold for him at the end of the rainbow? His data: born January 13, 1946, at 12:53 P.M. in Scottsdale, Arizona His Nervous Wife Dear Nervous Wife, You are right to be nervous. The horoscopes of J.P. Morgan and the wealthy elite ooze success with money in ways your husband’s chart does not. Your husband is developing a wealth mentality in this lifetime, something Morgan possessed at birth.

I checked on the Morgan quote, and it goes back to Sydney Omarr, the originator of the sun sign horoscopes that run in many newspapers. On May 3, 1988, during the flap over Nancy Reagan’s use of astrology to plan the President’s speaking schedule, the San Jose Mercury quoted Omarr under the headline “Other Presidents Looked to the Stars.” According to Omarr, Morgan was pressured by reporters who said, “‘You, J.P. Morgan, a powerful man, using astrology?’ And J.P. Morgan said, ‘Listen, millionaires don’t use astrology, billionaires do.’ “ The other presidents said to use astrology were George Washington and the Roosevelts, Theodore and Franklin Delano. Dear Astrologer, I am the mother of a teen-aged girl who is bright, personable and makes friends easily. She could date any boy she wants. Unfortunately, of the last three boys my daughter dated, two were controlling and abusive. The third boy I liked, because he treated my daughter with respect. She quickly dropped him, however, and now she’s seeing someone I am sure will turn out to be another macho abuser. I witnessed him sneer at the outfit my daughter was wearing when he came to pick her up and she actually went up stairs and changed her clothes without a word being spoken by either of them. It torments me to see my daughter setting herself up for more abuse. Why is she making bad choices? Her data: Born October 5, 1996, at 6:10 P.M. in Winter Park, Florida Perplexed Dear Perplexed, Your daughter is a heart-centered person who is drawn to these wounded boys out of an innate desire to heal them. In short, she’s a fixer. Her system of values places herself last behind the needs of others. Later, she will realize the weakcHIcKeN LITTLe

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For more information, call (360)682-5251, email info@handbagconsignmentshop.com, or visit www.handbagconsignmentshop.com.

Island Pet Icon Will Be Missed

Nominations to the Trust’s 2014 Most Endangered Historic Properties List are due on Monday, January 13, 2014. The 2014 List will be announced at the annual RevitalizeWA Preservation and Main Street Conference held in May as part of the Washington Trust’s Preservation Month programming. Those interested in nominating a resource are strongly encouraged to contact Cathy Wickwire, Operations Manager with the Washington Trust, prior to submitting a nomination. For more information on the Most Endangered Historic Properties List, including a nomination form, please visit the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation website at www. preservewa.org/Nomination-Process.aspx. [Submitted by Jennifer Mortensen, Washington Trust for Historic Preservation]

Planning Commission Vacancies The Island County Board of Commissioners is seeking applicants from Commissioner District 1 (encompasses all of Whidbey Island south of the greater Oak Harbor area) and Commissioner District 3 (encompasses Whidbey Island area north of Oak Harbor and all of Camano Island) to serve on the Island County Planning Commission for terms that expire on January 2, 2018. Members must reside in the district they are appointed to represent. The Board of County Commissioners appoints Planning Commission members for 4 year terms, which may be renewed by mutual agreement. The Planning Commission consists of nine members, three from each County Commissioner District, to assure county-wide representation. The Board of County Commissioners seeks to ensure that the Planning Commission is a balanced committee representing many different viewpoints with regard to land use. The Planning Commission generally meets the

Puzzle 1 (Very hard, difficulty rating 0.76)

“On November 19th we lost a cherished friend and family member, Reno, our blue and gold macaw. She was 33 years old. Reno had been fighting a battle with an aggressive tumor for several years. She was well loved by us all and will be deeply missed.” Brian Knoll, Owner Island Pet Center.

New Release by Local Author Joshua D. Elliott Local author Joshua D. Elliott has released the latest book in his On The Road Ahead series. Silver Lining: A Collection of Inspiring Stories is epic and powerfully inspiring—a remarkable book for teens and adults. Each story uniquely embraces healing, compassion, peace and reconciliation. Uplifting characters, however fictitious, are faced with real world challenges that illustrate real life victories. The Series will continue with Elliot’s upcoming novel, The Unthinkable. Copies of Silver Lining: A Collection of Inspiring Stories are available now at the Createspace E-Store and at Amazon. com. For more information, visit Joshuadeauthor.wix.com/silver-lining.

6 3 4 On a scale from 1 to 10...8. Every row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every column of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9

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Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen/ on Wed Sep 25 19:21:00 2013 GMT. Enjoy!

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Locally owned.

Locally operated. Whidbey Island Music Festival Holiday Concert Saturday, December 7, 7:30pm St. Augustine’s-in-the-Woods, Freeland

All entries are listed chronologically, unless there are multiple entries for the same venue or are connected to a specific organization (such as Sno-Isle Libraries) in which case all entries for that venue or organization are listed collectively in chronological order under one heading.

Black Friday Craftacular Friday, November 29, 2:00pm Oak Harbor Library

12th Annual Community Harvest

Gadget Clinic Saturday, November 30, 10:00am Freeland Library

Thursday, November 28, 11:00am-4:00pm Elks Lodge. Oak Harbor Free Everyone is invited to enjoy a free Thanksgiving Dinner. Volunteers will deliver a turkey dinner or even come and pick you up if you can’t make it. Call anytime before November 27 to schedule a time to pick you up or deliver a turkey dinner. You can call the Community Harvest number (360)240-1433 and make reservations.

15th Annual Thanksgiving Community Potluck Thursday, November 28, 12:00pm-2:30pm Coupeville Rec Hall, Coupeville Enjoy Thanksgiving with your Coupeville family and friends. Entree is provided, just bring your favorite family recipe or dessert to share. For information, contact Sue Winker at (360)6781224.

Country Christmas at the Fair Friday, November 29, 2:00pm-7:00pm Saturdays, November 30 & December 7, 10:00am-3:00pm Sundays, December 1 & 8, 10:00am-3:00pm Coffman Building, Island Country Fairgrounds, Langley Browse enticing array of affordable, unique, handcrafted gifts, collectibles and art. Homemade edible goodies and lunch daily. Fresh wreaths and Chirstmas trees, photos with Santa, face painting and tractor hayrides. For more information, call (360)221-4677.

Greenbank Farm Tractor Lighting & Caroling Friday, November 29, 5:00pm Greenbank Farm, Greenbank Back by popular demand is the Greenbank Farm Tractor Lighting & Caroling, led by local legends, brothers Vern & Karl Olsen. Gather ‘round the Farmall tractor and belt out your finest holiday carols. Come with family, friends, or by yourself – all are welcome.

Model Railroad Open House Saturday, November 30, 10:00am-4:00pm Sunday, December 1, 10:00am-4:00pm 508 Broadway, Coupeville Enjoy an extensive model railroad layout with a donation of food for the local food bank. Great fun for kids of all ages.

Holiday Open House Saturdays, November 30 to December 21, 10:00am-6:00pm Sally’s Garden, 107 S. Main, Coupeville Enjoy treats and good cheer. Weekly prize drawing. For more information, call (360)678-9114.

AAUW Talk and Book Signing with J.A. Jance Tuesday, December 3, 5:30pm First United Methodist Church, Oak Harbor Tickets: $15 Join the American Association of University Women (AAUW) Whidbey Island Branch, who will be hosting a talk and book signing with author J.A. Jance, New York Times top 10 best selling author. Tickets are available at Wind & Tide Bookstore in Oak Harbor; Lind’s Pharmacy in Coupeville; Sound Business Center in Freeland; and The Star Store in Langley. Light refreshments will be served. Proceeds benefit scholarships for young women on Whidbey Island.

Upcoming Sno-Isle Library Events See schedule below Cost: Free

Instead of buying holiday gifts on Black Friday, come to the library and make your own. For teens in grades 6-12.

Need help with an electronic device? Drop in any time between 10:00am-1:00pm to get professional assistance on eReaders, tablets, smart phones, media players, laptops or digital cameras. Clinic presented by Joel Kennedy, A-Tech Whidbey and funded by the Friends of the Freeland Library. Preregistration preferred at www.sno-isle.org or by calling (360)331-7323. How to Start a Business Tuesday, December 3, 1:00pm Oak Harbor Library Learn how to write a business plan using the Small Business Administration’s format. In the process you will discover some library tools that can save you hundreds of dollars. Seating is limited. Please preregister. Genealogy 101: Getting Started Tuesday, December 3, 1:00pm Freeland Library Interested in joining the fastest growing hobby in the United States? Confused on where to begin? This class provides a gentle introduction to genealogical methods and resources. Join us and dig up your dead relatives! Seating is limited by the availability of computers. Please preregister. Presenter: Nate Cushman. Golden Venture Thursday, December 5, 3:00pm Freeland Library This 90-minute film chronicles the ongoing struggles of passengers who were aboard the Golden Venture, an immigrant smuggling ship that ran aground near New York City in 1993. A short beginners “Golden Venture” origami workshop will follow the documentary. eReaders Explained: Your Guide to the Portable Sno-Isle Library Friday, December 6, 10:00am-11:00am Clinton Library Join us for an introduction and demonstration of eReader tablets and tips to find the right eReader for your needs.

Featuring: Julie Finch Soprano, Elizabeth Giesbers Mezzo-Soprano, Derek Sellers Tenor, Gustave Blazek Bass, Joseph Pollard White Conductor.

Star Party Friday, December 6, begins at dark Fort Nugent Park, Oak Harbor Explore the night sky and view distant galaxies, planets and nebulas at this free public Star Party hosted by the Island County Astronomical Society (ICAS). No telescope is needed and people of all ages are welcome to attend. Be sure and dress warmly and note that the event will be canceled if the weather is cloudy. For more information, contact Dan Pullen at (360)6797664 or icaspub@juno.com, or visit www. icas-wa.webs.com.

Whidbey Island Eagles Holiday Bazaar Saturday, December 7, 9:00am-3:00pm Sunday, December 8, 9:00am-2:00pm Eagles Aerie #3418, Freeland Shop for crafts, jewelry, speciality foods, and collectible gifts. The Eagles Aerie is located at 16691 SR 525. For more information, call (360)321-5636.

Christmas Bazaar & Lunch Saturday, December 7, 9:30am-2:00pm United Methodist Church, Coupeville The Bazaar starts with Coffee Time, and the chance to purchase hand-made crafts, wreaths, and baked goods. The popular hot lunch featuring home-made pie will be served from 11:00am to 1:00pm. The Bazaar is located in both the upstairs and downstairs rooms of the church. For more information, call (360)678-4256 or visit www.coupevilleumc.com. All proceeds benefit outreach programs of the United Methodist Women, such as the local food bank.

Cookie Walk Saturday, December 7, 10:00am Langley United Methodist Church Walk the aisles of homemade cookies (with ingredient lists) and choose the ones you want to fill your box. Only $12 for this popular holiday tradition. Come early for best selection. Proceeds benefit local charities supported by Langley’s United Methodist Women. Located in the Fellowship Hall of the church at Third & Anthes Streets. For more information, call (360)221-4233 or email lumc@whidbey.com.

Jingle Trail Run and Walk

Celebrate the season with an eclectic mix of Baroque Christmas music and rare Americana. Artists include internationally renowned lutenist Stephen Stubbs, and Scottish fiddle champion Brandon Vance. Tickets are $20 in advance or $25 at the door. Advance tickets can be purchased at www. brownpapertickets.com or by calling 800-8383006. For more information, visit www.whidbeyislandmusicfestival.org.

Elf Chase 5K Fun Run & Walk Sunday, December 8, 9:00am South Whidbey Community Park, Langley Chase an Elf , wear a crazy costume and run through Candy Cane Lane. There will be fun prizes, hot drinks and snacks. Registration begins at 9:00am, the run begins at 10:00am. A benefit for the Langley Middle School PTSA, registration fees are $25 for adults, $15 for students and family max of $80. For more information, visit Lmsptsa.wordpress.com/elf-chase/

A Norwegian Christmas Concert Sunday, December 8, 3:00pm Trinity Lutheran Church, Freeland Presented by the Everett Norwegian Male Chorus with the Bellingham Damekor. Featuring songs In Norwegian and English. Scandinavian treats & refreshments following the concert. Freewill offering suggested.

Religious Services Taizé Prayer Services Wednesday, December 4, 7:00pm-8:00pm St. Hubert Catholic Church, Langley Join us as we gather together to sing simple chants, pray scripture, enter into sacred silence, and pray for healing, peace and reconciliation. Invite your family and friends. This is a beautiful spiritual practice to slow down the hectic pace of life in our modern world. The church is located at 804 Third Street. The parish office may be reached at (360)221-5383.

Prayer Group Every Tuesday, 4:00pm-5:30pm St. Hubert Catholic Church, Langley Studying growth in the Holy Spirit: There’s always more, expecting new fire. Led by Sister Nancy Keller, S.C. For more information, call Bill at (360)221-8174.

Filipino Christian Fellowship Sunday School, 1:00pm; Worship Service, 2:00pm Church on the Rock, Oak Harbor Pastor Jansen Onggao

Living Circle: Friends on the Path

Whidbey Island Center for the Arts (WICA)

Saturday, December 7, 10:00am Camp Casey, Coupeville

Every Sunday, 10:30am 917 E. Whidbey Ave., Oak Harbor

Tickets are available by contacting the WICA ticket office (360)221-8268 or (800)638-7631. Additional information at www.WICAonline. com.

Bring family and friends to run, walk, or stroll through scenic trails of Camp Casey. All ages are welcome. For cost, information and registration forms, go to www.jingletrailrun.com. Check-in begins at 8:30am.

Living Circle is a welcoming spiritual community of friends on the path sharing music, prayers, blessings, stories, and more. They invite you to share your spirit with them. Their building is located next to Big Brothers and Big Sisters. For more information, call (360)320-2081, email alivingcircle@gmail.com, or visit livingcircle. webs.com.

You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown, Revised Fridays, December 6, 13 & 20, 7:30pm Saturdays, December 7, 20 & 21, 7:30pm Sunday, December 8, 2:00pm Sunday, December 15, 5:00pm Tickets: Adults $24, Seniors $20, Youth $17 An updated version of the beloved musical that tells the story of an average day in the life of the famous comic strip child hero, Charlie Brown. It’s a day made up of little moments picked from all the days of Charlie Brown, from Valentine’s Day to the baseball season, from wild optimism to utter despair, all mixed in with the lives of his friends (both human and nonhuman) and strung together on the string of a single day, from bright uncertain morning to hopeful starlit evening. Charlie Brown’s inner battle will resonate with young and old alike. WICA Holiday Concert: Mandolin Messiah Sunday, December 8, 7:30pm Tickets: $20 The Seattle Mandolin Orchestra presents what could be the first performance of Messiah played entirely on plucked strings. Joining the orchestra will be four top-flight vocalists from Seattle’s choral and operatic community.

Greening of Coupeville Saturday, December 7, see times below The annual Greening of Coupeville includes the Jingle Trail Run in the morning, the Christmas Parade at 4:00pm, tree lighting and singing at 5:00pm, various open house and late night shopping. Something for everyone. For more information, call (360)678-5434 or visit coupevillechamber.com.

Navy Band Performs Holiday Concert Saturday, December 7, 7:00pm Oak Harbor High School, Performing Arts Center Navy Band Northwest will present a free holiday concert for the local community. This year’s event, “Home for the Holidays,” is sure to be a heartwarming musical evening for the entire family. Navy Band Northwest is under the direction of Lt. Robert J. Coats and has performed over 480 engagements each year throughout the Pacific Northwest Region. A U.S. Marine Corps representative will be standing by to accept donations for Toys for Tots. Tickets are not required.

Oneness Blessings Every Monday, 4:00pm-5:00pm Oak Harbor A hands-on process of awakening the human being to its natural state by sending energy to the physical brain via a Oneness Blessings Giver. Come experience peace, healing & joy for yourself. Contact Netsah at (360)675-3420 for more information.

Teaching Through God’s Word Sundays, 9:00am & 11:00am Calvary Chapel, 3821 French Road, Clinton For more information, visit ccwhidbey.com.

Unitarian Universalist Sunday Service Sundays, 10:00am Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland All are welcome. Values-based children’s religious exploration classes and childcare will be provided. Visit www.uucwi.org for more infor WHAT’S GOING ON

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LoCaLLy oWNED.

LoCaLLy opEratED.

still talkinG By Eileen Brown

Retired Coupeville Elementary School teacher Jack Tingstad has just the thing to get you in the holiday mood. He works on his railroading hobby all year round so that he can annually invite visitors into his Coupeville home between Thanksgiving and Christmas. He keeps adding details and new items to the model railroad layout. Those who have come to the open house in the past are challenged to see if they can find what’s new. Ever the teacher, Jack feels this tests their mental skills. This year marks the 13th annual model railroad open house. Over the years, Tingstad’s HO scale layout has received regional and national recognition, appearing twice in Railroad Model Craftsman, a national hobby magazine, and the May 2011 issue of Model Railroad Hobbyist, a web magazine.

If you’ve never attended or, as several families do, return each year, Tingstad hopes you will stop by and enjoy what some have called “an animated work of art.” In keeping with the holiday tour, Tingstad asks that you bring an item of non-perishable food to help Gifts from the Heart, Coupeville’s food bank, feed those in need. A basket will be at the door as you enter. The layout will be open from 10 am to 4 pm, Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 30 and Dec. 1 at 508 Broadway in Coupeville. Phone 678-5120 if you need directions. A culinary challenge He was politically incorrect and would rather have been famous as a baseball player than a columnist, but if you are over a certain age, you know Emmett Watson loved his Seattle, calling things as he saw them on the street, on the war in Vietnam, waste in local government and occasionally, in the kitchen. There isn’t room here to include his biography, but I urge you to look him up. He’s a fascinating character and my dad never missed a column. I recently found one he saved from the Nov. 20. 1967 Seattle Post-Intelligencer on the subject of Thompson Turkey.

Tingstad’s set-up has been recognized for its excellence in scenery, structures and electrical wiring. Fellow modelers from around the region have come to Whidbey Island for a look at the impressive design.

You can find the recipe on a number of websites and enjoy colorful folklore connected with the bird. Choose one and make a list of the ingredients you will need before continuing.

He calls the layout Cloud City & Western. It features scenes from central Colorado’s mining district around Leadville.

The recipe can be intimidating in its length, so go slow. The results are said to be “heavenly.” I’d like to hear details of your experience.

Tingstad painstakingly built the rugged mountain scenery of Tennessee Pass and the shear cliffs of Glenwood Canyon. A major feature is the scratch built, award-winning, Crystal River Mine which hugs the side of Mount Massive.

Watson himself said cooking it requires roughly the logistical and tactical approach used by Field Marshal Montgomery when he defeated the Germans at El Alamein.

The layout is handicap accessible and each visitor can get close enough to see steam era locomotives and cars, as well as mini-scenes depicting horse and buggy life in the Old West. cHIcKeN LITTLe

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ness of such reasoning, which is that it puts her open to abuse from people who do not share her healing intent. Until then, allow her the opportunity to grow. The danger signs that signal abuse of the life threatening sort are absent in her horoscope. She will be fine, mom. Dear Astrologer, My science-minded, astrology bashing husband and I have a friendly bet. His bet is that you won’t dare answer this letter, because your often-glib tone covers for your lack of knowledge and an inability to deal with scientific fact. The fact of the Moon, according to him, is that it is only a piece of Earth flung into orbit following a strike by an asteroid, and has none of the properties astrology assigns to it. My position is that you know more science than you let on. I’m betting on you to produce a Watusi-free reply that will put my husband’s socks in orbit. A Fan P.S. I can’t mention the stakes in a family newspaper, but it’s a win-win! Dear Fan, Your husband is referring to the Giant Impact Theory. Call it the Big Whack. When it didn’t hold up mathematically, it became the Double Big Whack Theory, in which the supposed asteroid that hit the planet circled back for a second hit. Really? Perhaps it’s time for a new idea.

EXPLORE YOUR OPTIONS t8FJHIUMPTT#MPPETVHBSDPOUSPM t)JHICMPPEQSFTTVSF$IPMFTUFSPM t4USFTTSFEVDUJPO&OFSHZJNQSPWFNFOU t.PPEJOTUBCJMJUZ4MFFQJTTVFT t"MMFSHJFT"VUPJNNVOFEJTFBTF t*OGMBNNBUJPO1BJO t#JPJEFOUJDBMIPSNPOFT$MFBOTJOHQSPHSBNT

Board Certified Naturopathic Physicians

(360) 679-8946 Oak Harbor Tuesday - Friday Billing Most Insurances

www.whidbeynaturopathic.com

Here is only a portion of the recipe: “Rub the bird inside and out with salt and pepper. Put into a saucepan the gizzard, neck and heart, one bay leaf, one teaspoon STILL TALKING

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27.31 per cent of Earth’s. Moon makes 27.396 turns per orbit of Earth. Earth is 109.28 times smaller than Sun, which divided by 4 equals 27.322. Those three numbers, 27.332, 40 and 366 and their multiples, plus or minus a few thousandths, raise scientific suspicion, for they appear too often in matters of Earth, Moon and Sun to be coincidence. Oddly, Moon mimics Sun, but in opposite ways: Moon is highest and brightest in mid-winter, the time when Sun is lowest and weakest. Moon’s rising point on winter solstice is where sun rises on summer solstice. Moon’s rising point on summer solstice is where Sun rises on winter solstice. Equally suspicious, why is Moon’s orbit not elliptical, but uniquely circular? Why is its rotation timed exactly to keep the same face ever toward Earth? Why are the oldest moon rocks a billion years older than any found on Earth? How is it that the Moon, in the words of NASA, “rang like a bell” for three hours and 20 minutes after being struck by the Apollo lunar module? Soviet scientists in the 1960s proposed that the moon must have been artificially hollowed out and parked in its orbit. No other explanation can account for its oddness. Shamans of the Zulu nation say the same: The Moon is hollow and came from far away to be placed in its orbit by long-ago visitors to Earth. Did those long-ago visitors also bring astrology? Was that their purpose in parking the Moon? To nurture and evolve human consciousness?

If it’s facts you want, try these: The Moon is 3.66 times smaller than Earth. Earth takes 366 days to go around the Sun. 366 megalithic yards is the standard unit of measure built into Stonehenge and other ancient sites around the world.

Yes. I believe so.

Try a few more: The Moon is 400 times smaller than the Sun. It is also 400 times closer to Earth. Thus, the Moon appears to be exactly the same size as the Sun, resulting in the unlikely coincidence called solar eclipse. Earth rotates 400 times faster than the Moon, turning 40,000 kilometers each day, to Moon’s 400.

Nine out of ten people can’t answer the question, “Are your sleepless nights sleepless because the sky is falling, or because Saturn is doing the Watusi with your Moon, again?” Don’t be one of them. Send your questions, along with your date, TIME and place of birth (as listed on your birth certificate) to Wesley at planetbiz4u2@gmail.com. It’s fun and it’s free. You’ll also sleep better.

And a few more: Moon’s polar circumference is

Dr. Alicia Capsey Dr. Thom Rogers

I also believe I just saw your husband’s socks go soaring skyward, followed by his—never mind. Go collect on your bet.

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


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november 28 - December 4, 2013

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mation. The Unitarian Universalist Congregation building is located at 20103 Highway 525, two miles north of Freeland.

Unity of Whidbey Sundays, 10:00am 5671 Crawford Road, Langley If you’re one of the “spiritual but not religious” people who questions your childhood faith or is looking for something more, Unity of Whidbey may feel like a homecoming. Visit our website: unityofwhidbeyisland.org

Whidbey Quakers Sundays, 4:00pm-5:00pm Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland Whidbey Islands Friends Meeting (also known as Quakers) meet in silent worship and commu-

nity, with occasional spoken messages, every Sunday at the Unitarian Universalist building. For more information, contact Tom Ewell at tewell@whidbey.com or go to www.whidbeyquakers.org.

Restaurant Activities

First Church of Christ, Scientist

Brewer’s Nights Last Thursday of Month, 6:00pm-9:00pm Special prizes and giveaways. Live Music.

Worship, 10:00am Sunday School to age 20, 10:00am Wednesday Testimony Meeting, 7:30pm Christian Science Reading Room Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, 11:00am-3:00pm Wednesday 3:00pm-7:00pm The church and Reading Room are located at 721 SW 20th Court at Scenic Heights Street, Oak Harbor. Call (360)675-0621 or visit JSH-Online.com.

Flyers Restaurant & Brewery, Oak Harbor Happy Hour Daily 2:00pm-6:00pm, Sunday 2:00pm-close

Prima Bistro, Langley Restaurant Industry Discount Mondays 20% off when food handlers or alcohol serve permit presented.

Galleries and Art Shows “Home for the Holidays” Through December Rob Schouten Gallery, Greenbank

Featuring the work of 26 of the most highlyskilled and sought-after artists working on the island today. “Home For the Holidays” will be stocked with exciting, unique and beautiful art in a variety of forms, including glass, jewelry, paintings, sculptures, encaustics, ceramics, fiber arts, woodwork, handmade prints and books, as well as good collection of giclée prints and cards.

4th Annual “Small Pleasures” Show Through December Brackenwood Gallery, Langley “Small Pleasures” features nearly every artist in the gallery. Brackenwood is blessed with phenomenal artists and this exhibit showcases the range of incredible art and artists we have in this gallery community.


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november 28 - December 4, 2013

LoCaLLy oWNED. Featured Artist: Melissa Koch Through December 30 Museo Gallery, Langley The Museo annual Gift Show features favorably priced art works by gallery artists. New pieces are added throughout November and December.

Meetings and Organizations Greenbank Garden Club Thursday, December 5, 10:00am Greenbank Progressive Club, Greenbank The program will be a member hands-on Christmas craft. The Greenbank Progressive Club is located at Bakken and Firehouse Roads. For additional information, call Reece Rose at (360)579-5880.

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LoCaLLy opEratED. Republican Women of North Whidbey Thursday, December 5, 11:30am Frasers Gourmet Hideaway, Oak Harbor Cost: $25 per person A no-host luncheon. Two entree choices available: Snapper Fillet w/ a sauce Nantua and baby lobsters or Chicken Coq Au Vin. A house salad and dessert of Tiramisu included. Guest speaker is Eileen Sobjack, Secretary 2014-2015 National Federation Republican Women. Reservations recommended. RSVP to P.O. Box 2141, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. For more information, email vicki_wilmot@ yahoo.com or call (360)6784602 or (360)720-2944. Guests welcome.

PBY Memorial Foundation Tuesday, December 10, 11:30am CPO Club Ballroom, Oak Harbor

A joint luncheon meeting with the ANA in commemoration of Pearl Harbor. All Pearl Harbor survivors are invited. The speaker will be Steve Kobylk speaking on the Hawaiian Defenses at the time of Pearl Harbor. For more information, contact Richard Rezabek at (360)675-1102.

Al-Anon

Oak Harbor Garden Club

Oak Harbor

Tuesday, December 10, 9:30am-12:30pm First United Methodist Church, Oak Harbor No Program: Business meeting followed by a Holiday Social Potluck Luncheon. Come join us and get to know the ladies of this busy group of community-minded gardeners. OHGC is 90 years old and still growing. For more information, call OHGC President, Joyce Hollywood, at (360)678-7056.

Every Wednesday, 9:30am-10:30am 432 2nd St., Langley If a friend or relative has a problem with alcohol, you can find solutions for yourself at Alanon.

Al-Anon Group Are you troubled by someone’s drinking? Al-Anon group can help. Call Laurie at (360)675-4430 for meeting information.

Alcoholics Anonymous Every Day, 12:00pm & 8:00pm 432 2nd Street, Langley For more information, call (360)221-2070 WHAT’S GOING ON

WIN $2,000 IN PRIZES!

Spend $50 on anything in Oak Harbor from November 29 to December 31 and you will earn a chance to win $ 2,000 in gift cards and prizes!

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ESPRESS-OH

YOURSELF With Gifts Bought Locally!

The Whidbey Coffee Girls, Caffeinated Carolers

To enter, bring your receipts to the Oak Harbor Chamber of Commerce. You will be given tickets for your chance to win! Get double the tickets for receipts from Oak Harbor Chamber members!

*Limit 10 tickets per receipt. Receipts must be collected from any Oak Harbor business and dated between Nov. 29 and Dec. 31, 2013. Drawing will take place on January 16, 2014. Need not be present to win. Does not include purchases from the Navy Exchange or the 98278 zip code. Receipts can be combined to equal $50.

Sponsored by

360-675-3755 · 32630 SR 20 Oak Harbor, Washington 98277 www.oakharborchamber.com

Shop Anywhere Else and You’ll Be In Some Serious Hot Water and Grounded!


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November 28 - December 4, 2013

Locally owned. ON TRACK

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Locally operated.

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We could hear Dick Biondi on WLS in Chicago, or Cousin Bruce Morrow on WBZ in Boston, or Clark Race on KDKA in Pittsburgh. On a night of great skip, as the radio guys called it, I could start at the left end of the dial at 510 AM and see how many stations I could hear and how many signals I could get before getting all the way to the 1600 AM. It was a glorious adventure of discovery. It just does not seem right that I can now turn on my computer to locate any radio station in the world. What fun is that? Maybe my search for the right signal in my life has just been a test for me to discover which signals I liked and which I did not like. When Mom told me to never settle down, maybe she meant that I should keep looking for the right signal until I found it.

After many years of celebrating holidays alone, I have found that Thanksgiving is my favorite, alone or with others. Thanksgiving never seemed to be as pressure filled growing up as Halloween or Christmas. I did not have to dress up or read from the Bible at Thanksgiving. I did not have to help set the table. I did not have to do dishes afterwards, probably because they were Mom’s expensive china. For sure, Thanksgiving was the first day of the year since the previous year’s Christmas dinner that I saw the gravy ladle. Always an exciting time. Thanksgiving was always happier than Christmas. No one was disappointed by what was not received since nothing was expected but a cold turkey sandwich the next day.

During my lifelong search for a signal that brought clarity of purpose, as well as fun, I have been all over the dial.

I believe that last sentence has a subject somewhere.

Cab driver, furniture delivery boy, talk-too-much disc jockey, first chair clarinetist, lousy actor, retired notary public, former Marine, average college kid, below average law student, traveling executive secretary, PR director, weekly, bi-weekly and monthly columnist, social chairman, fry cook, precinct committee officer, auctioneer, television spokesman, vanity book publisher, speaker, teacher, counselor, truck driver, executor, and cheap jewelry salesman.

Tomorrow I will be eating hot turkey, hot ham, smashed potatoes, brown gravy, brown n’ serve dinner rolls, cranberry sauce, pumpkin pie, hot coffee and other savory items of celebratory cuisine. I will be joined by eleven other members of Team Two-Oh-Too, part of the “Hungry Dozen”, a collection of well-fitted misfits, all with aspirations to be left alone at the right time.

My head hurts trying to think of all of the signals I have encountered. One of my friends told me at lunch last Friday that I had an overactive mind. This was in response to a fellow seated at our dining table who said that his ulcers were cured by eating grated carrot sandwiches. I responded by sharing that carrots must be good because neither of the wild bunnies to whom I feed daily carrots has ulcers. “How would you know?,” said my friend, with superb timing and emphasis. Not having a response, I continued to eat my cooked carrots. Which brings us back to our original premise. How many radio stations have you lived in your life? How many were enjoyable signals? continued from page

The last 12 years you could always find Mac out in his scooter chair whistling his way around Oak Harbor. The town called him “The Whistler.”

Are you still dialed in?

could catch the Redlegs or the Indians, the Pirates or the Phillies, the Cubs or the White Sox.

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of paprika, a half a teaspoon of coriander, a clove of garlic, four cups of water and salt to taste. Let this simmer while you go ahead with the dressing. “Dice one apple and one orange in a bowl, add to this a large can of crushed pineapple, the grated rind of one-half lemon, one can of drained water chestnuts and three tablespoons of chopped, preserved ginger. “In another bowl, put two teaspoons of Coleman’s mustard, two teaspoons of caraway seed, two teaspoons of poppy seed, two and one-half teaspoons of oregano, one wellcrushed teaspoon of mace, four tablespoons of well-chopped parsley, four or five finely minced cloves of garlic, four fragrant cloves (minus the heads, well chopped), one-half teaspoon turmeric, four large, well-chopped onions, six well-chopped stalks of celery, onehalf teaspoon marjoram, one-half teaspoon savory, one tablespoon poultry seasoning. Salt to taste.” And you are not done yet. Don’t be discouraged when you remove the blackened turkey from the oven. Its treasure lays underneath the black coat of paste administered in preparing the bird. Big Daddy says when guests take a look at it, they consider going somewhere else for dinner. Let them taste it and they won’t eat it cooked any other way – ever again. One more thing, don’t count on leftovers. Just for ‘Seniors’ Social calendars seem to fill up fast around Thanksgiving and here’s one date you won’t want to miss. The annual senior citizens’ Christmas buffet luncheon is being hosted by the VFW & Ladies Auxiliary of Post No. 7392 at 3037 N. Goldie Road in Oak Harbor on Wednesday, Dec. 18 at Noon. The luncheon features a gift table where seniors can shop for free for their family and friends. Wrapping paper will be available. Visit with Santa and sing a carol or two. Folks who would like to contribute to the gift or dessert tables would be greatly appreciated.

Do you enjoy Thanksgiving?

With that in mind, I am very thankful to be sharing Thanksgiving 2013 with dear friends and gentle people, the same kind who lived in Dinah Shore’s hometown. There will be a lot of laughter around the table tomorrow. There will be a lot of smiling. Some of us will even know what was said. I may not be able to hear all the fun from one end of the table while seated at the other end, but I always know a good time when I see one. Like Supreme Court Justice Stewart said about pornography, “I don’t know how to define it, but I know it when I see it.” Happy Thanksgiving. May we all enjoy whomever and whatever we are listening to, as we give thanks once again to our Creator for the opportunity to keep on listening.

They never turn away volunteers. Larger groups will need reservations, so contact the VFW by calling 679-2445 and leave a message. America’s veterans and their families are a vanishing breed and deserve the very best. Good for you, VFW. Thanks for your hospitality. Diet from nature How did the natives, first to settle Whidbey Island, get their food? Explorers thought they were scavengers, looking for food wherever they went. There were more than 93 permanent village sites in Island County. In truth, natives lived where their food source was and had ingenious methods of drying, preserving and harvesting such things as blue camas, which they pit roasted and mashed. Nettles were hacked and destroyed, but such harsh cutting back only made for a more robust plant. The natives adapted and made rope and string. Salmon was dried by various means over several days, then stored with layers of maple leaves. Fish traps, outlawed in the 1930s, were used and nothing went to waste. They didn’t kill anything they did not intend to eat.

Matthew B. McCauley Matthew B. McCauley passed away peacefully in his home in Oak Harbor the last week of October at the age of 59. Matt had battled many ailments as well as the effects of a stroke in 2007. The cause of death was heart disease. Through it all, he never lost his smile and love for others. Matt was raised in Los Altos, CA, attended St. Williams School thru 8th grade, and he graduated from Los Altos High School in 1973. Matt maintained numerous friends from his days in Los Altos. Later, he attended Chico State University in California and earned degrees in both Social Work and Psychology. In 1998 Matt founded a business in South Whidbey Island. New Beginnings NW was a non-profit entity offering transitional housing for people in need. His desire to help others grew, and as many as nine people at a time were receiving his care, support, and charity. After New Beginnings NW closed in 2002, Matt worked as a chef at several local restaurants and eateries in South and Central Whidbey. Matt was an avid photographer, and could always be seen with his camera around Whidbey Island. Quite recognizable in his Native American persona, Matt was at home near the Native Northwest Coastal Tribes of Puget Sound. He believed his ancestors lived on Vancouver Island. One of his favorite places to visit was the Ebey’s Landing National Historic Reserve near Coupeville. A Memorial Service for Matthew will be held Saturday November 30, at 12 Noon. The location will be the Ebey Prairie Lookout near the Sunnyside Cemetery. This is part of the Ebey’s Landing National Historic Reserve, near the intersection of Sherman and Cook Roads, in Coupeville, WA. The service will be outdoors so dress for weather. All who knew Matt are welcome and rsvp’s or additional information may be available by email to: jeffcallison@comcast. net. Donations should be made to your local social services organization.

Elmer (Mac) McCracken Elmer (Mac) McCracken passed away suddenly with his family by his side at Skagit Valley Hospital on October 19, 2013. Mac was born on October 30, 1938 in Conway, Arkansas to Elmer and Louise McCracken. Mac enlisted in the Navy in 1957 in San Diego, CA. He was married to the love of his life Phoebe (Penny) on October 28, 1959 in Pasadena, CA. Mac and Penny moved to Virginia where daughters Sharon and Linda were born. In 1964 they moved back to California, where son, Troy was born. In his 20 years of military service Mac was sent to Vietnam twice where he survived an injury and also was shot down in his helicopter. After Vietnam, he was a Navy Police Officer and worked with Navy Survival, the Seawolfs and Seebees. In 1966 the family moved to Whidbey Island where he eventually retired.

Richard Castellano, director of the Island County Historical Society and Museum, gave an interesting talk on “Salish Bounty” at the Oak Harbor library last Thursday in observance of Native American History Month. He talks about native life as though he lived it, which is not surprising when you see where he works every day. The museum in Coupeville is a repository of island history, and Castellano promises even more Native American artifacts will be displayed in the future.

Mac was a long time Boy Scout leader with Troop 59. He was very involved in Scouting activities. He also loved to take his family camping at Mt. Baker.

Please support the Society with your contribution and the museum with a few volunteer hours every week. The small staff needs our help.

After another retirement in the early 80’s he and Penny sold everything and went traveling. They ended up in Deming, New Mexico, having fun in the sun and managing an RV park. After New Mexico, they moved to Deere Park, WA to be near their son until health issues had them moving back to Oak Harbor.

Call Castellano 360-678-310 or visit the museum at 908 NW Alexander St., Coupeville. Write to me at stilltalking2009@yahoo.com.

After retiring from the Navy, Mac worked for a short time as a police officer on Whidbey Island and then moved to the Tri-Cities where he was employed as a security guard for Hanford. Moving back to the Island, he found work as an EMT for Whidbey General Hospital where he served as a Union representative.

Mac leaves behind his loving wife of 54 years Penny; daughters Sharon (Dan ) Davis of Cave Creek, AZ, and Linda McCracken of Burlington; and son Troy McCracken of Oak Harbor. Also surviving are grandchildren Tony Rideout, Jessica Garrett, Joshua (Brittany) Garrett, Tanya Taylor, Luke, Grace, and Emma McCracken and one great grandson, Monty Rideout. He was preceded in death by his daughter Joann in 1963, father in 1976 and mother in 2004. Our husband, father, and grandfather will be deeply missed. In keeping with his wishes, Mac was cremated. Celebration of Life services are pending. Arrangements were entrusted to Wallin Funeral Home. Friends and family are encourage to share memories and offer condolences at their website: www.wallinfuneralhome.com

Bernard Hofkamp Bernard Hofkamp, age 91, went to be with his Lord and Savior Jesus Christ on November 4, 2013. He was surrounded by loving family and friends. He was born Feb. 9, 1922 in Leota, Minnesota. And he grew up on a farm and received his education at the Leota public school. On September 18, 1942 Bernie enlisted in the Navy to join the war effort. While stationed in Tennessee he married his sweetheart from home Hilda Prins. After training he was assigned to the aircraft carrier Natoma Bay. They saw extensive action in the South Pacific, where the Pacific Fleet was greatly outnumbered by the Japanese. But they still prevailed in a mighty way. Some have said the odds were so great that only divine intervention saw them through. The Natoma Bay took a direct hit when a kamikaze flew through the flight deck and exploded. But within hours repairs were made and they began sending planes back into action. Bernie’s job was to control the steam pressure on the catapult that sent the fighter bombers back into the air. After the war he returned home to his 1st and only love Hilda, and they began farming together in the Leota area. In December of 1959 they decided to take a leap of faith. They sold nearly everything they owned at a farm sale and loaded all their possessions and their four children into a new 1960 Chevy and headed west to Oak Harbor, Washington. He worked at numerous trades all putting his mechanical skills to work. He was a carpenter, a postal worker, a boat builder, a working owner of the Anacortes Plywood Mill, and the Reformed Church custodian and groundskeeper for many years. After retirement he worked in a saw sharpening shop and on any yard equipment that came his way. If a mower didn’t run it didn’t take him long to make it purr. He had a deep quiet Christian faith and was a member of the First Reformed Church since Jan. of 1960. Bernie is survived by his four children; Virgil (Suzie) Hofkamp of Anacortes, Lloyd (Jean) Hofkamp of Marysville, Verna (Gary) Tallmadge of Portland, Oregon and Ron (Sue) Hofkamp Oak Harbor, 10 grandchildren, and 16 great grandchildren and 1 great, great grandchild. He will be greatly missed by his family and many friends. Bernie is preceded in death by his wife of 66 years Hilda, two brothers Gary Hofkamp and Gilbert Hofkamp, two sisters Harriett VanDyke and Eleanor Van Ecke, and one grandson Jeff Tallmadge. A memorial service was held at the First Reformed Church in Oak Harbor, WA Saturday, November 16 with Pastor Matt Waite officiating. A reception followed. Interment with full military honors was held at the Tahoma National Cemetery, Kent, WA Monday November 18. In lieu of flowers the family suggests donations to the First Reformed Church Christmas Wish Fund. Family and friends are encouraged to memories and condolences in the Book of Memories hosted by Wallin Funeral Home at www.wallinfuneralhome. com.

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november 28 - December 4, 2013

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LoCaLLy oWNED.

LoCaLLy opEratED.

FRIDAY, November 15 12:39PM, NW Atalanta Way Requesting call to know how to go about contacting a neighbor with a barking dog. 2:07PM, SE Pioneer Way Caller says people hang dead seagulls on roof of building. 2:08PM, NW Crosby Ave. Caller advising is having difficulty with her phone. States she has been trying to call business and received a sex line. Caller states she also tried to call another place. They do not have multiple listings. 3:02PM, SW Thornberry Dr. Caller requesting contact referencing item found in daughter’s backpack. Small bag says 420 on it. 10-year-old daughter does not know where it came from. 11:56PM, SW Fort Nugent Ave. Caller’s car is locked behind gates, had gotten lost in the woods. Is out safe but cannot get out past the gate.

aCRoss 1. Weather map curves 10. Ring 15. At once, esp. payments (3 wds) 16. Accept 17. Land bordering a lake 18. Prefix with red 19. Past 20. “For shame!� 21. Animal hides 22. Corners of the eye 24. “Act your ___!� 25. Blood carrier 29. Insect between molts 31. Print media not controlled by government (2 wds) 35. Delay 36. “___ be a cold day in hell ...� (contraction) 37. Anger 38. Brain area 39. “The Sweetheart of Sigma ___� 40. Pleasing 42. Plant and animal life of particular regions 44. He took two tablets 45. Chop (off) 46. Victory hand gestures (2 wds)

50. Anoint 52. Ed.’s request (acronym) 53. Doctor’s order 58. “M*A*S*H� role 59. Cylindrical cells through which nutrients flow in flowering plants 61. Decree 62. Not mixed with water 63. Piers 64. Writers of literary works doWn 1. “Field of Dreams� setting 2. Catch 3. “Beetle Bailey� dog 4. Accordingly 5. “Catch!� 6. “Star Trek� rank: Abbr. 7. Indian dish of yogurt, cucumbers and spices 8. Cricket fielding position (hyphenated) 9. Cold shower? 10. Contribute money (2 wds) 11. Better 12. Parade balloon 13. Persons to whom property is pledged

as security for loans 14. Desk item 22. Ceiling 23. ___ Master’s Voice 25. Buff 26. Type of corrective shoe 27. Kindled anew 28. ___ el Amarna, Egypt 30. Coarse, obnoxious people 32. Fix, in a way 33. “To ___ is human ...� 34. “Comprende?� 38. ___-tzu 40. Balaam’s mount 41. Dash lengths 42. Made a loud noise 43. Heads off 47. Any Time 48. Increases, e.g. weight 49. Demands 51. Dearth 53. Bank 54. Small ornamental ladies’ bag 55. Makeshift shelters 56. “Not on ___!� (“No way!�) (2 wds) 57. Resting places 60. ___ Appia answers on page 15

SATURDAY, November 16 1:52AM, SW Kimball Dr. Caller advised that somehow on her Obama phone, heard all the numbers on her speed dial even though she doesn’t know how to use speed dial. Thinks numbers were set by subject who lives across from person she used to be friends with. 2:08PM, NE Ernst St. Requesting call referencing incident that occurred around 1pm of person coming to her door saying he was with “Hooked On Phonics� and wanted info on local sex offenders in the area to find out if he is one of them. 5:41PM, Sun Vista Circle Caller advising of the “same problem� with the neighbor’s light that is still keeping her from sleeping well. Caller advising they’ve made the lights even brighter. 6:30PM, NE Izett St. Loud music. Caller is upset that there is still music. Says she will call her boyfriend if they don’t get the music to stop. Caller advised she is disabled.

8:21PM, SW 6th Ave. Caller advising 14-year-old black male is at her door and harassing her. 8:54PM, SE Barrington Dr. Advising a female who lives below her was walking her dog around the place and stopped. Caller states the dog looked into her windows at her cat. TUESDAY, November 19 1:52AM, NW Crosby Ave. Advising her portable radio had an “emergency broadcast� and it was actually an advertisement for a home security system. Caller is concerned she is interfering with someone’s signals. 9:46PM, SW Robertson Dr. Caller requesting a phone call referencing cats damaging his wicker furniture by using it as a scratch pad. 12:55PM, NW 1st Ave. Requesting extra patrol for kids from the high school who are racing in the area. Last saw a small white vehicle that sounded like a wound up mosquito heading toward NW Fairhaven Dr. a few minutes ago. Caller advising it is an ongoing problem. 5:15PM, W Whidbey Ave. Requesting phone call referencing water was shut off. WEDNESDAY, November 20 2:58PM, SR 20 Reporting customer ran into cart corral & left scene. Occurred 15 minutes ago. Older green “boat� car with older male driver. 4:46PM, SE Dock St. Theft of guinea pigs. Caller recalled advising no contact yet – has to go to work – will call again tomorrow. 8:17PM, N Oak Harbor St. Reporting 17-year-old daughter getting in trouble. Caller trying to “ground her� and daughter crawled out the window. Caller advising daughter is there now and threatening to punch caller in the face.

THURSDAY, November 21 12:55PM, SW Barlow St. Requesting phone call referencing homeSUNDAY, November 17 less subjects sleeping under delivery van at 8:54PM, NE 9th Ave. location. States it appears they have tried Advising of three raccoons “chilling� in 9OUR'UESSISAS'OODAS/UR'UESS7EA to gain entry to sleep inside the truck, the back yard, no pets or anything in back doing damage the vehicle. 4HURS

*ANTH &RI

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.ORTH)SLE

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.ORTH)SLE

YOUR GUESS IS AS GOOD AS OURS WEATHER FORECAST Thurs, Nov. 28

Fri, Nov. 29

Sat, Nov. 30

Sun, Dec. 1

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Tues, Dec. 3

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

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Mostly Cloudy

Cloudy

South Isle

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Cloudy

Cloudy with Chance Showers

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Cloudy with Chance Showers

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Cloudy

Wed, Dec. 4 Showers

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.ORTH)SLE

1:41 PM, SR 20 ( ƒ, ƒ ( ƒ, ƒ ( ƒ, ƒ ( ƒ, ƒ ( ƒ, ƒ 9:32PM, NE 7th Ave. 2AIN 0ARTLY3UNNY 2AIN #LOUDYWITH Caller at location need toA,ITTLE2AIN retrieve driver’s 2AIN 9OUR'UESSISAS'OODAS/UR'UESS7EA Caller requesting phone call advising$RIZZLE he #HILLY $RIZZLE 0OSSIBLE 0OSSIBLE license. owners3UN

are refusing -ON

due*ANTH 4HURS

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*ANTH States 3AT the *ANTH *ANTH doesn’t know where his wife is, has not to her unpaid bill. She can .ORTH)SLE not go cash her .ORTH)SLE .ORTH)SLE .ORTH)SLE 3OUTH)SLE 3OUTH)SLE 3OUTH)SLE 3OUTH)SLE 3OUTH)SLE seen or heard from her since Friday. .ORTH)SLE Caller ( ƒ, ƒ ( ƒ, ƒ ( ƒ, ƒ ( ƒ, ƒ ( ƒ, ƒ ( ƒ, ƒto have( ƒ, ƒ ( ƒ, ƒ check money to pay the bill until( ƒ, ƒ has no idea where she is, thought she 2AIN 2AIN #LOUDYWITH 2AIN 0ARTLY3UNNY 2AIN 2AIN $RIZZLE $RIZZLE A,ITTLE2AIN #HILLY $RIZZLE she has it. 0OSSIBLE might be in jail. 0OSSIBLE 0OSSIBLE 10:21 PM, SW Barrington Dr. 3OUTH)SLE 3OUTH)SLE 3OUTH)SLE 3OUTH)SLE 3OUTH)SLE MONDAY, November 18 Caller advising( ƒ, ƒ white male,( ƒ, ƒ 5’-4�, dark ( ƒ, ƒ ( ƒ, ƒ ( ƒ, ƒ 2:50PM, NE Regatta Dr. 0ARTLY3UNNY 2AIN #LOUDYWITH 2AIN 2AIN jacket jeans, pushing a stroller $RIZZLE A,ITTLE2AIN #HILLY and blue $RIZZLE A white van went through the crosswalk 0OSSIBLE 0OSSIBLE with a 3-year-old child wearing camo, at this location, westbound. Driver was came in asking what time it was. When asian female and gave a shrug as she went told it was 10:00, he asked if it was day or through. night. 8:03PM, SE 4th Ave. Report provided by OHPD & Island County Sheriff’s Dept. Vehicle crashed into her house.

Showers

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S/UR'UESS7EATHER&ORECAST AS/UR'UESS7EATHER&ORECAST 9OUR'UESSISAS'OODAS/UR'UESS7EATHER&ORECAST 9OUR'UESSISAS'OODAS/UR'UESS7EATHER&ORECAST


www.whidbeyweekly.com LoCaLLy oWNED.

november 28 - December 4, 2013

13

LoCaLLy opEratED.

Whidbey’s Best Eats & Drinks

WINE SHOP

We Give Thanks for our Island Family - YOU! Come and get your Thanksgiving Day Wines & Beers

Thanksgiving week hours: Mon/Tues 11-6pm, Wed 11-7 Closed Thursday & Friday. Back to regular hours on Saturday 11/30 )BSCPS"WFt'SFFMBOEttXXXWJOPBNPSFDPN )PVST5VFT'SJBNQNt4BUBNQNt4VOQN

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november 28 - December 4, 2013

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Locally owned.

Locally operated.

Real Estate/Rentals 2 bedroom apartment 5 minutes from Charles Porter gate. Very private country setting. Pets negotiable, no smoking inside. $850 per month includes WSG and electricity. First/ last and $650 deposit. Available Oct. 1, 2013. (360)969-3968 (5.39)

Auto/Parts For Sale 1984 Camaro Z28 132,000 original miles, repainted, new motor, clutch, trans, rear-end, tires, seats, carpet, glass. Asking $14K. (360)929-5866 Pair of Husky Front SUV heavyduty Floor Mats. $25 or best offer. Photos available. Call (360)678-1167. Two Steering & Suspension arms and connectors by Delphi. Model #TC2088, brand new; Two Valeo Clim cabin air filters for Volkswagen or Audi. Model #715581, brand new; Moog strut mount kit for Volkswagen or Audi. Model #V0sB10087, brand new; Two Powerbuilt, 3-ton all-in-one truck lift jacks. Raises truck fro 11” to 21”. Brand new in box. Make offer on any or all. (360)221-7529 (0) Half doors with mirrors and hinges for Jeep Wrangler, $300 firm; Tow bar, $40; Highlift, tall, $50; Windshield, brand new, still in plastic, $75. (360)6720425 (0) Snow tires for sale with less than 100 miles. Michelin P225/70s-16 (4), $300 boo. (360)221-0123 (1) Four Michelin tires R265/60R18 (used on my Jeep Grand Cherokee). Only 18,349 miles, $200. David, (360)320-1186 (1)

Business Classifieds Well-established Antique Mall now accepting applications for space rental. Future retail spaces and shelf retail spaces becoming available. Apply in person at Shady Ladies. Antique Mall, 656 SE Bayshore Drive, Suite 5, Oak Harbor. Next to Licensing

Office. Come join us for fun and profit.

Garage/Estate Sales James Plumb Benefit Community Garage Sale, Saturday, Nov. 30 and Sunday, Dec. 1 from 10 am to 3 pm. Located at 4962 Bayview Road, Langley. Proceeds go towards mounting medical expenses. This is a community garage sale with tons of stuff. 2 raffles will also be held: one for a community cancer quilt and the other for a box of fireworks for New Years celebration. Tickets are $1 each. Cash Donations can be made at any Whidbey Island Bank in the Name of “JAMES PLUMB”. Sponsered by the Forbidden Legion M/C. Heading East on Bayview - Past the Deer Lagoon Grange. Look for the signs on the left side of the road - parking in the pasture next door

Announcements Medical Marijuana patients unite; If you need assistance, advice, etc. please contact at 420patientnetworking@gmail. com. Local Whidbey Island help. If you or someone you know has been a victim of Homicide, Burglary, Robbery, Assault, Identity Theft, Fraud, Human Trafficking, Home Invasion and other crimes not listed. Families & Friends of Violent Crime Victims has Advocates ready to help. Please call (800)3467555. 24hr Crisis Line. Free Service.

Ride Share/Van Pool Wanted: Riders for our existing Island Transit vanpool that commutes to First Hill area in Seattle. We are on the 6am ferry going in and leave downtown around 3:30pm with plan to be on 4:30pm ferry home. M-F. Contact Sarah (360)331-5594.

Childcare Central Whidbey Cooperative Preschool is now enrolling for the 2013-14 school year. Morning & Afternoon classes available for ages 3-5. CWCP is a non-profit organization affiliated with Skagit Valley College.

Please call (360)969-2491 for more information or visit us at www.coupevillepreschool.com

Volunteer Services Local Whidbey radio ~ LISTEN IN at ~ kwparadio.org ~ KWPA Whidbey AIR Public Radio local music, hosts, recorded events and popular music of all genres.  Whidbey AIR is all volunteer hosts, engineers, board of directors and window washers.  Listen in anytime from your computer and on itunes.  ~~ From Clinton to Deception Pass - it’s Whidbey in your home. Volunteer Program Assistant for Senior Services Adult Day Service program for frail seniors. Prepare room for activities, listen/observe/report changes in client behavior, assist with activities/personal care. Requires 4-hour commitment, 1 day week, 10 AM-2 PM. Contact Hestia Laitala (360)321-1600.

Jobs Wanted Handyman, Carpenter, looking for work, and or small odd jobs. Have local references, tools, and skill. Contact Scott for more info (360)675-5470. Winter is here, let’s get your project done! (1)

Job Market Manager/stylist wanted for busy beauty salon. Free booth rental and retail sales incentives. Send resume to hawaiiningirlie@aol. com Centrally located Hair Studio & Day Spa seeking 1 Full Time Stylist and 1 Full Time Nail Technician. Large & well established clientele stretching from Oak Harbor to South

end of Whidbey. Build your clientele successfully in an area with very little competition from neighboring salons! Both positions provide wages structured around commission. Products are provided. Must be able to work weekends. Must be dependable, communicate well, and self-confident. Please email resumes to whidbeysalon. jobs@gmail.com (5.17) Part-time Position Available in Oak Harbor Based Retail Store. Must have outstanding customer service skills, organizational skills and must be selfmotivated. Hours will include Saturday evenings and a few days per week. Must be flexible. Could become full time position. Email resumes to: oakharborjobs@gmail.com. (5.34) Nighttime custodial/maintenance assistant wanted to join the team at John Vanderzicht Memorial Pool. Night shift position, 4 hours per night; shift normally begins at 9pm. Responsibilities include: Assist in maintaining the sanitary standards of the facility; Assist in the security of the facility; Keep accurate inventory of janitorial supplies; Operate and understand how to use District equipment applicable to job tasks; Ensure equipment is properly maintained; Complete applicable reports and forms; Assist Maintenance Supervisor as necessary with maintenance tasks. Requirements: Must be able to lift 50 pounds, work alone or with little supervision, 18 years of age. Thorough background check including criminal history is required.

Check out our newly redesigned website! www.whidbeyweekly.com

8IJECFZ 8FFLMZ

Please contact Matt Morris at (360)675-7665 or stop by the pool for an application at: 85 SE Jerome St., Oak Harbor (5.43) Now hiring cook – full-time or part-time. Apply in person. Basil Café, 5603 Bayview Rd., Bayview Corner (5.45) IT Sales - Waypoint Business Solutions is looking for a motivated Account Manager to develop relationships with new and current customers. Excellent interpersonal relationship skills required. Send resume to resumes@waypointbsi.com (1)

Health/Fitness Iron weights: Four 25-lb. Olympic plates, $40. (360)678-2207

Lessons Happy Holidays! Gift Certificates available for a FREE guitar lesson when you purchase three. Give the gift of music! Learn how to play guitar, all genre and styles taught, from beginners to intermediate, ALL ages welcome. Call Scott for more information, (360)6755470

Electronics XBox for sale, asking $80. All works and come with games; Playstation for sale, asking $65. All works comes with games; Dreamcast for sale, asking $50. All works comes with games. (360)929-6154 (1)

Appliances Kitchen Appliances: Belgian waffle maker by Dominion, $10. George Foreman grill, model GRP4. 12” x 6” grilling surface. Clean, and in excellent condition. Photos available. $12. (360)678-1167

Home Furnishings 2 pedestal tables, 30” x 48”, walnut formica top (one has a fitted glass cover). $10 and $15. Call (360)678-1167 Pedestal table, 48” diameter, walnut formica top ($25). Another similar table, with modified rectangular shape, approximately 30” x 60” ($35). Four pedestal chairs, swivel style, with sturdy, gold vinyl

upholstery ($40 for the set). Call (360)678-1167 Three lime-green chairs; chrome pedestal bases; sturdy vinyl upholstery. $15 per chair. Call (360)678-1167 Round pedestal table; solid oak. 42” diameter. Excellent condition. $125 or best offer. Photos available. (360)678-1167 Two matching upholstered occasional chairs. Antique accent armchair. $75 each, or make an offer. Photos available. (360)678-1167 Walnut end table, hexagonal design, with beveled glass insert on top. Very good condition. Photos available. $40. Call (360)678-1167 Solid oak roll-top desk for sale. Excellent condition, $200 OBO. (360)221-8858 (0) Beautiful oval solid oak pedestal coffee table with scratchfree glass top. No room in new house. A steal at $150; Small maple china cabinet, bottom is desk with drop leaf and three drawers. Very good condition. $125. (360)675-8397 (1)

Lawn and Garden Perma Mulch rubber edging, 9 10-foot strips, $10 each. Call (360)678-1167

Miscellaneous Queen-sized bedspread; classic design; never used, excellent quality and condition; medium brown background with butterfly design. Photos available. Make an offer. Call (360)6781167. 4 each 1-1/2” stem-type carpet casters, $4; Box of “Secur-aTie” fasteners: $2; Books for the handyman, like new: $10; Two baskets: $5 each; Backpack, like new: $35; Barbecue tool set: $3. Photos available. (360)678-1167. Miscellaneous lumber; PVC pipe; and metal roofing panels (4 each). Photos available. Make an offer. (360)678-1167. Puzzles – a great gift idea! From brand new to gently used; 500, 1000, or 1500 pieces; priced from 50 cents to five dollars. Photos available. Call (360)678-1167.

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www.whidbeyweekly.com

november 28 - December 4, 2013

LoCaLLy oWNED.

Hand-crafted wood model logging truck. In excellent condition. 6.5” x 32” x 9” in size. Photos available. Make an offer. Call (360)678-1167. Lumber - Rough cut dry fir lumber. 2x4’s & misc. Good for building sheds and all those projects. 2x4’s 30¢ per lineal foot. (360)321-1624.

Looking for a great gift idea for Xmas, Birthdays, Fathers day, etc.? Here are some local made crafts that will help you fill some gaps, please order by letter- they are 16$ ea. and shipping will be extra where applicable. You can also reach me at ljohn60@gmail.com. Historic pottery from the Methow Valley. Five pieces including a large jug and tray. $75; Roar Ege. An exact replica of a small but well-built Danish Viking ship, built around the year 1000. $125 (360)6755029 (0) Underwood manual typewriter, $25. (360)579-4643 (0) Zenith Trans-oceanic portable radio. BC & SW bands; Model 1000-D with instruction manual. Collector quality. $110 obo. (360)920-3806 (1) Scotty Manual Downrigger, Model 1085, 30” boom, 1.24” diameter Swivel Base, 1026 9” gimbal mount, 1028 Braid line with rubber snubber and ball hook. $225. (360)969-3569 (1)

LoCaLLy opEratED.

Brand new, never used Lowe Alpine Walkabout backpack, 2100 cu. in., $50. (360)678-2207 L-3 EOtech holographic night vision sight. With batteries, new in box with warranty. Model #552.A65. Pictures upon request, $459. (360)221-7529 (0) Match Air Pistol, Power Line 747. Single pump pneumatic designed for match and competition or target range use. Like new, $75. (360)675-5029 (0) GAMO air rifle, .177-caliber, shadow sport model. 3x9 scope, as new, also auto set metal targets. $125. (360)5794643 (0)

animals/suPPlies Feeder Hay for Sale - Dry, stored in barn. $5 per bale. 20 bale minimum. (360)321-1624 Straw Hay for Sale - Good for bedding, erosion control, mulch,

etc. $3 per bale, 20 bale minimum. (360)321-1624 Excellent Grass Hay for Sale Good for horses. $7 per bale. 20 bale minimum. (360)3211624 Horse to ride. Gentle for beginner. Share cost or lease. Road and traffic safe. Will go Western. (360)279-1565 (0) Christmas Gift Idea! Two English saddles, one leather and one synthetic, with pad and girth. $75 and $125; Bridles and other miscellaneous equipment. Call for appointment, (360)6784124 (1)

Wanted Auto Garage Rental Wanted: Looking for one auto garage space to rent near Greater Freeland. Access to garage necessary for occasional removal of vehicle. Please contact Herb at (360)341-4140 (1)

FRee Samsung 50” DLP TV. Needs work - lamp & fan - cost approx. $60. You haul and you fix, great large screen TV. (360)321-4766 (0) 25” Zenith wood cabinet console TV with remote and manual, works fine. (360)6758397 (1)

No Cheating!

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WHAT’S GOING ON

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Bingo Every Sunday, 6:30pm Knights of Columbus Hall, Oak Harbor Open to the public. For more information, call (360)675-6070.

Bingo Every Monday, 7:00pm Elks Lodge, Oak Harbor Open to the public. For more information, call (360)675-7111.

Central Whidbey Lions First and Third Thursdays, 12:00pm Tyee Restaurant, Coupeville

Chess and Go Every Monday, 6:00pm-10:00pm South Whidbey Senior Center, Langley All ages and abilities welcome. Go is a board game of Asian origin which, involves strategy and tactics and has no element of chance. For more information, call Roy at (360)341-3230.

Co-Dependence Anonymous Every Monday, 10:00am-11:30am Trinity Lutheran Church Annex, Freeland CoDA is a fellowship of men and women whose common purpose is to develop healthy and loving relationships. We learn the balance of loving others and ourselves. A fragrance free meeting. For information, call (360)579-2391.

Conversations of War and Return First & Third Fridays, 7:00pm-8:30pm Trinity Lutheran Church, Old Building, Freeland Veterans Steve Durbin and Chuck McIntyre host a room of conversations for veterans, family members and caregivers. They need to hear your stories. Contact Chuck at (360)579-1059 or Steve at (360)678-2928.

Coupeville Lions Every Wednesday, 6:30pm Coupeville Methodist Church, Coupeville

Cribbage Club Every Thursday, 6:00pm Pizza Factory, Oak Harbor Cribbage players unite! Great fun, good people, all ages, come join the fun. The Pizza Factory offers discounts on all menu items to players. For more information, call Tim at (360)6783480. For information on the Sunday game please call Cheryl at (360)914-0084.

Debtors Anonymous Every Sunday, 6:00pm WGH Board Room, Coupeville If you are having problems with money and debt and think that you may be a compulsive debtor, the program of Debtors Anonymous can help you. No situation is hopeless. Find the solution that leads to solvency and serenity. Debtors Anonymous is a 12-step program based upon the 12-steps first developed and used by Alcoholics Anonymous. Call (515)451-3749 for directions to location or for more information.

Duplicate Bridge

ReCReation Golf Bag by MacGregor Pro Only. Heavy-duty vinyl and leather. Comes with carrying strap and hood. Two-tone green. Very good condition. Photos available upon request. $30. Call (360)678-1167. Leading Edge putter with brand new Golf Pride grip. Comes with cover. Excellent condition. Photos available upon request. $20. Call (360)678-1167.

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CLASSIFIED INFORMATION US Postal Mail ...................... Whidbey Weekly Classified Department PO Box 1098 Oak Harbor, WA 98277 E-Mail...............classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com Telephone .................................... (360)682-2341 Fax ............................................... (360)682-2344 PLEASE CALL WHEN YOUR ITEMS HAVE SOLD.

Please try to limit your classified to 30 words or less, (amounts and phone numbers are counted as words) we will help edit if necessary. We charge $10/week for Vehicles, Boats, Motorcycles, RVs, Real Estate Rental/Sales, Business Classifieds and any items selling $1,000 and above. We do charge $25 to include a photo. The FREE classified space is not for business use. No classified is accepted without phone number. We reserve the right to not publish classifieds that are in bad taste or of questionable content. All free classifieds will be published twice consecutively. If you would like your ad to be published more often, you must resubmit it.

Every Tuesday, 10:30am Ledgewood Beach Community Hall, Coupeville For more information, contact Sue Thomas at (360)678-7047, jetsue@cablespeed.net; Mardi Dennis at (360)675-5044, mvdennis@ comcast.net; or Peter Wolff at (360)678-3019, einkaufen@cablespeed.com.

Eating Addiction Support Group Every Thursday, 11:30am Private residence, Langley Meeting based on Becky Jackson’s book “Dieting, A Dry Drunk.” Meeting time subject to change based on groups needs. For more information and meeting address: DietingRecovery. com, or contact Christina (360)730-1886; christinamjames@hotmail.com.

Flying Fingers First Friday, 7:00pm Langley Methodist Church, Langley For deaf & hearing people who want to learn more signs and keep building their vocabulary in the third most used language in the U.S. Donation for room usage. For more information, call Susan Ishikawa at (360)221-0383.

Food and Schmooze Senior Support Group First & Third Tuesdays, 1:00pm-2:20pm Cam-Bey Apartments, 50 N. Main, Coupeville

This is a free support group open to all seniors that features facilitated group discussion and special presentations on topics of interest. Call Jan Pickard at (360)678-8800, or Katlaina Rayne at (360)632-5687 for more information.

Gambler’s Anonymous Every Saturday, 9:00am Whidbey General Hospital, Coupeville Downstairs in conference room near Cafeteria. A new meeting will start in Oak Harbor at the First United Methodist Church Tuesday evenings at 6:30pm downstairs in classroom 3, 1050 SE Ireland Street. Open Meeting. For more Meetings and Organizations, visit www.whidbeylocal.com.

Classes, Seminars and Workshops Dan’s Classic Ballroom & Moonlight Dance Cruises Featured on The Price is Right, March 2012 & 2013 See website for schedules/fees www.dansclassicballroom.com (360)720-2727. Group & Private Lessons, Adults, Teens, Children, Wedding Dances, Special Events/Parties Offering classes in: Smooth Dances: Foxtrot, Waltz, Tango Latin & Rhythm: EC Swing, WC Swing, Cha Cha, Rumba, Mambo, Merengue, Bolero, Samba Club Dances: Salsa, Night Club 2-step, Hustle, Bachata We also do Dance Cruise Vacations to Alaska, the Mexican Rivera, Alaska, New England & Hawaii. Please see our other website at: www. MoonlightDanceCruises.com for details.

How to Start a Business Workshop Tuesday, December 3, 1:00pm-3:00pm Oak Harbor Library, Oak Harbor Starting a business can daunt even the most determined entrepreneur. Come learn how to take the fear out of starting a business at a free business planning class sponsored by the Economic Development Council and Sno-Isle Libraries. At this workshop budding entrepreneurs will learn how to set a vision, analyze the market, determine which marketing channel is most effective and build a cash flow document. In addition, the library will also demonstrate their free and powerful online business tools. To sign up for the class, call the Oak Harbor Library at (360)675-5115.

Right Brain Aerobics for De-Stressing & Deep Relaxation! Wednesday, December 4, 6:00pm-9:00pm The Chiropractic Zone, Sears House, Langley Bliss out, be calm, learn Right Brain Aerobics techniques for a creative, happier mind. New ways for relaxation, deeper insight, using “inner creative genius” to solve issues, meditate when you couldn’t before. Plus some Laughter Yoga with Tere Baker, Instructor. Instructors are Sandra Rodman, CEO, Right Brain Aerobics and Dr. Craig Weiner, Dir., The Chiropractic Zone. The cost is $35 if first time, $25 for RBA Grads, materials included. The Chiropractic Zone is located at 2812 Meinhold Road. For more information or to register, call (425)214-2926 or email sandra@rightbrainaerobics.com.

DUI/Underage Drinking Prevention Panel Thursday, December 5, 6:45pm Hayes Hall, Room 137, SVC, Oak Harbor Open to all, no late admittance. Required by local driving instructors for both driver’s education students and parents. For more information, call (360)672-8219 or visit www.idipic.org.

DUI/Underage Drinking Prevention Panel Saturday, December 7, 12:45pm Trinity Lutheran Church, Grigware Hall, Freeland Open to all, no late admittance. Required by local driving instructors for both driver’s education students and parents. There will be no Freeland panel in January. For more information, call (360)672-8219 or visit www.idipic.org.

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A bit of advice we can all use By Eileen Brown Gene Kelly Barner is a local Financial Advisor with Edward Jones Investments in Oak Harbor who focuses on the individual investor and small businesses. He first started his practice in Oak Harbor in July 2003 after leaving the U.S. Navy where he served as a Naval Flight Officer. He and his team provide individualized financial services that address long-term needs and goals. They are dedicated to and have achieved a very high level of client satisfaction. Edward Jones recently got the highest numerical score among full service brokerage firms in the J.D. Power and Associates Full Service Investor Satisfaction Study. Cynthia Mason is the Business Office Administrator working with Gene Barner at Edward Jones Investments. She invites you to start planning your future today. Tomorrow will be here before you know it. Mason has lived in Oak Harbor for 19 years. Her first job in Oak Harbor was with Interwest Bank, which later became Pacific Northwest Bank, and finally Wells Fargo. She has also worked in retail, opening bayleaf, the gourmet grocer formerly located in old downtown Oak Harbor. Before moving to the island, she previously worked in New York City as Office Manager for O’Connor and Associates and then Dean Witter Intercapital. Barner urges serious investors to plan for the future now. “Call for an appointment so we can get you started. It costs you nothing to come in and let us do a check of where you are now, where you want to be, set reasonable expectations and continually measure it.” Julie Dale joined the adminstrative staff earlier this year. Julie, a Whidbey Island native, also has local banking history in her background. Both Barner and Mason make time to help their community. Mason serves on the board of directors of Medical Safety Net, a 501(c)3 group that helps those who cannot afford medications by sending payment for a prescription directly to the individual’s pharmacy. Barner is active in the community as a member of the Police Community Advisory Board. He is a member of the Oak Harbor Chamber of Commerce and supports various local charitable organizations. He relies on interpersonal communication skills and referrals to gain new clients. He can often be seen out in the neighborhoods and at businesses introducing himself. He also hosts educational luncheons monthly. Edward Jones Investments has brought Wall Street to Main Street communities across the country for more than 50 years. The company knows some folks just prefer face-to-face relationships. Barner and Mason hope you will stop by their office today on Ernst Street, in the real estate business across from Flyers, or you may call (360) 675-8239.

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Whidbey Weekly November 28, 2013