Page 1

&2%%

August 1- August 7, 2013

8IJECFZ 8FFLMZ -0$"--:08/&%01&3"5&%

XXXXIJECFZXFFLMZDPN

More Local Events inside

Whidbey Playhouse Auditions Whidbey Playhouse Oak Harbor Page 6

Tingstad and Rumbel WICA Langley Page 6

A Guide To Creative Photography Coupeville Middle School/High School Coupeville Page 11


www.whidbeyweekly.com

August 1 - August 7, 2013

LocALLy ownEd.

PHONE: (360)682-2341

TABLE OF CONTENTS

LocALLy opErAtEd.

FAX: (360)682-2344

LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED 390 NE MIDWAY BLVD | PO BOX 1098 | OAK HARBOR, WASHINGTON 98277 Publisher................................................................................................ Eric A. Marshall Contributing Writers ....... Eileen Brown, Jim Freeman, Helen Bates, Wesley Hallock Marketing Representatives ............................................Penny Hill, Roosevelt Rumble Production Manager, Editor ......................................................................TJ Pierzchala Graphic Design ......................................................................................... Teresa Besaw Circulation Manager........................................................................................ Jon Wynn

Volume 5, issue 31 | Š MMXiii Whidbey Weekly PUBLISHED and distributed every week. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The Whidbey Weekly cannot be held responsible for the quality of goods or services supplied by advertisers in this publication. Articles, unless otherwise stated, are by contribution and therefore the Whidbey Weekly is not in a position to validate any comments, recommendations or suggestions made in these articles. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. DEADLINES: The Whidbey Weekly is a submission based editorial with contributing writers. Please feel free to submit any information (please limit to 200 words) that you would like to share with the Whidbey Weekly. You may submit by email to editor@whidbeyweekly.com, by fax to (360)682-2344 or by postal mail to PO Box 1098, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date. For more information, please visit www.whidbeyweekly.com.

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.

3


4

August 1 - August 7, 2013

www.whidbeyweekly.com

Locally owned.

Locally operated.

ers, and make lots of suggestions for how the Greenbank Farm can serve you and meet your needs. After all, it IS your resource.

Letters to the Editor Editor, Last Saturday, I was able to attend the 5:00pm mass at our parish in St. Augustine Church Catholic Church in Oak Harbor, where 21 young students from the University of Texas in Austin, Texas arrived in their 50th day of pedaling from Austin, Texas to Anchorage, Alaska. They passed by our island because one of the students, Ver Andrew Madeja Starr, the son of the late SCPO Elza Elwood Starr, USN and Vicki Madeja Starr, both of Oak Harbor, is one of them and he decided to map the route to go home to Oak Harbor. Ver Andrew Madeja Starr and his teammates rode 40 miles up Whidbey Island from Clinton. This 40 miles is part of the 4,500 miles they ride up to Anchorage, Alaska. Upon arrival, the first group of four, including Starr, got to St. Augustine’s Catholic Church Parish at 5:30pm and attended the latter part of the mass. Then a dinner and presentation followed. All 21 riders of the Texas 4000 Sierra route, were fed more than well with the delicious donations of Filipino foods hosted by Vicki Madeja Starr, Peggy Smith and Debbie Gallo. The program team presented a program about Texas 4000, Cancer Awareness, as well as Cancer Prevention tips. Cancer is a disease that affects many people both directly and indirectly. The interesting part of this fact is not everyone knows about it. Texas 4000 is a Cancer fighting organization riding across the continent from Austin, Texas to Anchorage, Alaska to spread awareness in the communities like Oak Harbor they visit. Texas 4000 is dedicated to spreading Hope, Knowledge, and Charity with 17 days left in the 70-day trip, the team has come along way with a lot to go. All three routes, Sierra, Rockies and Ozarks will meet in Canada and cycle the last 10 days together. May they have a safe and blessed trip. Luz M. Stanalonis, Oak Harbor

Editor, Greenbank Farm is a community-founded nonprofit organization, in partnership with the Port of Coupeville. Yesterday I attended the Loganberry Festival, the Greenbank Farm’s yearly funfest. Just from wandering around, taking in the sights, I could see first hand how a wide diversity of folks truly enjoy this community event and location. Medieval royalty on horses, Zumba dancers, hot dogs from the Lions, pulled pork sandwiches from the Whidbey Pies Cafe -it was all good. And especially noteworthy -- so much community information was available from farmers, from winemakers, from artists, from falconers, from 4-H, from WSU, from Master Gardeners, from firefighters. Many of our Central Whidbey movers and shakers and community professionals volunteered their time and resources to connect with you -- the engaged public, the residents and visitors who make up our special place -- Whidbey Island. The Greenbank Farm is evolving into the community gathering place that local residents envisioned that it could be back in the early 1990s. As we move forward with intensified farming, solar power, event hosting and a growing variety of community interests and projects, I hope that you will check out their excellent website, http://greenbankfarm.biz/, walk your dog on the grounds, talk to the farm-

Mike Diamanti, Coupeville

Whidbey Audubon Society’s Birds of Whidbey Class Enrollment is now open to the public for the Birds of Whidbey series of classes by the Whidbey Audubon Society. Classes are on the first and third Thursday evenings of each month, beginning September 5 and ending in May of 2014. The course will be held at Whidbey General Hospital in Coupeville in Conference Room A from 7:00pm to 9:00pm. A follow-up field trip will take place once a month on a Saturday morning. The fee is $150 for Whidbey Audubon Society members and $175 for nonmembers. Not a member? Join now at whidbeyaudubon.org. The fee includes a notebook with information about all the birds on Whidbey. Mike Stropki and Ruth Scrivner are cohosting the course. To register, contact Mike Stropki at falcons72@att.net or (817)891-1994 or Ruth Scrivner at riscriv@gmail.com or (360)679-0397. On May 18 this year, the Birds of Whidbey Class of 2012 – 2013 completed the course with a final field trip and potluck. Seventeen residents of Whidbey Island are now much more knowledgeable about local birds and the best birding areas. From all habitats and seasons, the students were presented with excellent photos and informative lectures by some of Whidbey Audubon’s best birders who shared their passion. [Submitted by Susan Prescott]

Concerts in the Park Presents Cranberry Bog Bluegrass Band South Whidbey Parks & Recreation District continues its free Concerts in the Park series this week, presenting the Cranberry Bog Bluegrass Band. Come out to Community Park for some toe-tappin’ fun with the band, which brings the plaintive sound of country blues along with 3-part bluegrass harmonies, duets & solos. All the favorite bluegrass instruments are there: Amanda Leisle on the mandolin; Ken Merrell brings that High Lonesome sound with his voice & guitar; Southern girl Linda Rae Dobbs plays the bass and sings vocals; country boy Dave Holley weighs in on his 5-string banjo and Dobro; and local musician Alex Bonesteel makes his fiddle sing. The musicians will be playing a nonstop set from 6:30pm to 8:00pm on Thursday, August 1 at Community Park, 5495 Maxwelton Road in Langley, as part of the summer Concerts in the Park series. Don’t miss out on this opportunity to catch their show. Get dinner from the concession stand or bring a picnic. Grab a blanket or lawn chair, and invite your family and friends to this free concert series. The concerts are a cooperative effort, brought to you by South Whidbey Parks & Recreation District, Whidbey Island Bank, Windermere, and Music for the Eyes. For more information about the Concerts in the Park, call (360)221-5484 or visit www.swparks.org. [Submitted by Carrie Monforte, SWPRD]

Runway Closures at NAS Whidbey Island From August 5 through September 20, Naval Air Station Whidbey Island will have one operational runway for all flight operations. During this period, runway 14/32 at Ault Field will close for the installation of a new arresting gear system, restricting aircraft to Northeast or Southwest take off and landing headings. These approaches and departures will poten-

tially cause aircraft using Ault Field to operate more frequently than normal over western Skagit County/Mount Vernon/La Conner area, northern Island County and Lopez Island. Additionally, last month the Navy decided to temporarily suspend Field Carrier Landing Practice (FCLP) operations at OLF Coupeville until the end of the calendar year. FCLPs will still be conducted at Ault Field which could impact other aircraft landing and takeoff evolutions. Scheduled maintenance dates may shift due to early completion or work stoppage due to weather. As a reminder, NAS Whidbey Island established a new comment line and email address where community members can express their thoughts, concerns, and issues. The new phone number for this service, including noise complaints or concerns, is (360)257-6665. Alternatively you may email your comments to comments.NASWI@navy.mil. [Submitted by Mike Welding, NAS Whidbey Island]

Whidbey Island Music Festival The Whidbey Island Music Festival is delighted to announce its 8th season, August 2-4, 2013. This beloved annual event presents great performances of baroque and classical chamber music in relaxed and intimate venues on beautiful Whidbey Island, with repertoire ranging from Monteverdi to Beethoven. This year, the Whidbey Island Music Festival presents 3 concerts of two different programs showcasing the music of Handel and Bach, and will also present a Christmas concert in December. Program I: Handel’s Heroines Friday, August 2, 7:30pm St. Augustine’s in-the-Woods, Freeland Sunday, August 4, 3:00pm Greenbank Farm, Greenbank Program II: Bach Cantatas: Songs of Praise and Joy Saturday, August 3, 7:30pm St. Augustine’s in-the-Woods, Freeland The Whidbey Island Music Festival welcomes an all-star roster of northwest and national artists including rising star soprano Yulia Van Doren, baroque trumpet virtuosa Kris Kwapis, violinist and WIMF Director Tekla Cunningham, Grammy-nominated cellist William Skeen, Grammy-nominated violinist Adam Lamotte, Grammy-nominated harpsichordist Corey Jamason, violinist Katherine Kyme, and Whidbey Island resident violinist Patricia Lawrence. Complete bios are available at www.whidbeyislandmusicfestival.org/Artists.htm. Tickets are available now at www.brownpapertickets.com or by calling (800)838-3006. The Whidbey Island Music Festival is an affiliate of the Island Arts Council. [Submitted by Tekla Cunningham]

Island Beach Access is Throwing a Beach Party On Sunday, August 11, at 12:00pm, come and celebrate the extremely generous donation of beach property by the Frank Robinson family, which will become Island County’s newest beach park. Bring your own food or a dish to pass, and eating utensils. Everybody welcome. Any musicians who would like to play in this great location are welcome to attend. Go to the Freeland traffic light, turn south onto Fish Road, at the end turn left onto Mutiny Bay Road. Then turn right onto Robinson Road, at the end of which is the Mutiny Bay boat launch ramp. The new park is on the left, south of the ramp. Island Beach Access (IBA), formerly known as Island Citizens for Public Beach Access (ICFPBA), is also celebrating its four years of existence and the progress that has been made so far.

IBA is an expanding network of people who are dedicated to identifying, mapping, signing and preserving access to the public shorelines of Island County, for the legal and rightful use of its citizens, so that future generations can enjoy the unique beauty and the natural privileges of access. The shorelines of our county’s islands, like most of Washington State, are a complex of jurisdictional layers and conflicts, which have created a tangled web of laws. Too often, neither the public, nor even the landowners, understand the precise legal standing of a particular stretch of coast, or a particular road or access area. Determined to improve transparency around these places, IBA has set out to comprehensively research and document our aggregate county beaches, shorelines and access points. For more information, visit www.islandcountypublicbeaches.org or come to the party and talk with IBA members. [Submitted by Chris Williams]

Update for North Cascades National Park Fires North Cascades National Park Complex had two fires reported from thunderstorms on Tuesday, July 17, 2013. Personnel have been managing these fires since the last update. The Sourdough Chute fire, estimated at 0.5 acres, is located on the south side of Sourdough Mountain, below the lookout. A helicopter dropped water on the fire to suppress it on Tuesday, July 23 and Thursday, July 25, 2013. The Arctic Dan fire, from the same thunderstorm, has become more active due to lower humidity and higher temperatures. It is located on the south side of the Arctic Creek Drainage, west of Ross Lake. Smoke is visible from Hozomeen, Ross Lake, and Highway 20. Aerial reconnaissance on Thursday, July 25, 2013 indicated that the fire has grown to approximately 15-30 acres in size. These wilderness fires will continue to be managed by National Park Service staff. North Cascades National Park has no closures in effect at this time, although smoke will be noticeable from these fires. As temperatures continue to warm up and humidity drops, please be aware of local burning bans and campfire restrictions. For more information, please contact Joe Anderson, Fire Information Officer, (360)8547356 or email Jamie_Hart@nps.gov. [Submitted by Ken Hires, North Cascades National Park Complex]

The British Are Coming! South Whidbey Parks & Rec to Host British Soccer Camp As the number of soccer players in the USA nears 20 million, the number one soccer company in the United States, Canada and Australia, Challenger Sports, has been invited to hold one of their nationwide program of British Soccer training camps in the growing soccer community of South Whidbey. South Whidbey Parks & Recreation District (SWPRD) has teamed up to host the week long British Soccer camp during the week of August 12 – 16, at the Sports Complex on Langley Road. The camp will run Monday through Friday and each child will be coached by a member of challenger’s British coaching staff flown to the USA exclusively to work on these programs. Challenger will hold over 2,000 British Soccer camps this summer and will coach over 100,000 players between the ages of 4 and 18 and over 20,000 parents and coaches. Challengers’ British Soccer Camp is more than a week of drills and skills. In addition to taking part in a daily regimen of foot skill development, technical and tactical practices and daily tournament style plays, each child will also be

Thank you for reading! Please support our advertisers and tell them you saw their ad in Whidbey Weekly.


www.whidbeyweekly.com

August 1 - August 7, 2013

LocALLy ownEd. treated to a rich cultural experience and lessons on respect, responsibility, integrity, leadership and sportsmanship. The most popular part of each camp is the Camp Word Cup. The coaches use this daily tournament to teach the players about life, customs and traditions of other countries. The campers are asked to make up cheers, bring flags, dress up and learn as much as they can about the country they represent. SWPRD is offering British Soccer camp sessions for ages 6-9 from 9:00am to 12:00pm and for ages 10-16 from 5:00pm to 8:00pm. Teams are also welcome to attend and receive a week of focused instruction to prepare them for the fall season. Each camper will receive a free camp t shirt, soccer ball, giant soccer poster and an individual skills performance evaluation. Space is limited – parents are encouraged to sign up on line in advance to avoid disappointment. To sign up for the camp either visit www. challengersports.com or stop by the SWPRD office at 5475 Maxwelton Road, Langley to register in person. To find out more about Challenger Sports visit their web site www.challengersports.com. [Submitted by Carrie Monforte, SWPRD]

Forest City Gives Olympic View Elementary a Make-Over

Nearly 60 employees of the property management company Forest City turned Olympic View Elementary into a landscaping, grounds-cleaning festival of bright yellows, blues, and greens recently during its annual one-day school makeover. Forest City employees from the Everett, Bangor, and Oak Harbor areas converged on the school to give the grounds a fresh clean look, including a facelift of the ball fields, parking lot, and playgrounds. Forest City is a management company that contracts for residential services, construction, and maintenance of Navy housing. Every year, Forest City conducts a one day makeover of a school in their region, rotating between the three communities they serve. Three years ago, they made a big difference at Crescent Harbor Elementary. This year they are putting the shine on Olympic View, which has about 80 percent of its students from military families, many of whom live in Forest City housing. This is an event they all look forward to every year, said Scott Corley, maintenance supervisor for Forest City. The crew includes everyone from carpenters to secretaries, he said. They had a dozen jobs going on at once all around the school. One crew built a new recy-

LocALLy opErAtEd. cling bin. Another roto-tilled a softball and kickball field, creating new base paths that were previously overgrown with grass. One man fixed the fencing that served as the backstop.

The free exhibition will run August 31 through September 2, from 12:00pm to 5:00pm daily, and will kick-off with a reception on Friday, August 30, from 6:00pm to 9:00pm.

Painting was going on everywhere, with crews putting a new shine on the railings, benches, curbs, and handicap parking spaces. In the back of the school, a huge faded map of the United States, painted onto the asphalt, got a new coat with each state painted in bright blues, yellows, and greens. Sherwin Williams donated the paint for the entire Olympic View project.

The Guild seeks to support professional woodworkers as well as inspire and educate the budding amateur and provide awareness to the general public of the skills available locally from its talented members. In 2001 the Whidbey Island Woodworkers Guild was formed to bring together the woodworking community of Whidbey. Now in its twelfth year, the Guild includes makers of furniture, cabinetry, architectural woodwork, turners, clock makers, sawyers, carvers, restorers, musical instrument makers, boat builders and refinishers. For more information, visit www.woodpalooza.com.

Another large crew was busy weeding and sprucing up all the landscaped areas. A fresh layer of bark over the landscaping was donated by Brickman, a landscaping company that works with Forest City on many projects. Oak Harbor School District Superintendent Lance Gibbon stopped by the school to thank the crew for their hard work. “A makeover like this goes a long way toward making students proud of their school and feel comfortable going to school,” Gibbon said. “It’s another part of the big picture leading to student success.” [Submitted by Joe Hunt, OHSD]

Irish Music Ceremony at Historic Sunnyside Cemetery On Friday evening, August 16, at 4:30pm, Cascadia Irish Music Camp musicians will gather for a tune in Sunnyside Cemetery in Coupeville at the 1860s Maylor headstone that carries an inscription in old Irish Gaelic script. The headstone was inscribed in Ireland in the 1860s and was brought to Whidbey Island where it was erected in memory of Máire Barrett Maylor who died in Oak Harbor in 1861. All are invited to join the musicians at the headstone and for dinner afterwards at Camp Casey before the Friday evening Irish Music Camp Concert. Cost for the meal is $15. Advance dinner reservations are required to (425)290-7839. For more information on the headstone, visit IrishClub. org/headstone.

[Submitted by Gary A. Leake]

Register for Fall Quarter at Skagit Valley College It’s not too late to register for Fall Quarter at Skagit Valley College. Open Enrollment is going on now. Classes begin Monday, September 23. For students who want to train for a new career or upgrade their job skills, SVC offers 25 professional/technical programs to help them become job ready. High demand areas include Manufacturing, Composites, Multimedia and Interactive Technology, and Office Administration and Accounting Technologies. SVC also offers academic transfer pathways for students who want to begin their college experience and earn a bachelor’s degree. By completing two years at SVC and then transferring to a four-year university, students can study close to home and save money, compared to tuition at a four-year school. Prospective students can get an insider’s view of the College environment by taking a free campus tour. In addition, information will be available on programs and degrees, financial aid, career options, and getting started.

The Cascadia Irish Music Week, held August 11-16 at Camp Casey Conference Center, will have daily classes in fiddle, flute, guitar, button accordion, concertina, singing and more, taught by some of the world’s finest Irish musicians, including Randal Bays – fiddle, Antóin MacGabhann – fiddle, James Kelly – fiddle, Dáithí Sproule - Guitar and song, Mary Bergin – tinwhistle, Sean Gavin – flute, Johnny Óg Connolly - button accordion, and Florence Fahy – concertina. The week will end with an Irish Music Camp Concert on Friday evening at 7:00pm.

For more information, visit www.skagit.edu or contact:

Concert tickets are available at BrownPaperTickets.com. For more information, visit www. CascadiaIrish.org

Mark Vance of Island Transit is the winner of the local 2013 Bus Roadeo. He will represent Island Transit at the Washington State Bus Roadeo sponsored by WSDOT, Washington State Transit Association, and Washington State Transit Insurance Pool. Eligibility requirements are based on establishing positive reinforcement for operators who are sincerely dedicated to providing the best of service, courtesy, and safety to Island Transit customers. The course is based on ten problem areas encountered on a daily basis, and is a seven minute, scored event. It tests driving skills and safety training. Congratulations Mark.

[Submitted by Erin Hildebrand]

Woodworkers Guild Presents the 10th Annual “Art + Wood = Woodpalooza @ WICA” Exhibition The Whidbey Island Woodworkers Guild presents the “Art + Wood = Woodpalooza @ WICA” Exhibition – the 10th Annual Show of Whidbey’s Finest Woodwork. This year’s show promises exceptional work by twenty of Whidbey’s best.

Mount Vernon Campus, (360)416-7697 or toll free (877)385-5360 Whidbey Island Campus, (360)675-6656 South Whidbey Center, (360)341-2324 San Juan Center, (360)378-3220 Marine Technology Center, (360)766-6282 [Submitted by Arden Ainley, SVC Public Information Director]

Island Transit 2013 Bus Roadeo Winner

[Submitted by Meg Heppner, Island Transit]

Dr. Lemme’s Tiny Tips for Health Tip #5: Go to bed and get up one minute earlier. Use that extra minute to do something healthy for yourself. David Lemme, D.O., M.P.H. The Coupeville Clinic

202 N. Main St., Coupeville, WA 98239 Office: (360) 678-6576 Toll-Free: (855) 321-0668

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.

5


6

August 1 - August 7, 2013

www.whidbeyweekly.com

Locally owned.

Locally operated. labor music helps set an amusing yet compelling tone for this play.

Summer Street Dance Wednesday, August 14, 6:00pm-8:00pm Bayview Cash Store, Langley Deja Blooze plays a lively mix of blues standards and original songs rooted in the blues tradition.

All entries are listed chronologically, unless there are multiple entries for the same venue or are connected to a specific organization (such as Sno-Isle Libraries) in which case all entries for that venue or organization are listed collectively in chronological order under one heading.

DUI/Underage Drinking Prevention Panel Thursday, August 1, 6:45pm Hayes Hall, Room 137, SVC, Oak Harbor Open to all, no late admittance. Required by local driving schools for driver’s education students and parents. For more information, call (360)672-8219 or visit www.idipic.org.

Island Dance Carwash Saturday August 3, 10:00am-3:00pm Les Schwab, Clinton The dancers who bring you the WIDT Nutcracker every year have the “muscle” to make your car shine. All proceeds to be used to benefit WIDT a 501(c)(3) local arts organization.

DUI/Underage Drinking Prevention Panel Saturday, August 3, 12:45pm Trinity Lutheran Church, Grigware Hall, Freeland Open to all, no late admittance. Required by local driving instructors for both driver’s education students and parents. For more information, call (360)672-8219 or visit www.idipic.org.

National Night Out Tuesday, August 6, 3:00pm-8:00pm Windjammer Park, Oak Harbor A unique Crime/Drug prevention event with local officials, law enforcement, Fire Department/Emergency Personnel, NASWI Security and Departments, Social Service agencies, Family Resource Fair and local businesses. Activities include a climbing wall, K-9 demonstration, Crime Scene Investigations booth, DUI car crash demonstration, family inter-active displays and food booths.

Summer Street Dance Wednesday, August 7, 6:00pm-8:00pm Bayview Cash Store, Langley PeTE: South Whidbey’s ultimate garage band, plays an energetic mix of rock, blues and R & B that noodle-arm dancers across Whidbey Island have come to love. Held rain or shine, this family-friendly event features music that is appealing to all ages. Admission is free, with a charge for food and beverages. You are welcome to bring picnic dinners to eat on the grounds. For more information visit www.goosefoot.org or call (360)321-4145.

Coupeville Arts & Crafts Festival Saturday, August 10, 10:00am-6:00pm Sunday, August 11, 10:00am-5:00pm Various locations, Coupeville Over 200 arts and crafts booths, live music, food, an art show, and much more. Art Gallery opens Aug. 9 at 7:00pm. Enjoy the Tall Ships in Penn Cove, beer and wine garden, Artists-in-Action, children’s activities. This all-volunteer event has raised over $750,000 for grants and scholarships. For more information, call (360)6785116 or visit www.coupevillefestival.com.

Race the Reserve Saturday, August 10, see times below Coupeville Elementary School, Coupeville Choose either the half marathon, 10K or 5K fitness run/walk. Registration and check-in begins at 6:30am, the half marathon begins at 8:30am, the 10K and 5K begin at 9:00am. Run/ walk Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve. Proceeds support a safe and sober graduation night celebration for Coupeville High Seniors class of 2014. For registration and information, visit www.racethereserve.com.

6th Annual Bluegrass in the Garden Saturday, August 10, All Day Meerkerk Garden, Greenbank

Visit the Library Booth at National Night Out Tuesday, August 6, 3:00pm Windjammer Park, Oak Harbor

Loose yourself in the rhythms and harmonies offered by some of Whidbey’s favorite bands:

Find out what’s new at the library, win prizes, and make a craft.

11:00am-11:45am: Free guitar & dobro workshops

Turtle Tales Around the World Wednesday, August 7, 1:00pm & 3:00pm Coupeville Library, Coupeville

12:00pm-1:10pm: Bayview Sound 1:25pm-2:45pm: Blue Smoke 3:00pm-4:10pm: North Country Admission $15. Children 15 and under free. Dogs on leash welcome. Food and soft drinks available for purchase. For more information, call (360)678-1912 or (360)222-0121, email meerkerk@whidbey.net or www.meerkerkgardens.org.

Upcoming Sno-Isle Library Events See schedule below Cost: Free Tween Film Fest Mondays, thru August 5, 2:00pm Oak Harbor Library, Oak Harbor Call the library for film titles. For ages 8-12. Younger children welcome when accompanied by an adult. Refreshments provided by Friends of the Oak Harbor Library. Dig Into Books with Your Oak Harbor Teachers Mondays, thru August 12, 5:30pm Oak Harbor Library, Oak Harbor Join us for an evening of stories as teachers from Broad View Elementary read their favorite books at the library. Come say hi to teachers you know or meet someone new. Books with Bubba Fridays, thru August 16, 3:00pm-4:30pm Coupeville Library, Coupeville Read aloud to Bubba or Carlie, patient canine listeners. Reading aloud improves children’s reading skills and confidence, and reading to a therapy dog is a fun way to encourage reading practice and avoid summer reading slump. Prereaders and independent readers are welcome. Caregiver required. Used Book Sale Saturday, August 3, 10:00am-2:00pm Freeland LIbrary, Freeland Great time for picking up new fiction and mystery reading for the summer. Great selection of both mass market paperbacks and hardcover new novels. For those summer projects, lots of books on remodeling and new building ideas, plus sports, travel, gardening and other topics. All proceed go directly to support Freeland library programs. Saturday Matinee: Skyfall Saturday, August 3, 2:00pm Oak Harbor Library, Oak Harbor Popcorn provided by Friends of the Oak Harbor Library. Daniel Craig stars as James Bond in the latest Bond adventure. Bond’s loyality to M is tested as her past comes back to haunt her. As M16 comes under attack, 007 must track down and destroy the threat, no matter how personal the cost. “Dig into Reading” Finale Saturday, August 3, 4:00pm Clinton Community Hall, Clinton Join the fun at the libraries’ summer reading program finale with Deb Lund, the author of Monsters On Machines, and other delightful books for children. Come see construction vehicles and a fire engine up close! Take advantage of this opportunity to meet local firefighters. Create your own garden stepping stone, and enjoy refreshments.

Join award-winning storyteller Alleyoop (also known as Allan Hirsch) for stories starring the slow but steady turtle. For school-aged children and their caregivers. Drawing Lab Wednesday, August 7, 2:00pm Oak Harbor Library, Oak Harbor Would you like to draw or paint, but feel you don’t have artistic skill? Come to the Drawing Lab to unleash your untapped talent. Try four simple, creative techniques adapted from the lessons in artist Carla Sonheim’s books. All supplies provided. For teens and adults; no experience necessary! Are You Allergic to Foods? Find Out! Thursday, August 8, 6:30pm Clinton Community Hall, Clinton Do you complain of joint pain, insomnia, fatigue, headaches, and/or digestive problems? Does it ever feel like food might be your enemy? If so, you might be experiencing reactions to the foods that you eat every day. Barb Schiltz, RN, CN, has been working with the nutritional needs of patients with food sensitivities for over 20 years. She is the co-author of “The Ultimate Metabolism Diet.” Come hear Barb describe how to uncover what foods you might be reacting to. A Celebration of Readers with Mayor Dudley Tuesday, August 13, 2:00pm Oak Harbor Library, Oak Harbor Mayor Scott Dudley will read a story and celebrate Summer Reading with the families of Oak Harbor. Bring your camera! Refreshments provided by Friends of the Oak Harbor Library. Oak Harbor Fire Department Visits the Library Tuesday, August 13, 3:00pm Oak Harbor Library, Oak Harbor Climb aboard the OHFD fire truck and learn fire safety. Fun for everyone! Bring a camera! Summer Reading Finale: “Thumbelina” Wednesday, August 14, 1:00pm Coupeville Library, Coupeville Thursday, August 15, 1:00pm & 3:00pm Oak Harbor Library, Oak Harbor

Held rain or shine, this family-friendly event features music that is appealing to all ages. Admission is free, with a charge for food and beverages. You are welcome to bring picnic dinners to eat on the grounds. For more information visit www.goosefoot.org or call (360)321-4145.

Whidbey Island Area Fair Thursday, August 15, 9:30am-10:00pm Friday, August 16, 9:30am-10:30pm Saturday, August 17, 9:30am-10:30pm Sunday, August 18, 9:30am-7:00pm Island County Fairgrounds, Langley “Blossom to Awesome” is this year’s theme for the Whidbey Island Area Fair (formerly Island County Fair). Enjoy an old-fashioned fair! For more information, visit www.whidbeyislandfair.com.

Religious Services Quench Friday, August 9, 7:00pm Whidbey Evangelical Free Church, Greenbank Quench is a fun way to make new friends. Come to enjoy a time of worship, good food and learn something new as we participate in one of 3 breakouts: Adventures in Cooking, Crafting or Exercise for Everyone! So grab a friend and join the fun. For more information, call (360)222-3211 or email wefc@whidbey.com.

Filipino Christian Fellowship Sunday School, 1:00pm; Worship Service, 2:00pm Church on the Rock, Oak Harbor Pastor Jansen Onggao

Healing Room Every Thursday, 6:30pm-8:30pm 5200 Honeymoon Bay Road, Freeland The Healing Room is open to anyone desiring personal prayer for physical, emotional, or spiritual needs. They are a team of Christians from several area churches that are dedicated to praying for healing the sick in our community. For more information, contact Gert at (360)3315515, e-mail healingwhidbey@live.com or visit www.healingrooms.com.

Living Circle: A Place of Spiritual Growth Every Sunday, 10:30am The Spin Cafe, Oak Harbor They are a welcoming spiritual community of friends on the path sharing music, prayers and blessings and invite you to come and share your spirit with them. The cafe is located at 658-B Bayshore Dr. For more information, call (360)320-2081, email alivingcircle@gmail.com, or visit livingcircle.webs.com.

Oneness Blessings Every Monday, 4:00pm-5:00pm Oak Harbor

Immerse yourself in the world of Thumbelina’s adventures, presented by Oregon Shadow Theatre. Encounter frogs, beetles, birds, mice and a mysterious underground mole in this musical retelling of the traditional tale. For school-aged children with caregivers.

A hands-on process of awakening the human being to its natural state by sending energy to the physical brain via a Oneness Blessings Giver. Come experience peace, healing & joy for yourself. Contact Netsah at (360)675-3420 for more information.

Whidbey Island Center for the Arts (WICA)

Teaching Through God’s Word

Tickets are available by contacting the WICA ticket office (360)221-8268 or (800)638-7631. Additional information at www.WICAonline. com. I Dreamed I Saw Joe Hill Last Night Thursday, August 1, 7:30pm Friday, August 2, 7:30pm Saturday, August 3, 7:30pm Sunday, August 4, 2:00pm Tickets: Thursday- Saturday, $15; Sunday, $12 An original play by Tom Churchill, I Dreamed I Saw Joe Hill Last Night is an apolitical play about the highly confrontational political period following WW II and the people caught up in it—who gave themselves too readily to lofty causes that promised solutions but ultimately let them down. An undercurrent of gritty, funny

Sundays, 9:00am & 11:00am Calvary Chapel, 3821 French Road, Clinton For more information, visit ccwhidbey.com.

Unitarian Universalist Sunday Service Sundays, 10:00am Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland All are welcome. Values-based children’s religious exploration classes and childcare will be provided. Visit www.uucwi.org for more information. The Unitarian Universalist Congregation building is located at 20103 Highway 525, two miles north of Freeland.

Unity of Whidbey Sundays, 10:00am 5671 Crawford Road, Langley If you’re one of the “spiritual but not religious” people who questions your childhood faith or is

Thank you for reading! Please support our advertisers and tell them you saw their ad in Whidbey Weekly.


www.whidbeyweekly.com

August 1 - August 7, 2013

LocALLy ownEd. looking for something more, Unity of Whidbey may feel like a homecoming. Visit our website: unityofwhidbeyisland.org

Whidbey Quakers Sundays, 4:00pm-5:00pm Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland Whidbey Islands Friends Meeting (also known as Quakers) meet in silent worship and community, with occasional spoken messages, every Sunday at the Unitarian Universalist building. For more information, contact Tom Ewell at tewell@whidbey.com or go to www.whidbeyquakers.org .

First Church of Christ, Scientist Worship, 10:00am Sunday School to age 20, 10:00am Wednesday Testimony Meeting, 7:30pm

LocALLy opErAtEd. Joseph will demonstrate the methods and tools used for his wood carvings. Joseph concentrates his carvings on NW Coast Native style art, but creates non-native expressions as well.

Meetings and Organizations Republican Women’s Club North Whidbey Thursday, August 1, 11:30am El Cazador’s Restaurant, Oak Harbor The invited guest speaker is former Ambassador Della Newman who will share her experience as the Ambassador to New Zealand. Learn about her personal experiences during the Bush 41 presidency. For more information, call (360)4411415.

Christian Science Reading Room Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, 11:00am-3:00pm Wednesday 3:00pm-7:00pm

DAV Chapter 47

The church and Reading Room are located at 721 SW 20th Court at Scenic Heights Street, Oak Harbor. Call (360)675-0621 or visit JSH-Online.com.

The meeting is open to all veterans. If you have any questions, please contact the DAV at (360)257-4801.

Restaurant Activities Flyers Restaurant & Brewery, Oak Harbor Happy Hour Daily 2:00pm-6:00pm, Sunday 2:00pm-close Brewer’s Nights Last Thursday of Month, 6:00pm-9:00pm Special prizes and giveaways. Live Music.

Prima Bistro, Langley Restaurant Industry Discount Mondays 20% off when food handlers or alcohol serve permit presented.

Galleries and Art Shows Featured Artist: Shirley Haley Meet the Artist: Friday, August 2, 5:00pm-7:00pm Garry Oak Gallery, Oak Harbor Mountain climber and hiking Photographer, Shirley Haley, will be in the gallery to welcome you and show her images. Enjoy Northwest mountain scenes along with some chocolate and refreshments.

Colors of Whidbey Opening Reception: Friday, August 2, 5:00pm-8:00pm Show runs through September 3 Rob Schouten Gallery, Greenbank Colors of Whidbey is a group show of artists featuring colorful paintings, sculpture, glass, jewelry, encaustics and fiber arts depicting the brightness of summer on Whidbey Island.

Featured Artist: Barbara Mearing Artist’s Reception: Friday, August 2, 5:00pm-8:00pm Artworks Gallery, Greenbank Live music will be provided by guitarist Quinn Fitzpatrick. There will be light snacks and beverages available. Other Artworks Gallery artists will be on hand to greet visitors during the reception. Barbara’s work includes miniature to medium size paintings in oils, acrylics, pastels and colored pencils.

Featured Artists: Kathe Fraga & Elaine Michaelides Artists’ Reception: Saturday, August 3, 5:00pm-7:00pm Exhibit will run through September 1 Museo Gallery, Langley Featuring new paintings by Kathe Fraga and works in glass by Elaine Michaelides.

Featured Artists: Nancy Anderson & Travis Kuehn Artist’s Reception: Saturday, August 3, 5:00pm-7:00pm Show continues through August Whidbey Art Gallery, Langley The gallery will feature oils by member Nancy Anderson and sculpture by guest artist Travis Kuehn. See work by these and other artist members through August.

Featured Artist: Joseph Albert Meet the Artist: Monday & Tuesday, August 5 & 6 Penn Cove Gallery, Coupeville

Thursday, August 1, 7:00pm Elks Lodge, Oak Harbor

The Fishin’ Club Thursday, August 1, 7:00pm M-Bar-C Ranch, Freeland Kari Gerow, manager of Ace Hardware in Freeland, and Mike Mayers, manager of Ace’s sporting goods department, are the guest speakers. Kari will cover all the details of the August 24 Pink Salmon Derby sponsored by Ace and the Fishin’ Club. Entry forms will be available at the meeting. Mike is bringing show and tell fishing gear: rods, reels, lines, lures, bait, boots along with sun and insect protection products. He will demonstrate how to rig your pole for salmon fishing from the shore. Mike is co-founder of the Fishing Access Network and will show a recent video of their pontoon boat in action for disabled vets and anglers. A big plus is he will bring the actual pontoon for all to see.

Red Cross-Islands Chapter Tuesday, August 6, 3:00pm-8:00pm National Night Out, Windjammer Park The Islands Chapter Red Cross needs volunteers! Whether you are interested in responding to house fires or other disasters, promoting emergency preparedness, participating in parades and community events, or performing administrative tasks, we have opportunities to fit your interests and time commitments. Come by and visit us at our booth at the Oak Harbor National Night Out. Contact Linda. Giles@redcross.org for more information about becoming a volunteer.

Classes, Seminars and Workshops Dan’s Classic Ballroom & Moonlight Dance Cruises Featured on The Price is Right, March 2012 & 2013 See website for schedules/fees www.dansclassicballroom.com (360)720-2727. Group & Private Lessons, Adults, Teens, Children, Wedding Dances, Special Events/Parties Offering classes in: Smooth Dances: Foxtrot, Waltz, Tango Latin & Rhythm: EC Swing, WC Swing, Cha Cha, Rumba, Mambo, Merengue, Bolero, Samba Club Dances: Salsa, Night Club 2-step, Hustle, Bachata We also do Dance Cruise Vacations to Alaska, the Mexican Rivera, Alaska, New England & Hawaii. Please see our other website at: www.MoonlightDanceCruises.com for details.

Digging for Dinner Saturday, August 3, 8:00am Zylstra Road, Penn Cove, Coupeville Saturday, August 17, 9:00am Double Bluff Park, Freeland Discover how to forage for a delicious dinner in an environmentally-friendly way. Bring your shovel, bucket, boots, hat, sunscreen, water bottle, and shellfish license and join the fun. For details and directions, visit http://county. wsu.edu/island/nrs/beachwatchers/Documents/ Digging%20for%20Dinner.2013.Draft%20 poster%205-2-13.pdf or contact the WSU extension office at stinger.anderson@wsu.edu or (360)240-5558.

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.

7


8

August 1 - August 7, 2013

www.whidbeyweekly.com

LocALLy ownEd.

LocALLy opErAtEd.

sTill TalkinG By Eileen Brown

You may have heard the expression “watch out for the quiet ones.” They are those who take care of business without calling attention to themselves but later surprise everyone with their accomplishments. Sean Magorrian is one such man. I had to practically beg him to tell his story here. He’s more shy than boastful, a nice quality in a man. Who is he? For starters, he was an Oak Harbor police officer for 30 years, retiring in November 2010. Ace Hardware took a chance and hired Sean part-time. Good move both times. “Store Manager, Cheryl Wieldraayer, and others on staff taught me the hardware business,” he said, adding he loves seeing friends from his school days or social contacts. From 2006 to 2008, he worked for Kenmore Air Express at the Oak Harbor Station. “My wonderful wife Anita knew I had always dreamed of obtaining my Private Pilot rating, so I put my wages toward flight lessons,” he said. “In July 2008, I earned my Private Pilot rating. Since that time, I have made a number of flights at the controls of a Cessna 172.” His interest in aviation led him to join the PBY Memorial Foundation (PBYMF), a group dedicated to preserving naval and military aviation history. The group purchased a PBY-5A Catalina, or “Cat.” It was aweinspiring to see the PBY being moved from Bayview Airport in Skagit County to its current location, next to the historic center, while slung beneath a Chinook helicopter. “I was Gift Shop Manager for awhile,” he said. “Our modest gift shop stocked books, models, T-shirts, ball caps and other items for sale. All profit gained from the merchandise sales are returned to the PBYMF to keep the lights on and for on-going aircraft restoration. “I’d invite anyone interested in aviation and military history, particularly the history of our Seaplane Base and of Ault Field, to visit the Naval History Center in Building 12. They need financial and volunteer help to keep the organization growing.” He joined the Commemorative Air Force Airbase Arizona (CAF), with its mission to protect rare flying monuments for future generations, through preservation, education, exhibition and air shows. Airbase Arizona has seven aircraft available for public flights, including a B-17G Flying Fortress, B-25J Mitchell, SNJ, L-16, C-45, C-47 aka DC-3, and Stearman. “After completing Ground School Training, I volunteered to go on tour with the B-17. I had the luck to visit San Antonio, San Angelo and Midland, Texas,” he recalled. “During our visit to San Antonio, our crew was invited to visit with members of the 8th Army Air Force there for a reunion. It was a humbling experience to hear stories told by men who flew missions in B-17 Flying Fortresses over Europe.” Late this June into early July, he once again went on tour with the B-17, traveling with his crew to Muskegon, MI , St. Thomas and Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. This trip gave them an opportunity to fly their first Canadian passenger flights. He was thrilled to actually fly the B-17 over Lake Erie. “Our crew was made welcome in both Canadian cities,” he recalled. “Our visitors and passengers gave only positive reviews on the aircraft and respect for the men who flew missions in the B-17 during World War II.”

Magorrian admits the B-17 Flying Fortress has always been his favorite aircraft, very well built for WWII missions. Many B-17s were lost in battle, and over 70,000 air crew perished. Nevertheless, the B-17 had a tremendous impact on the outcome of the war. Mission after successful mission ultimately led to an Allied victory. Many B-17’s sustained damage, some to the point where some doubted they’d return to their base after a mission, but they did. Thanks to the design of the B-17, its well-trained flight and maintenance crews, many men completed their missions and returned home to family and friends. The CAF conducts yearly tours throughout the USA and Canada. The B-17G named “Sentimental Journey” and B-25 named “Maid in the Shade” are literally flying museums. Each year, the B-17 and B-25 visit communities to give future generations a closer look at a piece of history. Magorrian cannot say enough about the caliber of people he works with at Ace. He knows you will recognize their names and come to rely on them for great service and products. With a grateful heart, he wishes to thank Ed and Marv in the nuts and bolts aisle; Pat, The Secret Garden; Brian and Gary, electrical and tools; Bill and Chris, paint; Marilee and Colleen, plumbing; Bill and Ian, Stihl; John, Mike or Kevin, sporting goods; Kim, marine and automotive; Jeanette and Irina, office and paperwork; Mark, James and John, screens, keys, carry-out and more; and, of course, Tammy, Sahra, Elyssa and Ashley, all at the front registers. “Finally, thank you to Anita who has supported my interests in aviation, especially when we visit airfields and museums. She does her part to support the local economy and hopefully she will retire soon so we can continue our odyssey across this great land.” Birthdays A boy who has a “cool” birthday party is seldom alone. It starts when they are toddlers. A breeze, but messy. Just spread a tarp under the table and invite a couple of little terrors. My son put in a special request one year. He wanted a birthday party at a local burger joint. The Guest of Honor got a cardboard mask of a king wearing a crown. Don’t know about the other boys, but mine wore his around the house on those occasions I needed to be reminded of his imperial greatness. The centerpiece for many birthdays was an unappetizing sheet cake with entirely too much camouflage green icing. Rambo would love it. Pipe on some frosting Jeeps and army men and ring the party bell. I cannot recall with clarity what his birthdays were like from age 13 through 17. Maybe I need to seek professional help to reclaim those missing years, but maybe it’s best that I never know. My son’s official birthday was 7-27-72 at Oaknoll Naval Hospital in Oakland, Calif. The hour was 27 minutes after 7. He was loud and I cried and the delivery room nurse got so busy she missed recording his exact birth hour: 7:27PM. Thank you, son, for the best birthday of my life. Bridge anyone? Quiet, please. Bridge being played. It happens each Wednesday at the Oak Harbor Senior Center where three to five tables, each seating four players, pick up the action. Party bridge starts at 12:30 and concludes at 3:30. It costs .50 cents. Group spokeswoman Edna Schultz recommends signing up Monday for Wednesday’s game. Oh, yes. A different snack is provided by one member each week. (I am too well-mannered to help myself, but that pizza smelled great!) Write to me at stilltalking2009@yahoo.com

Thank you for reading! Please support our advertisers and tell them you saw their ad in Whidbey Weekly.


www.whidbeyweekly.com

August 1 - August 7, 2013

LocALLy ownEd.

9

LocALLy opErAtEd. may make more sense to you, in light of your own circumstance. * * * Dear Astrologer I am giving you my husband Harvey’s birth data. A year ago, Harvey dropped a loaded tool box on his foot and fractured his big toe, and we’ve been regulars at the ER ever since.

chicken liTTle and The asTrOlOGer By Wesley Hallock Dear Astrologer I just saw on a website that the full moon in Aquarius is called the Thunder Moon. It’s said to be the most emotionally charged full Moon of the year. Any truth to that? I was born under an Aquarian Moon, and I’m actually a rather placid woman. I relate to the humanitarian qualities that other astrologers have ascribed to my Moon, but the thunder part confuses me. I just don’t seem to have it. Comments? September 14, 19--, at 4:20 PM in (city and state) Looking for My Thunder Dear Looking A bodybuilder friend of mine had to look no farther than the mirror. We nicknamed him, “Thunder Thighs.” I’ve never heard the term ‘Thunder Moon,’ but I can follow the logic. The Moon signifies emotions. Aquarius charges those emotions with a variety of bubbling psychological complexes, all waiting to pop. The mix comes to its peak of power in the time of the Moon’s fullness opposite the Leo, King of Beasts, Sun, and—boom! Emotional thunder. I can follow the logic, but do I like it? No. It’s too simplistic, and you are a case in point. What is thunder, but a lot of noise? You have something more valuable: in the much richer zodiac used in ancient times, your Aquarius Moon falls in the sign of Shravana. This gives you the power to balance any out-of-balance situation, restoring its lost order. You do this using your ability to connect things in ways that reveal their commonality, rather than their differences, allowing them to work together. It’s fair to call this talent of yours, “silent thunder.” So stop looking, and be glad. * * * Dear Astrologer

A few highlights: The toe had barely healed before Harvey fractured his left leg in a motorcycle accident. He was laid up for weeks with a cast (and guess who ran herself ragged waiting on him?). The day after the doctor removed the cast, Harvey lopped off his little finger with a band saw. We spent our twenty-fifth anniversary in surgery, getting it reattached. In the past year, Harvey has had forty-six stitches, three fractures and been severely burned twice. Last week, he cracked three ribs in a fall. Tell me, please, where does Harvey’s run of bad luck end? April 11, 19--, at 4:23 AM in (city and state) His Long-suffering Wife Dear Long-suffering The term “train wreck in slow motion” perfectly describes Harvey’s accident-prone state. Mars is the key planet in the wreck, because Mars is the ruling planet in charge of Harvey’s Aries rising sign. Whatever befalls Mars, in terms of its condition and placement in the zodiac, will similarly befall Harvey. A year ago, Harvey had his first accident as his Mars progressed to the eighth house cusp. Think of the eighth cusp as a major pothole in the road of life. As such, it is a prime point of manifestation for accidents and breakdowns of innumerable sorts. Since Mars describes his body, as I said, the accidents are impacting him physically. The worst of the accidents should already be behind you, but Harvey should be very cautious for another year.

HAND

SURGERY

tArthritis t$BSQBMUVOOFMTZOESPNF t$VCJUBMUVOOFMTZOESPNF t&YUFOTPSUFOEPOJOKVSJFT t'SBDUVSFTPGIBOE XSJTUöOHFST t(BOHMJPODZTUT t/FSWFJOKVSJFT t5SJHHFSöOHFS

* * * Dear Astrologer

w w w. i h p l a s t i c s u rg e r y. c o m

I’m in such a FUNK! I don’t know what’s wrong with me! I snap, I snarl, I’m meaner than a rabid dog, and I don’t know how people can stand me. I need a vacation from myself, but there’s no getting away. Everywhere I go, there I am. I sob. I cry. I hate my job, I hate my car, I hate my hovel (I can’t call this box a house) and I hate astrologers who smile primly and say, “You’re learning Saturn lessons, dear….” So, I hope you can do better than that. I used to be a nice person. Is that person ever coming back? September 10, 19--, at 7:41 PM in (city and state) Crotchety Dear Crotchety

I recently had a tarot reading, in which my cards indicated a move. This took me by surprise. I’m perfectly happy where I’m at, but the cards say that is going to change. The timing was unclear, and I’m wondering if you can see in my astrology the move that showed up in the cards, and if so, can you give me a better sense of when it will happen? I would like to be closer to my grandchildren, but that is the only thing I can think of that might make me want to move. March 3, 19--, at 1:33 PM in (city and state) Watching and Waiting Dear Watching You sound anxious. Please don’t be. I do see indicators that point to a move, but in your chart they do NOT have the capacity to do you harm. I repeat, you have nothing to fear. The planets are divided into categories, gentle and cruel, and deliver their results accordingly. The cruel planets, Saturn and Mars, are not a part of your impending move. This means something is coming that you will value more than your current home life. You will move naturally and happily to the new situation, on or around November 1. Moving always involves expense. In your case, the move results in a net gain, not a loss. If you now have the necessary money, you will somehow recover the expense of the move. If you don’t have the money, then the means for the move will appear as part of the move. That is what I see, without knowing your means. It

Sorry. No. The nice person you were is never coming back. A new and even nicer person is being birthed in place of the old one. Your self-description of the present you is a perfect description of your labor pains. Your mid-wife in this birth is not Saturn. The delivery of the new you is being presided over by Pluto. Pluto is an evolutionary force, and it’s working hard on the very deepest levels of you, through your Moon. The nice person you remember as your old self was less genuine than the person you will be by 2016. You will be less of a people pleaser, and more in tune with your own wants and needs. Caution: Do not think I’m describing the new you as selfish. Only after building a personal foundation by attending to your own selffulfillment can you relate effectively to other people. The things you don’t like about your life are but reflections of the facades you’ve lived behind. As they begin to crumble, embrace the process and let it all go. * * * Nine out of ten people can’t answer the question, “Are your sleepless nights sleepless because the sky is falling, or because Saturn is doing the Watusi with your Moon again?” Don’t be one of them. Send your questions, along with your date, TIME and place of birth (as listed on your birth certificate) to Wesley at whallock@gmail.com. It’s fun and it’s free. You’ll also sleep better.

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


10

August 1 - August 7, 2013

www.whidbeyweekly.com

LocALLy ownEd.

LocALLy opErAtEd.

FRIDAY, July 19 2:40pm, SE Barrington Dr. Requesting call referencing whether it’s legal to have monkeys in the city limits of Oak Harbor, specifically a Capuchin Monkey. 3:27pm, SE Midway Blvd. Caller calling on 911, saying need an officer there right now. Poor cell connection. Caller now advising employee is refusing to ring p the purchase of services for caller. 4:05pm, SR 20 White male, 30-years-old opened items int he bathroom and used them. Now he can’t pay for them. Male subject appears high. Subject is in floral department now with manager. 10:42pm, SW 8th Ave. Caller’s father is throwing rocks at the window. Causing a disturbance.

acrOss 1. Jail, slangily 4. Indian turnover 10. Bacchanal 14. “___ we there yet?” 15. Big roll 16. Choice 17. Caribbean, e.g. 18. Out 19. Dwarf buffalo 20. Lack of compassion 23. Engine parts 24. Assimilate mentally 25. Matador 28. ___ tide 30. Assumed name 31. Knight fight 32. ___ vera 36. Exemplifying inaccuratley 39. Dawdling 40. Dash 41. Counters 42. Supergarb 43. Cordwood units 44. Dwarfed ornamental tree 48. “Darn it all!” 49. Having a “+” charge 55. Opera star

56. Maltreat (hyphenated) 57. Grassy area 58. “... happily ___ after” 59. Cheers 60. ___ and outs 61. “___ #1!” (contraction) 62. Least wild 63. Absorbed, as a cost dOWn 1. Bills, e.g. 2. Length x width, for a rectangle 3. Warm, so to speak 4. Small fish that swims upright 5. Ratio of reflected to incident light 6. Tablelands 7. “Your turn” 8. Transmitted 9. Come before 10. Big ape 11. Hindu queen 12. “Ick!” 13. Bakery supply 21. Depressing 22. Pickpocket, in slang 25. Pack (down) 26. Assortment

27. Classic board game 28. Bridget Fonda, to Jane 29. “... or ___!” 31. Mouth, in slang 32. Ideally (2 wds) 33. Pinocchio, at times 34. “___ bitten, twice shy” 35. Auspices 37. Treeless grassy plains 38. Most dapper 42. “___ on a Hot Tin Roof,” Williams play 43. Disrespects 44. Moisten 45. Antipasto morsel 46. “Well, I ___!” 47. Close call 48. Beat 50. ___ podrida 51. Agenda 52. Hip bones 53. Blow off steam 54. “___ on Down the Road”

answers on page 15

YOUR GUESS IS AS GOOD AS OURS WEATHER FORECAST Thurs, August 1 North Isle

H-66°/L-55°

Chance Shower

South Isle

H-71°/L-55°

Chance Shower

Fri, August 2 North Isle

H-64°/L-53°

Mostly Cloudy

South Isle

H-67°/L-54°

Mostly Cloudy

Sat, August 3 North Isle

H-67°/L-51°

Clouds and Sun

South Isle

H-71°/L-54°

Clouds and Sun

Sun, August 4 North Isle

H-66°/L-53°

Mostly Sunny

South Isle

H-72°/L-56°

Mostly Sunny

Mon, August 5 North Isle

H-68°/L-55°

Mostly Sunny

Tues, August 6 North Isle

North Isle

H-73°/L-56°

H-69°/L-58°

Partly Sunny

South Isle

South Isle

H-69°/L-59°

H-82°/L-57°

Mostly Sunny

Wed, August 7

Warmer

Sunny

South Isle

H-79°/L-61°

Plenty of Sun

SATURDAY, July 20 5:34am, SR 20 Caller reporting traffic hazard from the race. Is having an issue with the lack of signage for the race and the van drivers. 10:58am, SE Pioneer Way Recalled. Advising a drunk in front of the store refused to leave. Was sleeping in caller’s chair and tried to come in the store. 11:55am, SE Hathaway St. Customer reported to the caller, same subject contacted earlier today is down the wooden steps, face down on the ground, spread eagle. 9:30pm, NE Izett St. Juveniles are running in the middle of the road when a car is coming and “pretending” to pull a string in front of the vehicles, cussing at vehicles. 11:11pm, SW Bayshore Dr. Advising there is a man inside the dumpster right outside his building. Described as “tweaking out”, making noises. White male, approx. 30’s, unknown clothing description. SUNDAY, July 21 1:28am, NE Taftson St. Female advising she and her boyfriend “got into it” because he is a cheater and a liar. She hit him and he bit her. Male half is currently sitting on the couch and won’t leave. 2:01am, SE Pioneer Way Reporting black male in parking lot has been loitering for a few hours. Was drinking from bottle of Angry Orchards. Caller advised him can not drink outside. Male got into the back seat of a greenish/yellow cadillac parked right in front of location. 12:10pm, SW 6th Ave. Reporting neighbor in apartments across from location have cut little corners out of their windows. Talking about a lot of huge evidence and things going on at the facility. Upset she wasn’t allowed to put a lock on her window. 5:20pm, NW Columbia Dr. Caller was told by a neighbor that law enforcement came to her complex around 12:30 today. She is requesting a phone call to verify this and to make sure the police weren’t there about her. MONDAY, July 22 10:47am, SW Lopez Dr. Reports someone is in his backyard. Callers says his dogs are out there barking at him. Subject has gloves, grey t-shirt and big yellow pole.

11:40am, SE Barrington Dr. Caller is moving to the area. Requesting a phone call to know if there is a ban on pit bulls or pythons within the city limits. TUESDAY, July 23 1:30pm, SW Kimball Dr. Reports a small white sedan parked in the yellow zone at the entrance to the cottages. Caller says OHPD can make a fortune. Lots of cars parked illegally. 3:11pm, SE City Beach St. Caller reporting 3-4 subjects playing inappropriate music near the basketball courts. 3:28pm, SW Stremler Dr. Caller feels landlord is stalking her and she feels threatened. He seems to know when she arrives at home & comes over, etc. 3:28pm, SR 20 Caller reporting subjects with “Impeach Obama” signs standing near entrance off SR 20. Customers complained and caller wants to know if anything can be done. 4:23pm, SW Kimball Dr. Reporting FCC violations. Not requesting contact with law enforcement. Just reporting for documentation. Called call-taker a freak at the end of the call. 4:44pm, SE Barrington Dr. Reports when she came out someone had put credit cards, ID, etc. in her car. She had left her window down. Caller brought the items to the police department to turn them over. 7:38pm, NW Haslo Pl. Sbject shooting arrows across NW Haslo Pl. Subject is approximately 6 feet, white shirt with logo, blue jeans. Has archery bow. 9:31pm, S Beeksma Dr. States there is a man “setting up” in the weeds next to the trail that leaves from the campground across the swamp. Possible white male, was laying in grass. WEDNESDAY, July 24 1:47pm, SE City Beach St. Reporting male subject “sleeping” on the grass near the flagpole by the concession stand. Has been there since around 10 this morning. Subject has looked up and around. Moved under a picnic table. Has been moving. 4:32pm, N Oak Harbor St. Requesting call referencing neighbor. States she is constantly dumping cigarette butts off her balcony. Last month it started a fire. Caller has contacted her and reported to management. THURSDAY, July 25 1:01am, SW Rock Rose Dr. Caller reporting he saw a 10-12 year-old female walking in the area, wearing a white nightgown. Wasn’t sure if it was real or not. Dark brown hair. Child didn’t appear to see him when he flashed his high beams at her. 2:39pm, SE Bayshore Dr. Caller advising backpack full of medication was left at OH Transit station. Caller returned and the backpack is missing. Backpack is bag with drawstrings. 7:31pm, SE 8th Ave. Caller is calling from Michigan. Just received an e-mail from her grandmother. 82-year-old female. The e-mail was sent approx. 30 minutes ago. Requesting caller to call the police because she was given 2 cold baths and has been abused by the female owner. Report provided by OHPD & Island County Sheriff’s Dept.

Thank you for reading! Please support our advertisers and tell them you saw their ad in Whidbey Weekly.

'OODAS/UR'UESS7EATHER&ORECAST 9OUR'UESSISAS'OODAS/UR'UESS7EATHER&ORECAST 9OUR'UESSISAS'OODAS/UR'UESS7EATHER&ORECAST 9OUR'UESSISAS'OODAS/UR'UESS7EATHER&ORECAST 9OUR'UESSISAS'OODAS/UR'UESS7EATHER&ORECAST


www.whidbeyweekly.com

August 1 - August 7, 2013

Locally owned.

On Track with Jim Freeman

When Mom encouraged us to take Latin to satisfy our high school language requirement, we three kids of Ozark origin were perplexed.

yelling “Veni, Vidi, Vici?”

How would we survive on the playground pretending to be The Cisco Kid while

Last week I learned a bit more Latin. Did you know the word education is derived from the Latin verb, educare, meaning “to draw out from within”? Neither did I, but with the help of long time hometown hero, Don Zontine, founder and co-creator of The Flying Zontines, I learned what “drawing it out from within” really means. What an education it has been. Follow with me now as we journey to 1979 when a little red caboose was placed on a hillside in Freeland. Enter the water heater. Now, fast forward to 2013, a mere thirty-four years later, when Mr. Zontine has stopped by to help me change the heating elements in the old water heater. It had been some eight or nine years since the water was really hot. It was my way of being green. Luke warm showers and not doing any dishes but coffee cups just meant less water for me and more for the next generation. When Don took off the protective panels of the water heater, he looked up at me, “Your water temperature is pretty low. You sure you need a new element?” “Oh sure, a friend of mine told me I did about seven or eight years ago.” “Well, we may as well replace both of them.” After several attempts to “lefty loosey” the extremely rusted “righty tighty” of the element, Don looked up at me saying, “We better go to NAPA and get a tool for this. Maybe something that will loosen that old timer.” Jump cut about fifteen minutes, after Don has successfully removed the lower heating element, with the type of brute force one sees in the Chuck Norris movies. “Jim, this top element needs some time. Let’s go to Ace and get the new ones while that Deep Creep does its magic loosening.” While at Ace, we saw several neighbors, complete with their gardening smiles, enjoying the sunshine, inside and out. As two tan, non-local looking young men approached us, I was surprised to see Don’s wife, Anne Zontine, by their side.

Locally operated. At least Don let me hold the flashlight, until the second time that I walked away with it. Several dialogue exchanges later, Don looked around the bathroom and walls of the caboose. “Looks like you have a bathtub falling thru the floor and roof leaks all down the side where you work and sleep.” “Yea, it’s been that way for about 30 years. I work around it. That’s why I have so many yogurt cups. Great for window sills. Trouble is, on a real, rainy stretch, I have to stay here all day and night to empty them” “Jim, I’ll get back here next week. We can look at some of this other stuff then.” Later that night, I remembered. It had been since 2004 that the hot water in the caboose shower and kitchen sink had last seemed hot. I had just returned from several weeks of being away for the winter. As the saying says, “Good things come to those who wait.” Now, in 2013, I finally have hot water, after forgetting that in 2004 I had called my neighbor to ask him to turn down the temperature on the water heater since I would be gone so long. Were Dad alive he would suggest that I am still “a few fries short of a happy meal.” Well, at least the fries are hot now.

Stories around the Table Sitting around a dining room table, dishes cleared, talking with friends who have already raised their kids, brings out those stories that are not so laughable when experienced, but certainly humorous upon reflection. The winner of last week’s best story at the table was from a mom who had just finished taking care of her older boy’s horse. Mom shared several classics from her time spent working in the local middle school cafeteria for twelve years, several of those while her two boys were attending. If you know of someone who has raised two boys or more, you know the possible scenarios a parent faces. From broken limbs to broken spirits, from ripped jeans to ripped hearts, from getting picked on to getting picked up. Our story Mom, one of the dedicated who faces the daily combat of the a la cart line at her middle school cafeteria in Oregon, tired of watching the local 8th grade thugs pick on her 6th grade son every day after school.

Looking up at these two tall leaning towers of testosterone, I extended my hand nervously to each. Was this my only shot at foreign diplomacy?

“Well, do you know that is my son you are picking on?”

“Guillermo and Marco? Hi, I’m Jim. So nice to meet you.”

Mom leaned over, car engine still running, to whisper in the boy’s ear:

“No, Alessandro, and yes, Marco.”

“From now on, if you stop picking on my kid, I’ll give you extra French fries every time you come thru the lunch hall line.”

Now, even more nervous, I grabbed my cell phone to call my girlfriend to get some info about her father’s homeland. “Pal, is Dad Sicilian or Calabresian?” “Neither, Dad is Calabrese.” Comforted by having this information, I tried to explain to our across-the-water guests that despite my unnecessary banter, because of my girlfriend’s heritage, I felt secondary Italian. They seemed as unimpressed as their hosts. Nice try, Jim. Back to the water heating elements. Purchases made, we returned to the caboose for the next episode of Jim and Don’s Water Heater Talk. “Write this down, Jim, for the electrical. Bottom element, black on top, red on bottom. Top element is blue on top, yellow on bottom.” “Okay, Don, red on bottom of the top one, and blue on the top of the top one. Both bottoms are red, right?” “No, the bottom element is red on bottom and top element is yellow on bottom.” “Blue on top and red…” “That’s okay, Jim, I’ve got it.”

Life as we know it ended on July 21st 2013 with the death of Julia L. “Julie” Hodson. An avid supporter of the performing arts and inveterate traveler, Julie visited 49 states, more than 30 countries and all 7 continents. Julie was born in Seattle, the elder daughter of the Honorable James W. Hodson and Grace Hess Hodson. She was educated in Seattle schools, Forest Ridge Convent and graduated from Bellevue High School. Following high school she attended Colorado College and graduated from the University of Washington. She completed her legal education through a work/study program. For the last 20+ years her passion was her service as a Certified Professional Guardian to persons with impairment, providing for their needs while respecting and protecting their individual rights. She was also a self-described “community servant”, serving in numerous organizations. Julie was a founding board member of Habitat for Humanity of Island County – serving 14 years. She served on the Washington State Ferries Advisory Committee for 18 years. She was an active member of Soroptimist International since 1984. She was also active in the American Association of University Women, the Deception Pass Power Squadron, the NW Tulip Trekkers Volksport Club and other community organizations. At the time of her death, she was a current Commissioner of the Housing Authority of Island County and served

on the Board of Small Miracles, Coupeville’s Emergency Medical Support fund. In her work with the FIUTS organization at the University of Washington she hosted international students for 42 years. Julie worked with Harry Wilbert in organizing “Save the Trees” on Whidbey Island to preserve the old growth forest adjacent to South Whidbey State Park – part of which has now been added to the park, including “The Ancient Cedar” on the Wilbert Trail. Public Service was her lifetime work. Julie was preceded in death by both parents, and by her youngest son, Carl Mathew Pankau. She is survived by sons Gregory A. Pankau (and wife Mariana) of Bothell, WA., and Keith A. Pankau of Langley WA. , daughters Laura K. Crook (and husband Dan) of Wellston, OK, and Judith L. DeValdez of Freeland WA. Eleven grandchildren, nine great grandchildren, a sister, Elizabeth “Betsy” Dare in England and a niece, Elizabeth “Zeb” Dare also in England. And her loyal companion – her cat Lucie. A Christian Vigil service will be held at Wallin Funeral Home in Oak Harbor on Thursday, August 1st at 7:00 PM. A Funeral Mass will be held at St. Mary’s Church in Coupeville on Friday, August 2nd at 2:00 PM. Burial will follow at Sunnyside Cemetery in Coupeville, followed by a reception in the church hall. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Habitat for Humanity of Island County, PO Box 2279, Oak Harbor, WA 98277 or Small Miracles (Coupeville Emergency Medical Support Fund) PO Box 912, Coupeville, WA 98239. Care was entrusted to Wallin Funeral Home. Friends and family are encouraged to share memories and offer condolences using the Memory Book found atwww.wallinfuneralhome.com.

Driving home from school, Mom sees her son getting picked on by the corner bullies. She slams on the breaks, hops out of the car, and marches up to the alpha bully. “Do you know who I am?”

As I am taking my first breath, Alessandro suggests, “Slow down, please. You are talking too fast. We understand English, but slower please.”

JULIA L. HODSON (PANKAU)

While other parents offered veiled and idle threats to the 8th grade club of hooligans, our story Mom took it one step further.

“ Jim, I’d like you to meet Alessandro and Marco, our good friends who came to visit us, all the way from Italy.”

“Sorry, Alessandro, and Marco. Well, Buena Sera and Zooma Zooma to you both. That’s the only Italian I know. Louis Prima style. Hey Marco, did you know that we Americans have a kids game we play in the swimming pool called Marco Polo?”

11

“Yes”, says the bully.

“No ma’am, I didn’t know.”

That, ladies and gentlemen, is old school diplomacy in a middle school setting. It worked.

French Flies Last July 25th was the 104th anniversary of Louis Bieriot of France crossing the English Channel in a 28-horsepower monoplane, with a wingspan of just twenty-three feet. It was the first time that trick had been accomplished, making it the world’s first international overseas flight with or without a pillow.

Puzzle 1 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.45)

5

Moon Pies The dark spots on the moon that create the benevolent “man in the moon” image are actually basins filled three to eight kilometers deep with basalt, a dense mineral, which causes immense gravitation variations. Take that element of info to your next bored meeting.

Food Tip Overheard a man in the airport security line talking about a recipe posted on his Facebook page for Pan Seared Parmesan Scallops. We tried to see the picture of the seared scallops on his iPhone while he was showing the deliciousness to his friend on her iPad, but my eyes weren’t good enough. Maybe next time, when I’m eyes-dropping.

Willie on Lance “I think it is just terrible and disgusting how everyone has treated Lance Armstrong, especially after what he achieved, winning seven Tour de France races while on drugs. When I was on drugs, I couldn’t even find my bike.” –Willie Nelson Have a great week!

4

9

9

2

6 On a scale from 1 to 10...5. Every row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every column of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9

4

4

1 9 5

2

6

8

7

3 9

1

5

3

2

7

6

7

2 3

8

4

5

7

6

Answers on page 15

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen/ on Wed Jul 10 20:15:57 2013 GMT. Enjoy!

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


12

August 1 - August 7, 2013

www.whidbeyweekly.com

LocALLy ownEd.

LocALLy opErAtEd.

Whidbey’s Best Eats & Drinks BAYVIEW BASIL CAFÉ

360-321-7898

Pan-Asian

EL CORRAL RESTAURANT

360-321-7799

Mexican

JOE’S WOOD FIRED PIZZA

360-321-1819

NEIL’S CLOVER PATCH CAFÉ

360-321-4120

American

ANCHOR BOOKS & COFFEE

360-341-3343

Books & Coffee

THE COZY ROADHOUSE

360-341-2838

American Style

DAIRY QUEEN

360-341-2464

Fast Food

HONG KONG GARDENS

360-341-2828

Chinese

KIICHLI’S BAGEL BAKERY

360-341-4302

Bagels

PICKLES DELI

360-341-3940

Breakfast/Deli/Dinner

BAYLEAF DELI

360-678-6603

Wine/Deli

CAPT. WHIDBEY INN

360-678-4097

Wild, Local Seafood

CHRISTOPHER’S RESTAURANT

360-678-5480

Regional

CIAO

360-678-0800

Neapolitan Pizza

COUPEVILLE COFFEE & BISTRO

360-682-5832

Breakfast/Lunch/Dinner

EBEY’S DINER

360-678-2255

Diner Cuisine

FRONT STREET GRILL

360-682-2551

Steak/Seafood

KEYSTONE CAFÉ

360-678-5396

American/Fish & Chips

KIM’S CAFÉ

360-678-4924

Vietnamese/American

MOSQUITO FLEET CHILI

360-678-2900

Lunch Fare

THE COVE THAI CUISINE

360-678-6963

Thai Cuisine

THE KNEAD AND FEED

360-678-5431

Bakery/Lunch

THE OYSTERCATCHER

360-678-0683

Regional

PIZZA FACTORY

360-678-3200

Pizza

TOBY’S TAVERN

360-678-4222

Steak/Seafood

TYEE RESTAURANT LOUNGE

360-678-6616

American

CHINA CITY

360-331-8899

Chinese

COACH’S PIZZERIA

369-331-2345

Pizza

EAGLES #3418 DINING

360-321-5636

Home Cooking

FREELAND CAFÉ & LOUNGE

360-331-9945

Amcn/Hawaiian

GERRY’S KITCHEN

360-331-4818

Comfort Food

GORDON’S

360-331-7515

Fine Dining

GLASS ALLEY CAFÉ

360-331-0343

Italian

THE SHELL SHACK

360-331-3588

Fast Food

TIMBUKTU

360-331-1504

Coffee House

WIFIRE

360-321-9434

Coffee & Light Fare

Celebrating 7 Years of serving you Whidbey’s Best BBQ!

Pizza, Sandwiches, Salads

CLINTON

We Cater!

360-679-3500

601 NE Midway Blvd Oak Harbor Follow us on Facebook & Twitter

COUPEVILLE

FREELAND

Join Us For Our 2nd Annual Cajun Luau With New Belgium Brewery

Sat., August 24 3pm - 10pm

1JH3PBTUtLive Music

Tickets $25

Advance purchase highly recommended

We are Giving Away the New Belgium Fat Tire Cruiser Bike!

Must be present to win

Flight Deck Open! Dog Friendly Patio ~ weather permitting

LANGLEY THE BRAEBURN

360-221-3211

American

CAFÉ LANGLEY

360-221-3090

Mediterranean

INN AT LANGLEY

360-221-3033

Fine Dining

ISLAND COFFEEHOUSE

360-221-2414

Coffee House

LANGLEY VILLAGE EATERY

360-221-3525

Latin/Cajun Fusion

LIVING GREEN

360-221-8242

Vegetarian

MO’S PUB & EATERY

360-221-1131

English Pub Fare

MUKILTEO COFFEE

360-321-5270

Breakfast/Lunch

PRIMA BISTRO

360-221-4060

NW/Bistro

SWEET MONA’S

360-221-2728

Chocolate Bar

THE VILLAGE PIZZERIA

360-221-3363

Pizza/Pasta

USELESS BAY COFFEE HOUSE

360-221-4515

Coffee House

ÎÓәxÊ-,ÊÓäÊUÊ">ŽÊ>ÀLœÀÊUÊÎÈä‡ÈÇx‡xnxnÊUÊÜÜÜ°i>Ì>ÌvÞiÀðVœ“

Thank you for reading! Please support our advertisers and tell them you saw their ad in Whidbey Weekly.


www.whidbeyweekly.com

August 1 - August 7, 2013

LocALLy ownEd.

13

LocALLy opErAtEd. GREENBANK GREENBANK STORE & GRILLE

360-678-3300

Deli/Lunch/Dinner/Bar

WHIDBEY’S PIES CAFÉ & CATERING

360-678-1288

Pies, Lunch

WHIDBEY RICE CAFÉ

360-221-1314

SE Asian Cuisine

1-2-3 THAI #2

360-679-7600

Thai

AGAVE TAQUERIA

360-675-1052

Mexican

ALL SPORTS PUB & EATERY

360-679-3100

American

ANGELO’S CAFFE

360-675-4053

Breakfast, Lunch

APPLEBEE’S

360-679-6100

American

ARBY’S RESTAURANT

360-675-2245

Fast Food

ARIRANG GARDEN

360-675-1838

Korean & Sushi

BAKERVIEW

360-257-2891

American

BBQ JOINT

360-679-3500

BBQ & Take out

BLUE FOX DRIVE-IN

360-675-5667

American Diner

CAMERON’S CASUAL DINING

360-240-1222

American

CHINA CITY

360-279-8899

Chinese

CHINA HARBOR

360-679-1557

Chinese

DAILY GRIND

360-675-2767

Coffee/Brkft & Lnch

DAIRY QUEEN

360-679-8989

Fast Food

DH BUFFET

360-679-2899

Asian Buffet

DOMINO’S PIZZA

360-679-4141

Pizza

EL CAZADOR GRILL

360-675-6114

Mexican

ESTEBANS

360-675-4800

Mexican

FLYERS REST/BREWERY

360-675-5858

Rest. & Brewery

FRANK’S PLACE

360-675-5850

American

FRASERS

360-279-1231

Steak & Seafood

ISLAND CAFÉ

360-279-2838

American

JACK IN THE BOX

360-675-1768

Fast Food

JEDA’S THAI KITCHEN

360-679-8907

Thai

JUMBO BUFFET

360-675-9818

Buffet

KAKIES

360-682-6464

Bakery

KYOTO RESTAURANT

360-679-1433

Japanese

LITTLE CAESAR’S

360-279-2769

Pizza

LOTUS TEA BAR & STUDIO

360-240-8888

Tea/Lunch/Yoga

LUNDE’S

360-682-6279

Espresso & Deli

MARIO’S PIZZA

360-679-2533

Pizza

MI PUEBLO GRILL MEXICAN

360-240-0813

Mexican

NADYA’S

360-279-0190

Greek Cuisine

OAK HARBOR CAFÉ & BAR

360-675-9100

American

PAPA JOHN’S

360-679-0909

Pizza

PAPA MURPHY’S PIZZA

360-675-5505

Pizza

PIZZA FACTORY

360-679-0300

Pizza

PIZZA HUT

360-675-3800

Pizza

SAN REMO RESTAURANT

360-240-1302

Mediterranean

SEABOLT’S SMOKEHOUSE DELI

360-675-6485

Seafood, Angus

SHO NUFF

360-473-7399

Southern Food

SUBWAY

360-675-5304

Sandwiches

SWEET RICE THAI CUISINE

360-679-8268

Thai

TACO BELL

360-675-6868

Fast Food

THE TERRACE

360-720-2322

WIne & Bistro

TOKYO STOP TERIYAKI

360-240-9999

Teriyaki

TOPPINS FROZEN YOGURT

360-682-6695

Frozen Yogurt

VALLE AZUL

360-675-9020

Mexican

WENDY’S

360-675-1333

Fast Food

YUMMIES EATS & TREATS

360-682-2761

Bakery & Deli

ZORBA’S RESTAURANT

360-279-8322

Greek

OAK HARBOR

WINE, BEER & GIFTS Over 1,300 wines in stock.

We provide Personal Service. Join Koa’s Wine Club. Fill Your Growlers Here!

Come see us at at 5575 Harbor Ave, Freeland Tuesday-Friday 11am-6pm • Saturday 11am-7pm • Sunday 12:30-5

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


14

August 1 - August 7, 2013

www.whidbeyweekly.com

Locally owned.

Locally operated.

Real Estate/Rentals

2 bedroom/ 2 bath overlooking Saratoga Passage and Olympic Mountains. Bonus room, wrap around deck, 2-car garage, and detached shop. $289,000. For more information, call Linda Earnhart, Windermere Real Estate, at (360)929-0922 or email earnhart@whidbey.net. MLS#451810

Motorcycles/Parts For Sale

Brand new fiberglass heavyduty Ford truck canopy from Canopy West. 7-ft. long x 32-in. high, aqua green color. 3 sliding window + extra windows. $1000 (360)221-5911 (1) Four P215/75R15 tires, rims and hubcaps. Fit 2006 or earlier Jeep Wrangler. Less than 10K on tires. $149 OBO (360)6793256 (1)

Business Classifieds Well-established Antique Mall now accepting applications for space rental. Future retail spaces and shelf retail spaces becoming available. Apply in person at Shady Ladies. Antique Mall, 656 SE Bayshore Drive, Suite 5, Oak Harbor. Next to Licensing Office. Come join us for fun and profit.

Garage/Estate Sales 1999 Suzuki VL1500 Intruder; 20,230 miles, Red and White two tone, Saddle bags (newer ones, not included in picture), Wind screen, Driver back rest, Auxiliary running lights, LED brake lights added, Passenger Running boards for feet, $4,500 (360)5627263

Auto/Parts For Sale 1984 Camaro Z28 132,000 original miles, repainted, new motor, clutch, trans, rear-end, tires, seats, carpet, glass. Asking $14K. (360)929-5866 Pair of Husky Front SUV heavyduty Floor Mats. $25 or best offer. Photos available. Call (360)678-1167.

Block Street Garage/Estate Sale: Freeland Saturday, August 3, 9am to 2pm: 1813 Watkins Rd, off East Harbor Rd. Various quality items from A to Z. Weavers loom w/books, Milk Glass Ware, set of golf clubs, horseshoe set, misc home items, including lamps, etc, children’s items. Multi-Family Garage Sale, Saturday, August 3, 9:30am-3:00pm: Shadowood Drive, Clinton Garage Sale: Saturday, August 10, 10am to 2pm: 2559 Olympic Dr., Oak Harbor. Clothes, furniture, lots of misc. Downsizing.

Announcements Medical Marijuana patients unite; If you need assistance, advice, etc. please contact at 420patientnetworking@gmail. com. Local Whidbey Island help.

If you or someone you know has been a victim of Homicide, Burglary, Robbery, Assault, Identity Theft, Fraud, Human Trafficking, Home Invasion and other crimes not listed. Families & Friends of Violent Crime Victims has Advocates ready to help. Please call (800)3467555. 24hr Crisis Line. Free Service.

Ride Share/Van Pool Wanted: Riders for our existing Island Transit vanpool that commutes to First Hill area in Seattle. We are on the 6am ferry going in and leave downtown around 3:30pm with plan to be on 4:30pm ferry home. M-F. Contact Sarah (360)331-5594. Wanted: Riders for existing van pool to Sand Point/Magnuson Park or Children’s Hospital area.  Depart Island on 5:30 am ferry and return on 5 pm ferry.  Will consider one way riders, change in schedule or other pick up drop off points (Northgate, UW).  Call Karen before 9 pm at 360-321-5854. (0)

Volunteer Services Local Whidbey radio ~ LISTEN IN at ~ kwparadio.org ~ KWPA Whidbey AIR Public Radio local music, hosts, recorded events and popular music of all genres. Whidbey AIR is all vol-

unteer hosts, engineers, board of directors and window washers. Listen in anytime from your computer and on itunes.  ~~ From Clinton to Deception Pass - it’s Whidbey in your home. Volunteer Program Assistant for Senior Services Adult Day Service program for frail seniors. Prepare room for activities, listen/observe/report changes in client behavior, assist with activities/personal care. Requires 4-hour commitment, 1 day week, 10 AM-2 PM. Contact Hestia Laitala (360)321-1600.

Jobs Wanted Do you need a Nanny or a Tutor? Credentialed, recommended & flexible teacher and childcare available now. Ages infant to 12, CPR, first aid, as well as pet care, cooking and light housekeeping. Subjects include reading, math and creative games. Fees negotiable. Call Connie (360)989-9944 (1)

Job Market Manager/stylist wanted for busy beauty salon. Free booth rental and retail sales incentives. Send resume to hawaiiningirlie@aol. com New Image Salon has an immediate opening for a hairstylist. Commission or Booth Rental. Come join our professional yet

Check out our newly redesigned website! www.whidbeyweekly.com

8IJECFZ

8FFLMZ

fun salon. Confidential. Jennifer (360)929-2292 (5.17) Centrally located Hair Studio & Day Spa seeking 1 Full Time Stylist and 1 Full Time Nail Technician. Large & well established clientele stretching from Oak Harbor to South end of Whidbey. Build your clientele successfully in an area with very little competition from neighboring salons! Both positions provide wages structured around commission. Products are provided. Must be able to work weekends. Must be dependable, communicate well, and self-confident. Please email resumes to whidbeysalon. jobs@gmail.com (5.17) Line Cook Positions: The Braeburn in Langley is looking for 2 line cooks. One position is for part time summer help. Previous restaurant cooking, (preferably with breakfast) is a must. Additional hours available through our catering program. One position for long term, part time with full time potential, previous restaurant line experience needed. 18 yrs+. Positions available immediately. Please apply in person at 197 D. Second St. between 8am-3pm (5.24) Coach’s Pizzeria Seeks Supervisor Level, Long Term Applicants. Must be over 20 years old. Desire applicants who want long term employment. Work hours can compliment college or other training. Requires some Saturday, Sunday hours. NEW OWNERS! Call Candace: (206)409-5383, 5575 Harbor Ave, Freeland WA 98249 (5.27) Executive Director: WAIF is seeking an experienced individual to assume the leadership role of one of the largest nonprofits on Whidbey Island. Proven fundraising, management, financial and collaborative skills a must, along with a passion for animal advocacy. Position and application details can be found at www.waifanimals.org/jobs. No phone calls please. (0) WCT Administrative Assistant Position: This position is responsible to the Operations

and Facility Manager (OFM). Takes care of general office tasks. Interfaces with production teams, public, parents, and students. This office needs an efficient, hard-working and focused administrative assistant who shows initiative and purpose. This position also requires a passion and strength in customer service. As this is a children’s theater, the person in this position must also enjoy and interact well with children and youth. Qualifications: Experience working in the administrative support field; Excellent computer skills with a working knowledge of Word, Excel, and other applications; Excellent skills in customer service and youth interactions; Excellent communication skills both verbally and in writing; Excellent organizational skills, with the ability to prioritize and complete assignments on time. Bonus skills: Familiarity with Quickbooks, marketing knowledge, web and advertisement design abilities. To apply, please send your resume and cover letter to wct.operations@gmail. com (Please no drop-ins as we are moving locations). Position closes August 23. If you have any questions about the position you may call (360)2218707 (1)

Health/Fitness Sit-up bench. This is commercial grade, thickly padded, incline sit-up bench as found in health clubs. Like new, $75; Iron weights: Two 45-lb. Olympic plates, $35 and Four 25-lb. Olympic plates, $40. (360)6782207 (1)

Instruments Electric Piano/Synthesizer; Alesis QS8.1 88-weighted-key piano. Includes stand and sound cards, manual. $600 OBO. (360)341-3181 (0)

Lessons Looking for guitar students. Learn how to play guitar oneon-one. All ages welcome, all styles of genre taught, beginners to intermediate. Please call

Thank you for reading! Please support our advertisers and tell them you saw their ad in Whidbey Weekly.


www.whidbeyweekly.com LocALLy ownEd.

Scott (360)675-5470 for more information.

TickeTs/GeTaWays Seahawks vs. Broncos: August 17 at 7 p.m. Two tickets, 14 rows up on the 300 level on the 40-yard line. Originally $84/ ticket. Asking $60/ticket OBO. Could be your only chance to see Peyton Manning. Also available, Seahawks vs. Raiders: August 29 (360)321-0970 (1)

aPPliances Kitchen Appliances: Belgian waffle maker by Dominion, $10. George Foreman grill, model GRP4. 12” x 6” grilling surface. Clean, and in excellent condition. Photos available. $12. (360)678-1167 Champion Juicer. Heavy duty metal, $85. Originally over $300. Pickup in Freeland. (206)915-8991 (1)

hOMe FurnishinGs 2 pedestal tables, 30” x 48”, walnut formica top (one has a fitted glass cover). $10 and $15. Call (360)678-1167 Pedestal table, 48” diameter, walnut formica top ($25). Another similar table, with modified rectangular shape, approximately 30” x 60” ($35). Four pedestal chairs, swivel style, with sturdy, gold vinyl upholstery ($40 for the set). Call (360)678-1167

15

August 1 - August 7, 2013 LocALLy opErAtEd.

Three lime-green chairs; chrome pedestal bases; sturdy vinyl upholstery. $15 per chair. Call (360)678-1167 Round pedestal table; solid oak. 42” diameter. Excellent condition. $125 or best offer. Photos available. (360)678-1167 Two matching upholstered occasional chairs. Antique accent armchair. $75 each, or make an offer. Photos available. (360)678-1167 Walnut end table, hexagonal design, with beveled glass insert on top. Very good condition. Photos available. $40. Call (360)678-1167 Like new, trendy 4 chrome bar stools, with varied colored seats. Chairs worth $75 each. Glass table, chrome pole. Originally paid $800. Will sell all for $150. Photo available, call (360)720-4770 (0)

laWn and Garden Perma Mulch rubber edging, 9 10-foot strips, $10 each. Call (360)678-1167 Natural Barnyard Topsoil: Good for gardens, flower beds, etc. Unscreened, 10-yard loads, $225 delivered. South Whidbey. (360)321-1624

MiscellaneOus Queen-sized bedspread; classic design; never used, excellent quality and condition; medium brown background with but-

terfly design. Photos available. Make an offer. Call (360)6781167. 4 each 1-1/2” stem-type carpet casters, $4; Box of “Secur-aTie” fasteners: $2; Books for the handyman, like new: $10; Two baskets: $5 each; Backpack, like new: $35; Barbecue tool set: $3. Photos available. (360)678-1167. Miscellaneous lumber; PVC pipe; and metal roofing panels (4 each). Photos available. Make an offer. (360)678-1167. Puzzles – a great gift idea! From brand new to gently used; 500, 1000, or 1500 pieces; priced from 50 cents to five dollars. Photos available. Call (360)678-1167. Hand-crafted wood model logging truck. In excellent condition. 6.5” x 32” x 9” in size. Photos available. Make an offer. Call (360)678-1167. Lumber - Rough cut dry fir lumber. 2x4’s & misc. Good for building sheds and all those projects. 2x4’s 30¢ per lineal foot. (360)321-1624 Otterbox Commuter case and belt clip for Samsung Galaxy S3. Purple. Came with phone but I don’t use it. Otterbox Defender case and belt clip for iPhone4/4s. $20 each or make offer. (360)661-0051. Call, text or e-mail ewavada@gmail. com (0) Tired of dealing with Propane? Don’t like the taste of Charcoal? Grill your steaks, chicken and No Cheating!

hot dogs on a snazzy outdoor electric grill. Like new; Brother Electric Typewriter, $10. Call (360)221-8227 (0) Sears Craftsman 12” Band Saw, $150. Has new blade and owners manual. Located in Clinton, (206)930-9693 (0) Dry seasoned 1/2 cord wood, $100; Stainless Steel Electric Wine/Beer Cooler, about 20” x 24”, $50. (360)341-1983 (0) La-Z-Boy Queen hide-a-bed and mattress. Beige with splashes of soft colors. Excellent condition, $150; Foot bath (wax), $10. (360)341-7539 (0)

recreaTiOn Golf Bag by MacGregor Pro Only. Heavy-duty vinyl and leather. Comes with carrying strap and hood. Two-tone green. Very good condition. Photos available upon request. $30. Call (360)678-1167. Leading Edge putter with brand new Golf Pride grip. Comes with cover. Excellent condition. Photos available upon request. $20. Call (360)678-1167. South Bay Golf Clubs, men’s set, never used and with bag. Left Handed. $50 Call (360)320-3780 (0) Men’s brand new 20-speed bike. Del Sol LXI 2.0. Built-in carry case with rain cover, water bottle,. Men’s bike pants, large, gray and black, never worn. All for $300. (360)2221-5911 (1) Brand new, never used Lowe Alpine Walkabout backpack,

2100 cu. in., $50. (360)6782207 (1)

aniMals/suPPlies Feeder Hay for Sale - Dry, stored in barn. $4 per bale. 20 bale minimum. (360)321-1624 Straw Hay for Sale - Good for bedding, erosion control, mulch, etc. $3 per bale, 20 bale minimum. (360)321-1624 Local grass hay, $4 a bale. Uload. South Whidbey (360)3214877 (1) Malti-Poo Puppies for adoption. Please see our little whidbeygeek.net page for details. (We are a home, NOT a breeder). (949)945-8100 (1) 2 Horses for sale to approved home; Nice horse trailer, 4-place, bumper pll, tack room, 50-gallon H2O tank and nice tires; All tack for sale and lots of extras; Portable electric corral. All priced to sell. (360)6783469 (1)

WanTed Someone to weed our gardens. Will pay $15 per hour. Langley, (360)730-1522 (0) Drummer needed for Spellbound, a rock band with orig. material. Practice once/week in Oak Harbor. Must have good gear, experience and great meter. Will work on new CD. We have lots of experience,

great gear and fully equipped recording studio. Contact Rich or Scott at (360)675-5470 or rswitzer55@netzero.net (1)

Free 2 Display cases with sliding glass doors, 3’ x 4’, stackable; Entertainment center with 2 book shelves, 6’ tall x 8’ long, 3-pieces; Industrial-type restaurant table with metal base, wood grain top. (360)331-3876 (0) Nice Oak entertainment center, glass doors with 25” VG TV and DVD Player (54”Wx43”Hx17”D). Also, wood 3-shelf Stereo/Bookcase (25”Wx40”Hx18”D). Clinton, (360)579-4105 (0) Gray-blue, small pattern, Love Seat Hide-a-bed with clean mattress and pad. You pick-up. (360)321-5979 (1)

Puzzle 1 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.45)

5

4

2

1

8

9

3

6

7

3

9

1

6

7

2

4

8

5

6

7

8

4

3

5

9

2

1

4

2

7

3

5

1

6

9

8

1

3

6

9

2

8

7

5

4

9

8

5

7

6

4

1

3

2

8

6

4

2

9

7

5

1

3

7

5

3

8

1

6

2

4

9

2

1

9

5

4

3

8

7

6

CLASSIFIED INFORMATION US Postal Mail ...................... Whidbey Weekly Classified Department PO Box 1098 Oak Harbor, WA 98277 E-Mail...............classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com Telephone .................................... (360)682-2341 Fax ............................................... (360)682-2344 PLEASE CALL WHEN YOUR ITEMS HAVE SOLD.

Please try to limit your classified to 30 words or less, (amounts and phone numbers are counted as words) we will help edit if necessary. We charge $10/week for Vehicles, Boats, Motorcycles, RVs, Real Estate Rental/Sales, Business Classifieds and any items selling $1,000 and above. We do charge $25 to include a photo. The FREE classified space is not for business use. No classified is accepted without phone number. We reserve the right to not publish classifieds that are in bad taste or of questionable content. All free classifieds will be published twice consecutively. If you would like your ad to be published more often, you must resubmit it.

DID YOU KNOW MOST CLASSIFIED ADS ARE FREE?

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~

Contact us for more info! classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


From left to right: Gary Wallin, Martha Wallin, Elaine Terry, Jim Bailey

The Wallins have experience you can trust By Eileen Brown Why aren’t you telling your family what you want? For example, do you want your ashes scattered at sea to signify your maritime service? Or do you want to spend eternity in a plot above Ebey’s Landing. What about music? Is Linda Ronstadt’s “Goodbye, My Friend” suited to your memorial or is your family going to choose for you –perhaps the solid old hymn “Just a Closer Walk with Thee.” The fact is, without pre-planning, your last tribute will bear your family’s idea of what suits you, but not necessarily your last wishes. “People place their trust in us,” said Gary Wallin. “It comes from years of treating everyone as a special friend, even if we haven’t met before.” Wallin Funeral Home located in Oak Harbor remains independent and locally owned. Most funeral homes and cemeteries in our region have been sold to multi-national conglomerates. “Our service mission is never compromised by accountability to far-off stockholders,” said Gary. “We are longtime residents of the community. The reputation we have for serving residents of the local community is our greatest asset.” If you are confused by the variety of funeral services offered through the mail, be aware that these packages might contain items you don’t want or need. Such groupings can artificially inflate advertised savings. ”Our staff members will listen carefully to your wishes and be respectful of your emotional and financial needs,” added Martha Wallin, Gary’s wife and indispensable partner. Both Gary and Martha are committed to respecting your right to make a decision without undue influence. Whether your needs are simple or elaborate, Wallin prices stay reasonable. There is something only you know. No one else knows the details of your life that make you who you are. What experiences shaped you? There are no rules for how to have the talk, only that you do it. “Every time someone places their trust in Wallin Funeral Home, we have an obligation to prove we are worthy,” said Gary. “As a policy of our firm, if you or your family experience dissatisfaction with any of our professional services or facilities, we will reduce or eliminate the charge for that item.” Have “the talk.” Send it to everyone in the family address book. Have someone in the family help you share your story, or write it yourself. Let your ancestors read about your favorite summer, the best advice you ever got from grandpa or your parents and what was the most difficult thing to endure. Put down on paper how you would you like your family and friends to commemorate you when you die? “At Wallin Funeral Home, we are here to prove we are worthy. We take our obligation seriously,” Gary concluded. Stop by and get to know the staff at Wallin Funeral Home and Cremation, at the edge of Maple Leaf Cemetery, 1811 NE 16th Avenue, Oak Harbor, or call (360) 675-3447.

Thank you for reading! Please support our advertisers and tell them you saw their ad in Whidbey Weekly.

5 31 august 1, 2013  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you