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August 22 through August 28, 2019

SUMMER OPEN STUDIO TOUR

August 24 & 25 10:00 to 5:00, daily

come curious

leave inspired a program of the Whidbey Island Arts Council bringing the world toWhidbey

IslandArtsCouncil.org More Local Events inside WHIDBEY ISLAND WOODWORKERS

GUILD

info@woodpalooza.com WOODPALOOZA.com

August 31 thru September 2

WOODPALOOZA

WICA

Zech Hall, 565 Camano Ave, Langley, WA


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AUGUST 22 - AUGUST 28, 2019 LOCALLY OWNED

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Whidbey Working Artists Summer Open Studio Tour August 24 & 25 OAK HARBOR 98277 1 Dan Ishler 30678 SR 20 2 Timothy Haslet 1800 Conifer Ln 3 Leslie Stoner 1739 Hastie Lake Rd 4 Steve Nowicki 853 Bluewater Ln 4 Les Eelkema 853 Bluewater Ln 5 Regina Kastler 2459 Cahill Pl 6 Nan Leaman 1462 Arnold Rd

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Catalogs available with the artists and accross the island at local businesses or visit whidbeyworkingartists.com

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Whidbey Island Arts Council (WIAC) a not-for-profit 501(c)3 organization (91-1147736). For more information visit www.islandartscouncil.org. info@islandartscouncil.org

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Visit whidbeyworkingartists.com for more information and directions or look for our catalogue at local businesses.

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LANGLEY 98260 36 Island Art Glass 2062 Newman Rd 37 Joi & Dan LaChaussee 5535 Emil Rd 38 Ginny O'Neill 106 McLeod Alley 38 Liesel Lund 106 McLeod Alley 39 Brian Mahieu 3251 John Ct 40 Paul Shapiro 3000 Saratoga Rd 41 Pat Brookes 238 Clover Ct 42 Cary Jurriaans 813 Edgecliff Dr 43 Barry Leibman 4973 Blue Lady Ln 44 Frances Wood 5477 Wilkinson Rd

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CLINTON 982636 45 Alicia Elliott 2757 Sun Vista Circle 45 Kim Tinuviel 2757 Sun Vista Circle 46 Jan Lipetz 7538 Maxwelton Rd 47 Dan Freeman 4395 Rollinghill Rd 48 Sherren Anderson 6713 Cultus Bay Rd 49 Kathleen Secrest 6521 Wintergreen Dr 50 Karin Bolstad 6451 . Harding Ave 50 Sara Saltee 6451 S Harding Ave 50 Melissa Koch Blueschool Arts 6451 S Harding Ave 50 Tammi Sloan Blueschool Arts 6451 S Harding Ave 50 Doug Hansen 6451 SHarding Ave

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FREELAND 982499 24 Marcia Derse 4738 Smugglers Cove Rd 25 Jordan Jones 5250 Bounty Lp 25 Clovy Tsuchiya 5250 Bounty Lp 26 Brian Jones 5392 Shore Meadow Rd 27 John Moritz 819 Bush Point Rd 27 Leogene Brown 819 Bush Point Rd 28 Earl Olsen 5505 Shore Meadow Rd 28 Natalie Olsen 5505 Shore Meadow Rd 29 Annette Hanna 5540 Tara Dr 30 Steph Mader 1070 Timber Ln 31 Anne Niles Davenport 5485 Freeland Ave 32 Kristine McInvaille 1664 Main St 32 Cara Jung 1664 Main St 32 Karen Abel 1664 Main St 33 Lane Tompkins 1660 Roberta Ave 33 Woody Morris 1600 Roberta Ave 33 Lloyd Whannell 1660 Roberta Ave. Suite A 33 Sue Taves 1660 Roberta Ave 33 Matt Monforte 1661 Roberta Ave 34 Barbara Mosher 1461 Green Laurel Pl 35 Teresa Saia 6011 Moonrise Ln

TRO

Good for redemption August 25 & 26, 2018 in any tour studio

JONE

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GREENBANK 98253 20 Katrina Hude 3360 Old County Rd 20 Jim Short 3360 Old County Rd 21 Nancy Frances 24386 State Route 525 22 Sharon Spencer 4330 Walden Loop 23 Marcy Johnson 992 Honeymoon Lake Dr

Leslie Franzen $150.00 TOUR DOLLARS Deception Pass Bridge

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COUPEVILLE 98239 7 Briggs Shore 26184 State Route 20 8 Berit Bardarson 2530 Darst Rd 8 Siri Bardarson 2530 Darst Rd 8 Sarah Richards 2530 Darst Rd 9 Marian Quarrier 530 Lucky Dog Ln 10 Mike Wise 560 Hill Valley Dr 11 Teri Jo Summer 524 Fort Ebey Rd 11 Dale Reiger 524 Fort Ebey Rd 12 Marianne Brabranski 409 Marine Dr 13 Diane Tompkinson 437 Parker Rd 14 Janet Lewis 1020 Burchell Dr 15 Ilene Sorenson 490 Cormick Ct 16 Robbie Lobell 640 Patmore Rd 17 Jan Hoy 631 Olympic View Dr - Von Stark 631 Olympic View Dr 17 Harry 18 Francy Blumhagen 1825 Cedarcrest Ave 19 Mary Ellen O’Connor 1358 Willow Pond Ln

STUDIOS PARKS TOWNSHIPS EBEY’S NATIONAL RESERVE FOOD LODGING PUBLIC RESTROOMS COCKTAILS THE BRIDGE DECEPTION PASS

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Whidbey Weekly

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ON TRACK with Jim Freeman

While re-watching the Richard Brooks directed 1966 film The Professionals before last Sunday’s pre-season Seahawks/Vikings football game, mercenary Lee Marvin uttered this line of observation:

While I dabbled in moments of hide and seek, it really never made sense. Why hide from your friends if you didn’t have that many?

I thought about this. Feeling uncomfortable, I decided enough of that. What I was thinking was inappropriate for a free weekly.

Hon is a word I grew up with.

What games are played today work for today’s generation.

While I was never accused of being “cute as a bug’s ear,” some relatives said I was a pain in another area of development.

Dad used to roller skate down the steepest hill in Thayer, Missouri with his Mom’s broom between his legs in case he needed to slow down. After the broom thistles began to shorten, Dad got a bike with good brakes and Grandma got a new broom. Dump fun On those Sunday mornings when I do not feel like worshiping formally in a local area church, I drive to Coupeville to worship at the Island County Solid Waste location north of the Ryan’s House for Youth Campus.

Our southern female cousins were either someone’s “apple of my eye,” “peach of a kid,” “a little pumpkin,” or “a sweet magnolia blossom.”

For a very reasonable offering, one can enjoy a beautiful view of the sky above.

The closest I ever got to being considered a flower or fruit was from our aunt who said I was “plum crazy.”

Containers filled with memories.

Speaking of plums, thanks ever so much to Brigit and Jim for samples of their latest bounty. Their home grown plums are yummy and plummy. They shall not be returned. Were you a favorite fruit or flower growing up? Our family was described more as nuts. Nut cases, nuts and bolts, or nut much of anything. We got lots of nuts at Christmas. Day trader What is it about the mind that allows us to think it is one day when we know it is another? Overheard at a coffee gathering was the gentleman who said, “Why do I feel like it is Wednesday?” Overheard at Pay-Less was a different play on the day. The checkout lady said to the paper or plastic lady–“Today is my Friday” although it was really a Tuesday. The paper or plastic lady said back to the checkout lady, “This is my Monday.” Now we were all frowning. All my Fridays feel like Mondays, even if they are Thursdays. Game on After watching the evening news, I try to balance my mental ledger by watching a few questions on Family Feud with Steve Harvey. The ridiculousness on Family Feud is the perfect elixir for the ridicule on the news. A recent question was to name a game we may have played years ago. Incorrect responses included “duck duck goose,” “dodge ball,” “four square,” and “Cowboys and Indians.”

The sky above the containers. As I age more and save less, I find therapeutic value in recycling. Whether it be my pulling brown Henry Weinhard root beer bottles out of the green glass bin mistakenly used or learning how to properly rinse gunked up plastic smoothie bottles, I find comfort. While my carbon footprint is now larger by wearing Brahma boots as an adult more so than Red Ball Jets as a kid, I find comfort as I find the correct bin to recycle the broken memories of my root beer. While I may not remember each root beer, my teeth do. Maybe I can start a support group for people like me who enjoy going to the Island County Solid Waste center.

Call today to schedule your FREE HOME EVALUATION 360.321.4252 IslandHeatPumps.com

PHONE: 360-682-2341

FAX: 360-682-2344

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Whidbey Weekly LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

1131 SE ELY STREET | PO BOX 1098 | OAK HARBOR, WASHINGTON 98277 Publisher......................................................................... Eric Marshall Editor............................................................................... Kathy Reed

Marketing Representatives.................................................Penny Hill Graphic Design............................................................. Teresa Besaw

Production Manager......................................................TJ Pierzchala Circulation Manager.................................................... Noah Marshall

Contributing Writers Jim Freeman Wesley Hallock Kae Harris Tracy Loescher Kathy Reed Carey Ross Kacie Jo Voeller

Volume 11, Issue 34 | © MMXIX Whidbey Weekly

PUBLISHED and distributed every week. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The Whidbey Weekly cannot be held responsible for the quality of goods or services supplied by advertisers in this publication. Articles, unless otherwise stated, are by contribution and therefore the Whidbey Weekly is not in a position to validate any comments, recommendations or suggestions made in these articles. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. DEADLINES: The Whidbey Weekly is a submission based editorial with contributing writers. Please feel free to submit any information (please limit to 200 words) that you would like to share with the Whidbey Weekly. You may submit by email to editor@whidbeyweekly.com, by fax to (360)682-2344 or by postal mail to PO Box 1098, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date. For more information, please visit www.whidbeyweekly.com.

FREE 3 DAYS OF MUSIC

JAMESTOWN REVIVAL

There is a sense of accomplishment after spending a day to load a pickup full of stuff you would not want your preacher to see. Kind of like a confessional in 33 gallon plastic bags. The fee for the truck load of tiny time capsules deposited today was less than a bad bottle of Scotch and more than the buy one/get one 16 two-ply roll toilet tissue sale at Rite-Aid. Growing up, we always had people pick up our garbage. Big guys with big arms driving big trucks with big noise. We always waved at them. Those men were my first heroes. They all looked like Hercules, but with really dirty shirts. I enjoy emptying trash. I feel like a responsible adult with childish tendencies. I feel like I have done something which I really have a hard time doing–throwing stuff away.

Did you jump rope? Did you hopscotch? Did you kick the can?

Thanks Mom.

Did you play tag, hide and seek, or Red Rover?

of $800 to $1,500 for stick-built homes and $2,400 for manufactured homes!

We can get together to discuss our feelings when items are refused or when we hold up others because we have not yet made out our checks to ICSW.

While the last game makes sense in being omitted by a modern day Family Feud audience, the other three seem to be as good as these correct choices– Red Rover, King of the Mountain, Kick the Can, Tag, Hopscotch, Hide and Seek, and Jump Rope.

Those were never on my game list.

REBATES

Every childhood is the right one. Who cares which generation? What we did worked for us in the fifties.

Thanks to our hospitable kin, “Hon,” “Honey,” “Sweetie,” “Sweetie Pie,” “Sugar,” “Sugar baby,” and other terms seldom heard in a dental office, were just part of our vacation aliases.

PSE INSTANT

Or, Movie Mike and I rode our bikes to the library to read the lines from Mr. Roberts when the sailors are cleaning their binoculars.

Hon? Or more like Attila the Hun?

When summer visiting in the south, we Yankee grandkids were called almost everything except late for supper.

ASK ABOUT FINANCING! MONTHLY PAYMENTS AS LOW AS $50

Do today’s kids spend more time indoors or online than previous generations did with outdoor games until dinner?

Or, Movie Mike and I played Wiffle ball with fences on the outside of the park and apple trees on the inside.

For us, Hon was a Southern word.

LOCALLY OPERATED

Everybody hides from you but the teachers.

Movie Mike and I played Horse with his basketball and the hoop above the garage until the parental cocktail hour was over.

We heard Hon every time we went to Mississippi to see our grandparents, aunts, uncles, and cousins.

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Hiding from your friends by playing hide and seek is like being a new boy in school.

“Do you realize people are the only animals that make love face to face?”

Sweet tea The other day, while wearing my freshly battery’ied hearing aids, I thought I heard the checkout lady say “Thank you, Hon” after my Visa card paid the bill.

AUGUST 22 - AUGUST 28, 2019

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And this is saying something coming from a guy who still has his Christmas art homework from 3rd grade. To read past columns of On Track in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

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AUGUST 22 - AUGUST 28, 2019 LOCALLY OWNED

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Bits & Pieces of firm support or respectful dissent to your elected officials regarding their position, or silence, on NAS Whidbey Island. The more who get involved, the better.

Letters to the Editor Editor, In response to Gary Piazzon’s latest rhetoric-laced ramble: Again, just 2.5 percent of mass killings worldwide occur in the United States. Also, violent gun use constitutes only a small fraction of means people use to kill. Preventing violence involves treating mental illness, not destroying each American’s constitutional rights and liberties. Those trying to erode, then eradicate, our U.S. Constitution are whittling away the First Amendment and laying siege to the Second. If you read all 10 amendments in our Bill of Rights, it’s clear that eliminating the first two spells the demise of the remaining eight. Mark Anderson & Laura Phillips Oak Harbor, Wash.

Editor, We would like to take this opportunity to express our sincere appreciation for an extremely successful Christmas in July Food and Fund Drive. Help House received 21,919 food items and $16,111.95 in cash donations for this event, which exceeded our goal of 10,000 food items and $10,000 in cash. A special thank you to Robert Young and his group from Tradewinds Insurance and Camden Schutte and his group from Coldwell-Banker Koetje Real Estate for their fifth consecutive drive for Help House. Their contributions alone were 7,000 food items and a check for $1,229.68. We would also like to give a shout out to the Oak Harbor Lions and our volunteers Jana and Leroy for their help during our weekend food drive. And to everyone who dropped off donations, took items to their church or sent us a check, we couldn’t do it without you!

We need to make it very clear it is only a few moneyed interests who are calling for lawfare against NAS Whidbey Island, with no regard to the likely consequences, up to and including base closure. As COER tweeted last month, “Military jets don’t mix with people and the environment and shouldn’t be based where they do.” Outlying Landing Field Coupeville (OLF Coupeville) has been using jets since 1967, a full 11 years before Ebey’s National Historical Reserve (Ebey’s NHR) was established. Reckless talk of pitting one against the other only genuinely started in 2012 and now has resulted, even after the Navy making the largest investment in Central Whidbey historic preservation, in OLF Coupeville supporters wondering if Ebey’s NHR should exist. I’m one of them. When Ebey’s NHR Kristen Griffin vigorously participated in a fundraiser for Sound Defense Alliance last October, that was the end of me ignoring the NHR management’s antics. Without a strong narrative tying Ebey’s NHR to OLF Coupeville and Ebey’s NHR under new management, I don’t see a path of coexistence forward. Frankly, I support a version of Virginia’s NALF Fentress Encroachment Protection Acquisition Program, which is a voluntary buyout of properties near the naval outlying field there. Seems to have worked, and was a cunning response to attempts via litigation and a Base Realignment and Closure Commission (BRAC) to close NAS Oceana. It’s still possible to protect Ebey’s NHR farms – just not housing compatible with neither Ebey’s NHR nor OLF Coupeville. With that, our future is ours to chart. You need to speak up and make your views known. This is no longer the province of a brave few holding off COER, but everyone’s struggle. Very respectfully, Joe A. Kunzler Sedro Woolley, Wash.

New Fire Station to Help Meet Growing Demand

Unlike the holiday season, both food and monetary donations slow down during the summer months, so Christmas in July was established to help keep our supplies stocked. This years’ event definitely did just that! We would not be celebrating over 42 years of service to those in need if not for the generosity of this wonderful community. From the Board of Directors, staff, volunteers and clientele, thank you for making our little corner of the world a better place. Most Sincerely, Jean T. Wieman, Executive Director North Whidbey Help House

Editor, Former U.S. President Harry S. Truman said, in a time when sexist language was normalized, “Men make history and not the other way around. In periods where there is no leadership, society stands still. Progress occurs when courageous, skillful leaders seize the opportunity to change things for the better.” Indeed. Ladies and gentlemen, we are at a unique regional crossroads in 2019. Ebey’s National Historical Reserve is undergoing strategic planning, the State Attorney General has embarked on historic lawfare against a naval air station in his own state, and the Citizens of Ebey’s Reserve (COER) have lobbed two more lawsuits against NAS Whidbey Island. If ever there was a time for the regional citizenry to get engaged to make our history, it’s now. By getting engaged - maybe it’s a quick email

The South Whidbey Fire/EMS team begins moving into the new Bayview Station 36 over the next month. The station was built to meet a growing demand and completes the department’s final step of a 12-year-old strategic plan. “Building this station was the vision of our commissioners in 2007. It will be the new central hub of the organization where our career crew and administrative staff will be housed during the day,” said Chief H.L. “Rusty” Palmer. “It also includes room for growth and reinstates the sleeper program where out-of-district volunteers stay overnight.” The out-of-district program was instated two years ago to recruit experienced firefighters and EMTs from outside of the community to fill vacancies on the primarily volunteer team. It has successfully attracted new volunteers, many from the Seattle area. However, until now, there has been no place for them to stay overnight. When the Freeland station was originally built it had sleeping quarters. Those were converted

to administrative offices. The Freeland station will now revert back to its original purpose and the old Bayview station will be repurposed to a maintenance facility where equipment is repaired. The centrally-located offices at the new Bayview station represent the first actual offices the department has had since it was founded in 1950. Dwindling volunteers in the fire service is a disturbing national trend. A study released earlier this year by the National Fire Protection Association states rural areas like South Whidbey pose the highest risk for public safety as the number of volunteers continues to decline and the number of emergency calls rise. In 2018, the department responded to a record number 2,698 calls, or an average of seven calls a day. Call volumes rise for various reasons, including an aging population combined with an increasing number of residents and visitors. “We’ve been doing more with less. This building creates new opportunities for us to serve the community as we continue to explore how to meet the demand,” said Palmer. “With sleepers in both Bayview and Freeland, we can now attract more volunteers from out of the area. Eventually we have the ability to staff the new station 24 hours a day.” The project broke ground less than one year ago. Valdez Construction in Oak Harbor has served as the general contractor. A majority of the construction was completed by Whidbey Island contractors and sub-contractors, with less than 1 percent in change orders. The station was built to LEED principles and allows for future installation of solar panels. A training facility will be located behind the building. Beginning in October, monthly commissioner and biannual all-district meetings will be at the new station. Funds needed for the $5.8 million building were secured through bonds in 2017, including the additional 10 percent contingency funds and $500,000 anticipated sales tax. No new taxes were needed from the community to pay for the bonds. And due to the department’s excellent AA S & P rating, the interest rates were very low on the bonds. Final total cost is expected to land at $6.2 million. Carletti Architects of Mount Vernon, took extra care to incorporate surrounding design elements of Bayview Corner to ensure it fits well into the neighborhood. It is located at 5579 Bayview Road, between Good Cheer and Goosefoot. So far it has been well received by locals. “The construction has gone very smoothly for Goosefoot, especially since we are located right next door,” said Sandy Whiting, Executive Director of the Goosefoot Community Fund. “I am not sure I can say what the impact will be on the future of Bayview Corner. However, having a fire station at Bayview is very important for the safety of our community.”

The public is invited to tour the station during an open house Saturday from 10:00am to 2:00pm. A dedication kicks off the event, followed by a Push Back Ceremony where the members push the fire engine into the bay of the new station. This fire service tradition honors the past, when horse-drawn equipment could not be backed into the bay. To learn more visit www.swfe.org. [Submitted by Sherrye Wyatt]

Island County Democrats Hosting Annual Summerfest Everyone is invited to come to this year’s Summerfest, which is at the beautiful Langley home of Grethe Cammermeyer and Diane Divelbess, 4632 Tompkins Road, Saturday from 3:00 to 7:00pm.

Be Alert for Opportunities When Preparing for College Costs

Now that summer is winding down, it will soon be “back-to-school” time. When children are young, your logistics for the new academic year may involve little more than a trip to buy school supplies. But if you’d like to send your kids (or grandkids) to college someday, you need to plan far ahead to meet the financial demands. And, as part of your planning, you also need to be on the lookout for all opportunities to help pay those sizable college bills. Specifically, you’ll need to be ready to take action in these areas: Financial aid – You should start thinking about financial aid at least a year before your child heads off to college. For example, you can begin submitting the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) on Oct. 1, 2019, for the 2020-21 academic year. And if the past is any guide, you’ll always need to remember that Oct. 1 date for the next school year. The FAFSA helps colleges and the U.S. Department of Education evaluate your financial need and determine how much financial support your child requires. And since a lot of financial aid is awarded on a first-come, first-served basis, it’s a good idea to submit your forms as soon as possible once the application period opens. Scholarships – Colleges and universities offer their own scholarships, but you’re not limited to them. In fact, you might be surprised at the number and variety of college scholarships available to your child or grandchild – but to find them, you may need to do some digging. Find out what’s offered from foundations, religious, ethnic or community organizations, local businesses and civic groups. Also, ask the high school guidance office for information. Your own employer might even offer small scholarships. You can find more information on scholarships on the U.S. Department of Education’s website. College-specific investments – You might also want to consider an investment designed to help you save for college. You have several options available, each with different contribution limits, rules and tax treatments, so you’ll want to consult with a financial professional to choose an investment that’s appropriate for your situation. Community colleges – Not every bachelor’s degree needs to begin and end at an expensive four-year college or university. Many students now fulfill some of their “general” education requirements at affordable community colleges before transferring to a four-year school – often saving tens of thousands of dollars in the process. Paying for college is challenging. After all, for the 2018-19 academic year, the average annual cost (tuition, fees, and room and board) was $21,370 for in-state students at public four-year colleges or universities; for four-year private schools, the corresponding expense was $48,510, according to the College Board. And college costs will likely continue to rise over the next several years. But, as we’ve seen, by being proactive and having a plan in place, you can go a long way toward coping with these expenses and helping your loved ones enjoy the benefits of higher education. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Jeffery C. Pleet, CLU®, ChFC®

Financial Advisor 630 SE Midway Blvd. Oak Harbor, WA 98277 (360) 679-2558 jeffery.pleet@edwardjones.com

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

Speakers at Summerfest this year include: Island County Commissioner Helen Price Johnson (who has announced her candidacy for 10th LD State Senator), Janet St. Clair, Island County Commissioner, and Dave Paul, 10th LD BITS & PIECES

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Children’s Day Festival in Langley: A whole lot of fun awaits including bounce houses, pony rides, entertainment, 30+ interactive booths and a free lunch! The event is free and runs 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 14 at the South Whidbey Community Center. SWParks.org

By Amy Hannold

Dog Days at Flying Heritage and Combat Armor Museum: The FHCAM in Everett welcomes man’s best friend into the museum Sept. 7, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., for the opening of its newest exhibit, “Animals in Wartime.” Mingle with animal organizations and shop for your furry friend. Take home your own frisbee with a $3 minimum donation to the museum, in addition to the admission price of $18 for an adult and a dog, youth are $12, kids 5 and younger free. flyingheritage.org Skagit River Salmon Festival: This SPAWNtaneously-fun event Sept. 7, in Mount Vernon, celebrates the Skagit River and the return of the salmon. It’s a family and pet friendly festival with hands-on activities, artisan crafts, live music, recreational and educational booths, great food, raptor bird shows, Kidz Zone, face

painters, bouncy house, Knockerballs, Native American storytellers, live music and more. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., admission for adults is $5, kids are free. Skagitriverfest.org Celebrate Grandparents Day: Make plans now and prepare those beloved “homemade” gifts to share with the grandparents in your life, Sept. 8. Cherish the time together – and, if your child’s grandparents don’t live close by, “adopt a grandparent” for the day, by including a neighboring elder in some fun activities. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory Classic – with Smell-O-Vision: Enjoy the classic 1971 musical “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory.” with a Smell-o-Vision experience. Taste Charlie’s journey with taffy, everlasting gobstoppers, lollipops, and of course: chocolate! Sing-along with the eccentric Willy Wonka, kind-hearted Charlie Bucket, playful Grandpa Joe and the other Golden Ticket winners as they tour the strangest chocolate factory in the world! Smell-O-Vision bags are available for pre-purchase or purchase at the theater the day of the showing for $5, in addition to your movie ticket. Showings are in Bellingham, Mount Vernon, Anacortes and Stanwood, in September. Fortechocolates.com Raptor Day at Pacific Rim Institute: Don’t miss your chance to get up close to incredible birds of prey. Experts will be on hand Sept. 14

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from 1-3 p.m., to educate you about how to protect these amazing predators. A free, family-friendly event. PacificRimInstitute.org

Family Guide Whidbey Island Goat Olympics: Watch the goats and their handlers participate in zany contests: foot race, pole bending, goat calling, obstacle course, and more. The goats will also be competing for honors with “longest beard,” “most spots,” and “biggest belly” (on the goats, that is). This event Saturday, Aug. 31, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., is a fundraiser for the Whidbey Homesteaders 4-H Club, at the Whidbey Fairgrounds. Admission to the Olympics is a suggested donation of $2 per spectator, 15 percent of all profits will go to the Whidbey Goat Rescue.

AUGUST 22 - AUGUST 28, 2019

Whidbey Island Art & Craft Supply Flea Market: Do you have a box/closet/room full of extra art and craft supplies you aren’t using? Planning your holiday gift projects and need a bit more of something? Have you always wanted to try out a new craft, but didn’t want to buy all the supplies brand new? Shop for or sell arts and craft items Saturday, Sept. 21, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the Coupeville Rec Hall. To reserve a table, or for more information, email WhidbeyArtSwap@yahoo.com. Whidbey Island Kite Festival: View impressive kite displays and competitions, Saturday, Sept. 21 and Sunday, Sept. 22, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Fort Casey. Free-fly areas for your kites, kids kite-making, and more. Children ages 10 years and younger can catch a teddy bear, 1 p.m. each day. Saturday night, head to the Coupeville High School Gym, for a 7:30 p.m. indoor kite flying event. WhidbeyKites.org Take your Pup to the Park: Enjoy an afternoon of food, fun and fidos! The North Whidbey Island Sunrise Rotary Club hosts this event Sunday, Sept. 22, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., with informative vendor booths, raffles, canine activities, food trucks and more. Admission is free, food and other items for purchase. Event will be at NE 21st Court, Oak Harbor, off Goldie Road. Whidbeyrotary.com Whidbey Island Cider Festival at Pacific Rim Institute: Taste ciders from various NW cideries Saturday, Sept. 28 and enjoy food, music and fun. Family friendly activities include face painting, apple pressing, and more. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., free admission. Advance purchase of cider tasting tickets at Brown Paper Tickets. PacificRimInstitute.org

Harvest Faire at Greenbank Farm: Whidbey Island’s farming heritage is the focus of this new festival Sunday, Sept. 29, which combines Greenbank Farm merchants and the Port of Coupeville. Local produce, flowers and food will take center stage with music, tastings and a pie eating contest. For more information, email saltyacresfarming@gmail.com Experience the 1914 Triangle of Fire Haunted Fort Casey: Oct. 25 and 26, Fort Casey State Park will feature a Haunted Fort for ages 10 years and older, and a Kids Zone with bounce house, games and trick-or-treat street for younger guests. Tickets are $10 per person for ages 4 and older and must be purchased in advance at WhidbeyPlayhouse. com, beginning Sept. 1. A Discover Pass is required for park access. Sunshine Drip will be there with snacks and beverages. Produced by Whidbey Playhouse and Lighthouse Keepers. AREA SEPTEMBER EVENTS: Wooden Boat Festival in Port Townsend, Sept, 6-8. woodenboat.org Mukilteo Lighthouse Festival, Sept. 6-8. MukFest.com Snohomish Sunflower Festival, Sept. 14-15. thomasfamilyfarm.com Skagit Valley Giant Pumpkin Festival, Sept. 21. christiansonsnursery.com Fall Garage Sale, Antiques and More, Friday, Sept. 20 and Saturday, Sept. 21, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Classic Car Show Saturday. skagitcounty.net/Departments/Fairgrounds Bellingham SeaFeast, Sept. 21-22. Bellinghamseafeast.org Washington State Parks and National Parks Free Day, Saturday, Sept. 28, for National Public Lands Day. discoverpass.wa.gov and nps.gov Here’s to a super school year, 2019-2020: September is the start-up of many local youth programs, library activities, and more! Connect your family via guides posted at WhidbeyIsland.MacaroniKid.com

QUALITY FURNITURE, APPLIANCES AND MATTRESSES AT AFFORDABLE PRICES WE OFFER 2 DISCOUNTS!

SENIOR MONDAYS - 15% OFF! MILITARY PERSONNEL - 15% OFF EVERY DAY!

of Island County

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OAK HARBOR • 290 SE PIONEER WAY • 360.675.8733 store@islandcountyhabitat.com OPEN: MONDAY - SATURDAY 10AM-5PM SUNDAY 11AM-4PM

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AUGUST 22 - AUGUST 28, 2019 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

What’s Going On All entries are listed chronologically, unless there are multiple entries for the same venue or are connected to a specific organization (such as Sno-Isle Libraries) in which case all entries for that venue or organization are listed collectively in chronological order under one heading.

Lions Club Fruit Sales Daily until sold out, 9:00am-6:00pm Rite Aid parking lot, Oak Harbor The Oak Harbor Lions Club is selling cherries, peaches, nectarines, plums, Walla Wallas, bell peppers, beef steak and Roma tomatoes, jalapeños, and more. All proceeds are given back to the community. Look for the bright gold trailer.

Live Music: The Hot Club of Troy Thursday, August 22, 6:00-8:00pm Ciao Restaurant, 701 N Main St, Coupeville Lively swing music with a romantic flair. For reservations or more information, call 360-678-0800.

Island Herb Vendor Day Friday, August 23, 2:00-5:00pm Island Herb, Freeland Representatives from Kouchlock will be on site with product displays and information. Must be 21 or older. Island Herb is located at 5565 Vanbarr Pl, Unit F. For more information, call 360-331-0140 or visit whidbeyislandherb. com. Marijuana has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Keep out of the reach of children.

Live Music: Jess Friday, August 23, 7:30-9:30pm Penn Cove Taproom, Oak Harbor Back by popular demand, singer songwriter Jessica “Jess” Drugge and her wife, Marci Hastings, moved to Coupeville from West Seattle in December 2017. Jess’ performances are a mixture of originals and covers. Recently described as coffeeshop rock-acoustic, Jess has carefully handcrafted her originals. No cover. For more information, call 360-682-5747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com.

Whidbey Island Studio Art Tour Saturday, August 24 Take a free guided tour of six artists’ studios in Coupeville, Freeland and Langley, on Island Transit’s regularly scheduled bus. Please RSVP by calling 360-678-9536 or emailing Travel@ IslandTransit.org.

Bikers for Babies Saturday, August 24, 9:00am Pregnancy Care Clinic, Oak Harbor Registration and safety brief starts at 9:00am. Kick stands up 10:00am. Ride ends at Skagit Powersports. $30 registration fee. Food and drinks following. Call 360-675-2096 or visit islandspcc.org to register. Pregnancy Care Clinic is located at 670 SE Midway Blvd.

Meet the Author: Casson Trenor Saturday, August 24, 12:00-4:00pm Langley Whale Center, 105 Anthes Ave. Meet Casson Trenor, author of the beautiful childrens book “Umijoo,” which tells the tale of a young girl’s magical adventure to the ocean depths, which entertains while it educates about the connections between our daily life and the health of our oceans. Trenor will be signing books and doing readings throughout the afternoon. He is a career marine conservation activist, defended whales in Antarctica and ran campaigns to reform major seafood corporations. He has established sustainable sushi restaurants. He was named Time Magazine’s “Hero of Environment” and Ocean Protection Hero by the U.S. House of Representatives. For more information, email wendylsines@gmail.com or call 360-221-7505.

Junior Ranger Series: Plankton Party Saturday, August 24, 1:00pm Joseph Whidbey State Park, 1755 Crosby Rd, Oak Harbor Take a journey into the microscopic world of plankton. Learn how these teeny tiny plants and animals feed the marine animals of the Salish Sea. There will be a fun activity followed by making your very own plankton species! Recommended for ages 4+, all are welcome. Discover Pass is required. For more information, contact Jackie French at 360-5442457.

American Roots Music Series Saturday, August 24, 7:00-8:00pm Deception Pass State Park, West Beach Amphitheater Virtuoso fiddler Lisa Ornstein and ace guitarist Dan Compton relish musical conversation. A concert with the duo takes audiences on a journey deep into the musical heartlands of Quebec and Appalachia, with side trips to Ireland. The concert is free to attend, though a Discover Pass or Day Pass is required for parking. Bench seating is available, but feel free to bring your own folding chair. Blankets and bug spray are highly recommended. Please contact DeceptionPass.Interpreter@parks. wa.gov or 360-675-3767 with any questions.

Live Music: Levi Burkle Saturday, August 24, 7:30-9:30pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville Levi Burkle performs original acoustic jazz, folk, rock and country. He has recorded and produced a number of albums and has had songs in multiple films. No cover. For more information, call 360-682-5747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com.

Island Herb Vendor Day Thursday, August 29, 3:00-6:00pm Island Herb, Freeland Representatives from Sticky Budz will be on site with product displays and information. Must be 21 or older. Island Herb is located at 5565 Vanbarr Pl, Unit F. For more information, call 360-331-0140 or visit whidbeyislandherb. com. Marijuana has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Keep out of the reach of children.

Live Music: Jim Smith Friday, August 30, 7:30-9:30pm Penn Cove Taproom, Oak Harbor Playing classic hits from throughout the decades. Music that brings back memories… and puts a smile on your face. No cover. For more information, call 360-682-5747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com.

All You Can Eat Breakfast Saturday, August 31, 8:00am-12:00pm Whidbey Masonic Lodge 15, 804 N. Main, Coupeville Breakfast includes eggs, bacon, sausage, pancakes, orange juice and tea or coffee. $8/Adults, $4/Children 4-12, under 4 free.

Live Music: Woody Virgil Saturday, August 31, 7:30-9:30pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville This Whidbey Island musician plays original tunes mixed with pop, folk, rock, and country. Backed with his phantom rhythm section, he’s like a one man trio, with a little harmonica thrown in. No cover. For more information, call 360-682-5747 or visit www.penncovebrewing. com.

Upcoming Sno-Isle Library Events See schedule below Cost: Free Lit for Fun Book Group Thursday, August 22, 9:00-11:00am Freeland Library Join us for a discussion of Tara Westover’s

“Educated,” a memoir about a young girl who leaves her survivalist family and goes on to earn a PhD from Cambridge University. For adults. Made by Hand: Shell Art Saturday, August 24, 10:00am Freeland Library Collected a stash of shells over the summer? We’ll share some ideas (and supplies) for decorating and transforming them into something new. We’ll have some shells, but please bring your own as well. Stories with Sonie Saturday, August 24, 11:00am-12:30pm Coupeville Library Read aloud to Sonie, a patient listener and certified therapy dog. Pre-readers and independent readers are welcome. Caregiver required. Supported by the Alliance of Therapy Dogs. Whidbey Writers By the Sea Monday, August 26, 10:00am-12:00pm Freeland Library Meet with a group of dedicated writers to polish skills, share past and present work and have fun discussing all things literary. Everyone is welcome.

Religious Services South Whidbey Community Church Sundays, 9:00-9:45am Adult Bible Study 10:00-11:00am Worship Deer Lagoon Grange, 5142 Bayview Rd, Langley Sunday, August 25 - What Kind of Person can God Use?: Paul describes the person he is.

Prayer Group Every Tuesday, 4:00-5:30pm St. Hubert Catholic Church, Langley Charismatic Prayer and Praise group. Everyone welcome. For more information, call Bill at 360-222-4080 or email Sobico@comcast.net.

Filipino Christian Fellowship

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED every Sunday at the Unitarian Universalist building. For more information, contact Tom Ewell at tewell@whidbey.com or go to www. whidbeyquakers.org.

First Church of Christ, Scientist Worship, 10:00am Sunday School to age 20, 10:00am Wednesday Testimony Meeting, 2:30pm Christian Science Reading Room Tuesday & Friday, 11:00am-3:00pm The church and Reading Room are located at 721 SW 20th Court at Scenic Heights Street, Oak Harbor. Call 360-675-0621 or visit christianscience.com. Services and Sunday School are also held at 10:30am on South Whidbey at 15910 Highway 525, just north of Bayview and across from Useless Bay Road; testimony meetings are held the first Wednesday of each month at 7:30pm.

Galleries & Art Shows Featured Artist: Linnane Armstrong Through August Penn Cove Gallery, Coupeville The work of relief printmaking artist Linnane Armstrong will be featured for the month of August. Linnane creates woodcut and linocut prints inspired by the dramatic landscapes and natural elements of her Whidbey Island home. Her colorful and monochrome images use value and pattern in ways that draw the viewer deep into the scene.

Meetings & Organizations PBY Naval Air Museum Wednesday, August 28, 11:30am CPO Club, Oak Harbor The featured speaker at the monthly no-host luncheon will be Wayne Clark. Wayne will talk about the PBY history in Alaska as the PBY’s were the backbone of the early WWII involvement in the war. This would include the use of the PBYs as USCG aircraft, and the Navy’s recon and search and rescue use both in SE Alaska (Sitka), Anchorage, and in the 1000 Mile War effort (Kodiak, Adak, and the Aleutians). The public is invited to this event. Call 360-240-9500 for directions and more information.

Sundays, 2:00pm Meets at Church on the Rock, 1780 SE 4th Ave., Oak Harbor. www.ohcfellowship.com

Whidbey Weavers Guild

Concordia Lutheran Church

The business meeting is followed by show and tell at 11:00am. Bring your own lunch and a cup for tea. The program, “No Castle Walls Need Apply,” begins at 1:00pm and is presented by Terry Olson. Terry is a contemporary tapestry weaver from Oregon City, Oregon. She also teaches tapestry at the Damascus Fiber Arts School in Damascus, Oregon. She is coming to Whidbey Island to teach a three-day workshop titled “Tapestry Techniques on a Postcard.”

Sunday service, 9:30am Bible Study & Sunday School, 10:45am 590 N. Oak Harbor Street For more information, visit www.concordiaoak harbor.org or call 360-675-2548.

Teaching Through God’s Word Sundays, 9:00 & 11:00am Calvary Chapel, 3821 French Road, Clinton For more information, visit ccwhidbey.com.

Unitarian Universalist Sunday Service Sundays, 10:00am Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland All are welcome. Values-based children’s religious exploration classes and childcare will be provided. Visit www.uucwi.org for more information. The Unitarian Universalist Congregation building is located at 20103 Highway 525, two miles north of Freeland.

Unity of Whidbey Sundays, 10:00am 5671 Crawford Road, Langley If you’re one of the “spiritual but not religious” people who questions your childhood faith or is looking for something more, Unity of Whidbey may feel like a homecoming. Visit their website: unityofwhidbey.org.

Whidbey Quakers Sundays, 4:00-5:00pm Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland Whidbey Islands Friends Meeting (also known as Quakers) meet in silent worship and community, with occasional spoken messages,

Thursday, September 5, 10:00am-2:00pm Pacific Rim Institute, 108 Parker Rd, Coupeville

Adult Children of Alcoholics Meeting Every Monday, 7:00-8:00pm Carole’s Barbershop, Freeland A meeting dedicated to dealing with the problem and solution for recovering from the effects of growing up in an alcoholic or otherwise dysfunctional family. For more information, contact Clayton at 360-989-4248 or visit www.adultchildren.org.

Al-Anon Every Wednesday, 9:30-10:30am 432 2nd St., Langley If a friend or relative has a problem with alcohol, you can find solutions for yourself at Alanon.

Alcoholics Anonymous Every Day, 12:00 & 8:00pm 432 2nd Street, Langley For more information, call 360-221-2070 For a list of continuous Meetings and Organizations, visit www.whidbeyweekly.com

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NEWS www.whidbeyweekly.com

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AUGUST 22 - AUGUST 28, 2019

Whidbey Working Artists Open Studio Tour:

Find what speaks to you By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly There is perhaps no better way to experience the variety and scope of talent on Whidbey Island than to check out Whidbey Working Artists’ Summer Open Studio Tour, to be held Saturday and Sunday at 50 locations up and down the island, from Oak Harbor to Clinton. Studios are open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day, giving ample opportunity to visit the 70 participating artists.

Senator Barbara Bailey

Barbara Bailey to resign her senate seat, Cribb to seek appointment By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly Republican Senator Barbara Bailey has announced she will not be seeking re-election and will be resigning her 10th District senate seat, effective Sept. 30. Meanwhile, outgoing Oak Harbor Chamber of Commerce Executive Director, Christine Cribb, has announced she will seek the appointment to Bailey’s vacated seat. In a letter to Gov. Jay Inslee last week Bailey, 74, said she had been considering the move for the past few months, and cited the desire to spend more time with her family and church as well as work on projects while she and her husband, Butch, remain “relatively healthy and mobile.” Cribb, who announced just last week she will be leaving her post at the chamber Nov. 15, told Whidbey Weekly she will be seeking the appointment to the state senate. “Last week I gave notice to my board of directors and to chamber membership that I was going to be stepping down...and I have a couple of great options, the first on the list is to seek the appointment to fill Sen. Barbara Bailey’s seat for the rest of her term,” Cribb said.

“We have everything this year and we have a lot of it, so I would suggest to anybody who wants to do the tour to sit down with the catalogue, mark the studios you want to go to, and have a plan,” said Kay Parsons, executive director of the Whidbey Island Arts Council, of which Whidbey Working Artists is a program. “Look for the mediums you want to see or if there’s a particular artist or studio you want to visit, the island’s only 50 miles long – you can go all the way!” When Parsons says there is everything on this tour, she is not kidding. Visitors can see fiber artists, painters of all kinds, print makers, glass artists, sculptors of wood, clay and stone, woodworkers, photographers – the list goes on. The open studio tour is a unique, interactive way to view, explore and discover art of all kinds. “The idea behind the studio tour is that people can go into the creative spaces of the artists and look and see how the artists work, see how they incorporate their ideas into actual art,” said Parsons, an accomplished artist who has participated in the tour several times. “I think that’s really what people like. They want to see,” she said. “They want to see how you’re working, what you’re working with and how you inhabit your space. It’s a great conversation and conversation inspires more art. It’s a creative process not just for the artist, but for the visitors. You get to play, you get to think about ideas, and this is good for everybody.” Participating artists agree. “What I like most [about the tour] is meeting people that love art and welcoming them to my home,” said Mike Wise, an oil painter. “Painting is a solitary business, where I am mostly alone while I work, while the galleries sell the work for me. I rarely get to meet the people who buy my art, so it makes it really fun.”

“I love meeting the visitors,” she said. “I hope they gain an appreciation of the beauty of real wood.”

Wise will be showing a summer still life collection he created exclusively for the tour.

Lewis said the one thing she doesn’t enjoy about the tour is that she doesn’t get to visit all the studios.

“I enjoy expanding my interaction with people I have met and explaining my art process,” said Steve Nowicki, a metal artist inspired by Northwest flora and sea life. He shares space at his Shock-N-Awe Metalworks with wood/metal artist Les Eelkema.

“It’s an amazing opportunity to visit artists in their studios and see their creative process,” she said. “It’s also a great opportunity to support local artists and understand the incredible amount of talent that resides on Whidbey Island.”

“What I hope is that my art will spark their interest,” Nowicki said. “People often tell me they have no talent. I respond by telling them to visit many of the tour studios, see what might pique an interest and pursue it.”

If transportation is an issue, Island Transit is offering a free guided tour of six studios in Coupeville, Freeland and Langley on its regularly scheduled bus. Those interested are asked to RSVP for this special tour by calling 360-678-9536 or by emailing travel@ IslandTransit.org.

“I love to work and tell folks about my process, learn about their point of view and their experiences with art,” said watercolor artist Ginny O’Neill, at Studio 106 in Langley. “Our studio is a very relaxed place, where you can sit and have a conversation or just take your time to look around.

A former elected Oak Harbor School Board representative, moving from the chamber into politics is something that has interested Cribb for some time.

“For me, and for most artists I know, when we paint we’re not just painting a subject, we’re painting a feeling. A landscape can express the special relationship you have with your surroundings – in my case the Pacific Northwest.”

“It’s always been in the back of my mind that I would like to do that one day,” she said. “I feel really humbled and blessed about the opportunity to be appointed. There’s still a huge process that needs to be accomplished to even get the appointment. So, is it the normal way people get to the senate? No, but I’ve never been one to not think outside the box.”

Janet Lewis is one of two women whose woodworking will be featured on the tour. Lewis is a Luthier; she makes stringed instruments as well as wooden boxes and furniture.

Cribb, who moved to Oak Harbor with her family just after 9/11, said at the time, she knew she had come home. She said she

See BAILEY continued on page 12

Photo Courtesy of Mike Wise Oil painter Mike Wise is one of 70 artists participating in Whidbey Working Artists’ Summer Open Studio Tour, to be held Saturday and Sunday at 50 studio locations across Whidbey Island. This painting, entitled “Megan’s Sunflowers,” features flowers from the Coupeville Farmers Market and is part of a summer still life collection Wise created just for the studio tour.

“We weren’t expecting that at all, so we’re quite pleased,” said Parsons of Island Transit’s tour. “It’s kind of wonderful they’ve done this for us.” The Summer Open Studio Tour draws about 2,000 people – both local residents and visitors to the isle - over the course of the two days. Those planning on attending can check out Whidbey Working Artists’ Facebook page to see about earning tour dollars. Catalogues for the tour can be found at businesses all over the island, or online at www.whidbeyworkingartists.com. Explore art of all kinds this weekend. Explore Whidbey Island. Discover what speaks to you. “This island is filled with artists working in every conceivable medium,” said O’Neill. “Visiting the artists’ studios and getting the feel for how they work can be an inspiring experience.” “Creativity is something we’re all capable of,” Parsons said. “Train that little gray muscle matter that you’ve got up there to look at the world creatively. The more you use it the more it’s there.”

Photo Courtesy of Whidbey Working Artists Metal artist Steve Nowicki gets his inspiration from the flora and sea life of the Northwest. He cuts and hand forms mild steel into a variety of shapes, then colors and treats them, accenting them with copper, brass and bronze.

“It’s a rare opportunity to be able to enter into artists’ studios and watch them work, let alone 50 of them in a beautiful location like Whidbey Island,” said Wise. “I will be painting all weekend, welcoming guests and encouraging interaction, as will all of the artists on the tour.”

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AUGUST 22 - AUGUST 28, 2019 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

Island 911

Seriously, we do not make this stuff up! WEDNESDAY, JULY 17 7:56 am, Britzman Loop Reporting party advising ongoing issue with being harassed by male at location - states is paper delivery driver; when passing possibly throws rocks at reporting party, occurred last week. Damage to vehicle, yells at reporting party to slow down in area even when not speeding. 12:08 pm, Emil Rd. Reporting party states female drove up to reporting party and friend. Telling reporting to “Get the f*** out of here.” Keeps driving up and down roadway. 2:57 pm, SR 20 Advising motorhome struck female in head, then kept going; mirror shattered. 10:31 pm, Backswing Ln. Caller advising light bulb was stolen from exterior light – suspects neighbor; did not witness it. Unknown name for neighbor, unknown time frame. Caller states ongoing issue with neighbor being upset about light. THURSDAY, JULY 18 12:47 pm, Race Rd. Requesting call. States she can no longer care for her guinea pig so family friends were assisting with care at their own

residence; family can no longer keep the pet. Instead of returning pet to reporting party, family is indicating they will be giving pet to someone else or bring it to a home where no one is home. Reporting party is concerned. FRIDAY, JULY 19 8:53 pm, SR 525 Male advising he has a lot of complaints. Airwaves have been telling him his neighbors are doing cruel things and have weapons; asking deputy to contact him at pay phone “Bob’s office.” SUNDAY, JULY 21 1:29 am, Delphi Dr. Reporting party advising he needs cops, something is about to happen “Is that alright?” Now saying he might get killed. 4 am, Delphi Dr. Reporting party advising is still being stalked; requesting patrol; is safely inside his residence with doors and windows locked, 9-1-1 is only phone. 10:59 pm, Liberty Ln. Advising a sedan-type vehicle just ran off road into blackberries, almost took out reporting party’s fence, then continued on down Liberty; reporting party states occurred three minutes ago.

MONDAY, JULY 22 8:21 am, Cultus Dr. Reporting party advising she is afraid for her life. States neighbor stalks her; she is sitting in hot tub on her deck, watching neighbor come in and out of her residence. Can see she has a gun. 11:57 am, Mathew St. Advising daughter received text Thursday from number she doesn’t know saying “Hey, this is a scam text.” Requesting call. TUESDAY, JULY 23 6:54 am, East Harbor Rd. Reporting party wants to drop off donuts to say thank you for dropping off donuts. 4:56 pm, NE Midway Blvd. Reporting party advising she was walking into store and male subject asked her if she wanted to get into his car with A/C. 7:53 pm, Scenic Heights Rd. Reporting party advising since Saturday there has been a smell like something is deceased or really old garbage. Advising smells like it’s coming from woods near vacant property next door. WEDNESDAY, JULY 24 4:04 pm, Madrona Way Caller advising male stuck in boat in small lagoon; states male slipped in boat as well; is right at the edge of water on edge of lagoon. THURSDAY, JULY 25 6:35 am, NE Goldie St. Reporting party advising male is laying on shoulder of road; partially in street. 7:05 am, Possession Rd. Advising male in late 50s hit reporting party in the face and then walked away; states male was yelling at reporting party prior to incident about them not being Americans.

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED 10:08 am, Autumn Ln. Reporting party advising “crazy person” out on property; states lives in woods. He’s placing no trespassing signs in area; property does not belong to male. 12:19 pm, SR 20 Reporting party advising he is meeting someone at Petco around 1 pm to turn over tortoise he found; concerned, as person who is going to home the tortoise has been belligerent. 6:44 pm, SE Barrington Dr. Caller advising she is suspicious of cookie she was given; states is not feeling well. 8:19 pm, SR 20 Reporting party advising flock of seagulls is attacking baby seagull. FRIDAY, JULY 26 9:09 am, SE Bayshore Dr. Caller advising male subject just threw bolt cutters at another male on bike. 1:25 pm, Sandy Hook Dr. Caller advising neighbor moves caller’s boat and crab pots; left note on truck regarding being parked. States is on his own property, neighbor doesn’t think so. 4:17 pm, Riepma Ave. Call via medical alarm company, subscriber having issues with “roommate.” Has been pushing him for days, is “in fear of his life” due to recently signing his will. 8:32 pm, Steiner Dr. Reporting party advising she’s with someone who is claiming to be her husband; is in the house and won’t leave. Claiming he is same name as reporting party’s husband. 10:44 pm, Northgate Dr. Advising subjects backing cars up to center lane where cars are? Between road and trees? [sic] Report provided by OHPD & Island County Sheriff’s Dept.

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Island Angler No I’m not talking about the boat! If you have been a boat owner long enough I’m sure you’ve heard the old saying “a boat is a hole we throw money into” many times. It does seem that’s what we do, but when the boat brings home some fresh salmon, tuna or bottom fish to eat, or takes the family out on an unforgettable sightseeing tour, it’s worth every penny, I think. Rather, if you have taken the opportunity to fish or spend time combing the waters’ edge from North Beach under the Deception Pass Bridge, you were looking at the “The Hole.” From mid August through mid October you are going to see a small armada of fishing boats dancing around each other trying to place their boat with lures down and ready in the flowing water, searching for the perfect spot that hopefully leads to a rod-bending fish strike. It’s not lingcod the fishermen are after - that season has long passed – but there is a special spot within the hole where the Coho and Pink salmon hold and prey on baitfish before committing themselves to the rivers. Fishermen use their small kicker/trolling motors to keep their lure or herring offering in this spot as long as possible; this is what the boat shuffle is all about. The center of the hole is a few yards out from the base of the steep rocks on the South side of the bridge. Over time, Mother Nature has carved out a deep underwater sweet spot which, at the right times of the day, slows down the current directly or creates a soft back-eddy salmon can “suspend” in - face into the current without using too much energy - where they can feed and get a faint taste of fresh water coming from the glacier-fed Skagit River. The hole is well known by old timers and fishermen who are not afraid to gracefully bump boats. I knew a very good salmon fisherman by the name of Gene Poole; he told me stories of he and his sons catching big Kings on herring from the hole for many years. His stories, and many other early Whidbey Island fishermen I’ve spoken with over the years, all agreed about how common it was to hook 50- and 60-pound Kings in the hole. I can only imagine what that must have been like! I would bet Kings still hang out in the hole at certain times of the year, but no more 50- and 60-pounders. The hole can be a Coho hot spot in September. If downriggers are not used to carry the bait down to the fish, many herring fishermen will use a 6- or 8-ounce banana weight, followed by a dodger or flasher on two feet of heavy leader, followed by three feet of heavy leader with a

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We Specialize In Custom Framing double hook herring rig, all attached to a good quality 8.5- to 10-foot rod and reel; Coho love to attack spinning herring baits. Other fishermen will use proven Gold Star or Coyote-style salmon spoons instead of herring, but rigged the same way. Herring take a little more care than a spoon, but the goal is to keep the bait or lure down in the fish’s face as long as you can. Like most other areas in the Puget Sound, the tide and current schedule while fishing the hole is very important to your success. It is even more so in Deception Pass, where some tidal currents can be so swift and can change directions so unbelievably fast there may only be a 30 to 45 minute window of prime fishing water speed. This is when the boat dance for the sweet spot can get testy. There is hope, however. When the current gets moving that fast the fish can’t hold their position in the swift water either, so they too are forced to move to slower, comfortable waters inside the Pass or in the open flat waters out from the corner of north and west beach, depending on current direction. The fish will not be as concentrated as in the hole, but many of the fish won’t go far; after all, they are getting ready to commit to the rivers. Shore fishing from North Beach and casting toward the hole when boat fishermen are present can be frustrating. Most boat fishermen have what I call “bank fisher etiquette” and will cheat away from shore a little to give the bank fishermen some space, but not all. On the other hand, I think bank fishermen’s patience quickly runs thin with boats close ashore, and are more likely to cast a BuzzBomb warning shot across the bow to get someone’s attention. The hard truth is, when everyone is gunning for the snappy biting fish in the hole, things are bound to get a little tense. Fishing the hole from a boat is not for everyone, but if it’s not too crowded and you can get comfortable with the leapfrog pattern used, your busy efforts can be rewarded with a limit of chrome bright coho salmon. So the next time you drive over Deception Pass or visit the North Beach in the State Park think about all the fish and memories “The Hole” has seen and created over the last 100 years and still continues to make. Now is the time to get the kids to the beaches to fish for the pinks and coho. When possible cast to and target jumping fish and the surrounding water - the fish are there! Be safe and GOOD LUCK out there. Here is my email; feel free to drop me a note or story: tlfishmonger@ gmail.com.

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NORTH WHIDBEY SUNRISE ROTARY CLUB PROUDLY PRESENTS THE

27th Annual Whidbey Island

CHALLENGE SERIES

GRAVITY RACES FOR KIDS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

AUGUST 24, 2019 Races Start at 10am on SE Barrington Drive

Between Island Thrift and the Oak Harbor Post Office

Hardware

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WHY GO OVER THE BRIDGE FOR YOUR CUSTOM FRAMING & ART SUPPLIES?

By Tracy Loescher

“THE HOLE”

AUGUST 22 - AUGUST 28, 2019

CHALLENGE SERIES

This event is supported by donations and helps fund local scholarships and other Rotary projects. www.WhidbeyRotary.com • The North Whidbey Sunrise Rotary Club’s Foundation is a 501(c)3 organization.

Monday-Saturday 8am-7pm • Sunday 9am-6pm

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10 AUGUST 22 - AUGUST 28, 2019 LOCALLY OWNED

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Courtesy of Morgan Cooper

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly More than 100 people wave American flags and signs of support for the Navy, NAS Whidbey Island and jet noise during a three hour rally in Oak Harbor Saturday.

Pro-Navy rally draws supportive honks, hoots and hollers By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly There is strong support of the Navy, its mission and its aircraft on Whidbey Island, and a group of well over 100 people turned out Saturday morning in Oak Harbor to rally on behalf of it. Supporters of NAS Whidbey and the Navy lined all four corners of the intersection of State Route 20 and Pioneer Way for three hours Saturday, asking vehicle drivers to honk their horns if they agreed. Many drivers not only honked their horns, but joined in with shouts of support, earning whoops and hoots of encouragement from rally-goers. Organizers say they were pleased with how the grass-roots rally turned out. “I felt it was a good turn out for a Saturday with a lot of other things like Driftwood Days and vacations going on,” said Morgan Cooper, who helped plan the event. “I think simply the message that we love our Navy was well presented and received by all the smiles and honking and waving going on. “The goal was to give the community an opportunity to stand up and rally support around our Navy and our country,” she continued. “ We had the Pledge of Allegiance at noon with Oak Harbor Mayor Bob Severns leading. Patriotism ruled the day.” While the rally was not meant as a political gathering, several people in attendance said they came out not only to support NAS Whidbey, but to help show Washington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson how deep Navy support runs within the community. Ferguson recently filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Navy regarding the impact of increased EA-18G Growler operations on Whidbey, claiming the Navy had failed to study the environmental impacts increased flights could have over central Whidbey, particularly on Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve. A record of decision by the Navy earlier this

year quadrupled the number of Field Carrier Landing Practice operations – commonly called touch-and-go’s - conducted at Outlying Landing Field near Coupeville, drawing the ire of opposition groups such as the Sound Defense Alliance and Citizens of Ebey’s Reserve, which has also filed two new lawsuits against the Navy. Those at Saturday’s rally said it was time for the majority to make some noise of its own, such as Jim and Alice Grant. Jim is a veteran and the couple’s son is active duty, stationed at NAS Whidbey Island.

“We think the Navy was here before a lot of [the opposition],” said Mary. “There are more of us who appreciate the sound of freedom. They fly over our house, too, and we love it.” Some in attendance had strong words of condemnation for the AG and the lawsuit. “The AG is a piece of s**t,” said veteran Neil Lafiolais. “He’s upset me to the point I’m driven to be here. I hope that he wakes up and smells the coffee.”

“My son flies those aircraft,” Alice said. “People want their privileges but they’re not willing to put up with a little inconvenience. Meanwhile, my son puts his life on the line every time he gets in a jet.”

“I think the mission of NAS Whidbey is vital to our country and I think this lawsuit has a positive impact on the rest of us who support it,” said Howard Gulley. “We’re going to get out there and fight him.”

“I think it’s important to support our Navy,” said Carrie Meadows, who said she is not connected to the Navy. “They’re taking care of us. The least we can do is let them practice.”

“I think it’s important to show the attorney general the true story of our community and how much support there is for the Navy,” said Island County Commissioner Jill Johnson. “There’s a misconception that a minority of loud voices are representative of our county’s values; we want to make it clear that is not the case.”

“I support the Navy station,” said Larry Winton. “Its mission is important and the men and women who serve need to see their community supports them.” “I’m proud of what our military men and women do so we can be free,” said Rory Wallgren, who was born and raised on Whidbey Island. “I’m thankful they want to put their lives on the line to protect us. We need to come together and be proud of America and the people who fight for us. We watch them fly over our house every day and we go out and wave at ‘em.” Andy Stevens served in the Navy from 1961 to 1966. He said that’s the reason he and his wife, Mary, now live in Anacortes. “We’ve been doing things like this every Sunday for 18 years,” he said. “That’s a lot of Sundays. It’s important to wake people up and educate them.”

Organizers say proceeds from hat and T-shirt sales helped pay for insurance for the event and anything remaining will be donated to the NASWI Task Force, a group which has worked in the past to keep the air station off military base closure lists. Because of the success of Saturday’s rally, organizers said residents can expect to see more such events in the future. “There will be another and it will have additional community support,” Cooper said. “Everyone kept asking, ‘So when is the next one?’ People were happy!” For some, the message they want to share is very simple. “If these touch-and-go’s save one pilot,” said Mary Stevens, “then it’s worth every decibel.”

Everyone’s a winner: racing event raises funds for Rotary Club By Kacie Jo Voeller Whidbey Weekly The 27th Annual Challenge Series will bring heartwarming racing fun to downtown Oak Harbor Saturday starting at 10 a.m. Janis Powell, coordinator for the Challenge Series and member of the Rotary Club of North Whidbey Island Sunrise, said the Challenge Series was started by Leo Finnegan of Issaquah, who was inspired to create the races by his son with disabilities. She said Finnegan began the races for disabled children in the area, but soon wanted to expand the program. The Rotary Club of North Whidbey Island Sunrise got involved a few years into the event, and now organizes the Oak Harbor races, according to Powell. “He (Finnegan) started doing the races there and it was so well accepted that they started taking it on the road to other areas,” she said. Oak Harbor’s Challenge Series is an opportunity for children with developmental or other disabilities to participate in a soap box derby-type race where cars propelled by gravity race down Barrington Drive from Ely Street to the US Post Office. Powell said the two-person cars carry teams of a driver, ages 10-12, and a co-driver with a disability. Drivers receive training before the day’s activities commence. The event gives those involved a chance to bond, she said.

“When you have the drivers and co-drivers doing things together in a team effort to get that car to the bottom of the hill, they become friends by the end of day and they take that home with them,” she said. “And their (the driver’s) whole attitude changes from maybe what it was before, to someone with disabilities is not someone that you avoid, (but) it is somebody that you can have fun with and somebody you can be a pal to.” Powell said the Challenge Series is one of the club’s larger fundraisers throughout the year and is made possible by a number of sponsors and volunteers. This year, a portion of the proceeds will contribute to starting a community fund for the group, which will allow the club to give grants to projects and people in need. “It (the Challenge Series) is just a lot of fun,” she said. “It is really a grand thing and then we use the money to help do a lot of the projects we do in this town.” Powell said the Rotary Club hopes to continue to grow the event. Currently, the club uses cars and equipment provided by Finnegan. “We are hoping now to build our own fleet of cars and a trailer and a launching mechanism, so we can not only do the Challenge Series here whenever we choose

to do that, but we could also take it on the road up here in the Northwest,” she said. “And maybe they would have one in Mount Vernon or Bellingham where we could take the cars and do that and allow more people to be able to enjoy that sport.” The event is a labor of love each year for the Rotary Club of North Whidbey Island Sunrise Powell said, and the group comes together to make the Challenge Series and other community initiatives possible, such as creating a fire safety house to help educate children. “We are not a big club,” she said. “The morning club has about 32 members, so we are not that big, but we are mighty. We do not give up; if we have a project that needs doing, we make it happen.” Butch Laurion, a member of the Sunrise Rotary Club, has run a hot dog stand along with his wife, Kathy, at the event for 27 years. The pair serves up hot dogs, chips, soda and more at no cost to the race participants. “You ask them the question, ‘Are you having fun?’” he said. “And some of those kids, their eyes light up, and they say, ‘It is the most fun I have had in my life.’ It is something. It can make you tear up.” Laurion said the event offers a unique

Photo Courtesy of North Whidbey Island Sunrise Rotary Club Each year, Oak Harbor High School cheerleaders come out to support the racers as they complete the Challenge Series downhill course. The event is made possible by a number of groups and individuals in the community who volunteer their time.

opportunity for individuals with disabilities and in his years participating, he has appreciated getting to see the racers enjoying their day in the spotlight. “It is fantastic and just heartwarming to see the smiles on the kids’ faces,” he said. Laurion said the event is a day of fun the co-drivers often look forward to, and each participant gets a medal as a way to commemorate their participation. “If you can give them something that inspires them and makes them feel good about themselves, I think that is an important thing and I think that is what we try to do,” he said. For more information on the Challenge Series, please visit whidbeyrotary.com.

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Film Shorts sure the thing about the Bible is spot on. ★★ (PG • 1 hr. 55 min.)

The Angry Birds Movie 2: No one is more surprised than me that these birds can fly. ★★★ (PG • 1 hr. 40 min.)

Dora and the Lost City of Gold: The tagline for this first installment of what is sure to be a Dora the Explorer franchise is “Explorer is her middle name.” Which is dumb because everyone knows her middle name is “the.” Don’t hold it against Dora or her movie, though. It’s not their fault. ★★★★ (PG • 1 hr. 42 min.) The Farewell: Awkwafina gets the starring role she so richly deserves–and makes the most of it in this multi-generational story about family bonds, saying goodbye and those times in which honesty is not always the best policy. See summer’s indie blockbuster before it says farewell. ★★★★★^ (PG • 1 hr. 34 min.) Once Upon a Time in Hollywood: Quentin Tarantino’s latest is two hours and 40 minutes of setup for five minutes of payoff. But what a gloriously unhinged, completely crazy five minutes it is. Plus, I could watch Brad Pitt steal scenes from Leonardo DiCaprio forever and never tire of it. ★★★★★ (R • 2 hrs. 39 min.)

Ready Or Not: Everyone is commenting on the delightfully demonic turn by newcomer Samara Weaving as a bride who marries into a family with a seriously twisted take on hide and seek, but I’m here to remind you this horror-thriller also stars Adam Brody, aka Seth Cohen from “The O.C.,” aka Dave Rygalski from “Gilmore Girls.” ★★★★ (R • 1 hr. 35 min.) Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark: For anyone who grew up reading this series of short horror stories, all we want is for this film not to suck. And thanks to Guillermo del Toro, who is responsible for the story and the editing, it most assuredly does not suck. ★★★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 48 min.) Where’d You Go, Bernadette: The Angry Birds sequel has better reviews than this movie. Get it together, Bernadette. ★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 44 min.) For Anacortes theater showings, please see www.fandango.com. For Blue Fox and Oak Harbor Cinemas showings see ads on this page.

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Answers on page 15

ANACORTES NATURAL MEDICINE

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YOUR LOCAL MOVIE THEATER

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The Overcomer: Set against a backdrop of dire economic circumstances, a man, armed only with his Bible and a talented high-school athlete, overcomes something, thus being forever known as the Overcomer. It’s possible I got some plot points wrong, but I’m pretty

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FREELAND CANNABIS & ANACORTES CANNABIS

By Carey Ross

The Art of Racing in the Rain: Another move seen from a dog’s eye view, this time starring Milo Ventimiglia as the race-car driver who presumably races in the rain. If you like dog-centric movies, you’ll like this one. Personally, I prefer Cujo. ★★ (PG • 1 hr. 49 min.)

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Angel Has Fallen: Just when I forgot all about the existence of Gerard Butler, here he is. I gave some thought to learning what this movie is about, but it seems like a waste of effort, so I’ll just go ahead and guess it’s about as good as every other Gerard Butler movie. ★★ (R • 1 hr. 54 min.)

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AUGUST 22 - AUGUST 28, 2019 LOCALLY OWNED

Let’s Dish! with Kae Harris

BACK TO SCHOOL/WORK BENTO BOXES! It’s almost back to school time again which means busy days, jam-packed schedules and activities crammed into every second of time you have. With all this chaos that eventually seems to find equilibrium, how does one manage to run a home, be a chauffeur, nurse, teacher, personal shopper, coach and STILL make healthy lunches for everyone? A tall task I dare say, but there we are, doing it the best we can, right?

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ideas viable options for my incredibly selective children.” And I think I’ve found a way. The best part about it is this idea can suit people of all ages, in just about any setting, and you get to be really creative with the snacks and lunches. I think I’ve made mention of them before. They’re called “bento boxes.”

I have a busy household that wakes up (and I really mean me) at 5.30 a.m. I drag tired little people out of bed and insist they eat a healthy breakfast, or at least one that isn’t some toaster pastry every morning, and then we start the school runs. Given I work as well, it’s often quite tedious finding the time to prepare meals at ALL, let alone healthy ones the kids won’t pick apart. The part I have started to find most frustrating is their lunch bags AND mine, because it isn’t always just small kids who need to take a packed lunch somewhere. There are plenty of big kids and adults who do as well.

The history of the bento box is said to be a little controversial, though it is believed to be fashioned after the seed boxes Japanese farmers used for seed in the 5th century. It wasn’t just farmers who utilized these boxes with compartments; it was hunters and warriors, too. The multi-compartmental box allowed the hungry hunter/warrior/farmer to take a variety of food items – fish, rice and vegetables – all in one box, without them necessarily getting mashed together. Bento boxes spread across the Asian continent with several regions adopting a name for it all their own and while the earlier half of the 20th century saw the Bento box become a status symbol for the upper class and eventually dwindle in popularity, it re-emerged anew, invigorated with brand new concepts to fill the boxes now – character bento.

I am always curious to know what my friends give their kids for a snack or lunch and some of them put me to shame with how un-picky their offspring are and what they send to school for them. I think to myself, “I have to find a way to make these wonderful snack

Scrolling through Pinterest, looking at the marvelous ideas for children’s bento box lunches, I’m in awe. The creative parent in the video (whose face you can never see – which is fine, but I digress) seems to expertly form flavorful mirin sticky rice with nori

BAILEY continued from page 7 believes she has taken the chamber as far as she can, and is looking forward to moving on to new ways to serve her community. “What excites me is the opportunity to continue to serve on even a greater level,” she said, adding she plans to spend the immediate future listening to what her potential constituents feel are the issues on which she should focus. “For now, I’m going to keep my comments on issues limited and really respect Sen. Barbara Bailey’s time, to celebrate her service and get myself on a little listening tour. There will be plenty of time to delve into dozens of issues affecting our state.” Sen. Bailey has thrown her support behind Cribb’s potential appointment. “I strongly support Christine to be my replacement,” Bailey said in the statement. Christine Cribb “I have watched her for years provide strong leadership in our community, promoting small businesses and supporting nonprofits. She will hit the ground running for the voters of LD 10 as my replacement, if appointed.” It is now up to the Precinct Committee Officers in the 10th Legislative District (Island, Skagit and Snohomish Counties) to review candidates and select three nominees, then County Commissioners will appoint one of the nominees to fill the vacancy and complete the remainder of Sen. Bailey’s term. “State law also requires that the appointee be of the same party as the departing incumbent – in this case, a Republican,” said Allen McPheeters, a precinct committee officer for the Island County Republican Party. “There are no other formal eligibility requirements, but the PCOs will review each candidate’s personal and professional history, political views, and community involvement.” County commissioners are required to name a replacement within 60 days, or by Nov. 29, choosing from the list of nominees provided by the PCOs. If commissioners fail to do so, Gov. Inslee would have 30 days to choose a replacement from the same list. “This is the first time we’ve participated in this process since Rep. Chris Strow resigned in 2008,” McPheeters said. “Rep. Norma Smith was chosen through this process.” Bailey has served in Olympia since she was elected as a representative in 2002 and went on to be elected to the senate in 2012. Cribb said she is hopeful she will ultimately be selected to fill Bailey’s seat and is excited by the prospect. “I love making a difference,” she said. “I love the thought that a collective group of people that are committed, can make a difference.”

LOCALLY OPERATED

wrapped around it, into cute characters and then perfectly carved carrot sticks, cucumber pieces and tomatoes are placed into the other compartments of the box, along with a hard boiled egg (or something like that), complete with two little olive slice eyes looking at your child and coaxing them to enjoy their healthy lunch the minute they open their bento box. I wish I was that crafty with food characters. Maybe I could be - if I had the time. A conundrum. Some kids don’t want carrot sticks (high five to the ones who do) and what would happen if I just switched them out, you know, for slices of strawberry, for example? Well, I’d have the first compartment of the bento box filled, with confidence it will be eaten. Perhaps I’d put some cashew nuts in another compartment, get those good fats in there, and perhaps another section of bento would contain some mini pepperoni slices, or slices of salami. Add a sandwich (with whatever your child likes) cut up into small shapes into the largest compartment, add a squeezable yogurt to their lunch bag and there you have it! One shining example of a bento box for kids who are a little choosy, like mine. This whole bento box idea carried my imagination off to other realms of wondrous food delights for the working adult. Imagine the many combinations of things you could put in your OWN bento box? Walnuts, grapes, hard boiled eggs, celery sticks with some ranch dip. How about a quick salad made from cubed tomatoes, sliced red onions with a sprinkling of vinegar, salt and pepper over it, served with some crostini in another compartment, mozzarella or goat’s cheese in another and a mix of your favorite salami or smoked, cured meat. Kind of a la-dee-dah box, if you ask me, and there’s absolutely nothing wrong with taking some simple “luxury” with you to work. You see, a bento box can, in my opinion (and I am sure there will be people who disagree with me and that’s completely okay), be anything you like. The combinations for what can go into them are endless, though I highly recommend, fresh, easy and healthy, of course. Having options at lunch keeps it interesting BITS ‘n’ PIECES

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Rep. Candidates include: Linda Racicot, candidate for re-election to South Whidbey School Board, Brook Willeford, candidate for South Whidbey School Board, Craig Cyr, candidate for Langley City Council, Position 4, Joseph Busig, candidate for Oak Harbor City Council Position 3, and Mike Pelliciotti, candidate for State Treasurer. The afternoon includes a hot dog and brats bar (including non-beef and vegetarian options), side dishes, beer and wine and soft drinks, a dessert auction and the opportunity to hear from many local Democratic leaders and candidates. There will be two special auction items: a night at the Inn at Langley, which includes a gourmet buffet breakfast and an afternoon sailing trip which includes lunch and wine. Summerfest is the major fundraiser for Island County Democrats and usually draws over 100 people. Tickets are available only at the door: $20 for adults, $15 for youths 17 – 20; and 16 and under are free. The ticket includes the lunch buffet and a glass of wine or beer or a soft drink. For more information, email carolyntamler@ whidbey.net. [Submitted by Carolyn Tamler]

The Goose Community Grocer Sponsors Team of Walkers for Susan B. Komen Seattle 3-Day Walk A team of six Goose Grocer staff members and a local artist have joined forces to walk in the Susan B. Komen Seattle 3-Day Walk Sept. 13-15. The Goose Grocer has supported the team with $5,000 of sponsorship support as well. Team “Save the Honkers” has raised $18,770 to date and needs $1,000 more so all team members can walk. Team organizer Belinda Permenter, assistant store director, was diagnosed with breast cancer in October 2018. After a lumpectomy in January 2019, she received best-case

and who knows, maybe keeps your morale and your mood uplifted. Dear readers, I love the idea of having the ability to pick something new and interesting to eat each day, if it’s what you like. For kids, it keeps them interested in what they’re eating and encourages healthy eating habits if the right items are packed. It can be a great way to introduce new foods periodically and eventually, maybe get a picky eater to finally enjoy something they previously might not have thought they would like. Perhaps the key is smaller portions for those items. In any event, this time I will leave you with a list of options you can mix and match for your very own bento box (which you can actually purchase from stores in the lunch box or food plasticware sections). I hope you make your very own bento box and if you do, please let me know how you did it! Feel free to send any comments, questions and definitely recipes you might like to share to letsdish. whidbeyweekly@gmail.com and we’ll do just that and Dish! Bento Box Food Item Ideas Dairy Dried fruits Cheese cubes Cranberries Mozzarella balls Raisins Goats cheese Apricots Strawberries Nuts Mangoes Walnuts Banana Chips Almonds Protein Cashews Macadamia Nuts Cooked pulses Hardboiled eggs Vegetables Deli meat Cherry tomatoes Cooked chicken Carrot sticks Fruits Celery sticks Cucumber slices ANYTHING you like! Olives Remember to always keep certain items cold and to pack an ice pack into your bento box if it allows. Food safety first and if you aren’t sure, please do a little research ahead of time! To read past columns of Let’s Dish in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com. scenario results with no need for chemo or radiation. Despite the positive news, Belinda is considered high risk and will need a screening every 6 months for the rest of her life. But it didn’t stop there. Three of her friends were diagnosed with breast cancer around the same time. Unfortunately, their cancer was more aggressive. Two friends are still battling the disease and one has passed away from breast cancer. “I was feeling so helpless,” remembers Belinda. “No one should have to lose a mom, daughter, wife, sister, grandmother. I had to do something, and walking in the 3-Day was my little way of taking back some sliver of control for my own sanity.” Organizing a team for the walk was something within her capabilities. She began mentioning it to her co-workers at the Goose Grocer and interest and support rapidly grew. Tamara Forgas, beer/wine/spirits manager and Michelle Canty, assistant manager of produce, were the first to sign on to Belinda’s team. Belinda counts Tamara among her best friends and someone who supported her every step of the way through her walk with cancer. According to Michelle, “I am doing this walk for my co-worker who has had breast cancer and beat it, along with others who have fought cancer and for those who still are. I want to help support them.” Tinker Iddins, grocery clerk, is walking because cancer has affected many of her friends and family. According to Tinker, “The Susan G. Komen 3-Day isn’t just a 60-mile walk over the course of three days–it’s a journey to the end of breast cancer. Komen has a bold goal– to reduce the current number of breast cancer deaths by 50 percent in the U.S. by 2026. That’s why I’m walking and raising money–to make her goal a reality.” Gabby Watson and Kayla Leganza complete the Goose part of the team. Like so many, Gabby has seen many loved ones suffer from breast cancer and just couldn’t stand by any BITS & PIECES

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Whidbey Weekly

AUGUST 22 - AUGUST 28, 2019

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A talented professional, perhaps someone whom you might hire to perform a task, may be another..The 24th sees it all coming together.

CHICKEN LITTLE & THE ASTROLOGER By Wesley Hallock

ARIES (March 21-April 19) A happy turn of events that may affect your finances could take the strain off many areas of concern this week. With a smile on your face and zip in your step, you’re set for whatever comes. Much of the time, rather than grudgingly facing what you feel you must do, you’ll be free to focus more on those things you genuinely want to do. The 24th is risky for high-stakes activities that demand a specific outcome. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Pride is the issue this week in a situation that probably doesn’t fully meet with your approval. Since it’s not your gig, it won’t kill you to take a backseat in the matter. If you can, let the decisions be made by the one whose purview it is to make them. Life will be easier for all. Yours may in fact be a most useful role, that of the quietly stabilizing force. If so, there’s nothing wrong with being seen but not heard on the 24th. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) Your primary interest and duty this week is to ensure that nothing interferes with the way you carry out your obligations. Reliability is king and you will definitely be expected to live up to your promises. Ordinarily, this may not be a challenge, but this is not an ordinary week. If your execution proves clumsy, try again, and don’t abandon your post. The cause on the 24th is likely to be divided attention on your part. CANCER (June 22-July 22) The pace and structure of the week may not always be to your advantage, unless you particularly enjoy being over-amped and scattered. Some do, and those folk will revel in your company and the off-the-cuff way events are likely to unfold. A light-hearted approach that turns fumbles into part of the act will see you through. Look for the underlying humor on the 24th, and don’t take life too seriously. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Your proud bearing sends a loud message that you are a force on a mission this week. This silent warning that trifles will not be tolerated is something the wise will heed. Woe to any who fail to read you correctly. In a room full of followers, your self-directed frame of mind makes you a standout. This, combined with clear intent and bold action on the 24th, may be sufficient to see a troublesome impasse broken. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Skill and luck combine in your favor this week, and do so in just the right proportions. It’s the skill that puts you over the top. Luck entering at precisely the right time gives added oomph, like the cherry topping the sundae. A family member is a likely part of your equation.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Maintaining a state of consistent optimism when those of little faith might crumble has been the key to many a success. To the degree that such a positive mindset describes you, this week could generate a payoff. A change of status is in the works that could favorably impact your wallet. Any reinforcement of your ability to meet your obligations qualifies, including the emotional support of a benefactor on the 24th. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) The main driver behind what promises to be a good week is your willingness to stand and deliver on those ambitious plans of yours. Action now, while the time is right, is ten-fold better than poorly-timed efforts made later. You have the support of a key player in your camp, a crucial boost that shouldn’t be taken for granted. Whatever you undertake on the 24th, the ease of execution may surprise you. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Your on-going campaign to liberate yourself from the situation you’ve vowed to escape remains as your primary focus this week. Events are calculated to help you see your glass as half-full. Take advantage by keeping a happy eye on the goal. Face forward, dare new things and don’t be afraid to fail. But if you’re struggling, it may mean you’re bucking the trend by seeing a glass half-empty. The choice is yours on the 24th. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) There’s just enough in the works this week to make life interesting. You won’t need to be constantly on your toes, but neither do you want to be caught flat-footed by the unexpected. Even in the best of times, the world remains a place where anything can happen. A positive attitude is an open invitation to the good things in life. Don’t be surprised to see that invitation answered on the 24th. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb 18) You’re in a favorable position to reap the benefits of a generally fine week. Whatever you reach for, you’re likely to get. This could present a challenge, however. Someone jealous of your good fortune is sure to make life difficult if you let them under your skin. Guard against that possibility by making doubly sure that all your dealings are scrupulous and above board. Right and wrong could be the subject of much debate on the 24th. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Action speaks louder than words this week. In all that you undertake, any problems come from talking the subject to exhaustion without actually doing anything about it. This reflects uncertainty about what it is that you’re really trying to do. Get clear about what you want and you’ll instantly resolve a host of issues. The power you command once you get focused is considerable. Take matters one at a time on the 24th.

CLUES ACROSS

1. Social reformer Lucretia 5. Engine additive 8. Where draft beer comes from 11. Skin lesions 13. Denoting one or more things 14. Beloved dish 15. Packaging allowances 16. Surrounds the earth 17. Expresses pleasure 18. “For goodness __!” 20. Liquefied natural gas 21. Paul __, Swiss painter 22. Benign tumors 25. In an early way 30. Covered with wood 31. Principle underlying the universe 32. Message 33. Become dry through heat 38. Printing speed measurement 41. One who does not succeed 43. Type of agent 45. Type of waste 47. Wings 49. Giants’ signal caller

50. Polio vaccine developer 55. Congo native 56. Mortal is one type 57. Fishing vessel (Naut.) 59. Ethnic group of Thailand 60. Where golfers begin 61. Western Florida city 62. Belonging to us 63. Soviet Socialist Republic 64. Influential Israeli diplomat

CLUES DOWN

1. Mountain Time 2. Int’l political organization (abbr.) 3. Olympic champion Lipinski 4. March 5. Less fresh 6. Reduced in size 7. Garden archway 8. Professional translators group (abbr.) 9. Type of pain 10. What to do for the cameras 12. Midway between south and southeast 14. Bangladeshi monetary unit

19. Satisfy 23. Flop 24. Nearsightedness 25. Parts per thousand (abbr.) 26. Bravo! Bravo! Bravo! 27. Midway between northeast and east 28. Swedish castle 29. War-ravaged Syrian city 34. American model Carol 35. Bitterly regret 36. Grand __: superior grade wine 37. Of she 39. Clergymen 40. Ringwald and Shannon are two 41. Daze 42. Scores perfectly 44. More narcissistic 45. Fencing sword 46. Highest point 47. In addition 48. Hawaiian feast 51. Appropriate under the circumstances 52. Hillside 53. Metrical foot 54. Winemaking region 58. Someone Answers on page 15

© 2019, Wesley Hallock, All Rights Reserved

YOUR GUESS IS AS GOOD AS OURS WEATHER FORECAST Chicken Little looks at what is and fears the sky is falling. Wesley Hallock as a professional astrologer looks at what is and sees what could be. Read Wesley’s monthly forecast, with links to Facebook and Twitter, at www. chickenlittleandtheastrologer.com. To read past columns of Chicken Little and the Astrologer in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

Thurs, Aug. 22

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Mixed Clouds and Sun

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Sunny


14 AUGUST 22 - AUGUST 28, 2019 LOCALLY OWNED

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Whidbey Weekly BITS ‘n’ PIECES

Life Tributes SHIRLEY BLAIR MCDANIEL My lovely wife, Shirley Blair, was born April 6, 1941, in Tulsa, Okla. Her parents were John Pigler and Emma Blair. After her parents divorced, Shirley wisely decided to assume her mother’s maiden name in the second grade. She attended school in Tulsa throughout her young life and proudly graduated from Tulsa University with a BA in English and teaching in 1963. By that time she had two daughters, Valerie and Natalie, and was married to Paul Park. After an attempt at teaching (8th graders, all of whom were taller than her 5 foot frame), she decided to venture into another field. She became a social worker and worked in both Tulsa and Oklahoma City in child placement. She continued this work until 1968. In 1968, Shirley and Paul were divorced and she moved back to Tulsa. There I cautiously started calling her occasionally and going out to dinner with her. After a short while I fell in love with her and her daughters, and we were married Dec. 13, 1969, just a couple of weeks before I was to report to the Navy. She was a little dubious, having spent all of her life in Oklahoma. She should not have been! We moved to Pensacola, Fla., where I attended Flight Surgeon School, then moved to El Toro, Calif., where I was assigned to the Marine Corps Air Station in Santa Ana. We loved our time there, but soon I received orders to Viet Nam. I left Shirley and the girls behind..three girls now, with the birth of our daughter, Tara, in March 1971, while I went initially to Okinawa. Shirley kept putting the girls’ toys and other items in my ship-out luggage. I mistakenly thought I would not see them for a year. She knew better. After three weeks in Okinawa, I called her and suggested she get passports and tickets and move to Okinawa. She told me she already had passports and tickets in hand. She arrived in Okinawa where we secretly rented a house and put the older girls in a Japanese school. I went off to Viet Nam, and Shirley would fly to meet me whenever my ship would come for R & R. We met in Taiwan, Hong Kong, and the Philippines over the next year. (She was always wiser than me.) We then had an incredible career, living on both coasts, in Spain for three years, Germany, and back to Japan for two years. We were fortunate enough to live in Hawaii for four years. Shirley began teaching English as a second language while we were in Japan, and continued to do so in Hawaii. We finally retired from the Navy in 1997 after a total of 32 years, returning to Oak Harbor, were we had purchased a house when stationed here in 1986-88. I was a Commanding Officer for many years in the Navy, having a total of five commands. Shirley was my most valuable asset in those jobs. She guided me, lent sanity to my somewhat insane tendencies, and perhaps most importantly provided guidance to many young Navy wives through those years. Without her hand on the rudder, I would never have been able to do my job in the Navy. She was busy here in Oak Harbor, being a proud member of the American Association for University Women, Friends of the Library, and starting (at least) three book clubs and several lunch groups. She decided many years ago our neighborhood needed a picnic every summer, so we could be a true community, and single-handedly set that process in motion. Our yearly picnics continue these many years later. Shirley was the most gracious person I have ever known. Quiet, contemplative, wise, gentle, brilliant. I do not have all the adjectives, but she is the best person I have ever known. I was so proud to have been her friend and mate these 50 years. In the end, she was hospitalized at WhidbeyHealth Medical Center, where she had been an in-patient several times. Their care and compassion was absolutely outstanding. She moved from there to Careage House in Coupeville, where again the staff was incredible. They were caring, compassionate, professional, and dispensed love along with their other care. Shirley and I so appreciated both places; we should all be proud of those facilities and the people who work in them. She passed away Aug. 9, 2019. She is survived by her three daughters: Valerie (Tulsa), Natalie (Aiken, S.C.), and Tara (Missoula, Mont.). We have four grandchildren: Sasha, Fionna, Dakota, and Ian. Her brother, Blair Jackson, lives in Orlando. And, me, Bill McDaniel. She leaves behind so many family and friends who loved and appreciated her for the incredible person she always was. Instead of flowers, I would like to establish a scholarship in Shirley Blair McDaniel’s name through the AAUW, where for many years she worked as head of the Scholarship Committee. Donations can be made to AAUW – Whidbey Island P.O. Box 1332 Coupeville, WA 98239, designated to the Shirley McDaniel Scholarship Fund. A memorial service with reception will be held Monday, Aug. 26, at 1 p.m. at Wallin Funeral Home. Please Visit Shirley’s page In our book of memories online at www.wallinfuneralhome.com

FLORENCE MARIE SWAIN Florence Marie Swain, born Jan. 14, 1931 in Sitka, Alaska, left us the evening of Aug. 10, 2019. To the very end she was surrounded by her loved ones: Stephen Swain, 52; Ra Mona Swain, 51; and her grandsons, Zackery Swain, 23, and Nathanial HallSwain, 16. Raised on Maxwelton Beach, where Florence purchased land and a home and paved, she was quite nearly the original DIY or Do-it-Yourselfer and Farmsteader around. She helped create “Show and Tell Antiques” with her husband, Edgar Swain, and continuously gardened and created. She was a dedicated gardener for 30 years at “Aldermarsh Retreat,” previously owned by Joy Moullan and was an avid and active contributor to Jan Smith’s artisan-based “Christmas House.” She was usually reserved, by nature, but never ceasing to surprise you with her eclectic knowledge, charm and stories. Her last days were busy doing what she loved most, looking at gardening magazines, painting and visiting with family. I’m sure she is making new friends now. Rest easy and well, and don’t worry, we’ll all “behave ourselves” down here. Family and friends are encouraged to share memories and condolences at www.whidbeymemorial.com.

Life Tributes can now be found online at www.whidbeyweekly.com

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longer. ”60 miles is a long walk for me, but I know breast cancer is a much more difficult battle.” Kayla, former grocer manager at the Goose, is walking in support of Belinda, one of her best friends. Artist Louie Rochon is not letting his emphysema get in the way of walking three 20-mile days. Louie reassures everyone, “When I believe in something as passionately as I do, there is nothing on this earth that will stop me, even if I have to crawl across that finish line.” Louie is walking for his mother and sister, both survivors of breast cancer. “I remember, like it was yesterday, lying in bed with my sister as she was so desperately ill, sweating and throwing up for days at a time - never once complaining - from the effects of her chemo treatments, while fighting for her life. Nor do I ever want to forget sitting helplessly at my mother’s bedside, shortly after her double mastectomy. Even though I knew she was in great pain, she would just smile, holding ‘my’ hand, as if to comfort me, and never utter a single complaint. Bravery and courage seem to be the hallmark of those silently challenging breast cancer.” A car wash will take place Saturday and Sunday in the Goose parking lot by Bayview Appliance & Mattress Center in support of the “Save the Honkers” team.

center-based classes two days a week, with weekly home visits. In addition, new partday classrooms for children 2 to 3 years old, and additional full-day, full-year classes will be available. Head Start is a federal program which provides free, comprehensive early learning and family services for qualifying families, pregnant women, and children from birth to five years old. Specific services for children focus on education, socio-emotional development, physical and mental health, and nutrition. Skagit/Islands Head Start provides a safe, healthy, nurturing environment so each family, child, and staff member may reach their potential within the community. The program currently serves 428 children and families in Skagit, Island, and San Juan counties. To learn more about Skagit/Islands Head Start, visit www.sihs.skagit.edu. [Submitted by Arden Ainley, Chief Public Information Officer, SVC]

Local Business News Whidbey Telecom Upgrades Sandy Hook to The BiG GiG® Fiber Network

Located at the Bayview Center on Highway 525, the Goose Community Grocer is the result of a one-of-a-kind collaboration between Goosefoot, a non-profit organization and the owner of the store, and the Myers Group, a family-owned business that manages the store. Profits from the store go back into the community through a community grants program operated by Goosefoot. For more information, visit www.goosegrocer.com [Submitted by Marian A. Myszkowski, Goosefoot Community Fund]

Skagit/Islands Head Start Receives $7,817,445 Five-year Grant Skagit Valley College Skagit/Islands Head Start (SIHS) is pleased to announce it has received notice of an award from the Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Head Start and will receive a grant totaling $7,817,445 for Early Head Start and Head Start. The fiveyear grant runs from Sept. 1, 2019 through Aug. 31, 2024. In addition to the base funding, SIHS has been awarded additional funding to increase the hours of services in both Head Start and Early Head Start.  For Head Start: $3,554,611 for operations; $46,177 for training and technical assistance; $1,370,236 for additional hours of services. For Early Head Start: $1,592,795 for operations; $30,785 for training and technical assistance; $1,222,841 for additional hours of services. In addition to the five-year grant, supplemental start-up funding of $6,695,976 was also provided to address one-time program needs including vehicles, staff training, classroom furnishings and materials. The start-up funding also offers the opportunity to support the addition of four centers, including: • The construction of an Early Learning center on SVC’s Mount Vernon Campus. • The purchase and remodel of a new center in Burlington. • The purchase and remodel of a new center in Oak Harbor. • The purchase of a new modular building to replace the older modular in Friday Harbor.

Whidbey Telecom expanded its fiber optic internet network to the community of Sandy Hook in Clinton this month. These “Fiberhoods” are part of the company’s multi-year, multi-phase project to bring the fastest and most reliable internet to homes and businesses in South Whidbey. Fiber optic networks enable residential customers better functionality across their usage and devices, while it increases productivity and growth capacity for businesses. “We are looking at really creative ways of helping everyone to thrive right here,” says Whidbey Telecom co-CEO George Henny. “South Whidbey is our home; we love working and living here. If we can help local businesses work more effectively and prosper, everyone benefits.” The company first started upgrading to an all-fiber cable network back in 2016, when construction crews built up the infrastructure in the most densely populated areas of Freeland, Langley and Clinton. Whidbey Telecom currently offers three fiber internet packages featuring synchronous upload and download speeds of 1000Mbps, 300Mbps and 100Mbps. “With fiber, our customers can stream videos, upload and download thousands of photos, or play online games with no lag or buffering,” explains co-CEO Julia Henny. “We also ensure no data limits, so our customers have the best internet experience available. Homeowners may see a boost in their home’s value just from having fiber internet installed.”

This award will also create 38 new full-time positions in a variety of roles. Please refer to the SVC Human Resources web site for opportunities, www.skagit.edu/about/humanresources/current-job-openings.

Whidbey Telecom is the only provider on Whidbey Island offering residential and business, synchronous upload and download speeds, up to 1000Mbps over a fiber optic network with The BiG GiG®.

SIHS will continue to offer full-day and partday preschool, and will add more full-day classes. Early Head Start models will include a combination approach classroom to serve children 16 to 24 months and will provide

Whidbey Telecom delivers innovative communications solutions to its customers and communities, serving residential and commercial customers on Whidbey Island, in Point Roberts and on Hat Island for over 110 years.

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REAL ESTATE/RENTALS Oak Harbor mobile/RV space available in an approved park, $706 mo. Standard hook-up connections, with 50-amp, 4-prong PW plug. Located inside Oak Harbor city limits, minutes drive to NAS Whidbey and shopping in town. Two vehicle concrete driveway, paved streets with lighting, community playground, community room available for events, Island Transit bus route access. All applications subject to a $35 approval screening. $600 base rent includes water. Sewer, storm water, and garbage utilities are billed separately at $106. All other power, cable, & internet accounts are up to you. Bonus $100 off each month for the first 3 months with a one year lease. Call 360-675-4232 (2)

GARAGE/ESTATE SALES HUGE GARAGE SALE: Saturday, Aug. 24, 8am-4pm and Sunday, Aug. 25, 9am- 3pm, 1963 Zylstra Rd., Oak Harbor. Furniture, clothing, musical equip. (amps, mixers, guitars, organ etc.), books, tools, and lots more! No early birds! ESTATE SALE: Saturday, Aug. 24 and Sunday, Aug. 25, 10am-4pm, 3572 Old County Rd, Greenbank. Tools, furniture, 1998 F150 truck, kitchen, household

ANNOUNCEMENTS Pregnant? Need baby clothes? We have them and the price is right–FREE. Pregnancy Care Clinic, open most Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10am to 4pm. Call 360-221-2909 or stop by 6th and Cascade in Langley. Be the difference in a child’s life and become a foster parent today! Service Alternatives is looking for caring, loving, and supportive families to support foster children. 425923-0451 or mostermick@ servalt-cfs.com The Whidbey Island community is encouraged to try out the paddling sport of dragon boating with the Stayin’ Alive team. Our team’s mission is to promote the physical, social, and emotional benefits of dragon boating. It has been shown to be especially beneficial to cancer survivors. Practice with us for up to 3 times for free. Life-jackets and paddles provided. Saturdays at the Oak Harbor Marina, 8:45am. Contact njlish@ gmail.com. More info at our Facebook Page: www.facebook.com/NorthPugetSoundDragonBoatClub?ref=hl If you or someone you know has been a victim of homicide, burglary, robbery, assault, identity theft, fraud, human

trafficking, home invasion and other crimes not listed. Victim Support Services has advocates ready to help. Please call the 24-hr Crisis Line 888-3889221. Free service. Visit our web site at http://victimsupportservices.org

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES College student? Student of history? History buff? Opportunities are available to spend constructive volunteer hours at the PBY-Naval Air Museum. Go to www.pbymf.org and click on “Volunteer” or just stop by and introduce yourself. Imagine Oak Harbor’s first Food Forest, Saturdays 11am3pm, at 526 Bayshore Drive. Each week, we have volunteer opportunities available to help care for our community garden, share organic gardening tips, and learn Permaculture principles. All ages and skill levels welcome. Schedule can change due to adverse weather conditions. If you have any questions, please contact us at: imagineapermacultureworld.gmail.com Mother Mentors needs volunteers! Oak Harbor families with young children need your help! Volunteer just a couple of hours a week to make a difference in someone’s life! To volunteer or get more info, email wamothermentors@ gmail.com or call 360-3211484. Looking for board members to join the dynamic board of Island Senior Resources and serve the needs of Island County Seniors. Of particular interest are representatives from North Whidbey. For more information please contact: reception@islandseniorservices.org

JOB MARKET Automotive techs wanted: must have own tools, ASE certified helpful. Apply at Red Beard Automotive, 1707 Main St., Freeland (0) Full-time/Permanent Garden Center Manager: We are seeking a professional, experienced person to lead our outside Nursery Team. Looking for applicants with relevant experience, self motivation, and commitment. Northwest plant, tree and shrub knowledge is How’d youdifficulty do? rating 0.54) Puzzle 1 (Medium, 2 1 6 7 4 5 9 3 8 4 7 8 3 1 9 6 2 5

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Foster Homes Needed! Family Tails Dog Rescue needs foster homes! We can't save dogs from high kill shelters without homes for them to stay at while they wait to find their forever home. 1 week to 3 months, a fun and rewarding way to be involved with rescue and also have a dog without the full time commitment. We pay for everything, you just provide the love and the home. Please call 360-969-2014 for more info or for an application.

required, as well as previous buying experience. Supervisory and retail experience are a plus. Primary job will be to order weekly plant and hard goods order, assist customers with their selections and be involved in BBQ sales. Need to be willing to work outdoors in any type of weather. Will be supervising a team of 3-5. Qualified candidates please stop by with your resume (with references) and a cover letter, and fill out our application at: Freeland Ace Hardware, 1609 E. Main St, Freeland, WA 98249 (0) Fulltime Floor Sales Associate: If you have paint, tool, plumbing, or electrical product knowledge, love hardware, and crave the full-time retail career experience then we’d love to hear from you. Working Saturdays and Sundays are required. Must be able to lift 4050lbs. Qualified candidates, stop by with your resume (with references) and a cover letter, and fill out our application at: Freeland Ace Hardware, 1609 E. Main St, Freeland, WA 98249 (0)

one men’s size M, one men’s size L, $50 each, or best offer. Men’s work outfit: RAIL CHIEF size 42, Union Made, Sanforized, $20. Photos available, call or text 360-320-0525.

HOME FURNISHINGS House plants: small $5 each, larger floor plants $20 each; Small glass display case for use with coffee table or occasional table, hexagonal in shape, 12” H x 8” W from side to side, 3 shelves, $40 or best offer; Beautiful green wrought iron display/stand, 75” H x 29” W, four removable glass shelves, $50 or best offer; Ceiling mount light with beveled glass, classic, flush mount, 16 pieces of high quality beveled crystal glass, eight clear glass bulbs, $40; Swopper is an ergonomic office chair that enables movement in all three dimensions to provide balanced support for your lower back, $295. Photos available, call or text 360-320-0525.

LAWN AND GARDEN

Japanese Maple trees. These are young trees, still small enough to plant easily. Take MEDICAL EQUIPMENT your pick from several different kinds, including Coral Bark Brand new medical scooter Maples. $20 each. Coupeville (Wheelie). Paid $800, will sell 360-678-4848 (0) for $400 or best offer. Call Natural Barnyard Topsoil: 360-320-3615 (1) Good for flower beds, garCLOTHING/ACCESSORIES dens, etc. Unscreened, 10 yard Handsome hand-knit alpaca load, $225 delivered. South wool sweaters from Bolivia, Whidbey, 360-321-1624 No Cheating!

MISCELLANEOUS Looking for Xmas, Bday, Father’s Day, or just Gifts in general? These are LOCAL made crafts, I have about 50-60 of these available. They are $16 ea, plus shipping if you want them mailed. CASH preferred. Dimensions are: 5-6”W X 17”L. Contact me at ljohn60@gmail.com.

RECREATION Camping items: Old (but clean) Thermos 1-gallon jug, $5; Versatile backpack, the two parts can be used separately, or (for more serious backpacking) together, $15 obo. We have photos. Call or text 360-320-0525. Water sports accessories including gloves, hats, and footwear, many are neoprene, $5 each (or per pair); Cabela’s heavy-duty duffel, 31” L x 16” W x 17” H, sturdy base covered in canvas, two wheels in back for easy transport, never been used, in pristine condition, $40 or best offer; Penn Fathom Master 600 downrigger, includes stainless steel wire and 10-pound ball, in excellent condition, $135 or best offer. Photos available, call or text 360-320-0525. Golf clubs, excellent condition, each has its own head cover:

Scotty Cameron GoLo putter, RH, 35”, Super Stroke grip, $175; TaylorMade Ardmore mallet putter, RH, 35”, Super Stroke grip, $110; BAT stand alone putter, RH, 35”, $50; L2 stand alone putter, RH, 33”, $50. Photos available, call or text 360-320-0525.

ANIMALS/SUPPLIES Excellent grass hay, good for horses, $7 per bale. 20 bale minimum. 360-321-1624 Round bales of grass feeder hay, barn stored. 360-3211624 If you or someone you know needs help in feeding pet(s), WAIF Pet Food Banks may be able to help. Pet Food Banks are located at WAIF thrift stores in Oak Harbor (465 NE Midway Blvd) and Freeland (1660 Roberta Ave) and are generously stocked by donations from the community. If you need assistance, please stop by.

WANTED Art, Antiques & Collectibles. Cash paid for quality items. Call or text 360-661-7298 Was your Dad or Gramps in Japan or Germany? I collect old 35 mm cameras and lenses. Oak Harbor, call 970823-0002

CLASSIFIED INFORMATION US Postal Mail

Whidbey Weekly Classified Department PO Box 1098 Oak Harbor, WA 98277

E-Mail............classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com Telephone..................................(360)682-2341 Fax.............................................(360)682-2344 PLEASE CALL WHEN YOUR ITEMS HAVE SOLD.

Please try to limit your classified to 30 words or less, (amounts and phone numbers are counted as words) we will help edit if necessary. We charge $10/week for Vehicles, Boats, Motorcycles, RVs, Real Estate Rental/Sales, Business Classifieds and any items selling $1,000 and above. We do charge $25 to include a photo. The FREE classified space is not for business use. No classified is accepted without phone number. We reserve the right to not publish classifieds that are in bad taste or of questionable content. All free classifieds will be published twice consecutively. If you would like your ad to be published more often, you must resubmit it. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date.

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


42

$

95

Full Synthetic

36

$

95

Includes 4X4 & SUV

4295

$

Most cars up to 5 qts. 5W20, 5W30, 10W30. Other grades extra. Some filters cost extra. Vehicles with Skid Plates may be extra. Plus $1 Environmental Disposal Fee.

WE CAN SAVE YOU UP TO $250 ON BRAKE SERVICE VERSUS OUR COMPETITORS. WARRANTIED AT 30K LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE.

TOYO TIRES - PASSENGER, LIGHT TRUCKS AND SUVS STARTERS ALTERNATORS TIMING BELTS SERPENTINE BELTS

BRAKES TIRES TUNE-UPS EXHAUST

UP TO

1

$ 00

Flat Rate Auto Repair only $7995 per hour

PER GAL LON D ISCOUNT T ODAY!

always

Ask for De

tails

FREE ESTIMATES!

At Hilltop Service Center we only repair and replace parts that are needed. We will not oversell or install unnecessary parts. We are highly trained brake technicians, not high pressure sales people.

79

$

7995*

$

4 cyl

95

$

8995*

$

6 cyl

9995*

$

8 cyl

79

95

79

$

95

11995

$

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Whidbey Weekly, August 22, 2019  

Whidbey Working Artists Summer Open Studio Tour Bit's & Pieces What's Going On Whidbey Weekly News Island 911 Let's Dish On Track with Jim F...

Whidbey Weekly, August 22, 2019  

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