Whidbey Weekly, August 8 ,2019

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August 8 through August 14, 2019

More Local Events inside

SATURDAY

AUGUST 10, 2019

Run along the THE historic bluff with REGISTER AT RACETHERESERVE.COM by Coupeville High School Senior Parents and the Class of 2020. RES RVE magnificent views! Presented Proceeds Support a Safe and Sober Graduation Night Celebration.

RAC


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AUGUST 8 - AUGUST 14, 2019

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ON TRACK with Jim Freeman

Thanks to Pippi for providing the following unknown sourced humor to get us out of the blocks with a much needed chortle: So I was at Safeway earlier. A lady was looking at frozen turkeys, but she was unable to find one that she felt was big enough.

The woman asked the stock boy in the frozen food section. “Do these turkeys get any bigger?” He replied with a straight face, “No ma’am, they’re frozen.” If you thought that was weak, how about this one from my buddy Las Vegas John, an undercover Lyft driver for Uber. Truth Robot A father buys a lie detector robot that slaps people when they lie. He decides to test it out at dinner one night. The father asks his son what he did that afternoon. The son says, “I did some schoolwork.”

Breaking his solitude, Chuck from Forks drove over to celebrate his latest birthday in conjunction with the car show. Chuck’s soiree was catered by Man Cave Catering. Not only did Chef Sue of Man Cave change the birthday party time to avoid any car show conflict, Man Cave Catering provided the birthday celebrant with free lodging after he had drained his crankcase. We see you Celebrity sightings along the Midway include, but are not limited to, former Island County commissioner Mike Shelton, singer/songwriter Mike McInerney, artist and pool pro Frank Rose, the honorable Jo and Richard Evans of New Clinton, hometown legends Janet and Frank Ploof, track star Dean Hatt, former postal person Ann Teresa and her husband, world travelers Maria Teresa and husband Kenneth, Matt Armstrong of Freeland Warehousing and Storage, Whidbey Fair manager Carol Coble, and Emily and Margaret, both rejoicing after their 50th reunion with classmates from St. Joseph’s Elementary in Seattle. Talk on If it is okay with you, I need to finish up with some car show announcements I either did not have time to make, forgot to make, or did not know to make. I will try to keep my voice down in case you are on the phone.

AUGUST 8 - AUGUST 14, 2019 LOCALLY OPERATED

Darling, it wouldn’t be a party without you. 6th Annual Midsummer Antique Fair & Market August 9 & 10, 2019 Friday Night, August 9, 5-8pm Early Shopping Event

Tickets $10 (to benefit Skagit Symphony) www.eventbrite.com

Saturday, August 10, 9am-4pm

Complimentary admission Four Fabulous Shopping Areas Meadow Schoolhouse • Rose Gardens North Meadow Field • Primrose Antiques & Gifts

15806 Best Rd • Mount Vernon • 360-466-3821 • www.ChristiansonsNursery.com

PHONE: 360-682-2341

FAX: 360-682-2344

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Whidbey Weekly LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

The robot slaps the son.

Caron Wolmsley, your Mercedes winning plaque is ready for pick-up at Deb’s Hair Care in Freeland.

The son says, “OK, OK, I was at a friend’s house watching movies.”

Katrina, your Dad gave me your message. Thanks. The check is in the mail.

Publisher......................................................................... Eric Marshall

Dad asks, “What movie did you watch?”

Sir George of Elkhorn Trading Post. Your message was delivered twice just in case your courier thought I might forget. He was right. Third time will be the charm.

Marketing Representatives................Penny Hill, Roosevelt Rumble

Son says “Toy Story.” The robot slaps the son. Son says, “OK, OK, we were watching porn.” Dad says, “What? At your age I didn’t even know what porn was.” The robot slaps the father. Mom laughs and says, “Well, he certainly is your son.” The robot slaps the mother. Hold the mayo Not only did I notice last weekend that my Kraft mayonnaise had expired last February, I also found out old mayonnaise makes a great hair conditioner. Too bad I never knew that when I was in condition. Showtime at the Fairgrounds Last weekend, when not learning about the benefits of mayonnaise, I was learning about cars, trucks, and more at the Whidbey Island Car Show. What a superb event. Not having ever been to a car show, except the ones in the impound lots, I was eager to see a clean engine of any kind. Whether it was a 351 Cleveland or a 351 Windsor or a 283 or 327, the clean machines were on the scene last Saturday. This morning, before most people were awake, I was able to get a phone interview with a very enthusiastic Bruce Bell of Bruce Bell Landscaping regarding the Whidbey Island Car Show which benefited three local charities: Friends of Friends Medical Support Fund; The HUB Youth Center; and the Whidbey Veterans Resource Center. “We consider this a huge success for our first time out. We raised over $4,000 for this year’s three charities. It was great seeing so many families. We had over 1,200 spectators and over 100 cars. We’re already getting ready for next year.” For me, a gear-free guy, I learned quite a bit while rubber-necking between announcements.

A shout out to Gary Hammer for explaining to me what a muscle car is. No wonder I never knew. I left my muscles at Parris Island in the 60s. Black Horse Racing – congrats on winning Best of Show. Keith Jameson – congrats on winning the People’s Choice award for your 1970 Chevy Nova. Your picture is in the corner of this page.

Graphic Design............................................................. Teresa Besaw

Production Manager......................................................TJ Pierzchala Circulation Manager.................................................... Noah Marshall

Contributing Writers Jim Freeman Wesley Hallock Kae Harris Tracy Loescher Kathy Reed Carey Ross Kacie Jo Voeller

Volume 11, Issue 32 | © MMXIX Whidbey Weekly

PUBLISHED and distributed every week. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The Whidbey Weekly cannot be held responsible for the quality of goods or services supplied by advertisers in this publication. Articles, unless otherwise stated, are by contribution and therefore the Whidbey Weekly is not in a position to validate any comments, recommendations or suggestions made in these articles. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. DEADLINES: The Whidbey Weekly is a submission based editorial with contributing writers. Please feel free to submit any information (please limit to 200 words) that you would like to share with the Whidbey Weekly. You may submit by email to editor@whidbeyweekly.com, by fax to (360)682-2344 or by postal mail to PO Box 1098, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date. For more information, please visit www.whidbeyweekly.com.

Saturday, September 07, 2019

Best line Other than the line for the Saddlewagon Eatery’s homemade sausage gravy and biscuits, the best line of the car show for me was from the gentleman who met me at the bottom of the Eva Mae Gabelein Stage steps.

5K RUN FOR RECOVERY

“I wanted you to know that I enjoy reading your column even though sometimes it seems you are in search of a subject.” Who needs a drum roll with that symbol crash? This transparent reader is right. Sometimes I offer a beginning and an end, but no middle. For that, I am hopeful. Just know if you are like me, and you have read this far, you have already forgotten where we started. Best sad story Another gentleman shared with me a sad tale from his California youth, driving eight hours to see Little Richard in San Jose. The poster back home promoting the show said the tickets were $2. Tickets at the door were sold for $2.50.

These classic, modern, antique, and otherwise unusual rigs have incredible stories with incredible story-tellers.

Anacortes bound Congrats to Scouts from Troop 4097 (boys) and Troop 4319 (girls) who ran the carnival games and prize booth at the Marathon Refinery’s annual employee family picnic.

This year’s Whidbey Island Car Show participants were from as far away as Florida and Arizona, and as nearby as Monroe, Snohomish, Everett, Kirkland, and Whidbey.

Editor............................................................................... Kathy Reed

Marines Ed and Bob – Semper Fi for raising colors while Pat Boone sang The Star Spangled Banner. You two standing tall in your dress blues raising Old Glory made our day. Ooorah.

The young boy did not have another 50 cents to get in.

Know what else? I only saw one person smoking a cigarette. When I was growing up, smokes were on every dashboard or in every glove box.

1131 SE ELY STREET | PO BOX 1098 | OAK HARBOR, WASHINGTON 98277

Jim Simpson – thanks for announcing the awards. Superb job with your Chrysler accent.

I learned these vehicles, whether car or truck or converted firetrucks with 2,500 horsepower, are family to their owners, operators, restorers, and fixer-uppers.

Moms, dads, grandparents, and kids, all enjoying a Saturday in the sun with like-minded folks.

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Good golly, Miss Molly!

The refinery paid each troop $150, plus all their food and drinks and best of all, a big truck filled with all the ice cream they could eat. Hope there wasn’t too much hiking. To read past columns of On Track in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

RUN

• WALK • PICNIC • SPEAKERS

TIME/DATE 9 AM-4 PM, Saturday, September 07, 2019 (Check in 8:00-8:55)

LOCATION North Whidbey Middle School

67 NE Izett St, Oak Harbor, WA 98277

For registration or sponsorship please go to: http://www.nsrcnews.com

Adults: $25 Pre-register by 8/16 After 8/16 ($35) Ages 6-15 yrs: $10.00 (Registration Includes: Recovery T-shirt, bottle, wristband & lunch.)

Proceeds benefit NSRC a recovery coalition that teaches recovery is not only possible, but it can be a reality for all!

Please make checks payable to Everett Recovery Cafe. Mailing address: PO Box 2373, Everett WA 98213.

Write on Memo: NSRC Event

For volunteer opportunities contact Yessica (409) 549-6770 or yessicapadilla316@gmail.com

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AUGUST 8 - AUGUST 14, 2019 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

Bits & Pieces ments. Small business is the engine for jobs and economic growth, and our main street businesses form the backbone of resilience for our small towns. They need a stronger voice in Olympia.

Letters to the Editor Editor, Tuesday morning, July 30, I was involved in a vehicle accident. I want to take this opportunity to thank everyone involved in our assistance and aftermath. I don’t remember many names, unfortunately, but I would especially like to thank Nurse Kathy who was the first to come to my aid and stayed with me the entire time, even when the EMTs came (which was immediately, since they were on the road and saw the accident happen!), the wonderful couple who took care of my communications and called my husband, Rich, who joked around and kept us all laughing to lighten the issue at hand, and just everyone who took the time to stop and help, whether it was their job or not. This world is truly full of fabulous people. And to the other driver involved I would like to say: Life happens, sweetie. We all have lessons to learn and move on from stronger and wiser. Don’t be afraid and don’t ever give up. Kate Mistler Oak Harbor, Wash.

Editor, To Pigfest’s organizers, sponsors, and participants: Please work to transform Pigfest into an Animal-Friendly Fest. Although events promoting community spirit and charitable giving are laudable, contributing to animal slaughter is not.

“The 10th Legislative District encompasses all of Island County and parts of Snohomish and Skagit Counties. This district is home to a Navy base, forests, farmland, islands, shorelines and tribal lands. The people here deserve a Senator in Olympia who will represent the diversity of needs in our area.” [Submitted by Marti Anamosa, Campaign Chair]

Local Nonprofits Benefit from Trash & Treasure Sale

L to R: Trash & Treasure chairwoman Susan Sandri, Danielle Bishop of the Whidbey-Camano Land Trust, Pam LeLoup of Whidbey Island Nourishes, Charlie Vreeland of WAIF, and Jean Matheny of the Soup’s On soup kitchen

Proceeds from the 2019 St. Augustine’s in-theWoods Episcopal Church Trash & Treasure Sale were recently presented to four local nonprofit organizations. This year’s beneficiaries are the Whidbey-Camano Land Trust, Whidbey Island Nourishes (WIN), the Soup’s On soup kitchen at Island Church in Langley, and the Whidbey Animals’ Improvement Fund (WAIF) Crisis Care Fund. Recipients received $1,250 each. The 57th annual Trash & Treasure Sale was held May 18 at the church. For more information, contact the church office at 360-3314887. [Submitted by Mary Laissue]

Eileen Jackson Shares Own Story from “Slavery’s Descendants”

No animal should have to suffer and die for a community event. Respectfully, Laura L. Phillips Oak Harbor, Wash.

Helen Price Johnson Announces Run for State Senate

Price Johnson is the past president of the Washington State Association of Counties. She works with Republican and Democratic commissioners from across the state to address local government concerns. Since 2001, Price Johnson has served as a public official at the local level. She intends to take her community-focused leadership and bipartisan experience to Olympia in 2020. “State government needs to rethink its one-size-fits-all legislation regarding taxes, housing and small business. Our rural communities need common sense solutions that create family wage jobs, economic opportunities while protecting the environment and our quality of life. “Huge corporations lobby to get tax breaks and regulatory loopholes, making small businesses carry an unfair burden, with oversized mandates and burdensome reporting require-

The book, “Slavery’s Descendants” is available locally at Moonraker Books, 209 1st St, in Langley; call to reserve a copy, 360-221-6962. [Submitted by Carolyn Tamler]

Penn Cove Orca Capture Commemoration Orca Network invites the public to join today (Thursday) in commemorating the capture of Southern Resident orcas in Penn Cove and honor Tokitae/Lolita - the only survivor of those captures. From 3:00 to 5:00pm, the Suva and Cutty Sark will provide ceremonial boat trips into Penn Cove to the capture site. Tickets for the boat trip are $75 and registration is available at www.orcanetwork.org. If you have your own boat or kayak, please come to Penn Cove for a procession to the capture site to honor Tokitae and her family members who were captured in 1970. At 5:30pm, there will be a program and waterside ceremony including Howard Garrett and Susan Berta of Orca Network, and news from the Lummi Nation about new actions being taken for Tokitae. At 6:00pm, the group will honor Toki’s Southern Resident family with a vigil of remembrance for their recent losses and of hope for their recovery. Orca Network invites you to join them at the Coupeville Wharf, or at a beach near you, and observe a moment of silence for the Southern Residents and for Tokitae. After the Coupeville Wharf event, those interested are invited to a no-host gathering at the Captain Whidbey Inn lounge/deck. For more information, visit www.orcanetwork. org [Submitted by Orca Network]

Concerts in the Park Presents JM and The Recipe South Whidbey Parks and Recreation District continues its free Summer Concerts with a new band at the baseball field stage: JM and The Recipe.

Instead of supporting the unnecessary killing of animals, insist on a healthy and humane fest menu. Encourage vendors to prepare and sell today’s high quality and flavorful meat substitutes and other foods that incorporate local fruits, vegetables, and grains.

Helen Price Johnson has announced she is running for the Washington State Senate in the 10th Legislative District. Price Johnson, a third-term Democratic Island County Commissioner, is a former South Whidbey School Board member, and a life-long resident of Whidbey Island. She and her family have owned and operated a small business on Whidbey Island for many years.

and promise opportunities to engage in the more thoughtful conversations these topics require.”

Long-time Whidbey resident Eileen Jackson has an essay in a newly published book, “Slavery’s Descendants, Shared Legacies of Race and Reconciliation,” edited by Dionne Ford and Jill Strauss. She will be discussing her contribution and provide information about the creation of this new book, which includes 25 essays from descendants of slaves and slave owners. The presentation and discussion will take place today (Thursday) at 11:00am at St. Augustine’s-in-the-Woods Episcopal Church, 5217 S Honeymoon Bay Road, Freeland. The essays in the book are divided into four sections: “Uncovering History;” “Making Connections;” “Working Toward Healing;” and “Taking Action.” Eileen Jackson made her own discovery of her legacy. In the second section, “Making Connections” she shares the story and her connection with cousins who were enslavers and enslaved. In concluding their introduction, the editors write of the stories: “They are uncomfortable and sometimes harrowing, filled with displacement, shame, and guilt, silence across generations where rape, and even death was committed, but they also include generosity, gratitude, and love as they uncovered truths that challenge our understanding of history

JM and The Recipe brings together local Whidbey Island musicians from a variety of backgrounds playing your favorite cover songs and your soon-to-be favorite original songs. Rhythm guitarist and vocalist Michelle Molner honed her craft in Nashville, writing her own material and performing at local Nashville haunts. After moving to Whidbey Island, Michelle met fellow vocalist Jonathan Bowers and violist Bev Heising. Jonathan’s huge presence and powerful vocals fill up a room, while Bev Heising’s fiddle stylings add that special sauce. With the addition of Ron Greene on drums and Fran Einterz on upright bass, The Recipe was born. People find themselves tapping their feet, singing along and outright dancing to the catchy tunes JM and The Recipe churn out. With a compelling mix of oldies, classic rock and original tunes, JM and The Recipe know how to bring energy and enthusiasm to venues both large and small. JM and The Recipe will be playing a nonstop set from 6:00 to 7:30pm Wednesday, Aug. 14 at Community Park, 5495 Maxwelton Road, Langley. Don’t miss out on this opportunity to catch the show. Bring a picnic dinner, grab a blanket or lawn chair, and invite your family and friends to this free concert series. More information about Concerts in the Park can be found at http://swparks.org/recreation/ events/special-events/ [Submitted by Carrie Monforte, SWPRD]

Luise Greger International Women in Music Festival

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How Does Social Security Fit Into Your Retirement Income Strategy?

It might not be on your calendar, but Aug. 14 is Social Security Day. Since it was enacted on Aug. 14, 1935, Social Security has provided some financial support for millions of Americans during their retirement years. While Social Security benefits, by themselves, probably aren’t enough to enable you to retire comfortably, they can be a key part of your overall retirement income strategy – if you use them wisely. To help you make decisions about Social Security, you will need to answer these questions: When should I start taking my benefits? You can take Social Security once you reach 62, but if you wait until your full retirement age, which will probably be between 66 and 67, you’ll get much bigger monthly checks, and if you wait until 70, you’ll get the biggest possible payments. Before deciding when to begin receiving your benefits, you’ll need to weigh a few factors, including your estimated longevity and your other sources of income. How should I consider potential spousal benefits? If you are married, or if you’re divorced but were married for at least 10 years, you could receive up to half of your spouse’s full retirement benefit (offset by your own benefit, and reduced if you claim early). If you outlive your spouse, you could claim survivor benefits, which can provide either your own benefits or 100% of your deceased spouse’s, whichever is larger. Consequently, the higher-earning spouse might want to postpone taking benefits for as long as possible to maximize the survivor benefit. How much can I earn without reducing my Social Security benefits? If you are younger than your full retirement age and you are receiving Social Security, the Social Security Administration will withhold $1 from your benefits for each $2 you earn over a certain threshold (which, in 2019, is $17,640). For the year you reach your full retirement age, your benefits could be withheld by $1 for every $3 you earn over $46,920. But once you reach your full retirement age, you can earn as much as you want without your benefits being withheld, although your benefits could still be taxed, depending on your income. How much of my pre-retirement income will Social Security replace? Generally speaking, you should expect Social Security to replace slightly more than a third of your pre-retirement income. However, the higher your income during your working years, the lower the replacement value of Social Security will be. What other sources of retirement income should I develop? Contribute as much as you can afford to your IRA and your 401(k) or similar employer-sponsored retirement plan. You may want to consult with a financial professional, who can look at your entire retirement income picture and recommend moves to help you achieve the lifestyle you’ve envisioned for your later years. Keep in mind that your decisions about Social Security filing strategies should always be based on your specific needs and health considerations. For more information, visit the Social Security Administration website at socialsecurity.gov. One final word: You may have concerns about the stability of Social Security. While no one can predict the future, many potential solutions exist to put the program on more solid footing. Consequently, try to focus on the actions you can control. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor. This information is believed to be reliable, but investors should rely on information from the Social Security Administration before making a decision on when to take Social Security benefits. It is general information and not meant to cover all scenarios. Your situation may be different, so be sure to discuss this with the Social Security Administration prior to taking benefits.

Jeffery C. Pleet, CLU®, ChFC®

Financial Advisor 630 SE Midway Blvd. Oak Harbor, WA 98277 (360) 679-2558 jeffery.pleet@edwardjones.com

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

This year’s Women in Music festival will be held Friday, Aug. 16 at 7:30pm and features music by Clara Schumann, Angelique Poteat, Amy Beach, Rebecca Clarke, Luise Le Beau and – of course – Luise Greger. The perform-

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www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OWNED ing artists are Roxanna Patterson, viola; Fumi Tagata, soprano; and Sheila Weidendorf, piano. Proceeds from ticket sales will benefit WiM collaborator Tiny Houses in the Name of Christ (THINC). THINC is a 501(c)(3) founded by Coyla Shepard and Maralie Johnson, and is being sponsored by local churches committed to building affordable housing for workers in Langley. Housing artists in Langley is a vital part of establishing Langley Creates, the quest to be become Washington State’s next Creative District, led by WICA. THINC also plans for the future apartment in main house to be home to an artist. The local churches sponsoring THINC are: Calvary Chapel, The Island Church, Langley United Methodist, Saint Hubert Catholic Church, S. Whidbey Assembly of God, and Trinity Lutheran. A special thank you to Maralie Johnson for sponsoring the venue of WICA on behalf of St. Hubert. For more information, contact THINC Community Liaison, Elizabeth Derrig, Useless Bay Property Company, (CB Bain, Lynnwood) 360-320-6231 or girlsinthesunlight@whidbey.com. Get tickets at www.wicaonline.org. Useless Bay Property Co. is a Community Partner with THINC. For more information about THINC go to www. thincwhidbey.org. About Luise Greger and the Women in Music Festival Langley Luise Greger was a rare female famous composer in Germany, whose works were lost with the rise of Hitler and WWII. Luise was born in Germany in 1862. She began her musical life as a piano prodigy at the age of five, and was composing by the age of 11. In 1871, the year Germany unified, at just nine years old, Luise traveled to St. Petersburg to perform for the Tsar’s family. She was a prolific composer, recognized as one of the greatest musical artists of the Romantic era. In the 1880s, Luise was declared a professional composer by Richard Strauss and she continued to travel and performed concerts throughout Europe through the early 1900s to the 20s. In 1944, she was euthanized by the Nazis and much of her work was destroyed

or lost during WWII. Then her family made a rare discovery of 170 of Luise’s music in an old iron trunk at the family home in Kassel, Hesse, Germany. Artists are now once again performing Luise’s compositions in concerts and radio programs throughout Germany and in the United States, including here on Whidbey Island at the Women in Music Festival. Most recently, the orchestrated version of Luise’s magical fairy tale musical “Gaenseliesel,” last performed in celebration of Christmastime, Dec. 10, 1933 - to great acclaim - was discovered at a University in Kassel, Hesse. The Luise Greger International WiM Festival began in Langley in August 2015, after Luise’s great great granddaughter, Whidbey Island resident Elizabeth Derrig, returned to the island from performances of Luise’s work in Kassel, Hesse, with some of Luise’s Lieder. The founder of REC Music Foundation, Robert Crawford, and the most award winning classical singer, Mezzo Soprano Eleni Matos, recognized what a rare beautiful treasure Luise’s art songs are and Matos premiered several of Luise’s songs for the first time in the United States in Langley. Matos, along with internationally recognized virtuoso collaborative pianist, Rebecca Wilt, then entered the studio to create a CD of Luise’s works. The WiM features notable female artists performing works by Luise and other successful female composers of the 19th and 20th centuries, as well as by regional contemporary women composers. The first WiM featured Matos and Wilt performing at the Whidbey Island Center for the Arts Main Stage. Concerts have also included performances by Soprano Fumi Tagata, Seattle based violist Roxanna Patterson, Whidbey Island violinist/violist Cynthia Morrow, and pianist Sheila Weidendorf, founder of Whidbey’s own Island Consort. This year’s WiM performing artists will be Weidendorf, Patterson and Tagata featured on the WICA Main Stage, Aug. 16, at 7:30pm and the concert will include the world premiere of a song composed especially for Tagata by Whidbey Island Orchestra Conductor Morrow.

AUGUST 8 - AUGUST 14, 2019

After several successful Luise Greger Women in Music Festivals in Langely and on Useless Bay, Derrig is organizing a trip to Kassel, Hesse, Germany for the Luise Greger International Music Festival, Oct. 18-20, which will include a performance of the recently (re)discovered orchestrated version of Luise’s magical Grimmstyle fairytale musical “Gaenseliesel.” (The Brothers Grimm also lived in Kassel.) Matos and Wilt will headline in concert for the Kassel, Hesse festival. The “Father of Langley,” Jacob Anthes was born in Hesse, Germany in 1865 and Jacob arrived on Useless Bay at the age of 14. For more information, contact THINC Community Liaison, Elizabeth Derrig, Useless Bay Property Company, a Community Partner with THINC, at 360-320-6231 or girlsinthesunlight@whidbey.com [Submitted by Elizabeth C. Derrig, J.D., Attorney & Counselor at Law]

Woodworkers Guild Presents the 16th Annual “Art + Wood = Woodpalooza” Exhibition The Whidbey Island Woodworkers Guild presents the “Art + Wood = Woodpalooza @ WICA” Exhibition – the 16th Annual Show of Whidbey’s Finest Woodwork at WICA (Whidbey Island Center for the Arts). This year’s show promises exceptional work by 23 of Whidbey’s best. Held Aug. 31 through Sept. 2, the free exhibition will be open from noon to 5:00pm each day, with a reception scheduled for Friday, Aug. 30 from 6:00 to 9:00pm. WICA is located at 565 Camano Avenue, Langley. During the exhibition, you are invited to spend quality time with woodworking artisans while you experience the beauty of their creations. You’ll learn firsthand the inspiration and process that goes into each artist’s work, while enjoying many scenic island views as you discover Langley. The Guild seeks to support professional woodworkers as well as inspire and educate the budding amateur and provide awareness to

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the general public of the skills available locally from its talented members. In 2001, the Whidbey Island Woodworkers Guild was formed to bring together the woodworking community of Whidbey. Now in its eighteenth year, the Guild includes makers of furniture, cabinetry, architectural woodwork, turners, clock makers, sawyers, carvers, restorers, musical instrument makers, boat builders and refinishers. Please visit www.woodpalooza.com for more information. [Submitted by Gary A. Leake, Guild Secretary]

Sponsors, Volunteers and Participants Sought for Inagural 5K Run/Walk for Recovery The North Sound Recovery Coalition is seeking people to sponsor, volunteer for or participate in its first 5K Run/Walk for Recovery, which will be held at 9:00am Saturday, Sept. 7 at North Whidbey Middle School in Oak Harbor. NSRC is excited to offer those interested the chance to partner with them in supporting recovery awareness. Anyone who has had their life touched by someone in recovery or someone still in pain from addiction or mental health conditions is welcome to consider sponsoring this event. There are several levels and ways to offer support, from donating money and bottled water to setting up water stations and more. Sponsors may include families, treatment centers, behavioral health agencies, Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, community support groups, churches, nonprofit organizations, and anyone else who is interested in supporting recovery programs such as this. Bronze level sponsorships for $100 include half a table along the route or at the rally point (to be shared with another group). Silver level sponsorships for $200 include a table at a water station (must provide water for that station) or a table at the rally spot following the run. Silver sponsors will receive one complimentary entry, T-shirt, sport bottle and wristband. Gold level sponsorships are available for $400 and include two tables, one BITS & PIECES

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6

AUGUST 8 - AUGUST 14, 2019 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

What’s Going On

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED

Galleries & Art Shows Coupeville Arts and Crafts Art Gallery Opening Reception Friday, August 9, 7:00-10:00pm Coupeville Recreation Hall, 901 NW Alexander St For ticket information, go to http://coupeville festival.com/art-gallery-and-wine-reception/.

All entries are listed chronologically, unless there are multiple entries for the same venue or are connected to a specific organization (such as Sno-Isle Libraries) in which case all entries for that venue or organization are listed collectively in chronological order under one heading.

Whidbey Island Rendezvous Friday, August 9, 8:00am-9:00pm Saturday, August 10, 9:00am-9:00pm Sunday, August 11, 9:00am-5:00pm 4778 Monkey Hill Rd., Oak Harbor Experience American history at the Whidbey Island Rendezvous, which focuses on the fur trade era. Event includes traders, campers, muzzleloader shooting competitions, tomahawk and knife throwing, cooking competitions and more. Visit the on-site museum to learn more about this time in our nation’s history. No charge to attend but there are fees to enter the shooting competition or to camp. Call Greg at 360-679-4657.

All You Can Eat Breakfast Saturday, August 10, 8:00am-12:00pm Sunday, August 11, 8:00am-12:00pm Whidbey Masonic Lodge 15, 804 N. Main, Coupeville Breakfast includes eggs, bacon, sausage, pancakes, orange juice & tea or coffee. $8/ Adults, $4/Children 4-12, under 4 free.

Whidbey Pagan Pride Festival Saturday, August 10, 10:00am-4:00pm Coupeville Town Park, Coupeville Whidbey Witches, Heathens, Druids and Pagans is preparing for its first ever Whidbey Island Pagan Pride Festival. There will be music, vendors and free workshops. This social group is designed to be a safe place for everyone. Call Tabitha at 206-290-9831 or Aaron at 760563-2699 for questions and information.

American Roots Music Series Saturday, August 10, 7:00-8:00pm Deception Pass State Park, West Beach Amphitheater WHOZYAMAMA is led by Claudette Boudreaux from Dulac, Louisiana. Members Claudette, Tami Allen and Claudia Anastasio played in the all-women Cajun dance band “Les Femmes d’Enfer” for over a decade. They joined Doug Warren, Todd Fischer and Rick Rice, members of Bayou Boogie, Cayenne and Delta Reys to form WHOZYAMAMA. The concert is free to attend, though a Discover Pass or Day Pass is required for parking. Bench seating is available, but feel free to bring your own folding chair. Blankets and bug spray are highly recommended. Please contact DeceptionPass. Interpreter@parks.wa.gov or 360-675-3767 with any questions.

Lions Club Fruit Sales Wednesday, August 14 - Until sold out, 9:00am-6:00pm Rite Aid parking lot, Oak Harbor The Oak Harbor Lions Club will begin selling cherries, peaches, nectarines, plums, Walla Wallas, bell peppers, beef steak and Roma tomatoes, jalapeños, and more. All proceeds are given back to the community. Look for the bright gold trailer.

Guided Beach Walks Saturday, August 17, 11:00am-12:00pm Fort Casey State Park, Coupeville Come on a short walk to learn the basics about our ever-changing beaches at Fort Casey. Wear your walking shoes and a jacket. This will be an easy one hour, one mile walk with some uneven paths, stepping over driftwood, and a steep incline at the end. Discover Pass is required. For more information, email education@ soundwaterstewards.org.

Island Herb Vendor Day

Prayer Group

Saturday, August 17, 1:00-3:00pm Island Herb, Freeland

Every Tuesday, 4:00-5:30pm St. Hubert Catholic Church, Langley

Representatives from Skagit Organics will be on site with product displays and information. Must be 21 or older. Island Herb is located at 5565 Vanbarr Pl, Unit F. For more information, call 360-331-0140 or visit whidbeyislandherb. com. Marijuana has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Keep out of the reach of children.

Charismatic Prayer and Praise group. Everyone welcome. For more information, call Bill at 360-222-4080 or email Sobico@comcast.net.

American Roots Music Series Saturday, August 17, 7:00-8:00pm Deception Pass State Park, West Beach Amphitheater Juan Manuel Barco is a legend of conjunto and Tejano music in the Pacific Northwest and beyond. Barco was born in Coal Mine, Texas to a family of migrant farm workers who followed the crop harvests within Texas and to several states in the mid and southwest. Barco taught himself to play the guitar at age six and later taught himself to play the bajo sexto and bass guitar. His music incorporates the many styles he heard as his farmworker family traveled from place to place. The concert is free to attend, though a Discover Pass or Day Pass is required for parking. Bench seating is available, but feel free to bring your own folding chair. Blankets and bug spray are highly recommended. Please contact DeceptionPass. Interpreter@parks.wa.gov or 360-675-3767 with any questions.

Upcoming Sno-Isle Library Events See schedule below Cost: Free Lit for Fun Book Group Thursday, August 8, 9:00-11:00am Freeland Library Join us for a discussion of Mark Sullivan’s “Beneath a Scarlet Sky,” the triumphant, epic tale of one young man’s incredible courage and resilience during one of history’s darkest hours. For adults. Summer Sensory Play Thursday, August 8, 9:30am Coupeville Library Celebrate summer with fun, interactive sensory stations. Wear clothing that can get messy. For toddlers, preschoolers and caregivers. Aging in Grace Monday, August 12, 10:00am-12:00pm Freeland Library Come laugh, cry, make friends and connect with others as we accept and adapt to the limitations aging brings. Facilitated by the Aging and Disability Resource Manager of Island Senior Resources, Nicole Donovan. Everyone is welcome. Explore Summer: The Bright Light of a Lighthouse Wednesday, August 14, 2:00pm Coupeville Library Maybe you’ve visited a lighthouse and wondered how we can see the bright light from so far away. Central Whidbey Area State Parks will explain how the Fresnel lens works as well as how each lighthouse is different from the rest. For children ages 6 and up and their caregivers.

Religious Services South Whidbey Community Church

Filipino Christian Fellowship Sundays, 2:00pm Meets at Church on the Rock, 1780 SE 4th Ave., Oak Harbor. www.ohcfellowship.com

Healing Rooms Every Thursday, 6:30-8:30pm 5200 Honeymoon Bay Road, Freeland

“Visitations:” New Art from Marcia Van Doren Also featured: New Boho Poles by Tim & Tonah Potter Open House: Saturday, August 10, 2:00-5:00pm Show continues through August 30 Raven Rocks Gallery, Greenbank Farm Marcia Van Doren sees owls in quite a different light than the spooky views of folklore. Owl images show up in corners of her house and garden and their presence brings her joy. When Marcia realized how compelling owls are for her, an idea for a new series of paintings was sparked.

The Healing Rooms are open to anyone desiring personal prayer for physical, emotional, or spiritual needs. There is a team of Christians from several local churches that are dedicated to praying for healing the sick in our community. All ministry is private, confidential, and free. Teams are available to pray for individuals who drop by on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Also featured this month, handmade cedar BoHo Poles by Potter are bright and beautiful indoor or outdoor art for your garden, deck or anywhere you want a burst of color. Each pole is uniquely designed & created by gallery artists Tim and Tonah Potter.

For more information, contact Ann at 425-263-2704, email healingwhidbey.com, or visit the International Association of Healing Rooms at healingrooms.com.

Reception: Saturday, August 10, 2:00-5:00pm Artworks Gallery, Greenbank Farm

Concordia Lutheran Church Sunday service, 9:30am Bible Study & Sunday School, 10:45am 590 N. Oak Harbor Street For more information, visit www.concordiaoak harbor.org or call 360-675-2548.

Teaching Through God’s Word Sundays, 9:00 & 11:00am Calvary Chapel, 3821 French Road, Clinton For more information, visit ccwhidbey.com.

Unitarian Universalist Sunday Service Sundays, 10:00am Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland All are welcome. Values-based children’s religious exploration classes and childcare will be provided. Visit www.uucwi.org for more information. The Unitarian Universalist Congregation building is located at 20103 Highway 525, two miles north of Freeland.

Unity of Whidbey Sundays, 10:00am 5671 Crawford Road, Langley If you’re one of the “spiritual but not religious” people who questions your childhood faith or is looking for something more, Unity of Whidbey may feel like a homecoming. Visit their website: unityofwhidbey.org.

Whidbey Quakers Sundays, 4:00-5:00pm Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland Whidbey Islands Friends Meeting (also known as Quakers) meet in silent worship and community, with occasional spoken messages, every Sunday at the Unitarian Universalist building. For more information, contact Tom Ewell at tewell@whidbey.com or go to www.whidbeyquakers.org.

First Church of Christ, Scientist Worship, 10:00am Sunday School to age 20, 10:00am Wednesday Testimony Meeting, 2:30pm Christian Science Reading Room Tuesday & Friday, 11:00am-3:00pm

Sundays, 9:00-9:45am Adult Bible Study 10:00-11:00am Worship Deer Lagoon Grange, 5142 Bayview Rd, Langley

The church and Reading Room are located at 721 SW 20th Court at Scenic Heights Street, Oak Harbor. Call 360-675-0621 or visit christianscience.com.

Sunday, August 11 - How a Church is Built: The Church has many metaphors. How does God describe this phenomenon? 10:00am Service at the church property, followed by a picnic. Call for directions.

Services and Sunday School are also held at 10:30am on South Whidbey at 15910 Highway 525, just north of Bayview and across from Useless Bay Road; testimony meetings are held the first Wednesday of each month at 7:30pm.

Featured Artists: Judith Burns and Marcy Johnson

Working in acrylic and mixed media, Burns titles her exhibit, “Around my Whidbey Garden.” Inspiration for many of her works comes from nature, but sometimes she also wanders into the abstract. Johnson is currently focused on handwoven alpaca throws, shawls and scarves. She has also created a line of hand-pounded, ethnic-inspired jewelry. Please join the artists for light treats and beverages.

Featured Artist: Chris Cozine Artist Demonstration: Saturday, August 17, 11:00am-12:00pm & 4:00pm-5:30pm Garry Oak Gallery, Oak Harbor Chris loved creating art as soon as she was able to use a crayon. It was her passion in school and in her pastime. She loves all kinds of art mediums, but eventually gravitated toward painting due to her love of nature. She later went to college majoring in art which she eventually made her career. Chris’ art is characterized by vibrant colors and painterly texture.

Classes, Seminars and Workshops NRA Basics of Pistol Shooting Friday, August 16, 6:00-9:00pm Saturday, August 17, 9:00am-5:00pm NWSA Range, 886 Gun Club Road, Oak Harbor Cost: $35 This course introduces students to the knowledge, skills and attitude necessary for owning and using a pistol safely. The pistol handling and shooting portion is completed at the NWSA range where students will learn about safe gun handling, pistol shooting fundamentals, and pistol shooting activities. The Basics of Pistol Course will also help prepare the student for participation in other NRA courses. This class includes shooting on the NWSA Pistol Range. Students can register online at nrainstructors.org. For questions, call NRA instructor John Hellmann at 360-675-8397 or email NWSA.Training@gmail.com. Additional information can be found at www.northwhidbeysportsmen.org.

DUI/Underage Drinking Prevention Panel Saturday, August 17, 1:00-3:00pm Oak Harbor Library meeting room No pre-registration required. Seating at 12:45pm. No late admittance allowed. Open to all and required by local driving schools for driver’s education students and parents. For more information, call 360-672-8219 or visit www.idipic.org.

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Whidbey Weekly

NEWS www.whidbeyweekly.com

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AUGUST 8 - AUGUST 14, 2019

Oak Harbor welcomes new Main Street Director By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly Oak Harbor is a city on the precipice of new and exciting things, according to the new executive director of the city’s Main Street Association. Hayley Samford has been on the job two weeks and has spent that time starting to get to know her new community and just what makes Oak Harbor’s historic downtown tick. “I’m trying to understand everyone’s perspective, to see what they think our biggest needs are and offer an unbiased opinion,” Samford said. “There is so much opportunity here, which is really beginning to gain momentum. I’m very excited about some of the special projects already in progress and seeing a lot more focus about Oak Harbor’s history. “Everybody has been so kind and has gone out of their way to make me feel welcome,” she continued. “I’m trying to get a full picture of what the downtown is and what it could be.” Samford, 25, has a background in business and has worked in the nonprofit sector for the past few years. She was born and raised in Lindsborg, Kan., a community with a strong Main Street Association that added to her life as she grew up there. “I was most recently the CEO of Big Brothers Big Sisters and I’ve also been with the Chamber of Commerce, so I feel like if you combined both of those positions, you’d have this one,” she said. “Obviously, the fastest way to make a difference in any community is through the economy. Providing people with jobs, opportunities, things to buy – those are all things we want in any community to help it be successful and thrive.” Already Samford is thinking a little like a native Whidbey Islander, mentioning how the sun feels hotter here than in Kansas, noting she and her husband, Luke, are already embracing the many things Whidbey has to offer. “What really appeals to us about the Pacific Northwest are all the outdoor activities available,” she said. “There’s hiking, skiing, biking, canoeing, kayaking. There are a lot of selling points – everyone can get here pretty easily and driving through Deception Pass sells the island very quickly.

Photo Courtesy of Coupeville Festival Association A predicted crowd of 15,000 to 18,000 people will make the trip to Coupeville this weekend to peruse arts and crafts for the annual arts and crafts festival.

Annual Coupeville festival attracts arts, crafts and 15,000 attendees By Kacie Jo Voeller Whidbey Weekly Arts and crafts ranging from pottery to paintings will be on display at the Coupeville Arts and Crafts Festival this weekend. Shoppers can peruse and enjoy everything from handcrafted goods to fine art and food at the annual event Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. In addition to the street festival, the Art Gallery Reception will be held at 7 p.m. Friday at the Coupeville Recreation Hall, with tickets available for $12 in advance and $15 at the door. Mike Dessert, current president of the Coupeville Festival Association, said the event will feature over 170 vendors, including local artisans and those from as far away as Florida, Texas and California. Between 15- and 18,000 people will come through the town to experience the festival, which will also include six musical acts.

See DIRECTOR continued on page 10

The festival has always been a community-oriented event, according to Dessert, and the money raised goes toward historic preservation, promoting the arts and cultural enrichment. “We do not make any money off of this for ourselves, it is all volunteer to help our community be a better place to live,” he said.

“The key to our festival being so successful is that people come to our festival because they know they are going to see good quality arts and crafts and that is what they are coming to buy,” he said.

Over the years, the Coupeville Festival Association has helped with raising funds for the town, and has provided aid in projects ranging from preserving the recreation hall to providing three defibrillators placed around town, Dessert said. The association also offers four $2,000 scholarships to high school students who volunteer with the festival, he shared.

The festival started in 1964 as a way to revive downtown Coupeville.

“We try to reach out to the community and then give back to the community,” he said. The event serves as a way for artists to share and sell their work, and also includes a juried art competition. “I guess the main importance is giving the local artists that qualify a venue to express themselves and the chance to get themselves out in front of a large chunk of the public,” said Dessert.

“I’m a newlywed (married for a year), so I love doing things with my husband,” Samford continued. “There’s at least a year’s worth of stuff to see within an hour of Oak Harbor. Everything we could have wanted is here. If we could have built something ourselves from scratch, this would be it.” Samford, who grew up with horses and had to leave three behind in Kansas, said she brought her saddle along in hopes of finding a place to ride locally. She said she loves cheesy icebreakers to help get to know people and shared a few details about herself, such as, her favorite color is green, she’s

“It was started because downtown Coupeville was dead,” Dessert shared. “Buildings were empty, there were weeds in the street and buildings to repair. A group of building owners, the Chamber of Commerce, and the sportsmen’s club all got together. Then, Langley had a festival, and Anacortes had something, so they decided to have a festival.”

Dessert, a craftsman who made cedar boxes, said the show also encompasses a wide range of items, and provides a space to showcase many kinds of work.

Photo Courtesy Bansai8 Creations Bansai8 Creations will offer a variety of leather goods, from wallets to purses and more, at the Coupeville Arts and Crafts Festival this weekend.

“One thing that we are not is a fine arts show,” he said. “We have a lot of good art, we have a lot of fine art, but we are not exclusive. We also have a lot of handcrafted items that would not qualify as fine art and having been a vendor — I was a vendor there for 16 years and I had a handcrafted item made out of wood — I appreciate that, because there are some shows out there on the circuit that are looking more for the high-end art than the handcrafted stuff. That is why it is the Coupeville Arts and Crafts Festival, instead of the Coupeville Art Show.”

See FESTIVAL continued on page 10

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AUGUST 8 - AUGUST 14, 2019 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly gave her “chemical warfare.” States someone put a needle in her; it’s not chemical 22. Unknown who did this to her. When asked for phone number caller gave address.

Island 911

Seriously, we do not make this stuff up! TUESDAY, JULY 2 11:20 am, Soundview Dr. Requesting call regarding what guns are legal to shoot; states neighbor was asking about shooting machine gun that is not registered. Wants to know if this is legal. WEDNESDAY, JULY 3 3:36 pm, Harbor Hills Dr. Caller frustrated about fireworks going off in area. States she believes it is illegal; another caller advising “someone is blowing off huge grenades.” 10:48 pm, Cornet Bay Rd. Reporting party advising she went to her neighbor’s property to tell them to stop blowing off fireworks. Neighbor told her to get the f*** off of the property. THURSDAY, JULY 4 8:12 am, Keystone Ave. Requesting call. States paraglider is flying up and down beach, violating his privacy. 9:41 pm, Bayview Rd. Male caller on line rambling about deer crossing the road. Not making sense, sounds like he’s been drinking. Now stating “people are driving the road.” 10:18 pm, NE 8th St. Angry female on line, “Get rid of these f***ing fireworks;” disconnected.

10:19 pm, Orchard Loop Reporting party calling to ask if fireworks are legal; when asked if reporting party wanted call back, reporting party said “I would like to know if fireworks are legal in this town.” Female disconnected after saying “do what you want.” FRIDAY, JULY 5 1:38 am, SW 6th Ave. Reporting party stating male is headbutting door and now laying down outside door, talking about fighting someone. 9:43 am, SW Vista Park Dr. Reporting party stating male made claims he witnessed a murder on base in California. 11:36 pm, SW Swantown Ave. Caller advising person is sleeping in middle of road; subject is off to right hand side of road on Heller. SATURDAY, JULY 6 11:41 am, SW Barlow St. Reporting party advising transient subject came into store and started threatening to make a scene in the store. Reporting party states subject threatening to pick up a cash register and throw it around. 1:56 pm, SE 9th Ave. Caller states two hours ago, someone

2:53 pm, Fort Casey Rd. Reporting party states, June 16, subject drove past his house harassing several times; subject then sprayed termite poison on his home. Reporting party states he can still smell poison every morning; denied aid, requesting phone call. SUNDAY, JULY 7 11:08 am, NW Alexander St. Caller advising bathrooms need to be cleaned; usually cleaned every morning and hasn’t been cleaned yet. 12:48 pm, S Beeksma Dr. Reporting party states female subject pooping near lagoon, next to a row of garbage cans; states male subject with female is laughing. 1:46 pm, SE Barrington Dr. Requesting call. States friend told him he was out of control and report was taken. Caller wondering what report says he did. 6:44 pm, Crow Haven Rd. Advising coyote stalking her dog and cats; wondering what she can do, requesting call. Given number for wildcom as well. MONDAY, JULY 8 10:23 am, Alta Vista Ave. Reporting party advising his neighbor’s chickens are ruining landscaping. Advising house is for sale and chickens keep tearing up the landscaping. 11:44 am, Saratoga Rd. Caller advising new neighbors next to him have been sleeping in shared driveway; caller asked them not to and they continue to do so.

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED 1:56 pm, SR 20 Reporting party advising female subject in waiting area, appears to be transient, trying to sleep in waiting area. States when asked to move along, female subject started raising fists to employees. 8:06 pm, SW Rock Rose Dr. Advising male is jumping through peoples’ yards, climbing over fences. Tuesday, July 9 6:02 am, SR 525 Caller states female walking in middle of road holding her hands out “like a yoga pose.” Walking on the line. 9:08 am, Cedarcrest Ave. Advising it appears someone has been camping on reporting party’s front porch; belongings left on porch. 10:17 am, SR 525 Reporting party advising subject keeps coming to reporting party’s house and asking for meth. Saw him walking around Clinton by park and library. 11:32 am, SE Bayshore Dr. Caller advising male subject on a green bike is throwing rocks at customers. 1:13 pm, SR 20 Reporting party states heard noise in house Saturday night, then next day noticed wallet missing; states didn’t report sooner because thought “you were closed over the weekend.” 6:43 pm, Wellington Dr. Caller reporting a transient camp in caller’s backyard; male transient just stated they want to burn down reporting party’s house and kill reporting party’s husband. 10:14 pm, SR 20 Reporting party states strange man is on reporting party’s porch with guitar; reporting party is armed with a gun. Report provided by OHPD & Island County Sheriff’s Dept.

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Whidbey Weekly

Island Angler In addition to this question, many new Island Salmon Anglers are asking themselves “What can I keep?” I know how tourists who are visiting or new Island residents feel – they are excited to catch a salmon, any salmon, have spent good hard-earned money on a license and possibly tackle gear, and catch a fish, only to be told by a knowledgeable local fisherman standing next to him or a law enforcement officer “Sorry, but unfortunately you can’t keep that fish.” Not what a person wants to hear after so much effort and anticipation. We are blessed here in the Pacific Northwest to have all five species of salmon return to the Puget Sound: Chinook, Coho, Sockeye, Pink, and Chum, but in the saltwater, identifying which one can go in the cooler can be a challenge. I recall my thoughts when I first arrived on island in 1995 and tried my hand at hooking dinner – a salmon was a salmon was a salmon – right? We have no intention of breaking any laws by keeping a salmon not within regulations for our family to eat; but the truth is it takes time, with actually seeing the different fish species first hand to really be comfortable and consistent with making the decision to place it in the cooler. The pictures to help identify each salmon species provided in the state regulations are helpful, but are in no way a substitute for seeing the real thing. The 135-page State of Washington fishing regulations are filled with enough special instructions to leave even the most seasoned fishermen scratching their heads at times, not to mention the ever-changing emergency rule updates and changes. The best advice I can give is to look over the State fishing regulations carefully, keep them with you for a quick reference and just go and fish, have a great time and don’t be afraid to ask for help identifying your catch. Okay, you finally hook and land a fish and you have a pretty good handle on identifying the species of fish, then the old question arises - is it a hatchery or a wild fish? Luckily this is pretty easy; most United States hatcheries clip off the adipose fin of their fish as very small juvenile salmon and this fin does not grow back, but heals over nicely as they grow. My son and I have, on a few rare occasions, encountered hatchery fish from which the adipose fin was not completely removed by the V-shaped razor mechanism; the fish most likely moved its little tail at just the right moment and a very small portion (usually the back part of the fin) remains attached and intact. This is known as a miss clip, or partial clip. Generally, law enforcement is familiar with this mechanical mistake and may allow you to retain the fish, but use good judgment and ask, if possible. I get a lot of questions about why we can’t keep a wild fish. Here is my answer, and why: The number of returning wild salmon is so low we are not allowed to and are

9

LOCALLY OPERATED

Take the time to enjoy the simpler things in life. GO FISHING!

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By Tracy Loescher

WHAT ARE WE CATCHING?

AUGUST 8 - AUGUST 14, 2019

completely restricted from keeping even one. Why? Do not be fooled by people and studies by people, some of which are not even in this state, who want to place primary blame of wild fish loss on poor ocean conditions, loss of habitat, and hydro electric dams. These obstacles account for only a small portion of the modern loss of wild fish. Millions of dollars have been spent in this state to restore habitat, but where are the fish?

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The number one cause of the wild fish decline in the State of Washington is the over-harvesting of salmon with the use of open and coastal water gill nets, purse seine nets and non-selective gill nets in spawning rivers. River gill nets are very near to ending wild fish, PERIOD. I also get statements from people who say “I will not eat salmon raised in pens.” Please do not confuse healthy, hatchery-released Pacific juvenile smolt salmon with salmon raised to adults in captivity. Well run and cared for hatchery fish are the single reason we can still fish for salmon at all right now. Ninety-nine percent of fishermen would not be able to tell the difference between a wild and hatchery fish on the end of their line if it were not for the clipped-fin hatchery marking. I, like so many other fishermen, would like nothing more than to see record numbers of wild fish coming back to us year after year, but until modern, non-selective gill nets are removed from all spawning rivers and ONLY proven selective harvesting methods like fish-wheels, dip nets, and good old hook-line-and-sinker are allowed, the successful state hatcheries and trapping facilities like the one on the Baker River are the only source of renewal keeping Chinook, Coho, and Sockeye salmon fishing alive in Washington State. Some fishermen have taken the steps necessary to cross the border and fish in Canadian waters, or have simply thrown in the towel. For me, I am not ready to switch to golf, so I fish for what salmon I can when I can, and actively support clubs and organizations whose goals are to put the resource first, and use common sense to seek changes in laws that address the real killer and cause of wild fish extinction: GILL NETS. Up to this point, Coho and Pink salmon fishing has been what I would consider slower than usual; I’ve heard of a few fish taken from shore and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife fish-checkers have seen a few brought in by boat fishermen, so I’m hopeful things pick up this month. Summer took its sweet time getting here this year but a nice two-day good rain would help bring the fish in as well. Think positive, grab the kids and go fishing, and as always, be safe and GOOD LUCK out there!

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Race the Reserve event supports Coupeville High By Kacie Jo Voeller Whidbey Weekly Experience mountain, prairie and ocean views with the Race the Reserve event Saturday. Participants can choose from a 5K, 10K, half-marathon, marathon relay, or marathon distance, all of which start from Coupeville Elementary School. The marathon will begin at 7 a.m. for those who want an official time, and 6 a.m. for participants who want extra time to walk the course. The other races will follow later on in the morning. Beth Dion, race director, said the event will draw more than 300 runners this year and will help to support a graduation celebration for the senior class of Coupeville High School. “This event is in its ninth year and was started to raise funds for our senior class to have a safe and sober graduation night,” she said. “We want our kids to have a fun and memorable time with their classmates, some who have been in school together for the last 12 years, but even more importantly, we want them to do it safely.” According to Dion, the race offers a chance for runners to compete in a beautiful setting, followed by community events, including the Coupeville Arts and Crafts Festival, which boasts nearly 200 artisans and vendors. “As a runner, I can say Coupeville is one of the most beautiful places I’ve ever run,” she said. “It has the views of the prairie, the ocean, the mountains, the forests and best of all, the Coupeville Arts and Crafts Festival and Oak Harbor Pigfest are the same weekend.” Dion said the event has been growing and offering more unique distance options for runners as time goes on. “Both the marathon and marathon relay were started two years ago,” she said. “It was both to have a fun team event and a way for non-runners to get involved as relay support.” Dion said the event is made possible by 75 volunteers, along with local businesses. “The event is put on thanks to our community sponsors!” she shared. “Thanks to Haggen’s, Windermere, Branch Business Services and the many others. We couldn’t do it without them.” Lisa Toomey, a parent volunteer involved with fundraising, said she has been in direct contact with many of the sponsors, including Haggen Food and Pharmacy. “That is just another thing that is just incredible, is they (Haggen) are supplying all this food and water and tents and the volunteers,” she said. “We also have other supermarkets that have stepped forward - we have The Goose (Community Grocer) and we have Red Apple, so it has been pretty neat.”

Photo Courtesy of Race the Reserve An estimated 300 to 325 runners will “Race the Reserve” and explore Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve during the 5K, 10K, half-marathon, marathon relay, and marathon events Saturday in Coupeville.

Toomey said she has raised over $4,000 for the event by connecting with businesses in the community. “I have been out from Langley all the way to Oak Harbor talking in person with all the businesses in the area,” she shared.

In addition to supporting the senior class, she said the funds raised by the races also help to support Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve.

Toomey, who has twins graduating in 2020, said her favorite aspect of the event has been seeing how people have come together to provide support for the island’s youth.

“We donate part of the funds - because we run along the water and it is really beautiful - to Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve to keep that historic park alive,” she said. “That is another positive thing about this race, besides keeping the kids safe and sound on graduation night.”

“Definitely the best part is getting to know the businesses in the community and how willing they were to participate,” she shared. “I am really proud of our island and this community.”

Along with providing a chance to support the local community, the event is also perfect for a weekend getaway, Toomey said.

The event also gives Coupeville High School students and parents a chance to participate and help the event come together, Toomey said.

“It is just a beautiful, beautiful course and a lot of people run it because as a runner, it is also a vacation destination,” she said. “It is really fun to be on Whidbey Island for this race.”

“It is really positive,” she said. “It gives the kids a chance to volunteer and do community service and be a part of this race. The kids and the parents of the class of 2020 need to step it up and come and volunteer on Saturday.”

For those looking to participate, online registration is still open, and race day registration will begin at 5:30 a.m. Saturday at Coupeville Elementary School. For more information, please visit racethereserve.com.

DIRECTOR continued from page 7 a Netflix-aholic and her favorite movie of all time is “Forrest Gump.” But what she really wants to focus on now is getting settled in her new job. She has already set some goals. “My first step is to update the strategic plan,” she said. “We need to think about where we want to be in five years and this will be the roadmap for how to get there. I also want to rebuild the website.” Samford said as she listens to people, she has heard about some of the issues that divide Islanders, but she is optimistic about some of those challenges. Photo Courtesy of Katie Enewold Jewelry Festival goers can find everything from jewelry to home decorations at the Coupeville Arts and Crafts Festival this weekend. One of this year’s vendors, Katie Enewold Jewelry, creates jewelry that utilizes metals recycled from silver-plated trays and old roofing copper.

“Everyone I’ve talked to has all told the same story,” she said. “They all know what Whid-

bey Island is about and all sing its praises. Everybody knows we can work together to find solutions and they want to have those conversations and openly discuss our differences. That can only be good.” The move from a small, midwestern, Swedish community to a small, Pacific Northwest city on an island in Puget Sound was a big one, Samford acknowledged, probably the first really big decision she and her husband have made since being married. “I feel like we definitely made the right choice,” she said. “Now I’m looking forward to building something that improves the quality of life for those in my new community. There’s no greater reward than that.”

FESTIVAL continued from page 7 Dessert said the event is made possible by volunteers and sponsors and that each year over 4,000 hours of volunteer work is done between planning and putting on the event. “I really want to thank the volunteers,” he said. “It is amazing the people that come out of the woodwork to help put this festival on; I mean we have documented in excess of 200 volunteers on a regular basis — 200 different people are involved. For a little town with a population of 1,800, that is pretty remarkable.” Over the years, Dessert said participating in the event has become a tradition for some, and even spans different generations of family. “We get people that come from as far away as Seattle or Tacoma that are relatives or have volunteered in the past,” he said. “For eight years, I have had granddaughters that have come over and spent the weekend — four different granddaughters that have worked at the festival at various times, and that is just me personally,” he shared. “I know of one family that has at least three generations that have volunteered at the festival.” To explore this year’s vendors and learn more, please visit coupevillefestival.com.

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly Hayley Samford is the new Executive Director of the Oak Harbor Main Street Association.

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Film Shorts Courtesy of Cascadia Weekly

Annabelle Comes Home: Wake me up when Chucky and Anna face off in the ultimate demonic doll duel to the death, preferably for both of them. Until then, I’m not interested. ★★ (R • 1 hr. 40 min.)

the likes of Brad Pitt, Leonardo DiCaprio, Margot Robbie, and Al Pacino firmly in tow. ★★★★★ (R • 2 hrs. 39 min.)

Like us on:

The Secret Life of Pets 2: This sequel is pretty much a retooling of the first installment of this animated series, but since it’s a movie made for kids, who really cares? They love to watch the same things over and over again. ★★ (PG • 1 hr. 26 min.) Spider-Man: Far From Home: Spider-Man goes abroad to save the world and get the girl in this first post-Avengers movie in our new post-original-Avengers reality. If Tom Holland is the future of the franchise, I’m here for every web-slinging minute of it. ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 9 min.)

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By Carey Ross Aladdin: I’m just going to go ahead and say there’s not a single animated Disney movie I would like to see remade into a live-action film. Nor do I find the idea of a giant blue Will Smith appealing, but your mileage may vary there. ★★ (PG • 2 hrs. 8 min.)

AUGUST 8 - AUGUST 14, 2019

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Stuber: This is the Lyft of Uber movies. Hollywood has seen a million sharks and it has jumped them all. ★★★★ (R • 1 hr. 45 min.) Toy Story 4: I don’t know how the fourth installment of a franchise can maintain this level of excellence, but such is the genius of Pixar. Credit should also go to Tom Hanks as the ever-reliable Woody, but this time the show belongs to Forky, aka Tony Hale. One or both of them will no doubt make you cry. It’s Pixar, after all. ★★★★★ (G • 1 hr. 30 min.

Crawl: First this movie hits you with a hurricane. Then it traps you in a slowly flooding attic. Then it attacks you with giant alligators. If someone in this movie doesn’t make one of the alligators swallow an alarm clock, that will be an opportunity missed. Five stars for giant alligators. ★★★★★ (R • 1 hr. 27 min.)

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Fast and Furious Presents: Hobbs and Shaw: It stars Dwayne Johnson, Jason Statham, Idris Elba, and an actual dame, Helen Mirren, so I could care less about its nonexistent plot, thinly drawn characters and reality-defying stunts. Give it all of the Oscars. Every last one. ★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 15 min.) The Lion King: I didn’t like this movie the first time around, so do your worst, Disney. Everything the light touches is your kingdom, after all. ★★★ (R • 1 hr. 48 min.) Once Upon a Time in Hollywood: Quentin Tarantino’s movies can be hit or miss, but when he fires on all cylinders, no one can craft a free-wheeling, dynamic film that crackles with energy quite like Hollywood’s resident enfant terrible. This time he turns his lens to Tinseltown of the late 1960s and does some of his best work yet with

THURS., AUG. 8 THRU THURS., AUG. 15 Yesterday: Dude wakes up in a world in which the Beatles have never existed but he somehow knows about them and all their songs, which he then passes off as his own, only to achieve his ultimate rock star dream of opening for Ed Sheeran. Aim sky-high, Beatles guy. ★★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 52 min.)

For Anacortes theater showings, please see www.fandango.com. For Blue Fox and Oak Harbor Cinemas showings see ads on this page. Puzzle 1 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.52)

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On a scale from 1 to 10...5.2 Every row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every column of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9

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DORA AND THE LOST CITY OF GOLD (PG) FAST & FURIOUS PRESENTS: HOBBS & SHAW (PG-13)

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Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/sudoku on Mon Jul 29 18:23:06 2019 GMT. Enjoy!

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AUGUST 8 - AUGUST 14, 2019 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

Let’s Dish! with Kae Harris

A FAMILY AF-FARE I’ve seen that pretty much each day of every month is dedicated to something or other to do with food. This is fantastic, because for those of us who like a reason to celebrate a certain food item or dish, we have one. Literally every day of the month. Every month. It’s always National something-to-do-with-food month or National-this-food-is-amazing-day and this, coupled with a few conversations I’ve have via email correspondence with a reader, has prompted me to ask the following question: If your family had it’s own ‘National (insert your family name here) Family Dish,’ what would it be and why? Now, I’ve mulled this question over and over in my mind, trying to really narrow down the copious recipes and dishes my family love and adore and focus on just one. Not an easy task, but it does bring up some wonderful memories when I think about a particular dish and the people and places associated with it. My nana used to make a very simple pasta and egg dish that was my father’s favorite. He was the apple of his mum’s eye and she would make him anything he wanted whenever we visited. You see, my father isn’t a very big fan of pasta and this is one of the few ways he will eat it; boil pasta until al dente (or however you like

BITS ‘n’ PIECES

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at the start or finish line and one at the rally point after the run. Gold sponsors receive two complimentary entries, two T-shirts, sports bottles and wrist bands. Those who sponsor a runner or walker or make a donation of money or water will receive an honorable mention. Sponsorship fees are waived for churches or nonprofit organizations. There is a limit of three water stations on the course. Cost to enter the run/walk is $25 for those 16 and older, $10 for those ages 6 to 15 if registered by Aug. 16; cost will go up after that, but registration is still available. The top three runners will receive a gift basket and speakers will share their testimonies after the race. Volunteers are welcome to participate by contacting Yessica Padilla by phone at 409-549-6770 or via email at Yessica. padilla316@gmail.com. To register or for information about becoming a sponsor or about the NSRC, visit www.nsrcnews.com and follow the 5K Run for Recovery link. [Submitted by Yessica Padilla]

2020 Health Hero Awards The 2020 Individual Health Hero of the Year, Mitch Incarnato, was recognized recently for his many years, and many hours, of service in Island County, including being a Court Appointed Special Advocate involving volunteering his time for the best interest of children who have been removed from their homes due to abuse and neglect. Mitch also volunteers with his local food bank, Hospice, Sound Water Stewards, Equestrian Crossings, Camp Erin Children’s Bereavement Camp, Langley Whale Center and Hearts and Hammers.

it, because some of us prefer it a little softer). Drain the water out and return to heat. Next, crack two eggs into the pasta in the pot, add half a cup of grated cheddar cheese and stir until the egg coats the pasta and cooks completely and the cheese is melted and gooey. Season with salt and pepper and there you have it – cheesy egg pasta. Not a very imaginative name, but no one ever gave it one and I can’t think of what to call it. Nana’s noodles? You don’t use noodles for the dish, typically, so perhaps not this. I digress. The point is, it ended up becoming a family favorite and not just something my dad enjoyed. This got me taking a stroll a bit further down memory lane and thinking about my oupa (grandpa) and how he used to make potato rosti seasoned heavily with paprika. I used to stand on the chair next to the stove and eventually, he explained how to make it. Maybe this could be part of my National (insert my family name here) Family Dish? No…it doesn’t seem to be the right dish. There are a lot of people that comprise both sides of my family and this didn’t really hit the spot for everyone. I thought about this for days and the right dish just didn’t come to me until a day or so ago. I knew exactly the dish both sides of my family – mum’s and dad’s – can’t get enough

awards are sponsored by the Island County Community Health Advisory Board and the Island County Board of Health. For a listing of special recognitions during this year’s event and more information about the Health Hero award, visit www.islandcountywa.gov/Health/ AHC/CHAB/Pages/Hero-Awards.aspx The Linda Lee Martens Memorial Community Health Hero of Island County Award criteria recognizes an adult, youth (under age 21 when action completed), or agency that has either directly or indirectly impacted community health. [Submitted by Virginia Shaddy]

2019-2024 Draft Transit Development Plan (TDP) Island Transit is soliciting feedback about the agency’s draft 2019-2024 Six-Year Transit Development Plan (TDP). The Transit Development Plan (TDP) serves as a guide for Island Transit. It helps identify transit service needs, prioritize improvements and determine the resources required for implementing modified or new service. The plan also provides a foundation for requests for State funding and grants, which are an important addition to the local sales tax collected that enables Island Transit to provide bus and vanpool services. The draft 2019-2024 Six-Year Transit Development Plan (TDP) is available online on the Island Transit website. Information is available on the Island Transit Facebook page. Hard copies are available at the Island Transit main office on Whidbey Island and the Camano Island satellite base. An electronic copy is available by request from info@islandtransit.org.

The 2020 Group Health Hero award went to South Whidbey High School Forefront Peer to Peer Training Team for planning and leading peer-led student trainings on mental health and suicide awareness.

Comments or suggestions may be emailed to info@islandtransit.org or sent via USPS to the main office at 19758 SR 20, Coupeville, WA, 98239. The deadline for 2019-2024 TDP comments is Sept. 3, 2019.

The annual Linda Lee Martens Health Hero

[Submitted by Meg Heppner, Island Transit]

of. It’s a staple and it’s wholesome and filling and overall, each family member finds it delicious – even the picky ones. It’s called ‘samp and beans,’ a mixture of de-hulled kernels of maize (corn) and dried sugar beans, all cooked together with spices and seasonings until it turns into a thick and hearty stew; really sums us up in one pot. We can just buy the dried mix in South Africa and prepare it straight from that. It requires soaking and cooking for a fairly extended period, but after adding onions, garlic, pepper, nutmeg, allspice and cloves and allowing those flavors to seep into the beans and samp, it’s pure magic. Now, since this dish makes great use of our favorite musical fruit, any musicians in your family who are already pretty good with their instrumental toots may just want to give this a miss. Yes, this would most definitely be our family’s ‘National Dish,’ our gustatory emblem, our flag, if you will. Everyone enjoys it and while each member has their own slightly tweaked version of it, it’s very much the exact same recipe my mum’s father used to use. Thinking about family meals always gives me a warm, fuzzy feeling and it makes me want to know more about my family. When did this dish become a ‘thing?’ What is each member’s favorite food? What did my nana used to eat for breakfast as a young girl? I mean, besides walking to school for 80 miles, barefoot in the scorching heat or a blizzard, I didn’t ask her these questions and I really wish I had. So, my dear readers, if your family doesn’t ask you, maybe just freely offer information about the foods you love, what it was like when you were growing up at your mealtimes. You never know who the family historian is going to be, and what a shame it is to lose special stories – even the ones you may think are insignificant now. It will tie future generations to you across time and this is incredibly important. Everyone wants to know where their tastes, habits and mannerisms come from and this is true of each facet of life, but also in our partiality towards certain flavors, I feel.

NAS Whidbey SAR Conducts Multiple Mountain Rescues

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED What is your family’s very own gastronomic road map like? Which one dish defines your lineage? I would be so interested to hear from you all about this, so please, feel free to write in and tell me! I am including the recipe for samp and beans, though I had to adjust it slightly as per the ingredients available to us here, but it’s still delicious. I hope you all enjoy it as much as we do! Please send any and all comments, questions and definitely recipes you’d like to share to letsdish.whidbeyweekly@ gmail.com and we can do exactly that – Dish! Samp and Beans 3 cups dried hominy 2 cups dried sugar beans 1 large onion, chopped 2 teaspoons garlic, minced ½ teaspoon allspice salt and pepper to taste 1 beef stock cube (optional) Soak the dried beans and hominy overnight in a bowl with water. The next day, drain and rinse them and transfer the beans and hominy to a large pot. Cover with water and add salt and bring the water to a boil. Reduce heat to medium, cover and cook for 45 minutes, making sure from time to time that the water doesn’t cook off too much. Top up with warm water as needed and, if using a beef stock cube, add it at this point and continue to cook for about an hour to an hour and a half, always making sure there is enough water. When the hominy is tender, allow some of the water to cook down. In a separate pan, fry together the onions, garlic and allspice until the onions are super tender. Stir this into your hominy and bean mixture, season as you like with salt and pepper, add a nob of butter to each serving once it’s been dished up and enjoy! To read past columns of Let’s Dish in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

hoisted the injured hiker and two crew-members aboard the helicopter by approximately 9:40pm. The SAR crew transported the patient to Harborview Medical Center in Seattle. A SAR team from NAS Whidbey Island rescued an injured man near Mount Ellinor, on the Olympic Peninsula, Saturday, July 20.

A Search and Rescue (SAR) team from Naval Air Station (NAS) Whidbey Island rescued a male hiker with an injured ankle near Glacier Peak the evening of Thursday, Aug. 1, and a female hiker with a head injury Sunday, Aug. 4. Thursday, the SAR crew arrived at the patient’s location near Glacier Peak at an elevation of about 5,400 feet by 7:45pm. Two crew-members rappelled from the helicopter to prep the patient. Once the patient was ready for transport the SAR crew hoisted the injured hiker and the two crew-members aboard the helicopter. Sunday, the crew located the second individual on a barren ridgeline at an elevation of approximately 6,400 ft. around 3:00pm. During this rescue, the helicopter landed south of the injured hiker and dispatched two crew-members to assist her. After providing medical assistance on scene, the crew-members helped her to the aircraft. The SAR crews transported both patients to Harborview Medical Center in Seattle. A SAR team from NAS Whidbey Island rescued an injured female hiker on Mount Stuart Sunday, July 28. At approximately 6:15pm, the SAR crew received a call to rescue the hiker who had suffered a compound leg fracture. The SAR crew arrived at her location on Mount Stuart at an elevation of about 8,800 feet by about 7:40pm. After inserting two crew-members on scene to prep the patient, the SAR crew

The SAR crew received a call in the early evening to rescue a man suffering a possible broken collarbone and multiple wounds near Mount Ellinor, which is just west of the Hood Canal and just north of Lake Cushman. The victim was found at an elevation of approximately 5,000 feet and was subsequently hoisted onboard the SAR helicopter. The SAR crew transported the patient to Harborview Medical Center in Seattle by approximately 8:50pm. NAS Whidbey Island SAR has conducted 26 total missions throughout Washington State this year, including seven searches, ten rescues and nine medical evacuations. The Navy SAR unit operates three MH-60S helicopters from NAS Whidbey Island as search and rescue/medical evacuation (SAR/ MEDEVAC) platforms for the EA-18G aircraft as well as other squadrons and personnel assigned to the installation. Pursuant to the National SAR Plan of the United States, the unit may also be used for civil SAR/MEDEVAC needs to the fullest extent practicable on a non-interference basis with primary military duties according to applicable national directives, plans, guidelines and agreements; specifically, the unit may launch in response to tasking by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center (based on a Washington State Memorandum of Understanding) for inland missions, and/or tasking by the United States Coast Guard for all other aeronautical and maritime regions, when other assets are unavailable. [Submitted by Thomas Mills, NAS Whidbey Island]

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that ultimately will take you anywhere you want to go. Positive thoughts on the 9th are better than dwelling needlessly on the negative.

CHICKEN LITTLE & THE ASTROLOGER By Wesley Hallock

ARIES (March 21-April 19) One exuberant moment, felt deeply in your being, can set a positive tone for many days to follow. Such golden moments are rare, but one may be expected this week. Feelings alone do little to effect concrete results, so when your moment comes, be ready to act on it. Any small step that gets you moving will do. The important thing is immediate action. The catalyst may be an inspiring conversation on the 9th. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) A strong belief in yourself and your abilities is the key to unleashing powerful forces in your favor this week. Aid and encouragement are yours if your trust in yourself is powerful enough. Others will gladly align in support of you if they sense that you know what you’re about. If the help you desire is not forthcoming, ask yourself why. The stoppage may be your own self-doubt. Events on the 9th could prove revealing. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) Small acts of courage generate support this week from sources that might oppose you at any other time. All that’s required of you is the strength to move ahead in the face of doubt. Uncertainty is natural in light of what you’re trying to accomplish, but put your fears aside. Even the most tentative steps on your part should be enough to attract the aid that will get you to your goal. Penny-pinching holds you back on the 9th. CANCER (June 22-July 22) A loose hand with the good things that come to you this week is the surest way of producing a steady flow of desirables. More simply, it’s your willingness to share the bounty that brings in the good. More than increasing your own happiness, the act of sharing is healing and rejuvenating for all. Now is thus a social time by default. Attractions on the 9th are likely to be mutual, so what’s to be gained by trying to hide what you feel? LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Superficial exchanges hold little appeal this week. The most meaningful events will most likely take place privately, thus reaching a deeper and more personal level than would otherwise be possible. Communications may not even involve words, but will be highly evocative and expressive, nonetheless. The tone and pace of what occurs depends largely on you. If it’s too slow for your liking on the 9th, you’ll know what to do. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) What you know and who you know come together surprisingly easily this week. Even better, they do so in ways beneficial to you. You are about to reap the benefits of courage and your ability to remain calm while acting in the face of fear and doubt. These are the traits

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) The impression you make on people who view you from afar is generally favorable this week. Gains you enjoy as a result of those impressions may come in a way similarly remote. An application approved, a ballot count in your favor, or a committee recommendation are all examples of help from distant benefactors whose identities you may never know. This impersonal touch is especially strong on the 9th. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) It’s the overview of things that should concern you most this week. The fine details are less important than your grasp of how the large elements connect. Of particular value to you is the ability of others to describe in words what you would otherwise only feel. Social contacts are of obvious benefit, thus, and additionally because they force you to organize your thoughts. Both factors are in play on the 9th. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Events this week see you chipping away, perhaps unknowingly, at your personal load of the troubles loosely called “baggage.” The things that happen, good and bad alike, will have the effect of making you a better person. How much of what happens, then, can truly be called bad? Whether you learn your lessons knowingly, as in a spiritual retreat, or the hard way on the street, the 9th has something of value to deliver. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) This week, as every week, problems are in search of solutions. Nothing new there. The ability to quickly match problems with solutions is always handsomely rewarded. If that describes you, rejoice at the good times ahead. If you are only an average problem solver, take heart. The rewards are there for you, too. That you take a little longer, must work a little harder, matters not. Practice makes perfect on the 9th. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb 18) Your willingness to work long and hard at whatever you do is what distinguishes you from the pack this week. Some of those stand aparts may protest your ways, objecting to your work ethic quite vigorously, but pay their flak no mind. It’s no threat to your command, and you’ll prevail nicely despite them. The extent of your outreach hits a peak on the 9th, when even the protestors may recognize your worth. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Your solid grasp of where you’re at and where you’re going, far from diminishing festivities, can only enhance them this week. If you’re not so sure of where you stand, don’t fear. Relaxing into the good times can’t hurt, and may actually assist in bringing you to greater clarity. In that case, be open about your uncertainty. The right answer to your dilemma on the 9th depends on asking the right question. © 2019, Wesley Hallock, All Rights Reserved

Chicken Little looks at what is and fears the sky is falling. Wesley Hallock as a professional astrologer looks at what is and sees what could be. Read Wesley’s monthly forecast, with links to Facebook and Twitter, at www. chickenlittleandtheastrologer.com. To read past columns of Chicken Little and the Astrologer in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

CLUES ACROSS 1. Job 5. Retirement account

50. Spy organization

24. Israeli city __ Aviv

51. Ancient Greek oracles

25. Sportscaster

56. Swindles

27. Midway between northeast and east

26. Hastily set up

8. Parent-teacher organizations

57. Not young

12. Audibly

59. Professional engineer association

14. Leavened bread in Indian cooking

58. Log-shaped pastry

28. Beloved basketball player Jeremy 29. Consumed

15. “To __ his own”

60. Arabic feminine name

35. One point east of due south

16. Violent disorder

61. Sacred text

36. Television network

18. Not wet

62. __ and ends

37. Allow

19. Worst (French)

63. What remains after taxes

38. Wife

20. Move with springy steps 21. Georgia rockers 22. Moved quickly 23. Blood proteins 26. Return to 30. Related to Iran

64. Type of watt

40. Grayish-brown mammal

CLUES DOWN

41. Written language for blind people

1. Pack full of clay 2. Relating to wings 3. Type of bean

31. The first

4. Former MLB commish Bowie

32. Pearl Jam’s debut

5. Short-tailed lemur

33. Nocturnal, catlike mammal

6. Cheese dish

34. Hymn

7. To any further extent

42. Insecticide 43. Della __, singer 44. Cleaned 45. Eye membranes 47. Past tense of fly 48. Anwar __, Egyptian statesman 49. Currency exchange charge

39. One who engages in arbitrage

8. Enzyme

42. Less bright 44. Indian lute

10. Extensive landed property

46. Discovers

11. Remove

47. Weatherman

13. Remove the head

49. Jai __, sport

17. High IQ group

52. Dark stain

9. Taiwan capital

53. Easily manageable 54. One who does not tell the truth 55. Soluble ribonucleic acid Answers on page 15

YOUR GUESS IS AS GOOD AS OURS WEATHER FORECAST Thurs, Aug. 8

Fri, Aug 9

Sat, Aug 10

Sun, Aug 11

Mon, Aug 12

Tues, Aug 13

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

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North Isle

North Isle

H-68°/L-55°

H-68°/L-57°

H-67°/L-58°

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H-74°/L-57°

H-71°/L-55°

Mixed Clouds and Sun

Mostly Cloudy

Cloudy with Showers

Mixed Clouds and Sun

Partly Sunny

Partly Sunny

Wed, Aug 14

Partly Sunny

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

H-71°/L-55°

H-69°/L-56°

H-69°/L-56°

H-68°/L-53°

H-71°/L-57°

H-79°/L-58°

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Mixed Clouds and Sun

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Cloudy with Showers

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14 AUGUST 8 - AUGUST 14, 2019 LOCALLY OWNED

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Whidbey Weekly

Life Tributes Jesse Aaron DiDonna

Oak Harbor resident, Jesse DiDonna passed away suddenly at his home July 30, 2019. He was 36 years of age. Jesse was born July 15, 1983 in San Diego, Calif. Jesse lived in many different places throughout his life and ended up calling Coupeville his home. He met his future wife, April, at McDonald’s in Oak Harbor. They started dating and were married Aug. 7, 2010. Jesse and April have two sons, Aaron, 8, Christopher, 4, and a stepson Logan, 12. Jesse loved his boys. He loved to play video games, jump on the trampoline, and watch movies with them.

Jesse was employed as a manager for the Jack In The Box in Oak Harbor. Jesse loved sports and was a big Seahawks fan. He enjoyed card games, especially Skip-Bo and Spades. Jesse left this world too soon. He was found in his home July 30 by his wife, April. He leaves behind his sons, Aaron, Christopher and Logan; his wife, April DiDonna; his parents, Tony and Jennifer DiDonna; siblings, Steven DiDonna and Janelle DiDonna; as well as his aunts and uncles and many more family and friends. The community is invited to a visitation and viewing to pay respects and say final goodbyes to Jesse, Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Wallin Funeral Home, 1811 NE 16th Avenue, Oak Harbor. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to the family’s GoFundMe page created to help April and the boys pay for expenses and funeral costs during this difficult time: www.gofundme.com/f/funeral-expenses-for-jesse-didonna.

Lisa Rozycki Sunday, July 28, 2019, Lisa Rozycki, loving wife and mother of three children, passed away while hospitalized at Providence Hospital in Everett at the age of 73. Lisa was born April 22, 1946 in Candelaria, Quezon, Philippines. She met her husband, Ronald, while he was stationed with the Navy in the Philippines and they married March 2, 1977 in Beeville, Texas. Lisa is survived by her beloved husband, Ronald, of 42 years; her three children, David of Mukilteo, John and his wife, Sarah, of Oak Harbor, and Mary, also of Oak Harbor; five grandchildren: Dana, Lisabeth, Madison, Alyssa, and Kaitlyn; and one great-granddaughter, Luna. Lisa was very loving and generous; she dedicated her life to her family and will be deeply missed. Lisa loved taking care of her home and family, especially her grandchildren, whom she cherished. Lisa enjoyed taking care of 3-year-old Luna and would say, “her smile brightens my day.” Lisa will forever live in our hearts! A visitation and viewing will be held Monday, Aug. 12, 9 a.m. at St. Augustine’s Catholic Church in Oak Harbor with a funeral mass at 10 a.m. Interment will be at 11:30 a.m. at Maple Leaf Cemetery with a reception to follow immediately at Wallin Funeral Home.

Robert Lee Brooks Robert Lee Brooks was born June 29, 1947 in Torrence, Calif. He passed away peacefully with his loved ones by his side May 9, 2019. He grew up in Nebraska. He enlisted in the U.S. Navy at 17 and soon found the love of his life, Shari Beth Robinson; they married June 4, 1966. They had three children: Tina, Anna and Robby. They raised the children as Bob was working in the Navy. The military took him to many places over those years but in 1980, the family settled in the small town of Oak Harbor, Wash. After years there, Bob was deployed again to the USS Constellation until he retired in 1986. In the years to come, he started Brooks Auto Upholstery and quickly expanded to Brooks Auto Restoration. He practically lived at the shop. Bob was the most knowledgeable and witty man. His heart spilled over with love to every person he encountered, helping anyone in need. He was the best husband, father, grandfather and friend anyone could have. He had a total of six grandchildren and he loved each and every one dearly: Alexandria, Ethan, Isabella and Christophor from Tina and Michael Gudgel; and Austin and Ashley from Anna and Henry Reola. He loved being a grandparent and being a part of their lives. He is now reunited with the ones he loved and lost. May the Lord be with him. Bob and Shari will be interred at Tahoma National Cemetery Aug. 28 at 11 a.m.

John W. H. Roberts

After a long and good life, John W.H. Roberts died peacefully at home July 16, 2019. He was born Dec. 30, 1926 in Liverpool, England to Welsh parents. He served in the Royal Marines and Customs Service as a young man and traveled the world before eventually settling down in San Francisco, Calif. Anyone who met him was impressed by his gentlemanly demeanor, dry humor and impeccable attire. Forever curious, John lived a life of learning. He was an omnivorous reader, amateur thespian, bookbinder, map, clock and book collector and music lover. He even built his own harpsichord. He knew more about clocks than many of the clocksmiths he befriended over the years and he could rarely turn down an opportunity to add to his ever-growing collection of timepieces.

John met his wife, Inge, at a theater opening and less than two months later they were married at San Francisco City Hall. After many years in San Francisco and Larkspur, Calif., where they raised their daughter Kathrin, John retired from a successful professional life in Insurance. They built a house on Whidbey Island, Wash., where they lived for the past 16 years.

LOCALLY OPERATED

Angel; granddaughters Emma, Zoe and Helena Angel; nieces Sian Morgan Hall and Sarah Burton; nephews Huw and John Morgan and their families. They are joined in their mourning by a devoted throng of friends and family in England, Germany, France and the United States of America, John’s adopted home. Arrangements have been made with the assistance of Whidbey Memorial Funeral and Cremation Service.

Richard “Rick” Phillips

Rick passed away peacefully, July 18, 2019, at his home in Oak Harbor, Wash., surrounded by family. He passed after a courageous battle with renal cancer. Rick was the son of Walter and Dorothy (Miller) Phillips of Owosso, Mich. Rick joined the U.S. Navy June 21, 1971 two years after graduating from St. Paul Seminary in Saginaw, Mich., and a short stint at the University of Detroit. After basic training at Great Lakes, Ill., he attended aviation electronics technician class (A) technical training at Millington, Tenn., and fleet replacement training with VA-42. He went on to report to VA-85 in Oceana, Va. Following a successful sea tour, he received advanced technical training back at Millington before reporting for shore duty as an instructor at NAMTRADET, Whidbey Island, Wash., in October, 1976.

Rick spent more than his fair share of time at sea aboard the carriers USS Forestal, USS Kitty Hawk, USS Nimitz, USS Constellation, USS George Washington and USS America. His subsequent assignments at Whidbey included VA-165, VAQ-134, VAQ-140, two tours with VAQ-137, two tours with NAMTRADET and two tours at AIMD. He wrapped up his career as the maintenance master chief of AIMD and had the distinction of calling Whidbey home for 25 years of his successful and colorful 30-year Navy career. Rick rose to highest enlisted rank in the U.S. Navy in just 18 years, six years ahead of a normal career path. During his successful career he earned numerous awards and honors recognizing his dynamic leadership and unparalleled management skills. After retirement from the Navy, Rick brought his leadership and management skills to Commercial Aircraft Interiors for 10 years before fully retiring in November, 2014. Rick is survived by his wife of 46 years, Christine (Hayhoe) Phillips; his mother, Dorothy; children, Keri (Doug) Naes, Viki Phillips and Paul Phillips; granddaughters, Kimberly Naes and Kaelyn Phillips. He also leaves behind siblings, Shari (Mike) Hill, Dave (Gloria Jean) Phillips, Debbie (Brian) Stoddard and Katy (Tim) Brown; sister-in-law, Trish Phillips; along with an uncle, aunts, many nieces, nephews and cousins. He was proceeded in death by his father, Walter, and brother, Robert Phillips.

Elizabeth Jean Axford Elizabeth Jean Axford, beloved wife of Patrick Arthur Johnson, died at home July 30, 2019, after a year-long struggle with brain cancer. Her artistic inclinations led her to pursue architecture for 15 years, but then she found her true passion for creating textile art, especially art quilts. Her last and foremost exhibition, Overlay, a solo show at the International Quilt Museum at the University of Nebraska, began May 17 and will continue through Sept. 22. In explaining her turn from architecture to quilting, Liz was fond of saying that life is what happens when you are planning other things. Born April 28, 1953, in Vancouver, Canada, to Joan and Barry Axford, Liz grew up in Winnipeg, Manitoba. She loved to draw and attended children’s classes at the Winnipeg School of Art. In 1963, the family immigrated to Dallas, Texas. By the age of 10, Liz had decided she would become an architect. Three years later, they relocated to Maryland, where she learned to sew in home economics classes and won the Betty Crocker Homemaker of Tomorrow Scholarship for Maryland. She sewed some of her own clothes throughout high school and college. With the determination and purpose she showed throughout her life, Liz moved to Houston, Texas in 1971 to attend Rice University where she earned a B.A. in Architecture/Fine Arts (1976) as well as a Bachelor of Architecture (1978). She began her first quilt top in the summer after her freshman year. She attempted to integrate a traditional pattern with design principles she had learned. She never finished constructing the quilt but remained interested in quilt designs. While a student at Rice, she met Pat. She later told friends that from their first date she knew it was love. They were married on the summer solstice 1980 in Giddings, Texas, at the ranch of Pat’s parents. They settled in Houston where she pursued architecture and he law. That same year, while purchasing quilting books for her mother, Liz discovered contemporary art quilts and the contingent of (mainly) women educated in art and design who made them. She was intrigued and dabbled in quilts while studying for her architecture registration exam. Quilt making percolated in her psyche for six years while she practiced commercial architecture. In 1986, she left that grind and began a lifelong pursuit of quilt making as an art form. Textiles satisfied her design instincts and love of process in a way practicing architecture never did. As she immersed herself into a studio practice which steadfastly remained experimental, quilt making became her personal passion and professional focus. Dyeing her own fabrics was an integral part of her artwork; she loved creating with color. From 1993 to 1998, Liz and her longtime friend, Connie Scheele, were partners in Fabrics to Dye For, producing custom-dyed fabrics for themselves and other quilt makers. During her 32-year art career, her works have been exhibited in Europe, Asia and throughout the United States. Her textiles have been juried into more than 30 exhibitions and featured in more than 25 publications. Among her numerous awards and honors, she received the Quilt Japan Prize from Quilt Visions in 1997 and the Award of Excellence from Quilt National in 2017. Most recently, she won the Excellence in Fibers’ 2019 award for Wall/Floor Works. In 2001, Liz was one of the original artists-in-residence at the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft. She has also served as judge, juror, curator, speaker and educator. She taught classes and workshops in cities across the country, including Anchorage, San Diego, Houston, Gatlinburg, and others, as well as in Tokyo and Osaka, Japan. Her work is touring with the international exhibit Color Improvisations 2, which opened in Europe 2016 and is continuing in the U.S. until 2020. After Pat retired in 2012, he and Liz relocated to Whidbey Island and built her dream home with an ideal studio. She was active in Fiber Optix, a group of Pacific Northwest textile artists, and The Surface Design Association, a creative fiber and fabric organization. Somehow, Liz found time for other interests such as gardening and competitive bridge. She spent many summer hours designing and planting her gardens, which were selected for the 2015 Whidbey Island Garden Tour. She and Pat played in multiple bridge tournaments across the continent from 2015 to 2018, highlighted by two wins in the Gold Rush Pairs at the 2016 summer North American Bridge Championship in Washington D.C. Liz cherished her family and friends. Her sister, Lorraine (Axford) Woodmansee, was at her side for the last months of her illness. Special appreciation goes to Linda Kendrick, her caregiver, and to the many friends and neighbors who have helped in so many ways during the past year. A memorial service will be held in the future; the date is still to be determined. In lieu of flowers, remembrances may be made to WhidbeyHealth Foundation/Hospice, P.O. Box 641, Coupeville, WA 98239, or your favorite charity. Family and friends are encouraged to share memories and condolences at www.whidbeymemorial.com.

John is deeply missed by Inge, his wife of 52 years; his daughter, Kathrin Johanna Angel and son-in-law Stephen

Life Tributes can now be found online at www.whidbeyweekly.com Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


GARAGE/ESTATE SALES Garage Sale: Saturday, Aug. 10, 8am-2pm, 1931 NE 11th Ave., Oak Harbor. Nice loveseat w/recliners, 6-foot stainless steel table, bottle filler, antique buffet modified as TV stand, large food storage containers and much more. 3-Family Garage Sale: Fri. Aug. 9 thru Mon. Aug. 11, 9am-4pm daily, 12885 SR 525, Langley (west of Coles Rd. near Hwy. Milestone marker 13). Lots of good stuff. 11-Family Yard Sale: Saturday, Aug. 10, 9am-3pm, Sunrise Hills off Jones Rd, Oak Harbor. No early birds, please. 14’ sailboat w/trailer; riding lawn mower attachments; tools, gas-powered edger and rototiller; under-counter fridge; computer stuff; exercise equipment; Simplicity embroidery machine; Nest thermostat; bike rack; desk treadmill; darkroom equipment; food dehydrator; canoe; kayaks, paddles, life vests; two Trek 10-spd. bikes, helmets, pumps; Craftsman 10” table saw; Ryobi 10” drill press; glass table, framed art, books, clothes/shoes; dishes, knickknacks, toys. Garage Sale: Every Saturday and Sunday until site is cleared, 1010 Waterloo Rd, Oak Harbor (South of Oak Harbor, on Hwy 20, East on Waterloo Rd, large yellow shop building on south side). 40+ years: Tools, collectibles, furniture, household and kitchen appliances, dishes, pots and pans, oddities. Clothing, shoes, toys, games, yard furniture, books, large folding easels, briefcases, fabrics, quilting aids, mags, rulers, cutting guides and mats. Ironing and pressing aids. Over range microwave, never out of box, stainless (1)

ANNOUNCEMENTS Pregnant? Need baby clothes? We have them and the price is right–FREE. Pregnancy Care Clinic, open most Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10am to 4pm. Call 360-221-2909 or stop by 6th and Cascade in Langley.

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Imagine Oak Harbor’s first Food Forest, Saturdays 11am3pm, at 526 Bayshore Drive. Each week, we have volunteer opportunities available to help care for our community garden, share organic gardening tips, and learn Permaculture principles. All ages and skill levels welcome. Schedule can change due to adverse weather conditions. If you have any questions, please contact us at: imagineapermacultureworld.gmail.com

Mother Mentors needs volunteers! Oak Harbor families with young children need your help! Volunteer just a couple of hours a week to make a difference in someone’s life! To volunteer or get more info, email wamothermentors@ gmail.com or call 360-3211484. Looking for board members to join the dynamic board of Island Senior Resources and serve the needs of Island County Seniors. Of particular interest are representatives from North Whidbey. For more information please contact: reception@islandseniorservices.org

JOB MARKET

Whidbey Institute is seeking an experienced land steward for a full time, permanent position. The Land Steward is a 35-hour per week position and will be responsible for care and management of the landscape, conservation forest, and public trails at the Whidbey Institute, a 501(c)(3) educational non-profit with a 106-acre campus on South Whidbey. In addition, they will work with volunteers and service learning groups to support land-based community engagement. Compensation for this position is $19/hour, benefits include paid time off, paid holidays, and family leave. The application period closes Aug. 15. For more information, visit http://tinyurl. com/wi-landsteward (0)

House plants: small $5 each, larger floor plants $20 each; Small glass display case for use with coffee table or occasional table, hexagonal in shape, 12” H x 8” W from side to side, 3 shelves, $40 or best offer; Beautiful green wrought iron display/stand, 75” H x 29” W, four removable glass shelves, $50 or best offer; Ceiling mount light with beveled glass, classic, flush mount, 16 pieces of high quality beveled crystal glass, eight clear glass bulbs, $40; Swopper is an ergonomic office chair that enables movement in all three dimensions to provide balanced support for your lower back, $295. Photos available, call or text 360-320-0525.

Automotive techs wanted: LAWN AND GARDEN must have own tools, ASE certified helpful. Apply at Red Swing set with canopy, seats MEDICAL EQUIPMENT Beard Automotive, 1707 Main four, $25. Sturdy metal frame Pride 3-wheel medical scooter, silver colored. Great for deck St., Freeland (2) new batteries, $385. Located Full-time/Permanent Garden or patio or on the lawn. Center Manager: We are seek- on Whidbey Island, 360-320Coupeville, 360-678-7591 (1) ing a professional, experienced 3615 (1) Japanese Maple trees. These person to lead our outside CLOTHING/ACCESSORIES are young trees, still small Nursery Team. Looking for enough to plant easily. Take Handsome hand-knit alpaca applicants with relevant exyour pick from several different wool sweaters from Bolivia, perience, self motivation, and kinds, including Coral Bark one men’s size M, one men’s commitment. Northwest plant, Maples. $20 each. Coupeville size L, $50 each, or best offer. tree and shrub knowledge is 360-678-4848 (0) Men’s work outfit: RAIL CHIEF required, as well as previous Natural Barnyard Topsoil: size 42, Union Made, Sanforbuying experience. Supervisory Good for flower beds, garized, $20. Photos available, and retail experience are a dens, etc. Unscreened, 10 yard call or text 360-320-0525. plus. Primary job will be to load, $225 delivered. South order weekly plant and hard ELECTRONICS Whidbey, 360-321-1624 goods order, assist customers Visio 43” TV, 4K, model MISCELLANEOUS with their selections and be M43-C2, $150. 360-678-8449 involved in BBQ sales. Need Love Casa Blanca? Two (0) to be willing to work outdoors 8-1/2”x11” b&w framed TV with 50” screen, HD, on in any type of weather. Will portraits from the movie, one rollers, great picture. Coupebe supervising a team of 3-5. of Bogart, and one with both ville, 360-678-7591 (1) Qualified candidates please Bogart and Bergman, plus five stop by with your resume (with TICKETS/GETAWAYS framed 8”x10” b&w scenes references) and a cover letter, from the movie. Complete set SEAHAWKS tickets vs. Oakand fill out our application land Raiders: Aug. 29 at 7 pm. for $40. 360-320-7232 (0) at: Freeland Ace Hardware, Two tickets, 300-level, 40-yard RECREATION 1609 E. Main St, Freeland, WA line, $75 each. 360-914-0075 98249 (2) Ultralight sleeping pad: (0) Fulltime Floor Sales AssociTherm-a-Rest NeoAir Xlite, HOME FURNISHINGS ate: If you have paint, tool, weighs 1-lb., measures 77” plumbing, or electrical product Like new, cherry wood dining x 25” x 2.5”. $199.99 at REI, knowledge, love hardware, asking $95. 360-678-2207 (0) table with 6 chairs and 2 and crave the full-time retail Camping items: Old (but leaves, $200. 360-678-2111 career experience then we’d (0) clean) Thermos 1-gallon love to hear from you. Working Saturdays and Sundays are re- No Cheating! quired. Must be able to lift 4050lbs. Qualified candidates, stop by with your resume (with references) and a cover letter, and fill out our application at: Freeland Ace Hardware, 1609 E. Main St, Freeland, WA 98249 (2) How’d youdifficulty do? rating 0.52) Puzzle 1 (Medium, 2

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jug, $5; Versatile backpack, the two parts can be used separately, or (for more serious backpacking) together, $15 obo. We have photos. Call or text 360-320-0525. Water sports accessories including gloves, hats, and footwear, many are neoprene, $5 each (or per pair); Cabela’s heavy-duty duffel, 31” L x 16” W x 17” H, sturdy base covered in canvas, two wheels in back for easy transport, never been used, in pristine condition, $40 or best offer; Penn Fathom Master 600 downrigger, includes stainless steel wire and 10-pound ball, in excellent condition, $135 or best offer. Photos available, call or text 360-320-0525. Golf clubs, excellent condition, each has its own head cover: Scotty Cameron GoLo putter, RH, 35”, Super Stroke grip, $175; TaylorMade Ardmore mallet putter, RH, 35”, Super Stroke grip, $110; BAT stand alone putter, RH, 35”, $50; L2 stand alone putter, RH, 33”, $50. Photos available, call or text 360-320-0525.

ANIMALS/SUPPLIES Excellent grass hay, good for horses, $7 per bale. 20 bale minimum. 360-321-1624

Round bales of grass feeder hay, barn stored. 360-3211624 If you or someone you know needs help in feeding pet(s), WAIF Pet Food Banks may be able to help. Pet Food Banks are located at WAIF thrift stores in Oak Harbor (465 NE Midway Blvd) and Freeland (1660 Roberta Ave) and are generously stocked by donations from the community. If you need assistance, please stop by.

WANTED Art, Antiques & Collectibles. Cash paid for quality items. Call or text 360-661-7298 Was your Dad or Gramps in Japan or Germany? I collect old 35 mm cameras and lenses. Oak Harbor, call 970823-0002

FREE Spinet piano, ebony, fast action, great tone. In Freeland, will deliver locally. Call 360222-3360 (1)

PERSONALS Amanda – So good to see you, Sunshine. Love you so much. Sorry my brain took an extra minute to work. Love, Mom (0)

CLASSIFIED INFORMATION US Postal Mail

Whidbey Weekly Classified Department PO Box 1098 Oak Harbor, WA 98277

E-Mail............classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com Telephone..................................(360)682-2341 Fax.............................................(360)682-2344 PLEASE CALL WHEN YOUR ITEMS HAVE SOLD.

Please try to limit your classified to 30 words or less, (amounts and phone numbers are counted as words) we will help edit if necessary. We charge $10/week for Vehicles, Boats, Motorcycles, RVs, Real Estate Rental/Sales, Business Classifieds and any items selling $1,000 and above. We do charge $25 to include a photo. The FREE classified space is not for business use. No classified is accepted without phone number. We reserve the right to not publish classifieds that are in bad taste or of questionable content. All free classifieds will be published twice consecutively. If you would like your ad to be published more often, you must resubmit it. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date.

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


42

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Full Synthetic

36

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Includes 4X4 & SUV

4295

$

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11995

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