Whidbey Weekly May 2, 2019

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May 2 through May 8, 2019

Penn Cove Water Festival Saturday, May 4, 2019 11:00 am to 5:00 pm Historic Coupeville, WA USA

Appreciation to the Roger Purdue estate

PennCoveWaterFestival.com

PennCoveWaterFestival@gmail.com

More Local Events inside

SNO-ISLE LIBRARIES

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Need a New Mattress? every purchase supports the oak Harbor High School Band and Choir Boosters! 10am to 5pm

Saturday, May 4 OHHS Fieldhouse

Let’s create tomorrow, together, with great CD rates today.

Custom Fundraising Solutions will convert the Fieldhouse to a “show room” with a variety of mattresses to choose from.

Twin from $229 • Full from $259 Queen from $299 • King from $399 Help Support tHe MuSiC prograMS at oHHS • New, Top Quality, Brand Name Mattresses • Motorized Adjustable Bed Frames, Luxury Z Pillows, Protectors (Simmons, Englander & More) • Delivery and Haulaway Options Available • Wide Variety – Firm, Pillow-top, Memory Foam, Latex, Hybrid & More • Great Customer Service • Full Factory Warranties

Cash | Credit Card | Check | Layaway | Financing (OAC)

www.CustomFundraisingSolutions.com

At Flyers, Sunday, May 5, 2019

Save for the future. Open a CD today. 12 Month CD – 2.30% APY* 18 Month CD – 2.80% APY* 24 Month CD – 3.05% APY* *APY=Annual Percentage Yield. Minimum balance to obtain the APY is $2,500. Interest is compounded daily and credited as determined by account term. Early withdrawal penalty varies by term. Consult a Banner Bank representative for details. Current as of 04/01/19; available for a limited time at the following Banner Bank locations: Burlington, Mount Vernon, Sedro Woolley, Anacortes, and Oak Harbor. Special CD pricing is not eligible for Banner’s Best Checking rate premium.

bannerbank.com ~ 800-272-9933

Member FDIC

STARTERS Chips, Salsa & Guacamole Chile con Queso ‘Flyers Style’ Jalapeño Poppers! Black Bean Nachos MAINS ‘Bomber’ Burrito Carne Asada SWEETS Churros Kahlua Beer Float

BEVERAGES Noche Vuelo Lager Corona Premier MARGARITAS Classic Lime Poloma Jalapeño Pineapple Strawberry Mango Passion Fruit Basil & Blood Orange

MARGARITAS $5 2 TACOS $7 EVERY DAY IN MAY! 360-675-5858 • 32295 SR 20 • Oak Harbor • www.eatatflyers.com

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ON TRACK with Jim Freeman

Last Saturday afternoon, at 1500 hours, I had the honor of officiating the wedding of the bride and groom who will remain nameless until I get their permission. Why ask for forgiveness first?

When I entered their house at 1400 hours, the almost bride was typing vows on her almost groom’s computer. After staring at the monitor for a minute or two, the bride-to-be said to the groom-to-be, “You finish this.” Knowing the soon-to-be-groom was not a typist, I offered my two fingers. After a few minutes of discussion as to whether passion should be singular or plural in the sentence “to continue the passion(s) in life that you have for each other,” the husband in the on deck circle said, “I’ve got to go get dressed.” So, there I was, using a borrowed computer trying to finish up my friends’ vows before the clock struck three. At five ‘til, with the help of a wedding guest married to a locomotive engineer, I hit print. Seconds ticked by as the guests began to assemble in the kitchen. More seconds ticked, more waiting for the printer to pop out the paper. Exiting my chair, I quickly pulled the sheet of paper from the printer. No words. No ink. I tried printing the vows again, but with black ink instead of color. No words. No ink. Blank paper. The suggestion to take a picture of the computer monitor so I could scroll the vows on a smart phone was not an option for me. My application for a smart phone was denied because I could not get any references to show I would be able to operate one. Too old to scroll. Given my speed writing skills, I grabbed my pen and paper to transfer the vows from the screen to the page. Three minutes until three. Let the guests take their seats on the porch overlooking the pond and the beautiful spruce and cedar trees. Cue the bride. Guests rise as the Victorian adorned bride enters with grace and beauty. The soon-to-be-wedded couple clasp hands as their eyes of wonderment meet. Guests may be seated. Welcome by the officiant, sharing of Psalms 92:1 and more, then sharing of vows, and then the official announcement of the marriage union. “You may kiss the bride.” Kiss made with vigor. Newlywed bride looks over at me and whispers, “What about the rings?” Way to go, memory lips. That out-of-sequence omission should cut down on any referrals. However, I was able to get out of the house before the guests started throwing carrots. The carrots always go first on those relish trays.

Whidbey Weekly Musings while shaving The other day (Editor’s note: over six years ago) I was shaving with an electric. This is not something I normally do unless I am in a hurry.

I was on hold so long I finally realized after listening to the Medicare top ten on-hold songs I could just wear some of Dad’s scarves until summer.

SHRED-IT

FUNDRAISER

There’s no need to travel the world In search of Pirate Treasure... Second Hand Booty has amassed it all Displayed for your shopping pleasure. 4777 Commercial St • Suite 6 • Clinton “Just up the hill from the Ferries”

206-552-4904

2ndhandbooty@gmail.com

I can worry about looking like Grandpa later. Baseball trivia On page 62 of the July/August 2012 issue of Capital Style, a Columbus Dispatch newspaper magazine insert, reporter Beth Stallings interviewed Joe Santry, baseball historian and director of communications for the Columbus Clippers. A couple of stories stood out to me. “Columbus Buckeye and the first deaf major leaguer, Eddie ‘Dummy’ Dundon, couldn’t hear if he was safe, so umpires began to use hand gestures: arms out with hands patting at the ground to show he was OK to stay; a thumb over the shoulder to send him back to the dugout. After 10 years in the majors, the hand gestures stuck for everyone, creating the signals you know as ‘safe’ and ‘out.’” “Buckeye Eddie ‘Cannonball’ Morris was one of the first pitchers to throw overhand in the pros in 1884. He was a strong left-handed pitcher, and because his arm faced south in the original Recreation Park, he was referred to as a southpaw. Thus, the lefty nickname was born.” “Bernard Malamud’s novel, ‘The Natural’ is a collage of real baseball stories. The player who carried a special bat in its own case was Columbus Senators infielder George Perring. The bat had been a gift from his father, who carved it from the hangman’s gallows at the Ohio Penitentiary.” Question of the week I wonder why I never used this bit of info? It is mind boggling to me that I wrote all this on a piece of paper to share almost seven years later. Must have been a slow Saturday night during a power outage. Q: What is the solar constant? A: “It’s 1.37×10 (to the 6th power) ergs per second per centimeter (squared). The solar constant is the mean value of the strength of the sun’s radiation taken at the outer edge of the earth’s atmosphere when the earth is at its average distance from the sun. It gets trickier. The solar constant is, in fact, not constant. Since we’ve been measuring it, it has varied up to 0.2%. The intensity of solar energy on the surface of the earth is greatly diminished and varies quite a bit due to atmospheric interference. Without the diffusion, we’d fry.” If anyone over 35 understands what this means, you might consider running for President. Word of the week Pluvial – Of or pertaining to rain; rainy. Using the word in a sentence, “We were on the way to a meeting of The Pluvials, but we pulled over because it was too sunny.” Penn Cove Water Festival This Saturday in Coupeville, one of life’s greatest pleasures takes place. The annual Penn Cove Water Festival will be celebrating another year with entertainment, food, canoe races, lectures, story-telling and more, honoring the culture and history of Native Americans in the Northwest. www.penncovewaterfestival.com

One of the more intriguing files was labeled On Track, December 12, 2012.

Stop by the boat launch to say hello. If you time it right, you may hear me mispronouncing.

Inside the file, I found several unused sources of unnecessary information.

To read past columns of On Track in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www. whidbeyweekly.com.

Soroptimist International of South Whidbey Island presents

Friday, May 3rd • 11am To 5pm

So, I turned off my electric shaver, placed it near the sink, and got out my Medicare card from my wallet to get the number to call.

Time machine When one is listening to the Mariners lose 15-1 and 14-1 within an eighteen hour period, going through old files is a pleasant diversion. Many of the items which I think I have lost are found. Many of the items I forgot I ever had are rediscovered.

Shall we begin?

GRAND OPENING

As I looked into the not-so-clean mirror, I noticed what looked to me like our Grandpa Freeman’s neck.

I wanted to know, as a first time caller, if my Medicare benefits included coverage for a neck lift.

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Upon doing so, I was taken back a bit when I scrunched my neck to liberate those flimsy gray neck hairs aging eyes may not see on the first go round.

1-800-Medicare or 1-800-633-4227.

MAY 2 - MAY 8, 2019

COUPEVILLE FARMERS MARKET

Saturday, May 11th 10:00am - 2:00pm Time to spring clean your filing cabinets! Securely dispose your personal & financial records! Licensed & Bonded shredding company! PAPER ONLY • STAPLES OKAY

Minimum Donation $5 Bankers Box or Grocery Bag $10 Oversized Box or Bag Sponsored by

GROWING SINCE 1979 Market Saturday 10-2 On the Community Green Stop by during the Water Festival

5575 Harbor Ave, Freeland Parking Lot Behind Bank All proceeds benefit Soroptimist International of South Whidbey Island Programs & Training

THANK YOU! To all of you who have donated food and/or NORTH WHIDBEY finances, we thank you HELP for helping us provide HOUSE assistance to those in need in our community. 1091 SE Hathaway St • Oak Harbor • 360-675-3888

PHONE: 360-682-2341

FAX: 360-682-2344

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Whidbey Weekly LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

1131 SE ELY STREET | PO BOX 1098 | OAK HARBOR, WASHINGTON 98277 Publisher......................................................................... Eric Marshall Editor............................................................................... Kathy Reed

Marketing Representatives................Penny Hill, Roosevelt Rumble Graphic Design............................................................. Teresa Besaw

Production Manager......................................................TJ Pierzchala Circulation Manager.................................................... Noah Marshall

Contributing Writers Jim Freeman Wesley Hallock Kae Harris Tracy Loescher Kathy Reed Carey Ross Kacie Jo Voeller

Volume 11, Issue 18 | © MMXIX Whidbey Weekly

PUBLISHED and distributed every week. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The Whidbey Weekly cannot be held responsible for the quality of goods or services supplied by advertisers in this publication. Articles, unless otherwise stated, are by contribution and therefore the Whidbey Weekly is not in a position to validate any comments, recommendations or suggestions made in these articles. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. DEADLINES: The Whidbey Weekly is a submission based editorial with contributing writers. Please feel free to submit any information (please limit to 200 words) that you would like to share with the Whidbey Weekly. You may submit by email to editor@whidbeyweekly.com, by fax to (360)682-2344 or by postal mail to PO Box 1098, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date. For more information, please visit www.whidbeyweekly.com.

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Bits & Pieces right. The legislature needs to stop passing its costs on to the counties, and it needs to pay for the services it is mandating to the local level.

State Mandates Neglect Counties It’s a fact that it takes money to run the government. And, “government” is often seen as a bad word. But, let’s remember what government is - government is ensuring access to justice for everyone, it’s patrolling our streets to keep us safe, it’s keeping those same streets in a drivable condition, and it’s making sure your favorite restaurants are sanitary. In Island County, it’s also providing for beach access, walkable trails, and monitoring our groundwater quantity and quality. Washington State has a good economy, and the state has more money than ever before, yet the legislature is considering new taxes because their costs of doing business are up even more than revenue. County expenses, however, out-pace revenues on a near permanent basis because the bulk of county revenue comes from property taxes. Property tax collection is capped at one-percent growth for local governments, a restriction the legislature waived for themselves when addressing the McCleary education funding court order. This means counties whose revenue does not grow like the state’s and who need voter approval to raise taxes beyond one-percent per year, have to figure out how to keep doing all the things they already do and pay for all the new mandates resulting from the current legislative session. Counties are continually being asked to do more, for a growing population, without adding new funding. Counties have been asking legislators to recognize the incredible strains they are putting on county budgets for a number of years now. At a time when the state’s economy has never been better, counties are facing budget shortfalls, staffing reductions, and the elimination of services residents expect from their local government. This legislative session alone is expected to see tens of millions in additional costs to counties with almost no new funding to cover these mandates. Anyone who has ever watched a crime show on TV knows the line “If you cannot afford an attorney, one will be appointed for you...“ It’s a constitutional right given to everyone, but the state pays just $6 million of that cost compared to the $156 million spent by counties. This cost has increased by 30-percent since 2008 in Island County, over half of this increase has been since 2015. Counties run elections, even the elections for state offices and initiatives. All local districts pay a fair share of their election costs, but the state doesn’t pay for the costs of printing ballots, sending voter pamphlets, and ensuring voters have access to ballot drop boxes. In Island County that meant local taxes had to cover $273,000 in state election expenses in 2016 alone. Unfortunately, a bill to require the state to pay its costs for elections stalled in the legislature this year. If the legislature won’t give local governments the funds they need to do the jobs required of them, then the legislature should allow counties some flexibility within the existing resources, which are often earmarked for specific purposes, regardless of where the need is greatest. When the state doesn’t cover its fair share of costs and won’t allow counties to raise additional revenue or give them the flexibility to use funds to meet the needs of their communities, counties are forced to divert money from other vital local services. It’s well past time for the state to step up and do what’s

Commissioner Helen Price Johnson, District 1 Commissioner Jill Johnson, District 2 Commissioner Janet St Clair, District 3 Sheriff Rick Felici Mary Engle, Assessor Sheilah Crider, Auditor Wanda Grone, Treasurer

2019 Salish Sea Early Music Festival World-renowned early music specialists, viola da gambist Susie Napper from Montreal and harpsichordist Elisabeth Wright from Bloomington, Ind. will join baroque flutist Jeffrey Cohan in Baroque Trio JEST, presented by the Salish Sea Early Music Festival in a program of music by French baroque composers François Couperin, Jean-Philippe Rameau and Marin Marais, among others. The concert will be held Sunday, 7:00pm at St. Augustine’s in-theWoods Church, 5217 S Honeymoon Bay Road in Freeland. The Jeffrey, Elisabeth and Susie trio “JEST,” marks its 40th year of performances together in 2019. Please see www. salishseafestival.org/whidbey or call the church at 360-331-4887 for additional information. Admission is by suggested donation: $15, $20 or $25 (a free will offering), and those 18 and under are free. [Submitted by Jeffrey Cohan]

Free Workshops For Whidbey Nonprofits Whidbey Community Foundation is pleased to partner with Washington Nonprofits and the Office of the Secretary of State to bring workshops for nonprofit organizations to Whidbey Island; all are free to Whidbey Island participants. To register for either the May or June workshop, see the Whidbey Community Foundation website at www.WhidbeyFoundation. org. Whidbey Community Foundation has a mission to improve the quality of life on Whidbey Island by providing support for the nonprofit sector, assisting donors to build and preserve enduring assets for charitable purpose, and meeting community needs through financial awards. As part of its mission, Whidbey Community Foundation offers workshops and educational opportunities to local nonprofit organizations. For more information call 360-660-5041. May 7: Finance Unlocked for Nonprofits (FUN) - The why, what, who, and how of nonprofit finance 1:00-4:00pm at Whidbey Island Nordic Lodge Hall, Coupeville An in-person workshop presented on Whidbey Island by Washington Nonprofits Through this interactive, hands-on workshop, participants will learn more about nonprofit finance. It will dig deeper into two key reports - balance sheets and income statements and then cover what board members need to know about IRS Form 990, the intersection of finance and fundraising, and oversight. The FUN workshop will be presented by Nancy Bacon from Washington Nonprofits. Nancy is a teacher and instructional designer who led the teams creating Finance Unlocked, Boards in Gear, Let’s Go Legal, and Strategic Planning in Nonprofits and regularly teaches about nonprofit topics in communities across Washington.

provisions. This training is excellent for those who are going to start a nonprofit, or would like to review and update their nonprofit provisions. It is highly recommended for nonprofit board members. [Submitted by Robin Hertlein, Secretary/Treasurer of Whidbey Community Foundation]

Make ‘em Laugh “Zaniac” Puts Zing! into Family Comedy Friday, May 10 at 7:30 pm, for one night only, WICA Family Series presents The Zaniac Comedy Show. Alex Zerbe will bring his zany comedy show to the Whidbey Island Center for the Arts (WICA). The Zaniac is an award winning show making SCIENCE accessible for the whole family. When was the last time you laughed as hard as your kids? With captivating amounts of energy, Alex Zerbe moves like a rubber band from one end of the stage to the other. Beatboxing, juggling, dancing, singing, music and magic are just a few of the things that led Piers Morgan of “America’s Got Talent” to call Alex, “The total package.” This show is family friendly. The “Professional Zaniac,” who’s been cracking jokes onstage for almost 15 years, zigzags between physical stunts and non-stop comedy. During the show vegetables are sliced in half by flying playing cards, flaming torches and bowling balls are juggled with ease and every audience volunteer leaves the stage in triumph. A self-described “human cartoon,” his show isn’t only for the kids in the family. “I try to make my show like the movie ‘Shrek,’ super entertaining for the kids but there’s a whole other level of comedy for teens and adults.” says Zerbe. Formerly of the award-winning duo Brothers from Different Mothers, Zerbe is a Hacky Sack World Champion, was voted The Pacific Northwest’s Funniest Prop Comic and is currently ranked Seattle’s 3rd Best Air Guitarist. He’s performed everywhere from cruise ships and comedy clubs to prime-time television in three countries, including “America’s Got Talent!” and “Last Comic Standing.” Grab seats for the whole family by visiting wicaonline.org or by calling 360-221-8268 for tickets. Got school-age kids? Ask about the special performance for schools. [Submitted by Jeanne Juneau, WICA Marketing Director]

Worldwide Protest to End Captive Whale and Dolphin Programs Concerned citizens rally to save cetaceans at over 60 events in 20 countries Concerned citizens across the globe will gather Saturday, May 11 for the 7th Annual Empty the Tanks Worldwide event. Thousands will come together in solidarity to bring awareness to the plight of captive whales and dolphins during this annual event, which spans over 60 event locations across 20 countries. As part of this event, Orca Network and the Langley Whale Center will host a small gathering in Coupeville in honor of Tokitae/Lolita.

June 12: Nonprofit Bylaws - What is the real purpose of bylaws, and what provisions should be in them? 12:00-1:30pm at Wi-Fire Coffee Bar’s community classroom in Freeland A live-streamed event; half webinar and half workshop

Please join Orca Network at the intersections of Highway 20 in Coupeville from 11:00am to 1:00pm. This is near Penn Cove where Tokitae/Lolita was captured in 1970. Tokitae is the only surviving Southern Resident orca from the capture era and Orca Network continues to work toward returning her to her home waters. Bring your enthusiasm and signs – there will also be some signs available for use. It’s time to retire Lolita! If you don’t live in the Whidbey Island area, check out the Empty the Tanks Worldwide Facebook page to find an event near you: www.facebook.com/EmptyTheTanksWorldwide/

This training for nonprofit leaders will cover the purpose of nonprofit bylaws, and explain all necessary or recommended nonprofit bylaw

Empty the Tanks Worldwide was founded by Rachel Carbary after witnessing the horrific dolphin slaughters that occur annually in Taiji,

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Should You Borrow from Your 401(k)?

If you work for a business that offers a 401(k) plan, consider yourself fortunate, because a 401(k), with its tax advantages and variety of investment options, is a great way to save for retirement. But what if you need to tap in to your plan before you retire? Is it a good idea to borrow from your 401(k)? To begin with, you need to determine if a loan is even available. You can only borrow from your 401(k) if you’re still working for the company that offers the plan, but even so, you’ll have to check with your human resources area to determine if loans are allowed. If they are, you’ll want to weigh the pros and cons before taking action. On the “pro” side, it’s pretty easy to get a 401(k) loan – there’s no formal loan application and no minimum credit score required. Plus, you’re only borrowing from yourself, and you can generally repay the loan with automatic paycheck deductions, typically over a five-year period. However, you’ll also encounter some “cons” when taking out a 401(k) loan, particularly concerning taxes. If you had not borrowed from your 401(k), the money you took out could have been growing on a tax-deferred basis, assuming you used pre-tax dollars to fund your plan, and your withdrawals will only be taxed once. But when you borrow from your plan, you will have to repay it, along with interest, with money you’ve earned – and been taxed on – and then, when you withdraw it later, you’ll pay taxes on it again. Furthermore, if you leave your employer before fully repaying your loan, the outstanding balance likely will be taxable, although you may have a grace period in which to pay it off and avoid taxes. And perhaps even more important, taking money from your 401(k), even if you repay it later, will almost certainly slow the growth potential of your account – which, in plain terms, means you may have less money available for retirement. Of course, if you encounter an emergency, and you have nowhere else to turn, you may need to borrow from your 401(k). And some plans allow hardship withdrawals for medical expenses and other needs, although you’ll still be taxed on the amount you withdraw. But you’d probably be better off if you can prepare, well in advance, for situations in which you need immediate access to a sizable sum. One way of doing this is to build an emergency fund containing six months’ to a year’s worth of living expenses, with the money kept in a liquid, low-risk account. You also might find some resources in the part of your investment portfolio held outside your 401(k). For example, you can always withdraw contributions to a Roth IRA without incurring taxes (although the earnings on these contributions could be taxable if you take the money out before you’re 59½ and you’ve had your account less than five years). In any case, you work hard to build your 401(k) – so, no matter where you are in life, think carefully about how you will use the money. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Jeffery C. Pleet, CLU®, ChFC®

Financial Advisor 630 SE Midway Blvd. Oak Harbor, WA 98277 (360) 679-2558 jeffery.pleet@edwardjones.com

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

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www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OWNED Japan. Rachel is an animal activist who aims to educate people about various animal rights issues. Empty the Tanks is a campaign aimed at educating the general public about what captivity means to cetaceans and allows activists to reach the public all over the world in a positive and productive way. www.emptythetanks.org

Since 1962, St. A’s Trash & Treasure sale has raised approximately a quarter of a million dollars for Whidbey charities. Stop by to find housewares, jewelry, art and artifacts, craft and office supplies, linens, toys and sporting goods, furnishings and small appliances, tools, garden items and plants, and more!

Awards will be given to the top five women and men. Dogs will get rewarded too, for such feats as first across the finish line, most drool, shortest legs, biggest eyes, most active tail and more. Costumes are definitely encouraged.

Don’t miss the Treasure Shop with antiques, silver and crystal, fine arts and collectibles, and many wonderful surprises at astonishing prices.

This year’s race promises to be packed with the serious runners and the not-so-serious runners/walkers who just come to enjoy the great course and other participants. Organizer, Louise Long, has organized over 16 marathons including the Seattle Marathon, See Jane Run, and more.

57th Annual Trash & Treasure The 57th Annual Trash & Treasure sale will be held Saturday, May 18 from 9:00am to 2:00pm by St. Augustine’s in-the-Woods Episcopal Church at 5217 S. Honeymoon Bay Road in Freeland.

All profits go to local charities. This year’s beneficiaries are the Soup’s On! Soup kitchen at Island Church Langley, Whidbey-Camano Land Trust, Whidbey Island Nourishes (WIN) and WAIF’s Crisis Care Fund. Donations may be brought to the church Tuesday through Friday between 9:00am and 3:00pm. They do not accept clothing, books, computer or exercise equipment, TV’s (unless flat screen), large furniture, anything broken or stained or not in working order. [Submitted by Mary Laissue]

PAWZ 5K & 10K Walk/Run It will be a doggone great day for the eighth annual PAWZ 5K & 10K run/walk offered on a scenic course through the seaside village of Langley on Whidbey Island. The event will be

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held Memorial Day, Monday, May 27 and you can register online at www.PawzbytheSeaLangley.com This family-friendly event allows you to walk or run with two- or four-legged friends. You don’t have to have a dog to run, you just need to bring your enthusiasm. Race goodies will be handed out at the finish line. Humans will receive shirts and goody bags. Dogs will receive treats and water. The course will take you on a circular route through historic downtown Langley, along tree-lined back roads, and along the Saratoga Passage bluff with beautiful views of the Sound. The race starts at 9:00am for the 5K and 9:15am for the 10K with registration available online or on race day beginning at 7:30am. The kids’ run is offered for those under 10 years old and starts at 10:30am.

[Submitted by Cindy Hansen, Orca Network]

MAY 2 - MAY 8, 2019

Speaking historically, Long said, “It’s an absolutely wonderful day. There are lots of runners and dogs, no dog fights, and no runner fights.” Sponsored by Animal Hospital by the Sea owner Jean Dieden and Langley Main Street Association, the event benefits the 4H Happy Hounds Dog Club and Good Cheer Pet Food Bank. For more information, visit www.Pawz bytheSeaLangley.com or email perfecttime events@gmail.com [Submitted by Langley Main Street Association] BITS & PIECES

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Contractors & Do-it-yourselfers Save Time & MONEY!

Donations Are Tax Deductible

FREE pick up island wide, call for appointment. WANTED: CABINETS • WINDOWS • DOORS • PAINT • LUMBER FLOORING • ELECTRICAL • PLUMBING • HARDWARE TOOLS • APPLIANCES • LIGHTING • GARDENING ITEMS FREELAND • 1592 Main Street • 360.331.6272 southstore@islandcountyhabitat.com

of Island County

DONATIONS ACCEPTED 7 DAYS A WEEK! Volunteer Opportunities Available

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Whidbey Weekly

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What’s Going On

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED International Needs, Roy and Elvia Sprague - N.I.C.E. , and Ron Frost, Barnabas International. Nursery at 9:50am and 11:20am services. Children’s Program at 11:20am-12:20pm

South Whidbey Community Church Sundays, 9:00-9:45am Adult Bible Study 10:00-11:00am Worship Deer Lagoon Grange, 5142 Bayview Rd, Langley

All entries are listed chronologically, unless there are multiple entries for the same venue or are connected to a specific organization (such as Sno-Isle Libraries) in which case all entries for that venue or organization are listed collectively in chronological order under one heading.

National Day of Prayer

Northwest, Montana, Hawaii and British Columbia, Canada as both a solo artist and with his band “J.P. Falcon Band.” No cover. For more information, call 360-682-5747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

St. Petersburg Russia Men’s Ensemble

Thursday, May 2, 10:00am Concordia Lutheran Church, Oak Harbor

Saturday, May 4, 7:00pm Oak Harbor Lutheran Church

Thursday, May 2, 12:15pm Island County Courthouse, Coupeville

The St. Petersburg Men’s Ensemble from Russia returns to Oak Harbor to present a concert of World Classic Choral Sacred Music & Traditional Russian Folk Songs. The concert is open to the public. Free-will donations from concert goes accepted to support the ensemble in its tour of the U.S. west coast. The church is located at 1253 NSW 2nd Ave. For more information and directions, call 360679-1561 or visit www.oakharborlutheran.org.

Thursday, May 2, 5:30pm North Whidbey Middle School, Oak Harbor The National Day of Prayer is an annual observance held the first Thursday of May, inviting people of all faiths to pray for the nation. It was created in 1952 by a joint resolution of the United States Congress, and signed into law by President Harry S. Truman. This year’s theme is Love One Another. For more information, email jlh71848@aol.com or visit www. nationaldayofprayer.org

Garage Sale Friday, May 3, 9:00am-4:00pm Saturday, May 4, 9:00am-4:00pm St. Mary Catholic Church, Coupeville Be sure to stop by and check out all the great items. The church is located at 207 N Main St.

Thrillusionist David DaVinci Friday, May 3, 7:00pm Oak Harbor High School, 1 Wildcat Way Spectacular and family friendly. Not just a magician, not just an illusionist, but a thrill-seeking, mind-bending master of prestidigitation. Prepare to be mystified by mind boggling illusions and jaw dropping magic, seamlessly fused with exotic parrots that materialize from thin air. You’ll laugh, you’ll cheer, your jaw will hit the floor, as David DaVinci presents his interpretation of the age-old art of magic and illusions. All proceeds benefit Oak Harbor Boys and Girls Club. Price is $15 to attend. For tickets, call 360-6755953 or contact whidbeycommunications@ windermere.com

“From Sea to Skye” Friday, May 3, 7:00pm Sunday, May 5, 4:00pm First Reformed Church, Oak Harbor Join the Whidbey Community Chorus as it welcomes spring at its annual spring concerts. “From Sea to Skye,” under the direction of Darren McCoy, will celebrate the wonder, magnificence and influence of these two natural forces. Oak Harbor High School’s Harbor Singers will also perform Friday. Admission is free, but donations are very gratefully accepted. For more information, call 360-678-4148 or visit https://sites.google.com/ site/whidbeycommunitychorus/home

21st Annual Eagles Plant & Garden Sale

Star Party Friday, May 10, begins at dark Fort Nugent Park, Oak Harbor Explore the night sky and view distant galaxies, planets and nebulas at this free public Star Party hosted by the Island County Astronomical Society (ICAS). No telescope needed and people of all ages are welcome to attend. Be sure to dress warmly and note the event will be canceled if the weather is cloudy. For more information, contact Bob Scott at ICAS_President@outlook.com or visit www. icas-wa.org.

Shred It Event Saturday, May 11, 10:00am-2:00pm SaviBank, 5575 Harbor Ave., Freeland Time to spring clean your filing cabinets. Securely dispose your personal and financial records. Licensed and bonded shredding company. Paper only, staples okay. Minimum donation is $5 per bankers box or grocery bag, $10 for oversized boxes or bags. All proceeds benefit Soroptimist International of South Whidbey Island programs and training.

High Tea Saturday, May 11, 12:00pm Oak Harbor Senior Center, 51 SE Jerome St. Tickets $15 Grandmothers, mothers, daughters, and friends are invited to a High Tea at the Oak Harbor Senior Center. The tea includes a gracious selection of finger-foods and fancy hats are encouraged. Pre-purchase tickets by calling 360-279-4580 or stopping by the Center.

Mother’s Day Concert Sunday, May 12, 12:00-4:00pm Meerkerk Gardens, Greenbank Stroll the gardens, bring a picnic, enjoy soothing music, relax and unwind. Desserts from Whidbey Pies will be available for purchase. Admission is $10 for adults, free for ages 16 and under. For more information, call 360-678-1912 or visit www.meerkerkgardens. org

Saturday, May 4, 9:00am-4:00pm Sunday, May 5, 9:00am-2:00pm Eagles Aerie #3418, Freeland

Sports Physical Night

Visit the big Eagles Plant & Garden Sale to find everything from bedding plants to healthy gallon size tomato plants to landscape trees. Once done shopping, come inside where you can grab a snack or buy raffle tickets to win giant hanging baskets and other neat stuff. The Eagles lodge is located one mile south of Freeland on SR 525. For more information, call 360-321-5636.

Live Music: JP Falcon Grady

Local physical therapists, podiatrists and family practitioners volunteer their time to work together to perform a comprehensive sport physical. The cost is $35 each or $70 per family, debit/credit accepted. Students must be accompanied by parent. Sports physicals are required for participation in school athletics for middle and high school. Presented by the OH Wildcat Booster Club, all proceeds benefit OHHS athletic programs.

Saturday, May 4, 7:00-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville

57th Annual Trash & Treasure Sale

J.P. Falcon Grady is a self taught acoustic guitarist, singer, songwriter and a proud member of the Blackfeet Nation. He performs originals and covers all over the Pacific

Saturday, May 18, 9:00am-2:00pm St. Augustine’s in-the-Woods, Freeland

Thursday, May 16, 5:00-7:00pm Oak Harbor High School Fieldhouse

Come find housewares, jewelry, art and artifacts, craft and office supplies, linens, toys

and sporting goods, furnishings and small appliances, tools, garden items and plants, and more! Don’t miss the Treasure Shop with antiques, silver and crystal, fine arts and collectibles, and many wonderful surprises at astonishing prices. All profits go to local charities. The church is located at 5217 S Honeymoon Bay Rd.

Sunday, May 5 – Communion: Celebration. The Ordinances Given by the Lord. Services are followed by a light lunch and loving fellowship.

Upcoming Sno-Isle Library Events

Charismatic Prayer and Praise group. Everyone welcome. For more information, call Bill at 360-222-4080 or email Sobico@comcast.net.

See schedule below Cost: Free Used Book Sale Saturday, May 4, 10:00am-2:00pm Freeland Library Large selection of great books for all ages at bargain prices! Proceeds support Friends of the Freeland Library. Lit for Fun Book Group Thursday, May 9, 9:00-11:00am Freeland Library Join us for a discussion of Anthony Bourdain’s “Kitchen Confidential,” a deliciously funny, delectably shocking banquet of wild-but-true tales of life in the culinary trade. For adults. Walks With Wheels Thursday, May 9, 2:00pm Freeland Library Want to get out more, but have mobility issues? Want to know where you can take the kids on bikes, or maybe you just want a smooth, relaxing walk? Maribeth Crandell will explore a dozen local trails. Recovering from an injury or illness? Find out which trails you can reach by buses that are ADA accessible. Preventing and Responding to Identity Theft Saturday, May 11, 10:00-11:30am Freeland Library In this class you’ll learn to protect yourself and learn what to do if you are a victim of identity theft. Presented by Jonathan Moore of Island County Victim Support Services.

Religious Services Global Partners Conference Family Bible Church, 2760 Heller Rd, Oak Harbor Friday, May 3, 5:30pm Pulled Pork BBQ Potluck for the whole family (bring a side dish to share). Speaker, Dr. Ron Frost, with Barnabas Int. will be speaking after the meal. Free “Kids Spring Weekend” program for infants-preschool and K-6th grade will begin at 6:30pm after the meal. Saturday, May 4 Men’s Breakfast - 8:00-10:00am - $1- with speaker Jon Hagedorn with Family Lines Women’s Luncheon - 12:00-2:00pm - $2 with speaker Terry Heyward with International Needs. Saturday Evening- 6:00-8:30pm - “Tapas and Treats” plus lattes- tickets $2. Interviews with our Global Partners and speaker, Rob Brooks, with iTEE Global. Free Children’s program - 6:00-8:30pm - for infants to preschool and K- 6th grade. Great activities with Rebecca Brooks, our Children’s Ministry Director. Sunday, May 5 Three services - 8:30am, 9:50am and 11:20am Speaker at all three will be Paul Johnson, with Frontier - Middle East. Adult Sunday Seminars - 2nd service: 9:50am- with speakers Meredith Falk, Youth Dynamics Whidbey- Area Director, Paul Spence VP of YD Adventures, and Jon and Erin Hagedorn with Family Lines. Adult Sunday Seminars- 3rd service- 11:20 AM with speakers- Trent Allen

Prayer Group Every Tuesday, 4:00-5:30pm St. Hubert Catholic Church, Langley

Filipino Christian Fellowship Sundays, 2:00pm Meets at Church on the Rock, 1780 SE 4th Ave., Oak Harbor. www.ohcfellowship.com

Healing Rooms Every Thursday, 6:30-8:30pm 5200 Honeymoon Bay Road, Freeland The Healing Rooms are open to anyone desiring personal prayer for physical, emotional, or spiritual needs. There is a team of Christians from several local churches that are dedicated to praying for healing the sick in our community. All ministry is private, confidential, and free. Teams are available to pray for individuals who drop by on a first-come, first-serve basis. For more information, contact Ann at 425-263-2704, email healingwhidbey.com, or visit the International Association of Healing Rooms at healingrooms.com.

Concordia Lutheran Church Sunday service, 9:30am Bible Study & Sunday School, 10:45am 590 N. Oak Harbor Street For more information, visit www.concordiaoak harbor.org or call 360-675-2548.

Teaching Through God’s Word Sundays, 9:00 & 11:00am Calvary Chapel, 3821 French Road, Clinton For more information, visit ccwhidbey.com.

Unitarian Universalist Sunday Service Sundays, 10:00am Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland All are welcome. Values-based children’s religious exploration classes and childcare will be provided. Visit www.uucwi.org for more information. The Unitarian Universalist Congregation building is located at 20103 Highway 525, two miles north of Freeland.

Unity of Whidbey Sundays, 10:00am 5671 Crawford Road, Langley If you’re one of the “spiritual but not religious” people who questions your childhood faith or is looking for something more, Unity of Whidbey may feel like a homecoming. Visit unityofwhidbey.org

Whidbey Quakers Sundays, 4:00-5:00pm Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland Whidbey Islands Friends Meeting (also known as Quakers) meet in silent worship and community, with occasional spoken messages, every Sunday at the Unitarian Universalist building. For more information, contact Tom Ewell at tewell@whidbey.com or go to www. whidbeyquakers.org.

First Church of Christ, Scientist Worship, 10:00am Sunday School to age 20, 10:00am Wednesday Testimony Meeting, 2:30pm Christian Science Reading Room Tuesday & Friday, 11:00am-3:00pm The church and Reading Room are located at 721 SW 20th Court at Scenic Heights Street, Oak Harbor. Call 360-675-0621 or visit christianscience.com Services and Sunday School are also held at 10:30am on South Whidbey at 15910 Highway 525, just north of Bayview and across from

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Whidbey Weekly

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OWNED Useless Bay Road; testimony meetings are held the first Wednesday of each month at 7:30pm.

Meetings & Organizations

Galleries & Art Shows

Thursday, May 2, 9:30am The Barn, Greenbank Farm

Northwest Shores and Waterways: watercolors by Peggy Woods Opening Reception: Saturday, May 4, 5:00-7:00pm Show continues through May 27 Rob Schouten Gallery, Langley The play of light on water and the soulful connection to her subjects convey the poignancy of everyday coastal life in Peggy Woods’ watercolor paintings. An advocate for the natural environment, her paintings are renowned for realism and detail, and convey the beauty found in the fragile balance of our shore ecology. Please join us for our Opening Reception in conjunction with Langley’s First Saturday Art Walk. Peggy Woods and many of our gallery artists will be in attendance, and light refreshments will be served.

Whidbey Art Gallery Art Walk

Doors open at 9:30am for a social time followed by a brief meeting starting promptly at 10:00am. The program this time is a round table discussion/ member plant /seed exchange. New members and guests always welcome.

Whidbey Weaver’s Guild Thursday, May 2, 10:00am-2:00pm Pacific Rim Institute, Coupeville Mixing yarn doesn’t work like mixing paint and we’re often surprised by color effects in woven cloth. Sarah Jackson will provide a presentation on the numerous possibilities for successfully translating color into woven cloth and developing greater confidence in the use of color. Bring your own lunch and a cup for tea. For more information, visit www.whidbeyweaversguild.org

Early Childhood Open House Friday, May 3, 8:30-10:00am Whidbey Island Waldorf School, Clinton

Bring friends and family and enjoy new work from our artists and see how many bunnies you can spot. Some three-dimensional rabbits will be taking their place throughout the gallery. Light refreshments will be available. Guest Artist Lauren Brumbaugh is happy to show her miniature paintings that she expertly fastens inside small antique clock faces. Shirley Lacy will be featuring her interwoven bead, shell and found object necklaces that are truly wearable art. Bonney Netzel’s photography will be on display as well. Bonney is drawn to the juxtaposition of shapes or the repetition of lines and colors.

Come along with your child to experience a morning together with Early Childhood teachers. Guests will play, sing songs and a go on a forest walk. For parents with children 1-6 years old. Please RSVP to enrollment@wiws.org or 360-341-5686.

Opening Reception: Sunday, May 5, 11:00am-12:00pm Exhibit continues through June UUCWI Art Gallery, Freeland For the months of May and June, the UUCWI gallery will feature the works of local artists Lianna Gilman and Gerard Del Monte. Lianna is a free-style weaver and fiber artist inspired by the Japanese Saori weaving philosophy of creativity and free expression. Gerard is a woodworker with a degree from Rhode Island School of Design. On display are his sculptural and elegant wooden art boxes incorporating the restraint of Zen, classical mathematical and architectural proportions, and Bauhaus functionality.

Bright, Shiny Objects: Jewelry by Helen Nind Open House: Saturday, May 11, 2:00-5:00pm Show continues through May Raven Rocks Gallery, Greenbank Farm Raven Rocks joyfully announces the debut for the jewelry designs of Helen Nind to our gallery. Her creations span a range from simply fun everyday pieces to those with the elegant touch of sterling silver. Hand drilled beach glass, charms, stones and an ever changing array beads and found objects all combine to make the perfect gifts for special occasions, or just because they’re fun!

Flying Fingers Deaf and Hearing Social Friday, May 3, 5:45-6:45pm Langley United Methodist Church We celebrate birthdays, holidays and share food. Small group of individuals who enjoy seeing sign language used in conversations. Fun, easy going time. Donation for room usage. Come and meet us. Parking across street, off Third St. and Anthes Ave. Fireside Room is back side of church, follow the path and signage. For more information, contact Susan at 360-221-0383 or email sisoleil973@ yahoo.com.

FOUNDATION

Monday, May 13, 1:00pm Trinity Lutheran Church Annex, Freeland We offer fellowship and support to anyone interested in genealogy. New members and guests are always welcome. The presentation May 13 about tax records will be given by Karl Krum, director of education at the Fiske Library. Come and hear why tax records are important to genealogists in helping us locate our ancestors. Do we recognize them when we see them? What do they tell us about our ancestors? All visitors are welcome.

Adult Children of Alcoholics Meeting Every Monday, 7:00-8:00pm Carole’s Barbershop, Freeland A meeting dedicated to dealing with the problem and solution for recovering from the effects of growing up in an alcoholic or otherwise dysfunctional family. For more information, contact Clayton at 360-989-4248 or visit www.adultchildren.org

Al-Anon Every Wednesday, 9:30-10:30am 432 2nd St., Langley

Featured Artist: Richard Nash

Are you troubled by someone’s drinking? Al-Anon group can help. Call Laurie at 360-6754430 for meeting information.

Richard Nash will discuss the methods and motivations behind his artworks. A Washington native and lifelong student of the visual arts, Richard holds a MFA and has completed lengthy studies in Japan and Europe. His 2-D work ranges from botanicals to abstracts, with 3-D sculptures of Cor-ten and stainless steel. His main focus is always composition. For his abstracts, he draws inspiration from the play of light and shadows created by architectural forms. www.rjnashart.com

SNO-ISLE LIBRARIES

Genealogical Society of South Whidbey Island

In May we will also be featuring the a new addition to the gallery of collector mineral specimens, hand cut gemstones and beach rocks from Windwalker Taibi, as well as his one of a kind pendants made from gemstones, wood, antler and more. Wednesday, May 22, 10:00am-5:30pm Thursday, May 23, 10:00am-5:30pm Penn Cove Gallery, Coupeville

LOCALLY OPERATED

Greenbank Garden Club

Saturday, May 4, 5:00-7:00pm Whidbey Art Gallery, Langley

Wood, Warp ‘n’ Weft

MAY 2 - MAY 8, 2019

If a friend or relative has a problem with alcohol, you can find solutions for yourself at Alanon.

Al-Anon Group Oak Harbor

Alcoholics Anonymous Every Day, 12:00 & 8:00pm 432 2nd Street, Langley For more information, call 360-221-2070

American Rhododendron Society Fourth Wednesday, 7:00pm Coupeville Firehouse, 1164 Race Rd. For more information, call Stephanie at 360-678-1896. WHAT'S GOING ON

continued on page

17

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8

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Whidbey Weekly

NEWS www.whidbeyweekly.com

Power of the pedal p. 14

LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

MAY 2 - MAY 8, 2019

Community group being formed to help save Coupeville Wharf By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly The Coupeville Wharf is in desperate need of repair and renovations and the Port of Coupeville would love the community to get involved in the effort. At two presentations last week, port officials laid out the phases of repair and renovation they would like to see happen to the 114-year-old wharf, leading those interested on a brief tour under the landmark to see some of the damage caused to the support piles by time, water and the elements. Phase one of the project, pile and cap repair and stabilization, is underway. An assessment study has been completed, as have engineering plans for the permitting process; an updated cost structure estimates repairs will cost $967 thousand. According to Chris Michalopoulos, executive director of the Port of Coupeville, the port is in the process of hiring a permitting specialist and officials hope construction plans will be finished and a project manager hired by the end of the year.

See WHARF continued on page 17

Photo courtesy of Penn Cove Water Festival

Traditions kept afloat at annual Penn Cove Water Festival By Kacie Jo Voeller Whidbey Weekly The waters around Penn Cove will be dotted with canoes Saturday at an event where the modern world and tradition converge for the 29th year. The canoe races are part of the annual Penn Cove Water Festival in Coupeville, where attendees can also experience Native American arts and crafts, artist demonstrations, and traditional music and dance exhibitions. The festival’s opening ceremony will take place at 11 a.m. Saturday, with the canoe races running from 12:30-5 p.m. Eleven canoe clubs, including those from various First Nations tribes have registered and it is expected approximately 300 pullers will compete in a number of different divisions. Vicki Reyes, president of the Penn Cove Water Festival Association, said although the festival as it is known today was started in 1992, its roots run deep, actually dating back to the 1930s. “My understanding is that originally in the 1930s Coupeville merchants got together and just wanted to invite Native Americans to come and race on Penn Cove, because they were the original inhabitants of Whidbey Island,” she said. “Part of our mission is to celebrate the history of Native Americans having lived here for thousands of years before the settlers ever came.”

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly Chris Michalopoulos, executive director of the Port of Coupeville, points out areas last week where piles and caps under the Coupeville Wharf building are in need of repair.

The early rendition of the event from the 1930s was paused in the wake of World War II, Reyes said. Today, the event has expanded from the canoe races to encompass everything from preservation efforts to traditional art displays. “We get to share information about the waters that surround us and how to maintain them and keep them clean and healthy,” she

Photo Courtesy of the Penn Cove Water Festival Association Up to 300 pullers from various canoe clubs will participate in the Penn Cove Water Festival canoe races Saturday in Coupeville.

said. “We have educational vendors that come, as well as our arts and crafts vendors, who are either Native American themselves or do Native American-style art.” For those who want to get up close to the races, Reyes recommends watching from Captain Coupe Park.

See PENN COVE continued on page 14

SOUTH WHIDBEY EAGLES 21ST ANNUAL PLANT & GARDEN SALE

SATURDAY, MAY 4TH, 9AM-4PM • SUNDAY, MAY 5TH, 9AM-2PM

LOCALLY GROWN • BARGAIN PRICING

Friday, May 3 & Saturday, May 4 • 9am-4pm St. Mary Catholic Church 207 N. Main Street • Coupeville

HANGING BASKETS • FUCHSIAS • GRASSES • BEDDING PLANTS GROUND COVERS • LANDSCAPING TREES • RHODIES • AZALEAS HERBS • VEGETABLES • FRUIT TREES TOMATOES – BEST NORTHWEST VARIETIES

• RAFFLES • PRIZES • FUN •

360-321-5636 • EAGLES AERIE • LOCATED ONE MILE SOUTH OF FREELAND ON HWY 525 THIS EVENT HELPS SUPPORT OUR ISLAND CHARITIES. Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


10 MAY 2 - MAY 8, 2019

Whidbey Weekly

LOCALLY OWNED

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ASK ABOUT FINANCING! MONTHLY PAYMENTS AS LOW AS $50

2019 PSE REBATE

$800 for electrically heated homes and $2,400 for manufactured and mobile homes Call today to schedule your FREE HOME EVALUATION 360.321.4252 IslandHeatPumps.com

Memorial Day 2019: A Service of Remembrance with special presentations by the Oak Harbor High School Chorus and Navy Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps; and Naval Air station Whidbey Island

Monday, May 27th @ 10 am Maple Leaf Cemetery 1961 NE 16th Avenue / Oak Harbor Hosted by Island County Cemetery District #1 Sponsored by the Oak Harbor Lions Club in conjunction with Whitehead-Muzzall VFW Post 7392

Teen Talent Contest

THURSDAY, MARCH 7 8:41 am, SW 6th Ave. Reporting white vehicle parked on SW 6th with number 13 spray painted on it, occupied by two males; revved engine, scaring students. 11:30 am, NE Midway Blvd. Caller advising she has a stalker parked next to her in Dollar Tree parking lot. 5:34 pm, Woodland Cir. Requesting call; advising bought a vehicle from subjects reporting party doesn’t really trust. Requesting law enforcement assistance looking through vehicle or advice about what to do if illegal things are found. FRIDAY, MARCH 8 1:08 pm, SE Pioneer Way Reporting party advising male rolling around on ground swearing. Reporting party believes he has been drinking. 3:13 pm, Bush Point Rd. Caller advising male subject walking around area singing to himself loudly, possibly on something. 7:08 pm, Resort Rd. Reporting party advising he wants a restraining order on female; she just arrived at location. Reporting party advising just doesn’t want female in house, advising female just barges in.

2:26 pm, SR 525 Caller advising male in yellow kayak under dock refusing to leave; people with bullhorn have been telling him he has to leave dock area but he will not.

ENTRY DEADLINE Tuesday, June 18 FINAL COMPETITION Monday, June 24 OHMF PERFORMANCE DATE Sunday, September 1

Are you ready to perform? • Do you love to sing? Do you have a group or band that would like a spot on the big stage at the Oak Harbor Music Festival?

• Create an audition video of your group or solo performance • Attach your entry and email your submission to music@oakharborfestival.com • Finalists will compete live for four stage slots at the festival

Seriously, we do not make this stuff up!

SATURDAY, MARCH 9 11:49 am, NW Elwha St. Advising boyfriend shot leg trying to unload gun.

For teens ages 12 - 18 or grades 6 - 12

Island County teens are invited to enter the TEEN TALENT CONTEST to win a chance to perform LIVE at the Oak Harbor Music Festival on Sunday, September 1.

Island 911

For full contest rules and submission guidelines, visit ohmusicfest. com. Supported by the Oak Harbor Music Festival. OAK HARBOR LIBRARY 1000 SE Regatta Drive 360-675-5115

For help uploading your videos, contact Jessica Aws, teen librarian, at 360-675-6000 or jaws@ sno-isle.org to make an appointment. Accommodations for people with disabilities will be provided upon request. Please contact your library with two weeks’ advance notice.

sno-isle.org

4:26 pm, Wahl Rd. Reporting party states no contact order violated through text with subject; sent reporting party text “eat me.” MONDAY, MARCH 11 7:42 am, SE Bayshore Dr. Reporting party at transit station, advising female across the street is yelling and calling her names. TUESDAY, MARCH 12 5:40 am, NW Atalanta Way Reporting party advising there’s a loud thumping noise coming from upstairs. 12:33 pm, Homestead Rd. Requesting call referencing incident that occurred last week; reporting party’s estranged wife burned all of reporting party’s clothes. 12:55 pm, SR 20 Caller advising semi crushed his vehicle. 3:41 pm, SR 525 Reporting party states chickens from next property are attacking her dogs; wants to know what she can do. 6:01 pm, SW Terry Rd. Advising vehicle was stolen from location sometime between Feb. 24 and March 1; states employee had permission to use vehicle; employee was arrested during that time. 10:23 pm, Rhododendron Dr. Caller states got a car from boss and now boss is stating the car was stolen.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13 8:45 am, SE Bayshore Dr. Advising male is walking around screaming; says he is trying to train invisible dog. 1:56 pm, Brideck Ln. Advising transient male at location is sitting on bench; reporting party advising is a “private neighborhood.” Male is yelling at reporting party, calling him names. 5:40 pm, Cranes Landing Dr. Advising neighbors are driving golf balls into homes below them, occurring now. 8:11 pm, Penn Cove Rd. Caller reporting fire in garage; male subject in garage is refusing to leave. 9:35 pm, Donald Ave. Requesting call. Advising female came to location earlier today looking for someone who doesn’t live there; female demanded to see identification and was asking reporting party’s daughter, who answered door. THURSDAY, MARCH 14 7:36 am, Stellar Ln. Advising people staying at house are selling items out of reporting party’s home; found out by looking on social media. 7:41 am, SW Terry Rd. Reporting party states woke up to cat in her bathroom; reporting party does not own a cat. Cat has caused damage to home and appears ill; requesting assistance in getting help for cat and getting it out of house. Still locked in bathroom. 12:29 pm, Heritage Way Driver advising saw large dog on roof of location; driver honked horn to see if anyone would come out, no one did. Suspects dog accessed roof through large upstairs window. 2:14 pm, Sonic Ln. Reporting party advising property at location is getting ready to sell; states person went missing there seven years ago and she hasn’t been seen since. Was told by law enforcement to advise when septic tank is ready to be pumped. 2:43 pm, SR 20 Requesting call referencing several vehicles left on property for 10-15 years; reporting party wants vehicles towed. 3:20 pm, Hastie Lake Rd. Reporting party advising had dispute with neighbor this morning; neighbor was irate and screamed at reporting party while she went over to get dog off his property. States neighbor started firing rounds off. 3:56 pm, Northgate Dr. Reporting party states there is trash in the yard next door over a story tall; states it is a health hazard; has already contacted health department. 4:38 pm, N Oak Harbor St. Reporting party is wondering where his vehicle was towed; he was gone for three months on detachment and does not know where his car is. 9:33 pm, Fish Rd. Abandoned call; recalling. Female advising “This mother f****r won’t go to bed. Come and get him.” Caller no longer answering call-taker. Report provided by OHPD & Island County Sheriff’s Dept.

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Penn Cove

Tribal Canoe Races Music Dancers Food Native Arts & Crafts Storytelling Youth Activities

Water Festival Saturday, May 4, 2019 11:00 am to 5:00 pm

in loving memory Roger Purdue Jackie Feusier-Walck PennCoveWaterFestival@gmail.com PennCoveWaterFestival.com

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Penn Cove Water Festival 2019 Performances

Schedule

Friday, May 3rd, 7:30 PM -SPECIAL PERFORMANCE Native American Storytelling around the bonfire at Pacific Rim Institute with Lou LaBombard, Anthropologist and Lecturer/Storyteller SATURDAY, MAY 4th - STAGE at ALEXANDER & FRONT STREET: 11:00 - FESTIVAL OPENING CEREMONY -PCWF President Vicky Reyes, Mayor Molly Hughes, Samish Cultural Development Coordinator Rosie James, Kelly Hall, Samish Language Specialist and our PCWF Native American Advisor/Entertainment Lead, Lou LaBombard MAIN STAGE at ALEXANDER 11:15-12:00 Peter Ali, Flute 12:15-1:00 JP Falcon Grady, Music & Songs 1:15-2:00 Rona Yellowrobe, Storytelling & Music 2:15-3:00 Swil Kanim, Violin 3:15-3:45 Lou LaBombard, Storytelling 4:00-5:00 Tshimshian Haayuuk Dancers Traditional and ceremonial dances involving you, the audience! In-between performances, we'll hear updates of the Canoe Races that can be viewed from the Wharf, along Front Street, at the Boat Launch in Capt. Coupe Park. *There also will be a raffle of one of Peter Ali’s beautiful flutes-winner announced after the performance by the Tshimshian Haayuuk Dancers

SATURDAY, MAY 4th - At the BOAT LAUNCH on 9th Street: 12:00 Noon - FESTIVAL WELCOME - PCWF President Vicky Reyes, Mayor Molly Hughes with Rosie James and Kelly Hall 12:20 – Race Captains Meeting 12:30-5:00 -Canoe Races take place during the rest of the afternoon FREE SHUTTLE FROM REC HALL TO BOAT LAUNCH PROVIDED There are also Food Booths at the Boat Launch PennCoveWaterFestival.com PennCoveWaterFestival@gmail.com


PENN COVE WATER FESTIVAL • SATURDAY, MAY 4 AIRPORT SHUTTLE & CHARTER SERVICE

The fastest, most convenient way to SeaTac Serving SeaTac Airport with 9 trips a day

Visit our booth and learn about our local orcas and gray whales www.orcanetwork.org Follow us on Facebook

www.seatacshuttle.com 360-679-4003 • 877-679-4003

Time for a Sweet Treat!

105 Anthes Ave, Langley, WA Open Thursdays-Mondays 11 am till 5 pm

Free Admission to our Educational Exhibits Fun Gift Shop

Popcorn, Ice Cream & Sweets Open Daily: 11am-6pm 851 SE Pioneer Way, Suite 101 (360)240-8937

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THERE’S NOTHING LIKE OAK HARBOR YOUTH FOOTBALL & CHEER! Tackle Football Ages 7-14 Cheer Ages 6-14

FARAWAY ENTERTAINMENT

For Your LOCAL Cinema Experience 3 Big Screens Featuring Blockbuster Movies Daily Visit the Oak Harbor Cinemas Movie Hotline

360-279-2226

Book A Party or Special Showing

360-279-0526

Discounts available • Like us on Facebook 1321 SW Barlow St • Oak Harbor

We Clean It All!

• WINDOWS • GUTTERS • ROOFS • PRESSURE WASHING

Volunteers at our Wharf Display

Registration Now Open! Early Registration Discount Ends June 15!

Contact us today for a quote!

360-395-5748 acleanstreak.com brian@acleanstreak.com Fully Licensed & Insured CLEANCS851PA

To register or for more information visit OHFCL.org

www.farawayentertainment.com

Our sincere thanks to all for supporting Penn Cove Water Festival!

Saturday, May 4, 2019 11:00 am to 5:00 pm

Historic Coupeville, WA USA

Paddle your way into Island Thrift for Name brand clothes and merchandise at affordable prices

Live barnacles wait for you at our Water Festival booth

The Store with the Big Heart All proceeds donated to community programs

(360)675-1133 600 SE Barrington Drive • Oak Harbor

PennCoveWaterFestival.com

Hours: Mon-Sat 9am-5:30pm Donation Hours: Mon-Sat 9am-4pm

www.soundwaterstewards.org


PENN COVE WATER FESTIVAL • SATURDAY, MAY 4 AIRPORT SHUTTLE & CHARTER SERVICE

The fastest, most convenient way to SeaTac Serving SeaTac Airport with 9 trips a day

Visit our booth and learn about our local orcas and gray whales www.orcanetwork.org Follow us on Facebook

www.seatacshuttle.com 360-679-4003 • 877-679-4003

Time for a Sweet Treat!

105 Anthes Ave, Langley, WA Open Thursdays-Mondays 11 am till 5 pm

Free Admission to our Educational Exhibits Fun Gift Shop

Popcorn, Ice Cream & Sweets Open Daily: 11am-6pm 851 SE Pioneer Way, Suite 101 (360)240-8937

Follow us on Facebook

THERE’S NOTHING LIKE OAK HARBOR YOUTH FOOTBALL & CHEER! Tackle Football Ages 7-14 Cheer Ages 6-14

FARAWAY ENTERTAINMENT

For Your LOCAL Cinema Experience 3 Big Screens Featuring Blockbuster Movies Daily Visit the Oak Harbor Cinemas Movie Hotline

360-279-2226

Book A Party or Special Showing

360-279-0526

Discounts available • Like us on Facebook 1321 SW Barlow St • Oak Harbor

We Clean It All!

• WINDOWS • GUTTERS • ROOFS • PRESSURE WASHING

Volunteers at our Wharf Display

Registration Now Open! Early Registration Discount Ends June 15!

Contact us today for a quote!

360-395-5748 acleanstreak.com brian@acleanstreak.com Fully Licensed & Insured CLEANCS851PA

To register or for more information visit OHFCL.org

www.farawayentertainment.com

Our sincere thanks to all for supporting Penn Cove Water Festival!

Saturday, May 4, 2019 11:00 am to 5:00 pm

Historic Coupeville, WA USA

Paddle your way into Island Thrift for Name brand clothes and merchandise at affordable prices

Live barnacles wait for you at our Water Festival booth

The Store with the Big Heart All proceeds donated to community programs

(360)675-1133 600 SE Barrington Drive • Oak Harbor

PennCoveWaterFestival.com

Hours: Mon-Sat 9am-5:30pm Donation Hours: Mon-Sat 9am-4pm

www.soundwaterstewards.org


14 MAY 2 - MAY 8, 2019

www.whidbeyweekly.com

Whidbey Weekly

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Photo Courtesy of Coupeville School District Coupeville Elementary School students line up last year in preparation for riding their bikes to school as part of National Walk and Bike to School Day, which will be observed Wednesday, May 8.

Whidbey youth to explore the power of the pedal By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly

we connect with students and their parents to remind them that you can put a bike on a bus rack to make that first and last mile connection,” said Island Transit Mobility Specialist Maribeth Crandell. “We also want pedestrians and cyclists to be safe as they travel on the road shoulder or wait at a bus stop. Nationally, 19-percent of traffic fatalities involve a pedestrian or cyclist, so we’re there to promote being visible and encourage safety.”

Drivers, be extra vigilant on the roads Wednesday morning (May 8), as hundreds of Whidbey Island youth participate in National Walk and Bike to School Day. Children attending Coupeville Elementary School and Broad View, Hillcrest, Crescent Harbor and Olympic View Elementary schools in Oak Harbor are all participating in the annual event, which promotes the importance of road safety. This is the second year Coupeville has participated in the event. “Students, parents, and school staff will meet at Coupeville’s Town Park for a fun send-off that includes music, snacks, and a special guest speaker, WhidbeyHealth EMS Paramedic Robert May, who will share keys to safe outdoor activities,” explained Jon Gabelein, fourth grade teacher and Coupeville Elementary leadership club advisor, who is helping organize the event there. “At 8:30 a.m., the group will depart and head down Broadway, turn left after the church onto the wooded trail before walking their bikes across the overpass and arriving at Coupeville Elementary School,” he continued. “This is a fun, engaging and exciting day as we encourage a healthy habit while promoting bike safety,” said Conor Laffey, communication officer for Oak Harbor Public Schools. “For many students, this will be the first time they’ll come to school on a bike and what better way than being cheered on by their peers, the community and staff members?”

Gabelein said the event also helps raise students’ awareness of environmental issues they may not ordinarily associate with walking or biking. “Participating in this event allows students to enjoy a fun biking or walking adventure with a large group of other students, staff, and families in their community,” he said. “It also allows students to actively support an environmentally friendly choice larger than themselves.” “Our students love making a difference,” said Laffey. “When they hear they contribute to less congestion and a cleaner environment, they take real pride in it.” Several agencies get involved in the Coupeville and Oak Harbor activities, such as Island Transit, Island County Health Department, WhidbeyHealth EMS, Coupeville Marshal’s Office, Central Whidbey Fire, Whidbey Island Bicycle Club, Prairie Center Grocery, North Whidbey Fire and Rescue and Washington State Parks. “By partnering with the Walk and Bike to School Day events

There is also a health benefit to getting kids involved in walking or cycling. “Studies show kids who participate in Walk and Bike to School Day events tend to continue walking or biking for weeks or months after the event,” Crandell said. “That contributes to a healthier community, a cleaner environment and more independent and responsible young people. So Island Transit is happy to support Walk and Bike to School Day.” “The simple joys of riding your bike and being cheered on by community members, staff and administrators are also major factors that lead to big smiles on this day,” said Laffey. Coupeville fifth-grader Ember Light participated in the event last year. “We all got to socialize and interact with everyone while doing something active,” she said. Bike safety checks, instruction on how to wear helmets properly and general outdoor sports safety tips are all included as part of the day. More information can be found online at www.walkbiketoschool.org.

PENN COVE continued from page 9 “Although we can see the race from the wharf and the pier and along Front Street from various spots, we encourage people to go down to the Captain Coupe Park boat launch, where the main action of the race

takes place because they start and finish there,” she said. “We have a shuttle bus that will take people back and forth from town to the boat launch, although it is a lovely walk, about three or four blocks at the most.”

Penn Cove is a unique destination for the canoe races, Reyes said. “Another piece of interesting trivia is that Penn Cove is the only non-reservation host on the Native American canoe racing circuit,” she shared. “We are honored that they love to come back and continue that tradition here.” According to Reyes, the event has even become a family tradition for some. “Many of the kids that were in what we call the junior Buckskin races we have been able to watch grow up, and they become canoe club captains with their own children participating in the races,” she said. Reyes, who first attended the festival in 2011 and became president of the association in 2013, said she wanted to get involved with the event after experiencing its traditions firsthand. “I think what really drew me in that first year I attended was that at the end of the performances, the Tshimshian Haayuuk Dancers invited the crowd to come and dance with them,” she said. “They are into their second and third generation of family members that come and dance.”

Photo Courtesy of the Penn Cove Water Festival Association The Penn Cove Water Festival highlights Native American culture and incorporates aspects of dance and art throughout the event, which will take place Saturday in Coupeville.

Businesses and other groups from the island community come together to contribute and add to the event, said Reyes. “We get a lot of community support in

sponsorships for the prizes we award to the first, second and third canoes in each race,” she shared. Another key tradition of the event, the artwork and posters, is made possible by a gift from a late local artist, Reyes said. “The artwork since 1993 has been provided by Roger Purdue, a local Native American artist,” Reyes shared. “He passed away a few years ago and prior to that gifted us more images that we can continue to use, and our graphic artist Kay Parsons is the one who used a design of Roger’s to create our poster and other artwork. Those will be available for sale during the festival at the Coupeville Recreation Hall.” The Penn Cove Water Festival is a link between the modern world and tradition and gives a glimpse into the Native American history of Whidbey Island, Reyes shared. “It is a continuation of a historic tradition that allows us to share the Native American culture,” she said. This year, additional parking will be available at the Coupeville Elementary School and a shuttle bus will run to the corner of Birch and Main Streets. For more information and a full schedule of events for this year’s festival, please visit www.penncovewaterfestival.com/ current.php.

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Whidbey Weekly

Island Angler

MAY 2 - MAY 8, 2019

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Build a Birdhouse for Mom! Saturday, May 11, 10am-2pm

FREE family event hosted by Christ the King Community Church.

All materials provided, everyone welcome!

By Tracy Loescher

1036 SE Pioneer Way, Oak Harbor 360-420-8301 BUY YOUR FISH OR BAIT YOUR HOOK? For many Island anglers, May 1 kicks off the beginning of the summer saltwater fishing season. Wednesday was the much anticipated Lingcod opener for Marine Areas 5 through 13, closely followed by the Pacific Halibut opener today. The boat ramps will be busy and fish stories will be made and told. There will be many successful fishermen returning to the docks with their limit of lingcod and possibly a few Kelp Greenling for fish tacos, but when it comes to bringing home a halibut - the steak-of-the-sea - the numbers will be drastically lower. Finding and catching halibut in the Puget Sound can be a challenge, simply because there are not huge numbers of these tasty flatfish lurking around that other places like Alaska and Coastal regions, such as Neah Bay, have. If you live on Whidbey Island and choose to only eat halibut, I hate to say it, but you are money ahead to just visit the market and buy a halibut steak for dinner. However, if fishing is in your soul, like mine, and if every dime spent on fuel, license fees, bait, tackle, rain gear and the sea lawyer needed to clarify the endless restrictions and rules does nothing to dull the warm and fuzzy feeling of catching your own fish - and you don’t see dollar signs, only total enjoyment - then by all means, bait your hooks and go fishing! Grit your teeth about the chopped up halibut season and take on the challenge of finding that rock-prowling lingcod and lonely halibut to bring home some fresh, savory fish for a wonderful family dinner. Now let’s go fishing. Lingcod are fairly plentiful in the Sound; the slot size restriction of 26-inches minimum and 36-inches maximum keeps the catchable numbers consistent and, so far, has allowed us to keep a lingcod season each year. Lingcod are curious, aggressive fish by nature. They don’t shy away from much, which works to our advantage for hooking them. Herring, in my opinion, are their favorite food but they will eat just about anything, including each other. A few years ago, my son and I hooked a large ling and scooped it out of the water and onto the deck of the boat; we watched as it coughed up a two-foot long, slightly digested dogfish. Now that’s hungry! So, don’t worry if you’ve got the right bait or jig, the goal is to get your offering in front of the fish. I fish with a 7-foot, medium heavy rod with a medium-sized, level-wind reel filled with 65-pound braided line. Braid has no stretch, so feeling a bite and setting the hook is superior to monofilament line; use caution when handling braided line - it is thin and can easily cut the skin. If I’m fishing bait, I use a 6-ounce banana weight with 24 inches of 50-pound mono leader tied with two 3/0 hooks. I use Herring, salmon belly strips or any chunk bait I have left in the freezer. I also have good luck using soft, artificial baits; a 6-8 ounce jig-head with a 4-6 inch thumper-tail swimbait or curly-tail grub are my go-to deeper water lures. White, orange, and glow are the colors I use. If I fish shallower waters, I switch to a heavy spinning rod and reel, spooled with the 65-pound braid, then reduce the jig head weight down to 1-2 ounces and reduce the soft bait length to 3-4 inches. A long cast with a slow retrieve, ticking the bait along the bottom will get bit; be sure to add some Herring scent to your soft plastics.

I don’t always rely on the same rock piles year after year. The islands and rock piles close to the boat launches are the first areas to feel the fishing pressure and many of the keeper lings will have been caught, so plan to cover some water in search of fish. When there is a slow tidal shift, all of the San Juan Islands, reefs and shoals can produce keepers. When fishing an underwater hump or reef, always try to drift fish downhill; this will help reduce snags and hang-ups. There is no doubt halibut are scarce compared to lingcod, but if you read a couple of good how-to-books on halibut, along with some online research and stick to basic fundamentals of halibut behavior, we can give ourselves the best odds on landing a “chicken” (25- to 35-pound halibut). During the months of May and June, concentrate your fishing depths between 100- and 200feet; fishing the Sound is different than fishing the Pacific Coast or near the Continental Shelf. Study bottom contour maps and find underwater humps, banks, and shelves that consist primarily of sand, gravel, and broken shell; these loose bottom materials give the halibut cover and the raised sea floor attracts bait fish. Always use scent when fishing for halibut; they can pick up a smell hundreds of feet away, so be patient, they will come to take a look. If the current is not too strong, drift fishing while jigging is a great way to cover ground. Remember to jig gently, the fish have to be able to get their teeth around the bait. Anchor fishing for halibut has become more popular over the last few years; once the boat has stopped in position, most fishermen drop a scent bag down to the bottom and fish in the scent cloud. Successful anglers often tell me it can take an hour or more before the fish move in close enough to be caught, so be patient. I fill my scent bag with all the frozen salmon and bottom fish carcasses left over from last year’s season, along with a couple of perforated cans of cat food. The scent bag is generally lowered down to the bottom on the anchor rope or a downrigger. Because of the very limited days we are allowed to fish for halibut, it takes a long time to gain the experience needed to make catching a halibut a sure thing. Sharpen your hooks, brush up on the regulations, check the tides, and go catch some Fish Tacos! Be safe and GOOD LUCK out there!

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360-675-3854 • 250 SE Pioneer Way • Oak Harbor genesartframing.com 9:30-6 Monday-Friday • 10-5:30 Saturday • Closed Sunday Custom Framing • Pens & Pencils • Papers • Canvas Brushes • Portfolios • Clay • Easels • Palettes • How-To- Books Calligraphy • Drafting • Airbrush • Artists & Craft Paint Supply Totes • Readymade Frames • Children's Art Kits

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16

MAY 2 - MAY 8, 2019 LOCALLY OWNED

Let’s Dish! with Kae Harris

WEIRD AND WONDERFUL WATERWAY FARE – AND A LITTLE PACIFIC NORTHWEST DELIGHT TOO! What does the water offer us? Besides quenching our thirst and making up a considerable portion of our body, water offers us, in simple terms, life. Not only do we require it for so many internal physical processes, but almost everywhere it is, there’s life to be found within it. From microscopic organisms to enormous creatures, the water is home to them all. Some of the weirdest dishes spring forth from the water and were it not for the abundance of edible resources found in this liquid, we’d never know all the many ways to enjoy waterway fare. I like to keep in mind whatever sounds extraordinary to some of us, might be a very run-of-themill thing for others and this includes the foods we eat. With that being said, food can be fascinating; not necessarily with the ingredients used to make a dish, but rather the way it’s prepared and what you actually turn out. This brought my search to something I find interesting - conch. More specifically, conch fritters. A conch is a type of mollusk (a sea snail), and conch fritters feature largely in Bahamian fare. Small balls of ‘queen’ conch snail, combined with hot sauce, chopped onions, peppers and tomatoes, battered and deep-fried, introduces you to something a little off-the-beaten-path in the world of waterway foods. Who doesn’t enjoy a little something deep-fried every now and then? While I’ve never tried conch myself, I’m told it has a slightly sweet and mild flavor, almost like calamari. Deep-fried balls of golden, seafood-y deliciousness? Yes, please! And if deep fried conch balls aren’t really up your alley, then how about the meat cooked in a garlic and lemon sauce brimming with fresh herbs? Served with bread or even grains (rice, for example), this warm and tasty dish sounds like an absolute treat! Conch doesn’t seem all that frightening, though. In fact, it seems rather benign. So too does fish sauce, one of the staple ingredients in Thai cuisine and yet the process of making fish sauce might seem a little off-putting at first. Tiny, fresh

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fish are caught and put into barrels, which are then closed up and left to ferment in the warm sun for up to a year. Every now and then the barrels are opened to air out a bit and then, after a sufficient enough amount of time has passed for the fish to completely ferment, the fish juices are drained from the barrels and collected into bottles or jars for use in cooking. Tasty! While the process itself isn’t terribly appetizing, the end product really is. Perhaps not so much by itself, but it most definitely enhances the flavor of the dish it’s put into, giving the food a little something extra that wouldn’t be there without it. So, while the starting ingredients are rather average, the process of turning it into something, and the end result, are not quite so banal after all! But what about the less ordinary things that come from the sea, or at least the things less oft seen and eaten here in the states? I’m thinking of jellyfish. As far back as 1,700 years ago, Chinese diets have included certain species of jellyfish. It would seem a dangerous thing to eat, but apparently, they are rather tasty and quite nutritious, too. If their sting doesn’t make you wary of eating them, then perhaps the whole process of preparing them (which thankfully isn’t normally done domestically in the home, I guess unless you’re a pro) might make you balk at the idea of turning jellyfish into a meal. Because they deteriorate rather fast at room temperature, they must be worked with quickly, removing the tentacles from the bell and scraping the muscous and gonads. They are then dehydrated, though if you wanted them re-hydrated, this is possible by soaking the jellyfish in water and then parboiling it. Oh, how weird the water can be. All the things you can find in it are fascinating and even though not always so delicious looking, can be exactly that through proper food prep. But I want to move a little closer to home and focus on the things we can find in our own waters and how we might enjoy those, even in unique ways. Yes, oldies are goodies when it comes to recipes. The tried and tested are often the best because they have been, well, tried and tested countless times before. Of course, salmon is always at the fore-

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front of the mind when one thinks of the Pacific Northwest. Not quite as complex or involved as the jellyfish, salmon is quick and easy to prepare and it’s a great source of protein and essential fatty acids (omega- 3). Salmon is so versatile in the way it can be used; soups, stews, grilled and baked. Turned into salads, it’s fantastic summertime fare and it is even candied and turned into jerky! Quite remarkable what we can do with seafood when we think about it. Now, salmon isn’t the only thing to come from the water along our coastal regions. Clams, mussels, oysters, scallops and crabs also find their way into the hungry bellies of seafood lovers here. In fact, clamming might just be a fun family activity to indulge in. There’s geoduck, littleneck, butter and manila clams in the Pacific Northwest. Why not make a day of cooking – from sourcing your own fare to preparing it. Always be sure you have any permits you might need to do this, of course! Dear readers, the water is vast and full of things we can turn into a gastronomic fusion of flavors. Protecting our waterways will always bode the health of our marine life well, and in turn, we too can benefit from it, but it starts naturally, with us. I’m including a recipe for pan-fried salmon. I know I’ve included a salmon recipe before, but one can never have too many different recipes for a single ingredient. I hope you enjoy this as much as I do and if you try it, let me know how you like it! Please send any and all comments, questions and definitely recipes you might like to share to letsdish.whidbeyweekly@gmail.com and we’ll do exactly that – Dish! Pan Fried Salmon 4 salmon fillets (approximately 6 oz. each) 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 tablespoons brown sugar 1 teaspoon ground black pepper ½ teaspoon cumin ¼ teaspoon dry mustard pinch of nutmeg In a medium bowl, combine sugar, pepper, cumin, mustard and nutmeg. Mix well. Rinse the salmon fillets to remove any loose or excess scales and pat dry with a paper towel. Heat the oil in a large skillet and, after rubbing the fillets down with the seasoning mixture, add them to the skillet, skin side up first. Cook on medium heat until the flesh side is golden, turn and continue cooking until the skin side is slightly browned, approximately 5 to 7 minutes per side. Serve with a side of your favorite steamed veggies and enjoy! www.trubahamianfoodtours.com/tru-bahamian-must-eats/tru-bahamian-food-toursbites-ofnassau-food-tourtru-bahamian-eat-conch-fritters www.allrecipes.com/recipe/219756/pan-friedwild-salmon To read past columns of Let’s Dish in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www. whidbeyweekly.com.

BITS ‘n’ PIECES

continued from page

5

Lean, Green, Ferry Machines: Washington State Ferries Releases Action Plan for Sustainable Ferry System Strategies to protect orca whales, reduce emissions and more outlined In honor of Earth Day, Washington State Ferries launched a two-year Sustainability Action Plan that outlines goals and actions for greener ferries and terminals. The plan includes initiatives to protect orca whales, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, improve air quality, reduce waste and other ways to make the ferry system more sustainable. The Sustainability Action Plan (www.wsdot. wa.gov/sites/default/files/2019/04/22/washington-state-ferries-sustainability-action-plan. pdf) lays out a path to fulfill the Washington State Department of Transportation’s commitment to sustainability, achieve the goals set out in Governor Jay Inslee’s Executive Orders 18-01 and 18-02 and implement sustainability recommendations outlined in WSF’s 2040 Long Range Plan (www.wsdot.wa.gov/ferries/ planning/long-range-plan/the-plan). The plan addresses some of the toughest challenges facing the ferry system. WSF is the largest consumer of diesel fuel in Washington state, burning more than 18 million gallons each year, and its operations generate the most carbon and other greenhouse gas emissions within the state transportation system. The plan lays out actions to go beyond carbon dioxide emissions reduction requirements under state law. Already, WSF is helping protect Puget Sound’s orca whale population by: Slowing down ferries on some routes to reduce underwater noise. Stopping work at terminal construction sites if marine mammals are in the vicinity. Reducing speed or changing course if the crew spots whales near a ferry. Reporting orca sightings to local partners such as the Orca Network. The Sustainability Action Plan sets an ambitious goal to reduce ambient ferry noise throughout the system and to do more to protect orca whales. “Because we operate our 23 ferries on Puget Sound and manage 20 terminals on its shores, we have an obligation to ensure WSF is doing everything we can to protect our environment,” said Assistant Secretary Amy Scarton. “This plan lays out our commitment to tackle these issues and continue our efforts to make Washington’s ferry system the greenest in the world.” BITS & PIECES

continued on page

Dining Guide Advertise your restaurant here. Advertising prices start at only $35 per week!

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www.cozysroadhouse.com 8872 SR 525 • Clinton • 360-341-2838

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Whidbey Weekly

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MAY 2 - MAY 8, 2019

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WHARF continued from page 9 “If everything falls into place, we can hopefully begin the work by the end of August [2020], with work done by the end of November [2020],” he said, adding that much of the timeline depends on how long the permitting process takes. Worst case, according to Michalopoulos, is that the first phase wouldn’t be completed until 2021, but he is optimistic. “I think we’re poised to move through the permitting process efficiently,” he said. There are 248 existing piles supporting the wharf, which saw its last major renovation in 1985. Of those piles, 200 are in excellent condition, with 90- to 100-percent of their performance life left. Another 10 are in good condition, with 75-percent life left. However, there are seven piles with just 50-percent life remaining, five are at 25-percent and there are 26 piles that are completely shot. Upon inspection, damage is clearly visible. Some of the piles are nearly rotted through, covered inside and out with mussels/barnacles. Still others are clearly not even attached to the structure above. Phase one of repairs calls for eight new steel piles on the east and west sides of the pier and 14 new piles under the wharf building. While phase one of the project is well underway, it is phase two – which will focus on building rehabilitation - with which community assistance is needed, both in terms of fundraising as well as planning.

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly The Port of Coupeville hopes to put together a community advisory group to help direct restoration and repair efforts for the Coupeville Wharf.

“The building is a far bigger project and it could take years to complete,” Michalopoulos said. “Phase two is not going to be a port project, it’s going to be a community project. “There’s a lot of opportunity here and this is where the community can play a vital role,” he continued. “It can be anything – from a monetary contribution to offering us feedback – it is all wonderful.” Phase two could also be a much more expensive rehabilitation project. A roof assessment of the wharf building rated the building in fair to poor condition, but recommended repairs to the pier be done before beginning work on the building. The roof is clearly sagging in some places, wavy and rolling in others. One wall is bulging at the base and concave higher up.

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly Failing piles under the Coupeville Wharf building have caused obvious damage to the roof.

WHAT’S GOING ON

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7

Breastfeeding Support Group Third Thursday, 10:30-11:30am Pregnancy Aid, 816 Camano, Langley You can bring your own lunch if you’d like, tea and muffins are provided. Pregnant moms welcome. Call Pregnancy Aid at 360-221-4767 for more information.

Bingo Every Monday, 7:00pm Elks Lodge, Oak Harbor Open to the public. For more information, call 360-675-7111.

Blind Support Group Fourth Tuesday, 2:00pm Oak Harbor Senior Center A support group for people with impaired vision. Learn and share techniques to be more mobile. For more information, call Paul Bovey at 360-544-2561 or 360-679-8293.

Conversations of War and Return

Michalopoulos said the port is looking at a possible tax levy lid lift (with a sunset) next year as one funding source for future repairs, as well as Recreation Conservation Office grants and historical building grants, along with community fundraising efforts, to procure the money. Most RCO grants, however, require a 50-percent funding match.

Larry at 360-969-0552 or Lisa - DC4kids at 360-672-4239. Living Word Church is located at 490 NW Crosby Ave.

Duplicate Bridge Club Every Tuesday, 10:30am Sierra Country Club Clubhouse, Coupeville
 The club is ACBL sanctioned and we encourage anyone interested to come with or without a partner. For more information, contact one of the directors: Mardi Dennis at 360-675-5044, Sue Thomas at 360-678-7047, or Peter Wolff at 360-678-3019.

Gamblers Anonymous Every Friday, 7:00pm St Augustine Catholic Church, Oak Harbor The church is located at 185 N. Oak Harbor St., the meeting is held in the north end of the building. Enter through the double doors next to the parking lot. For more information, email OakHarborga@gmail.com - Washington GA hotline: 855-222-5542

First & Third Fridays, 7:00-8:30pm Trinity Lutheran Church, Old Building, Freeland

National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Whidbey Island

Veterans Steve Durbin and Chuck McIntyre host a room of conversations for veterans, family members and caregivers. They need to hear your stories. Contact Chuck at 360-579-1059 or Steve at 360-678-2928.

Fourth Thursday, 7:00pm-8:30pm Trinity Lutheran Church, Freeland

Coupeville Chess Club Second and Fourth Fridays, 6:45-9:00pm Coupeville Library All skill levels welcomed. Please bring a board if possible. Spread the word and come down for some leisurely play. For information, call 631-357-1941.

Divorce Care and DC4kids Every Sunday, 5:00pm Living Word Church, Oak Harbor A support group for people dealing with separation and divorce. For more information, call

NAMI is the largest grassroots organization dedicated to making life better for people with a mental illness and their friends and loved ones. The group is nonreligious but meets at Trinity Lutheran Church, 18341 SR 525. It isn’t necessary to preregister. Please contact Kathy Chiles, 206-218-6449 or k.chiles22@live.com for more information.

NAR-ANON Every Tuesday, 7:00pm-8:00pm St. Peter’s Lutheran Church, Clinton NAR-ANON family groups are world-wide for those affected by someone else’s addiction. St. Peter’s Lutheran Church is located at 6309 Wilson Place.

“If it’s a $2 million project and we get an RCO grant for that amount, the port doesn’t have a million dollars to contribute toward that,” Michalopoulos said, explaining why he would rather seek other funding options – just another thing a community advisory group could help navigate in the future. “I could not imagine Coupeville without the wharf,” said Vicki Chambers, executive director of Coupeville Historic Waterfront Association. “Whatever this advisory group looks like, Central Whidbey has to be on board with this project. I know piles and caps are not very romantic, but that’s the foundation. I hope we can move forward with this.” “This is one of Whidbey Island’s iconic landmarks,” said John Mishasek, president of the Port of Coupeville’s board of commissioners. “We must maintain and renovate this icon.” Anyone interested in being part of a community advisory group should contact the Port of Coupeville at 360-222-3558. More information is available online at www.portoc.org. “I’m kind of excited about this project,” Michalopoulos said. “And I’ll be even more excited as the community gets involved.”

North Whidbey Coupon Club Every Friday, 10:00am-11:30am Christian Reformed Church, Oak Harbor Cost: Free All are welcome. Coupon-clipping, money-saving conversation and new friends. Our motto is “Eat Better, For Less.” Kids welcome. Money-saving classes are available. Find us on Facebook: ”Whidbey Coupon Club” and via email: nwcouponclub@comcast.net. The church is located at 1411 Wieldraayer Rd. For further information, please call 360-675-2338.

Overeaters Anonymous Every Monday, 6:00pm-7:00pm Langley Fellowship Hall, Langley Is food a problem for you? Do you eat when you’re not hungry? Do you binge, purge or restrict? No dues and no fees! No weigh-ins, no diets, no judgments. Just caring support, hope and abstinence.

Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG)

from a variety of photographic and conceptual perspectives. Over the course of eight trips to Midway Island, Jordan photographed hundreds of birds, documenting both their beauty and their plight as the result of massive plastic pollution in our oceans. Edge-walking the lines between beauty and horror, abstraction and representation, the near and the far, the visible and the invisible, Jordan’s images confront the enormous power of humanity’s collective will. His works are exhibited and published worldwide.

A Parent’s Perspective on Schools Thursday, May 9, 6:00pm Oak Harbor Library Meeting Room Come learn the rights of parents in the education of your children. Speaker is Sharon Hanek, “Research Mom” and Education Activist. Presented by the Republican Women of North Whidbey. Open to the public. No charge, donations welcome.

Second Mondays, 6:30pm-8:00pm Unitarian Universalist Congregation Whidbey Island, Freeland

Back Pain & Sciatica Workshop

For more information and support contact: WhidbeyPFLAG@gmail.com; Chapter President, Sharon Kabler at 360-222-4028; or Chapter Secretary, Erick Westphal at 360-331-3393.

This is a free informational workshop. Rue & Primavera is located at 785 Bayshore Dr, Ste 102. For more information or to register, call 360-279-8323.

For a list of continuous Meetings and Organizations, visit www.whidbeyweekly.com

Laughter Yoga

Classes, Seminars and Workshops Trudy Sundberg Lecture Series Friday, May 3, 7:00pm Whidbey Island Center for the Arts, Langley Saturday, May 4, 7:00pm Coupeville High School PAC The 2019 Trudy Sundberg Lecture welcomes world renowned artist Chris Jordan, whose work explores contemporary mass culture

Saturday, May 18, 11:00am Rue & Primavera, Oak Harbor

Saturday, May 18, 1:00-2:00pm Freeland Library Meeting Room A unique, playful experience combining easy and fun guided laughter exercises with yoga breathing. Not traditional yoga with mats or poses. All can participate moving, sitting, standing, or lying down and still achieve the scientifically proven health and happiness benefits of a guided laughter practice. Led by experienced Certified Laughter Yoga Leader/ Teacher. Library Laughter Yoga sessions are free. For more information, contact 949-4647843.

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MAY 2 - MAY 8, 2019 LOCALLY OWNED

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Life Tributes WAYNE YOUNG Wayne Young, 63 years old, went on to glory in April 2019. She was the youngest daughter of Wilbert and Mary of Norfolk, Va. The sister to Constance, Pete, Fabra, Keith, and Eddie. Wayne was fun-loving, lighthearted, kind and a devoted wife to Westley Young, 1st Sgt. (USMC, Ret). She is also survived by her three children, Westley, Wynndee, and Wryan, to whom she devoted her life, and grandchild Samra, whom she loved very much. Also, her love overflowed to a host of family and friends. As a military wife, Wayne settled in Oak Harbor, Wash., where she served as a licensed practical nurse at Naval Hospital Whidbey Island. She was recognized as Civilian of the Year and supported her community as a Girl Scouts leader, loyal Federal Employed Women member, and a faithful Diabetic Support Group facilitator. Some may remember her as a grief counselor with the NASWI Mother-Infant Unit support group. Wayne reminds us to “Be still and know God,” Psalm 46:10. A special thank you to North South Kidney Physicians, DaVita Kidney Center and Providence Medical Center staff for caring and supporting for Wayne’s health. There will be a celebration in her honor Saturday at 2 p.m. in the NASWI CPO Club dining hall, 1080 W Ault Field Rd., #138, Oak Harbor. Family and friends are encouraged to share memories and condolences at www.whidbeymemorial.com.

PAMELA ANN SIBLEY It is with great sadness that we announce Pamela Ann Sibley passed away Thursday, April 4, 2019 at Swedish Hospital in Seattle, Wash. Pamela was born February 11, 1958 in Ft. Polk, La. to parents John and Rose Sibley. She came to Oak Harbor in 1974 and graduated from Oak Harbor High School in 1977. Pam continued her pursuit of higher education throughout her life. She graduated from Skagit Valley College in 1980 and then went on to graduate from the University of Washington Seattle in 2009 with Communication Specialties Training. Her professional career was as a senior analyst for the Crowley Maritime Corporation for over 20 years. Pam was also very active in the many outreaches of the Faith Deliverance Church in Seattle. She loved working to serve the needy and homeless. Pam was well liked by all. She had an easy-going personality and never knew a stranger. Pam loved spending time with her family, friends and co-workers. She cherished those closest to her such as nieces, nephews and God children Joel and Tyson. Pam is survived by her parents, John and Rose Sibley, and her brothers, Michael Sibley and John Sibley, Jr; her sisters, Iris Williams and Jennifer Sibley; and a host of loving friends, nieces and nephews. Pam truly lived her life through simple pleasures such as curiosity and travel. She loved to travel internationally, enjoy good music and watch old black and white movies. If you wish to make a tribute to Pam, please do a kind deed for another, as she so often did, in honor of her memory. A celebration of her life will be held Saturday, 1 p.m. at Faith Deliverance Assembly, 2642 S. 138th St., SeaTac, Wash. All who knew her are welcome!

ROGER SHERMAN Roger Sherman was born Jan. 22, 1935 and died April 12, 2019 surrounded by his family. Roger grew up in Coupeville and graduated from Coupeville High School in 1953. He attended WSU for two years, meeting his wife, Darlene, on a train going to a Methodist Student Movement Conference in Kansas. He enlisted in the Air Force and married Darlene in 1956. He was a weatherman in the Air Force and spent a year of his service in Iceland. After his military service, he and Darlene returned to Coupeville to farm with his father, Clark, and his brother, Al. Roger believed deeply in serving his community. He was a lifelong member of Coupeville United Methodist Church, a life member of the Coupeville Lion’s Club, and a Sea Explorer leader for 25 years, which led him to get his master’s license for Puget Sound waters. He served on the Mount Baker Area Scout Council and earned the Silver Beaver award for his service to scouting. He served on the Farm Bureau, Cemetery Board, the Port Commission, and on the Marine Resource Committee. Roger was instrumental in the creation of the Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve, and with his brother, Al, sold development rights on much of their farm land to the National Parks to help preserve Ebey’s Prairie. He was involved in local barn restoration, restoring the Davis Blockhouse in Sunnyside Cemetery and the museum’s band organ, seen in many of the local parades. After retiring from farming, he took a great interest in local history, especially maritime history. He did extensive research, gave countless history programs to local organizations, led cemetery tours and was a docent at the Jacob Ebey House. Roger recorded interviews with many family members and local folks to retain Whidbey’s history. He authored the book, The Sinking of the Calista, about Whidbey’s maritime history and was close to finishing a second book on Whidbey’s maritime history.

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Legislature Approves 2019-21 Capital Budget, Investing Nearly $28.5 Million Into The 10Th District For Local Projects In a 97-1 vote Sunday, the Washington State Legislature approved the 2019-21 capital budget. Also known as the state’s construction budget, the $4.9 billion spending plan makes key investments in mental and behavioral health facilities, K-12 school construction, higher education facilities, low-income housing, fish and wildlife preservation, local community projects, and more. Tenth District Reps. Norma Smith and Dave Paul worked to secure nearly $28.5 million in local project funding. Some of the investments include: Grants for the Oak Harbor Tri-County Behavioral Health Center – $1 million Skagit County Sheriff Emergency Communication System – $1 million Coupeville Boys and Girls Club – $849,000 Oak Harbor Boys and Girls Club – $743,000 La Conner Regional Library improvements – $720,000 Wiley Slough Dike Repair – $3.9 million Samish Hatchery improvements – $7.7 million Local estuary and salmon restoration projects – $1.2 million Preservation of Ebey’s National Historic Reserve – $1 million Camp Korey Youth Recreational Facilities Grant – $545,000 Oak Harbor Marina – $400,000 Three Washington Wildlife and Recreation Program farm preservation projects – $810,000 The capital budget also invests $50 million in the state parks system for projects like the Bowman Pier restoration project at Deception Pass State Park. “Along with record investments in mental and behavioral health infrastructure, as well as increased funding for K-12 school construction, higher education facilities, low-income housing, natural resources and more, this budget makes critical investments in our 10th District communities,” said Smith, R-Clinton, who serves as the assistant ranking member of the House Capital Budget Committee. “I’ve spent much of the past several months in negotiations on this budget, and can truly say it’s the best capital budget we’ve produced in my time as a state representative. It will make a tremendous difference for many people in our local communities and around the state.” “These are important investments in our communities that protect natural resources, support first responders, and expand recreational opportunities throughout Island, Skagit, and Snohomish counties,” said Paul, D-Oak Harbor. “We have great quality of life in our part of Washington; this budget invests in strengthening that way of life.” For a full list of projects funded in the 10th District, visit http://fiscal.wa.gov/BudgetCProjList.aspx and select “10th Legislative District.” The 2019-21 capital budget now heads to the governor’s desk for his signature. [Submitted by Nick Jacob, Public Information Officer, WA State House Republicans]

Roger dearly loved his family and friends. He will be remembered by his wife of 62 years, Darlene, and his children Connie (Mike) Tripp, and Don (Debbie) Sherman. He will also be remembered by his grandchildren: Brad-

Dear Constable,

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[Submitted by Hadley Rodero, WSDOT]

Local Business News

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The Sustainability Action Plan presents six focus areas: greenhouse gas emissions, air quality, biodiversity, water, waste, and community impacts and engagement. In addition to plans to remove dangerous creosote-coated timber from Puget Sound, develop an electric hybrid ferry program and implement operational efficiencies to reduce fuel consumption, the plan focuses on gathering data and establishing a baseline in the first two years to continue to make data-driven progress in the years to come.

Reading was his escape from the world until he discovered Hallmark movies. He often said he would have been further along in his second book, except for those movies. He loved being on the waters of Puget Sound, both on a ship or in the water scuba diving. In his later years, he enjoyed coffee at the Tyee with the Lion’s guys, Tai Chi (he was the opening joke teller) and was a Shifty Sailor groupie.

LIFE TRIBUTES

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Whidbey Weekly

Second Hand Booty Celebrates Grand Opening Are you aware there is a pirate in Clinton posing as a merchant? The store front “Second Hand Booty” popped up overnight,

hidden between our fine market and library, in the same ally as the Birch Label printing press. He has been smuggling in wares from around the world under cover of darkness. I’ve seen things such as candle holders, art, beads, jewelry, baskets, and dare I mention scarves and hand bags so bright and colorful they are sure to attract all sorts of attention. The prices on everything are so low, they must be plundered goods. The children! Don’t forget the children; he plans to steal their hard-earned dollar with the promise of pirate treasure. Rumor around town is he plans to open this Thursday for locals only, before the passenger ships get here from the mainland. Please put a stop to this! It will only attract unwanted business to our blissful little town. Send the guards to 4777 Commercial St., Ste. 6 Clinton and put a stop to this tomfoolery before the grand opening May 3. Sincerely, Ms. Penelope Lansdale The Village Watch

Whidbey Island Macaroni Kid Celebrates Seven Years of Service to Whidbey Island A Free Weekly Newsletter and Website for Kids and Families Whidbey Island Macaroni Kid is excited to announce this spring, they celebrate seven years of service to Whidbey Island. Macaroni Kid is a free weekly e-newsletter and website highlighting all of the great things for kids and their families to do in our communities Under the stewardship of Amy Hannold, Whidbey Island Macaroni Kid’s mission is to connect families with their community, and the community with local families. Amy is an advocate for local businesses, as well as nonprofits, having worked as a volunteer and employee in our community. “As a mom on Whidbey Island, I know how difficult it can be to find the fun and enriching events and activities available for kids. As a life-long resident of Whidbey Island, I bring a wealth of knowledge, as well as passion, to serve local families. “Each week, for the past seven years, I have devoted several hours to maintain and provide a resource that is up-to-date, relevant and wide in topic, so local families can easily find what interests them, and what is going on, on Whidbey.” Whidbey Island Macaroni Kid is one of nearly 600 Macaroni Kid-served communities in the United States and Canada. Whether you are moving to, or traveling to visit a community, there is likely a Macaroni Kid ready to show you around town, focused on connecting you to family-friendly activities. If moving, or traveling, you can find a Macaroni Kid guide by visiting MacaroniKid.com, and selecting the state, and then the city of interest. Whidbey Island Macaroni Kid supports with their promotion, the cultural, not-for-profit, school and just plain fun things to do on Whidbey Island. Macaroni Kid covers the spectrum of things to do with kids – classes, shows, events as well as things to do at home, cooking projects, book reviews, arts and crafts and more. Those interested in connecting with their community on Whidbey Island can sign up to receive the free weekly newsletter by visiting WhidbeyIsland.MacaroniKid.com. In addition to events on Whidbey Island, there is a guide on the Whidbey Island Macaroni Kid homepage listing major events in neighboring cities, giving families the opportunity to enjoy fun within a short drive. Ideas for articles and event listings can be sent to eventsandinfo@comcast.net.

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Whidbey Weekly

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Film Shorts Courtesy of Cascadia Weekly

By Carey Ross

MAY 2 - MAY 8, 2019

LOCALLY OPERATED

360-679-4003 877-679-4003 www.seatacshuttle.com

Hellboy: Guillermo del Toro is still alive and yet somehow he is rolling over in his grave. ★ (R • 2 hrs.)

Like us on:

The Intruder: Why would I pay money for a ticket to this movie when at any given moment I can turn on the Lifetime Movie Network and watch a movie of similar quality with the exact same plot? ★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 42 min.) Long Shot: Charlize Theron is a Serious Actress and she’s got the Oscar cred to prove it, but where she really excels is in comedic roles, and with Seth Rogan’s freewheeling speechwriter to her presidential candidate with an “electability” problem, she’s found her weirdly perfect comic co-conspirator. ★★★★ (R • 1 hr. 55 min.)

Avengers: Endgame: It took 22 movies over 11 years to get here, but more than a billion dollars in worldwide box office during its opening weekend cements this film as the biggest cinematic event of my lifetime. Sorry, “Star Wars.” I’ll always love you, but the Marvel Cinematic Universe is my new master. ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 3 hrs. 1 min.) Captain Marvel: Brie Larson, Captain Marvel and real-life hero, on her movie bypassing $1 billion in worldwide box office: “I’m very grateful to have broken this glass ceiling of normalizing the concept that women can also make a billion dollars. I don’t know why that was so hard to comprehend in the first place.” Solidarity, sister. ★★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 8 min.)

Dumbo: I do not wish to see a live-action remake of this animated Disney classic, no matter how much Tim Burton, Colin Farrell, Danny DeVito, and CGI baby elephants might be thrown at it. ★★ (PG • 2 hrs. 10 min.)

UglyDolls: I know very little about this movie except that it celebrates difference and diversity in a colorful, kid-friendly package, and is the self-proclaimed “movie musical event of the year” and a “classic underdoll story.” Sold. ★★★ (PG • 1 hr. 27 min.) For Anacortes theater showings, please see www.fandango.com. For Blue Fox and Oak Harbor Cinemas showings see ads on this page.

Puzzle 1 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.42)

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9 On a scale from 1 to 10...4.2 Every row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every column of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9

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COMING SOON: THE CURSE OF LA LLORONA, LONG SHOT 5/10 POKEMON: DETECTIVE PIKACHU 5/24 ALADDIN Movie Hotline 360-279-2226 Book A Party or Special Showing 360-279-0526 1321 SW Barlow St • Oak Harbor

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UGLYDOLLS (PG) AVENGERS: ENDGAME (PG-13)

THIS WEEKS SPECIALS: 2 MINI BURRITOS & 4 MINI TACOS $3.75 BOX OFFICE OPENS AT 4PM, 1ST MOVIE BEGINS AT DUSK 11 & OVER $6.50; KIDS 5-10 $1.00; 4 & UNDER FREE Go Karts Now Open! Thurs & Fri 4pm-Dusk, Sat 11am-Dusk, Sun 12:30-Dusk *Cash prices

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This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. Keep out of reach of children. Marijuana products may be purchased or possessed only by persons 21 years or older.

MMCWS MEDICAL • Naturopathic Physician Dr. Lori Olaf, ND

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AVENGERS: ENDGAME PG-13 AVENGERS BREAKTHROUGH PG

THURSDAY, MAY 2 THRU SUNDAY, MAY 5

18646 SR 525, Unit B Freeland (in the U-Haul building) 360-544-8440

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FARAWAY ENTERTAINMENT YOUR LOCAL MOVIE THEATER

Now Showing!

Pet Sematary: True story: I can do a spot-on impersonation of back-from-thedead baby Gage Creed from the original version of this movie, but don’t ask me to do it unless you enjoy having me appear to you in your nightmares. ★★★ (R • 1 hr. 41 min.)

The Curse of La Llorona: The title might make this movie sound like a cool arthouse film, but instead it’s yet another forgettable installment of the “Conjuring” franchise. Curses! ★ (R • 1 hr. 33 min.) Disneynature: Penguins: Thus far, the Disneynature movies have been both breathtaking and dignified in that old-school nature movie sort of way. But now a clumsy dork of a penguin named Steve has come along to capture everyone’s hearts and Disneynature will never be the same. ★★★★★ (G • 1 hr. 16 min.)

360-682-2341 • www.whidbeyweekly.com

Missing Link: In the realm of original ideas Hollywood would do well to traffic in comes this story about fur-covered, 630-pound Mr. Link, who undertakes a Victorian globetrotting adventure with the help of a cast of memorable characters and a whole bunch of the stunning stop-motion animation that has become Laika Studios stock in trade. ★★★★ (PG • 1 hr. 35 min.)

Shazam: DC Comics finally scores another win (“Wonder Woman” can’t do it all herself, after all) with this endearing, engaging story of lost boys and the superhero they conjure who possesses great powers but needs a little help when it comes to using them to save the world from evil. ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 10 min.)

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Specializing in Chronic Pain / Opioid Reduction / Multiple Sclerosis Epilespy / Seizure Disorder / Stroke / Fibromyalgia Migraines / Neuropathy / Arthritis / PTSD Muscle Spasms / Cancer / Glaucoma / HIV/AIDS Parkinson’s Disease / Crohn’s Disease / Hepatitis C Medical Marijuana Authorization & Primary Care BY APPOINTMENT ONLY • For Ages 21+

MMCWS.com

7656 State Route 20, Unit B • Anacortes • 360-422-3623

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/sudoku on Fri Mar 29 18:13:44 2019 GMT. Enjoy!

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From Concept To Completion We’ve Got You Covered! Full Service Graphic Design & Printing!

In addition to being your favorite source for news and events on the island we are now your source for:

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The Faces of Relay Teresa Besaw Oak Harbor

How has cancer touched your life? Cancer first touched my life when my mom was diagnosed with lung cancer in June of 1990. We had no idea we were going to lose her, we thought there’d be a cure. She passed away in Dec. of 1990 and my life has never been the same. I was pregnant with my first child when she passed away, so she was never able to meet any of my children. I have also lost many other family members to cancer: My former husband, David Scott Nichols, the father of my children, David and Mackenzie Nichols; my cousin, August Drafts; my aunt, PatriPhoto Courtesy of Teresa Besaw cia Ham; and my uncles Phil Michel, Bob Michel Teresa Besaw walks in memory of her mom, Helen. and Don Michel - all siblings of my father. My father also lost his mother to cancer. I also have a nephew who has battled cancer twice now and thankfully beat it and currently I have a very close family friend battling breast cancer. How did you become involved in Relay for Life? I became involved with Relay when the father of my children was diagnosed with cancer in 2008. That year one of my best friends, Laura Ulam, lost her brother, Mark Jeffries, and then in early 2009, we lost David “Big Nic” “Papa Bear” Nichols. A co-worker, TJ Pierzchala, suggested we form a team for Relay for Life and so Laura and I, along with many friends, decided to form a team that year. Another co-worker and friend suggested we call the team “Big Nic’s Bears,” combining Nic’s two nicknames. Busy schedules kept me away for a couple years, but this year we’re bringing our team back as we have lost more family and have current family members battling. Why do you Relay? To raise money and awareness of cancer in hopes of finding cures. How has your participation in Relay for Life impacted you? When you go to the meetings and you participate at the event you meet people, children who have survived, and you realize why we need to do this. We have to continue to find more cures. It can be an emotional experience, too - the lighting of the luminaria reminds us of how many we have lost. We need that reminder to know why we need to do this - for them. What is your favorite part about being involved with Relay for Life? A lot of really great people have been involved for many years and they’re so helpful and fun to be around. Karla, Sandy, the Brocks, to name a few.

Photo Courtesy of Teresa Besaw David “Big Nic” “Papa Bear” Nichols

Why should others participate in Relay? It feels good to help your community, and frankly the world, fight this horrible disease.

RACE FOR A CURE

Put Cancer In The Dust! Come join us and see for yourself what Relay For Life is all about!

CANCER Relay Rally: May 8, 7-8pm Oak Harbor Elks Lodge

relaywhidbey@gmail.com RelayForLife.org/whidbeyislandwa www.facebook.com/whidbeyrelay

RELAY FOR LIFE OF WHIDBEY ISLAND • MAY 31-JUNE 1, 2019 • OAK HARBOR, WA

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encounters should be obvious. Rallies are an example of what can happen when the energies begin flowing. Powerful people may hold an especially intense command over your psyche on the 3rd.

CHICKEN LITTLE & THE ASTROLOGER By Wesley Hallock

ARIES (March 21-April 19) You’ll be putting a lot of yourself into all that you do this week. You may find yourself strung out across a wide spectrum of half-finished projects, the result of over-eager ambitions. It’s probably too much to ask that you tackle things one at a time, but you will fare better if you at least try. Compounding your situation are people who reach out with emotional pleas. Those may be especially compelling and hard to resist on the 3rd. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Enthusiastic schemes that steer you into situations you would be wise to avoid are distinctly possible this week. If you feel yourself being pushed too far, too fast, you are already on the road to regrets. All kinds of partnerships are favored, including marriage and professional arrangements. Consultation with the experts in a given field could lead you into unfamiliar territory on the 3rd. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) A lot can happen in a short time this week, especially as it regards friendships. Emotional connections run deeper than usual, now, and are more easily expressed. The bias and misconceptions of those in your social sphere are apt to bleed over into your thinking, with results depending a lot on the kinds of friends you keep. If you want to lift yourself up, associating with those of a higher social station is wise on the 3rd. CANCER (June 22-July 22) Your personal life may be on display more than you like this week. Loud conversation in a public place is one probable scenario. Be wary of emotional outbursts that could expose more about you than you intended. On the positive side, your ability to convince and command makes this a good time to present yourself and your ideas to those who need a lot of convincing. They’ll be putty in your hands on the 3rd. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Even the most trivial encounter can be a positive experience this week. New and unfamiliar scenarios are likely, the kind that can teach you the most. People of different backgrounds may expose you to aspects of the world you never would have suspected. All situations now will impact you deeply and find a home within you. Opting for the high road in all your thoughts and actions is a desirable thing on the 3rd. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) The kinds of people and situations you feel drawn to this week could have deep emotional impact. Moving experiences are likely to make you respond in kind. The synergy resulting from give and take

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Passionately expressive moments are extremely likely this week. If you are in a negative emotional state, you could become jealous and possessive now. The only sure thing is that you won’t be lukewarm about anything that happens. Shakey partnerships will be the first to show the effects of what you are going through. Going it alone is not desirable on the 3rd, when the company of others is your yardstick for progress. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Too much vigor in the way you relate to others could become a problem this week. Coming across with confidence and poise is a good thing, but be aware, it may trigger resentment in the insecure. Bragging about your accomplishments is not wise. On the other hand, the unexpressed grievances that weaken a relationship may come out now, strengthening your emotional ties on the 3rd. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Ideas may come into your head this week that serve no function beyond their entertainment value. This playful spirit makes it tempting to deal with other people in a light-hearted matter. Be careful that they are thinking on the same plane as you, or misunderstandings and hurt feelings could result. Pranks are an especially unwise activity now. The 3rd is great for enlarging your mind in constructive ways. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) The need to be outgoing and social may come just when you least feel like it this week. Focusing inwardly is a good thing, but it can be overdone if it goes on too long. Even if you don’t think so at the time, anything that draws you out of yourself may thus be a good thing. Your friends can be of particular benefit to you on the 3rd. New friends you make then will be especially valuable over time. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb 18) The welcome opportunity to demonstrate your personal and professional skills is likely this week. The tempo of events is likely to be fast, and it’s unrealistic to expect to settle down and concentrate at this time. Do what you do on the fly, and worry about forming conclusions later. In the heat of the moment is no time to second guess yourself. The 3rd is better for discussing possibilities than for reaching firm commitments. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) It’s a great week for making favorable personal impressions while avoiding controversy. Your great desire to relate to others in a peaceful way will make others gravitate toward you. This is a good time to be with friends, take a vacation or do anything that lets you enjoy life. Turn to whatever you value on the 3rd, in full confidence that it will expand your outlook in a positive way.

CLUES ACROSS

49. A type of light

25. Commercial

1. Partially burn

52. Books

26. “__ humbug!”

5. Mind

56. Bothers

27. Relaxing period

11. Those who build again

58. Two-colored

29. Calls balls and strikes

14. Small chapel 15. Hot fluids

60. December 25

31. Decorative scarf

62. Save

18. Makes beer

63. Bangladeshi money

19. It can be done

CLUES DOWN

21. Take to court 23. Line the roof of

1. Research exec (abbr.)

24. Middle Eastern peoples

2. Famed jazz musician Alpert

28. Longtime film critic

3. Sixth month of the Jewish calendar

29. University of Dayton 30. Coat with plaster 32. Wife 33. Famed NY opera house

34. Korean family name 36. Antagonizes 37. Buenos Aires capital La __ 38. Exhibit grief 40. Gadolinium 43. Half-tamed horse (slang)

4. Network of nerves

45. American conglomerate

5. Those who convince

48. Cape near Lisbon 50. Quantum physics pioneer

6. Slick 7. Hello (slang)

51. Medieval England circuit court

35. Health insurance

8. Cost per mile

36. Inches per minute (abbr.)

9. A type of honcho

53. To the highest degree

10. Consequently

54. Spanish city

12. Couples say them aloud

55. Saturate

39. Longtime London Europe Society chairman 41. Pa’s partner

13. Sharp slap

42. Lump of semiliquid substance

16. On a line at right angles

44. Grasslike plant

17. More guileful

46. Large, wild ox

20. Chipotle founder

47. Make a mistake

22. Trauma center

57. Female sibling 58. British thermal unit 59. Scandinavian wool rug 61. Sports highlight show (abbr.) Answers on page 23

© 2019, Wesley Hallock, All Rights Reserved

YOUR GUESS IS AS GOOD AS OURS WEATHER FORECAST Chicken Little looks at what is and fears the sky is falling. Wesley Hallock as a professional astrologer looks at what is and sees what could be. Read Wesley’s monthly forecast, with links to Facebook and Twitter, at www. chickenlittleandtheastrologer.com. To read past columns of Chicken Little and the Astrologer in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

Thurs, May 2

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Rain and Drizzle Possible

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Mostly Cloudy

Cloudy

Clouds and Sun Mixed

Rain and Drizzle Possible

Partly Sunny

Rain and Drizzle Possible

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.

Partly Sunny


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MAY 2 - MAY 8, 2019 LOCALLY OWNED

LIFE TRIBUTES

continued from page

www.whidbeyweekly.com

Whidbey Weekly

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ley (Abbey) Sherman, Jamie Tripp, Bryan (Bailey) Sherman, Jeffrey (Leah) Tripp, Tony (Shelby) Sherman, and his five great-grandchildren (with two on the way). He is also survived by his brother, Al (Phyllis) Sherman, and Jim Sherman (Michael Ferri). He leaves a large extended family in the area. Roger was preceded in death by his parents, Clark and Dorothy Sherman. The family requests gifts be made in his honor to his favorite organizations: Island County Historical Society, Coupeville Lion’s Club or Coupeville United Methodist Church. Roger’s memorial service will be Saturday, May 11, 2 p.m. at the Coupeville United Methodist Church.

RUBY G. HARTSHORN Ruby G. Hartshorn, born Aug. 24, 1933, died March 22, 2019, at the age of 85, surrounded by her loved ones, at her home in Oak Harbor, Wash. She was born in Seattle, Wash. to Guy Satterlee and Wilhelmina (Makkonen) Satterlee. Ruby married the love of her life, Gordon F.R. Hartshorn in 1953 and together they raised their family. Ruby was preceded in death by Gordon in 2000. She leaves behind seven children: Mitch Hartshorn, Lisa (Hartshorn) Kile, Michael Hartshorn, Wren (Hartshorn) Hendershot, Robin Hartshorn, Matthew Hartshorn and Heidi Hartshorm; 17 grandchildren and 28 great-grandchildren. She is also survived by her sister, Jean Simpson, and her brother, Tom Sutterlee. Mom, your love and spirit live and carry on within each and every one of us. You were a mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother who loved us fiercely, without judgment, and who just gave pure love and joy for the family you created. Arrangements have been made with the assistance of Whidbey Memorial Funeral and Cremation Service. Family and friends are encouraged to share memories and condolences at www.whidbeymemorial.com .

VIOLET GRACE (HEGLIN) STEWART May 31, 1928 – March 30, 2019

Violet Grace Stewart peacefully went to be with the Lord Saturday, March 30, 2019 at the age of 90. She was born May 31, 1928 to Walter and Matilda Heglin at Big Lake. She had two brothers, older brother, Warren and younger brother, Don, who both preceded her in death. The family later moved to Anacortes, where Violet grew up and went to school and was fondly known as Gracie. Her childhood home still stands on 24th Street. She regularly attended class reunions for Anacortes High School class of 1946, including their 72nd reunion last summer. Violet was told by her mother she could not get married until she turned 18, so she obediently waited until after her 18th birthday, May 31, to marry Jerry Stewart June 1. They were married 62 years before Jerry’s passing in June of 2008. Together they had three children: Rick, Shelley, and Randy. Jerry’s 20-year Navy career took the family all around the country and overseas twice. Violet was the epitome of strength as she herded her three kids on our almost annual trek to wherever Dad was transferred next, often leaving her to manage the household and kids for months at a time while he was at sea. Vi was an excellent cook. She cooked many years at the Sucia Reef in Anacortes and was the first cook at the bowling alley in Anacortes, where her homemade soups and chowder were a hit. She was an avid gardener, having a huge vegetable garden each year that supplied friends and family with veggies for the summer, and her yard was always gorgeous with beautiful plants and flowers. Jerry and Vi loved to entertain and loved music. Fond memories include the many barbershop quartet practices in their home and the annual picnic they hosted in their backyard, which included An-o-chord members and many international barbershop quartets who were scheduled to perform at the annual An-o-chord summer show and picnic. She loved to bowl, sing, dance (including tap dancing in the kitchen at home while she cooked), annual trips to Hawaii, and giving generously of the love that filled her heart for others. She was strong, kind, determined, an incredibly hard worker, loyal and generous. She was a woman of strong faith and served God and others through her church, singing with the worship team, helping with Sunday morning coffee, and wherever else she was needed. We are immensely grateful for her example and the love she expressed to her family. She will be missed incredibly. She was preceded in death by her husband, Jerry; brothers, Warren Heglin and Donald Heglin, all of Anacortes, and son-in-law, Peter Wagner, of Mount Vernon. She is survived by her children, Rick and Gail Stewart of Oak Harbor, Shelley Wagner of Mount Vernon, and Randy and Katha Stewart of Bayview. She is also survived by grandchildren, Jake (Tanya) Stewart, Kelly (Kelly) Stewart, Aaron (Brandi) Wagner, Gabrielle (Eric) Hensyel, Collin Wagner, Rachael (Bob) Wyman Zeinemann, Seth (Tori) Wyman, Tara (Cody) Morrison and great grandchildren, Connor, Cassidy, Cole, Cori, Juliana, Toby, Aleena, Mattie, Evan, Nathan, Trenton, Natalie, Asa, Ryker, Kya, and August. We would like to thank the staff at Regency on Whidbey Island and Harbor Care for their amazing care of Mom the past few years. A service will be held Saturday, May 11, 2 p.m. at the Mount Vernon Church of the Nazarene, 2710 E Fir Street, Mount Vernon, WA 98273 with Pastor Troy Johnson officiating. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Voices of the Children, a 501(C)(3) non-profit organization in Mount Vernon, started by grandson, Aaron Wagner, which connects youth in Skagit County with youth around the world in collaborative arts projects to shine a spotlight on humanitarian crises, encourage community engagement and personal growth. (Voices of the Children, 417 Gates Street STE 2, Mount Vernon, WA 98273) Family and friends are encouraged to share memories and condolences at www.whidbeymemorial.com.

MARILYN JOY IVERSON April 20, 1933 - April 5, 2019

Joy (Thrailkill) Iverson, 85, of Coupeville, Wash., passed away peacefully in her sleep at Regency on Whidbey April 5, 2019. Born in Seattle, Wash. April 20, 1933, she graduated from Lewis and Clark High School in Spokane, Wash., and the University of Washington. After majoring in Education in 1955, she taught physical education for the Bellevue, Wash. School District 1958-1961. Joy and Sidney C. Iverson married in 1960 and moved to Bellevue, Wash. to raise their family. Following retirement, Joy and Sid moved to Whidbey Island, Wash.

LOCALLY OPERATED

ANNE MASON BYRON September 15, 1932 – April 7, 2019

Anne Mason Byron (A. M. Byron as some might know her), passed away with her husband and children by her side Sunday, April 7, 2019 at WhidbeyHealth Medical Center in Coupeville, Wash. She was 86 years of age. Anne was born in St. John’s, Mich., Sept. 15, 1932 and grew up an hour away in Grandville near Grand Rapids. She graduated from Handy High School in Bay City, Mich. Anne attended Trinity College in Burlington, Vt. and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in ESL. She received her master’s degree just across the Winooksi River at St. Michael’s College. From 1973 to 1980, Anne and husband James owned and operated a hotel in Westfield, Vt. Anne also taught adult education. In 1991, while visiting two of her children on Whidbey Island, Anne fell in love with the Island way of life. She and Jim made the move to Oak Harbor in 1996. Anne loved music. She was a clarinet player in the community band in Newport, Vt. After moving to Oak Harbor, she joined the Whidbey Island All-Community Band, where she continued playing her clarinet for parades and community concerts. She was a member of the St Stephen Church Choir and enjoyed singing alto for many years with the Whidbey Community Chorus. Anne was a novelist. Her books included “Full Circle,” “Patterns,” “Kin’s Harbor,” “Invasion of Snowfield,” “Frost Heaves,” and “Howard, Not Forgotten.” She continued her love of the written word as an English instructor at Skagit Valley College in Oak Harbor. As a fifth generation Episcopalian, Anne was a member at St. John Episcopal in Mich., St. Mark Episcopal in Vt., St. Paul Episcopal in Mass. and St. Stephan Episcopal in Wash. Anne is survived by her husband, Jim; three children: Kath, Bob, and John; two grandchildren: Christa Mann and Elizabeth Oh; and three great-grandchildren: Hannah Chelsey, Jonathan Perkins, and Emily Mann. Those who preceded Anne in death are her parents. The Byron family suggests memorials in Anne’s name to her favorite charities: Paralyzed Veterans of Americaby phone at 1-800-555-9140 or online at www.pva.org; and The Salvation Army by phone at 1-800-SAL-ARMY (725-2769) and online at www.salvationarmyusa.org/usn. A memorial service for Anne was held April 17, 2019, 11 a.m., at Wallin Funeral Home.

DONALD LEE LOOFF April 26, 1930 – April 15, 2019

Donald Lee “Don” Looff passed away peacefully April 15, 2019, following a sudden heart attack. Don was born April 26, 1930 in Oak Harbor, Wash., to Henry and Ethel Looff. For many summers as a young boy, he travelled by steamship to Olga Bay, Kodiak Island, Alaska, with his family, where his father worked in wildlife management and conservation for the federal government. The remainder of each year was spent on Whidbey Island. He graduated as valedictorian from Oak Harbor High School in 1948, and from the ROTC program at the University of Washington in 1953 with a degree in civil engineering. In 1954, Don married San de Fuca’s Patricia Louise “Pat” Van Dam in Oak Harbor, following a courtship which included ukulele serenades of “Red Sails in the Sunset” on West Beach. Together they raised four children: Jean (Roma Jenkins), Alan, Debra (Dwayne Jansen), and Cheryl (Rex Yoder). A 20-year military career encompassed both Air Force and Navy service. As an engineer at Wright-Patterson, Don oversaw construction of a photographic clean room facility which evaluated intelligence photos during the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962. This work resulted in his first Air Force Commendation Medal. Don participated in seven separate Vietnam campaigns, beginning with the Vietnam Advisory Campaign. At Tan Son Nhut Air Base in Vietnam, he developed an integrated master plan for a civilian airport that was becoming overwhelmed by the escalating Vietnamese conflict and was increasingly needed for military purposes. A subsequent tour at the start of construction of the Cam Rahn Bay complex included time in Saigon for base development planning. Don earned his second Air Force Commendation Medal for this assignment. Back in the United States for a duty tour at the Nevada Test Site, Don served as Test Group Engineer for underground construction related to nuclear testing, where he designed mining tunnels through complex geology for blast containment. In 1968 he requested and was granted an honorable discharge from the Air Force, accepting a commission in the Navy. Don’s third return to Vietnam, this time for the Navy, assigned him direct responsibility for management of a $2.4 billion construction inventory in a war zone. He was subsequently awarded the Bronze Star (Valor) Medal for aggressively performing his duties “under the threat of enemy, rocket, and mortar attacks.” Following duty assignments in Port Hueneme, Calif. (Seabees), Jacksonville, Fla. (public works), and Keyport, Wash. (public works), Don retired in 1980 to his beloved Whidbey Island. He built his retirement home on West Beach and worked for the Island County Public Works Department for many years, overseeing the construction of the current Island County Jail in Coupeville. Don is survived by his wife of 65 years, four children, 13 grandchildren, 10 great-grandchildren, and many nephews, nieces, great-nephews, and great-nieces. He was preceded in death by his parents, older brother (Dr. David Looff), granddaughter (Erica Jenkins), and great-granddaughter (Hailey Jansen). Don was a faithful, longtime member of First Reformed Church in Oak Harbor. He will be remembered for his honor, his forthright manner and an offbeat sense of humor. Don also leaves fond memories of summer fishing trips to Newhalem with his children, sons-in-law and grandchildren. The epic family Easter egg hunts he organized are a tradition that will continue in his memory. He will be greatly missed. A private graveside service for the family was held Saturday, April 20 at Maple Leaf Cemetery. Family and friends are encouraged to share memories and condolences at www.whidbeymemorial.com.

DR. GERALD L. SHADEL Dr. Gerald L. Shadel, 87, passed away April 16, 2019. He was born in Lafayette, Ind., June 19, 1931, the son of Bill and Marion (Kocher) Shadel.

Joy loved sports and found great pleasure both playing, and coaching club, junior and senior high soccer, volleyball, badminton, and bowling in a Bellevue women’s league. She also enjoyed volunteering her time through local organizations, including Campfire Girls, Sons of Norway, Washington Special Olympics, Marymoor Museum, and Island County Historical Society Museum.

He received a PhD in history from the University of Maryland. Dr. Shadel taught for 40 years at a small denominational school, Columbia Union College, located in a Maryland suburb of Washington D.C. He also taught at an affiliated school, Newbold College, in England. Upon retirement, he came to Whidbey Island to be near family in 1995. He was an elder in the Seventh-Day Adventist Church.

Joy is survived by Terri Iverson, Seattle; Scott Iverson and TeriAnn Davis, of Whidbey Island. Her family includes sister, Karen Ocheltree and husband, Gary, Spokane; brothers, Donald Thrailkill, Bayview, Idaho, and Don Cummings and wife, Carol, Ellensburg, Wash.; uncle, Walt Thayer, Bothell, Wash.; sister-in-law, Marli Iverson, Mercer Island, Wash.; nephews, Jans Iverson and wife, Andrea, Mercer Island, and Dane Iverson and wife, Brandyn, Orinda, Calif., and cousins Rebecca Thayer, Seattle and Rex Thayer, Bothell.

Dr. Shadel was pre-deceased by his older brother, Dr. Willard F. Shadel. He is survived by his sister-in-law, Mrs. Tuyet Shadel, of Ben Ure Island; brother, Dr. Douglas Shadel, of Seattle; and brother, David Shadel, of Kent.

Family and friends are encouraged to share memories and condolences at www.whidbeymemorial.com.

Burial will be in the family plot in Springport, Mich. Arrangements have been made with the assistance of Whidbey Memorial Funeral and Cremation Service.

Life Tributes can now be found online at www.whidbeyweekly.com Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


REAL ESTATE/RENTALS

7.49 acres for sale. Lovely western view of Puget Sound. Water supplied by a four party well. Power, phone and cable are available. Located just north of Ledgewood, 1899 Pinecrest Avenue, Coupeville. This parcel would be an ideal mini-farm. Owner willing to carry a contract. Price $179,000. Call 360-320-0525 for more information (1)

AUTO/PARTS FOR SALE 1977 Ford F250 XLT, complete parts truck. Motor blown. Pull down front seat access, rear jump seat. Complete rear end transmission, wanted by 4-wheelers, all or parts, $130. 425-835-0052 (1)

BOATS/PARTS FOR SALE Honda long shaft boat motor, 2-hp, excellent condition, $500. Greenbank, 360-2220109 (1)

ANTIQUES/VINTAGE Antique oak roll top desk, good condition, $450 or best offer; Antique small oak chest with drawers, good condition. Greenbank, 360-222-0109 (1)

ANNOUNCEMENTS Pregnant? Need baby clothes? We have them and the price is right–FREE. Pregnancy Care Clinic, open most Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10am to 4pm. Call 360-221-2909 or stop by 6th and Cascade in Langley. Be the difference in a child’s life and become a foster parent today! Service Alternatives is looking for caring, loving, and supportive families to support foster children. 425923-0451 or mostermick@ servalt-cfs.com The Whidbey Island community is encouraged to try out the paddling sport of dragon boating with the Stayin’ Alive team. Our team’s mission is to promote the physical, social, and emotional benefits of dragon boating. It has been shown to be especially beneficial to cancer survivors. Practice with us for up to 3 times for free. Life-jackets and paddles provided. Saturdays at the Oak Harbor Marina, 8:45am. Contact njlish@ gmail.com. More info at our Facebook Page: www.facebook.com/NorthPugetSoundDragonBoatClub?ref=hl

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Imagine Oak Harbor’s first Food Forest, Saturdays 11am3pm, at 526 Bayshore Drive.

Each week, we have volunteer opportunities available to help care for our community garden, share organic gardening tips, and learn Permaculture principles. All ages and skill levels welcome. Schedule can change due to adverse weather conditions. If you have any questions, please contact us at: imagineapermacultureworld.gmail.com Mother Mentors needs volunteers! Oak Harbor families with young children need your help! Volunteer just a couple of hours a week to make a difference in someone’s life! To volunteer or get more info, email wamothermentors@ gmail.com or call 360-3211484. Looking for board members to join the dynamic board of Island Senior Resources and serve the needs of Island County Seniors. Of particular interest are representatives from North Whidbey. For more information please contact: reception@islandseniorservices.org

JOB MARKET Regency on Whidbey is hiring a Maintenance Director. Please visit www.regency-pacific.com and click on careers to apply. Incomplete applications will not be accepted. (2) Ace Freeland is hiring the following positions: Seasonal Cashiers - As a valued cashier, you will be expected to provide outstanding customer service at all times, process sales quickly, accurately, and efficiently, and become knowledgeable with all aspects of cash register operations. Must be able to stand all day, work nights and weekends, have a professional appearance and lift 25 lbs. Previous retail/cashiering experience a plus Full-time/Permanent Garden Center Position - We are seeking a professional, experienced person to join our outside Nursery Team. You must be able to provide amazing customer service, interact with a variety of personalities, and comfortably lift 40-50 lbs. Looking for applicants with relevant experience, self motivation, and commitment. Northwest plant, trees and shrub knowledge a plus. How’d you do? Puzzle 1 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.42) 3

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Primary responsibilities will be to process incoming plant and hard goods order, assist customers with selections and be involved in BBQ equipment sales. Must be willing to work outdoors in any type of weather Full time Paint Dept. Sales Associate - Retail minded person wanted for the Freeland Ace paint department. If you have paint and stain product knowledge, love hardware, and crave the retail career experience then we’d love to hear from you. Working Saturdays and Sundays are required. Must be able to lift 40-50 lbs. Qualified candidates please stop by with your resume (with references) and a cover letter, and fill out our application at: Freeland Ace Hardware, 1609 E. Main St, Freeland, WA 98249. Working Saturdays and Sundays are required. 36+ hours per week qualifies for full time benefits: Medical/401k/Discounts/Bonuses/Vacation, after passing a 90-day probationary period. Please think of this as a longterm opportunity for yourself. Employment here is very stable and very satisfying (2) Oak Harbor Main Street Association, a nonprofit downtown revitalization organization, is seeking a full time Executive Director. Deadline for resume submission is May 20, 2019. For information go to www. oakharbormainstreet.com or email devans@oakharbormainstreet.com (2) Need yard help mowing lawn. Self-propelled, walk behind mower. We are in Coupeville on the bus line. Hank, 360678-7591 (1) Holmes Harbor Rod and Gun Club in Langley, WA is hiring! Our private club is an excellent place to work. Our patrons often think of our restaurant, kitchen and bar staff as family. We are looking for a restaurant manager and a line cook. Some positions include benefits. If interested, or if you No Cheating!

have a referral, please contact Office Suites, self-motivated, RECREATION Holmes Harbor Rod and Gun great organizational skills, Get ready for baseball 2019! Club: Hiring Manager, Holmes strong social media skills, New Balance baseball cleats, Harbor Rod and Gun Club, PO keen attention to detail, size 10.5, well-used for one Box 151, Langley, WA 98260. excellent verbal and written Email: Target@hhrodandgun. communication skills, ability to season, good condition. REDUCED $15 or best offer; com or call 760-428-8660 (1) maintain strict confidentiality, Drivers wanted for Whidbey skilled in operating a variety of Catcher’s glove by Akadema, 33-inch, used for two seasons, SeaTac Shuttle. CDL/P2 Pregeneral office equipment and fair condition. REDUCED ferred, Training available for computers. Details at www. those without. Full Time, Part seatacshuttle.com or call 360- $30 or best offer; Louisville Time and weekend openings Slugger 916 bat, 32-inch, 29 679-4003 (0) available. Send resume to oz., 2-5/8” barrel, BBCOR CLOTHING/ACCESSORIES certified. REDUCED $45 or admin.seatacshuttle@gmail. com (0) Men’s work wear & coveralls, best offer; Marucci Cat 8 bat, Whidbey SeaTac Shuttle is medium and large. New, used 33-inch, 30 oz., 2-5/8” barrel, looking for an Office Adminonce. All for $200 or priced BBCOR certified. REDUCED istrator to oversee a busy appropriately. 425-835-0052 $150 or best offer. We can front office for its Oak Harbor, (1) send photos of these items. Wash. operations who will Women’s Sneakers: Black Fila 360-678-1167 report directly to the Genwith turquoise & lime accents, Camping items: Brookstone eral Manager. This position size 8-1/2; Gray Saucony with waterproof floating lantern, for requires the candidate to be silver, lime & aqua accents, camping, patio, poolside, or fully computer proficient in size 9; White Saucony with emergencies, new, $5 or best Microsoft Office products and silver and pink accents, size 9. offer; Old (but clean) Thermos quick to learn other computer All in really good shape. $10/ 1-gallon jug, $5; Versatile programs. Excellent verbal and pair. Call 360- 331-1063 (1) backpack, the two parts can written communications skills Men’s shoes: “Reaction,” by be used separately, or (for are essential and you should Kenneth Cole. Men’s black more serious backpacking) be highly detailed oriented for leather dress shoes, like new, together, $15 obo. We have this position. Proof reading size 8.5. REDUCED $20 or best photos. Call or text 360-320and double checking will be offer. We can send photos. 0525. a critical duty. Job duties will 360-678-1167 include: Supervisory skills (SuSports items: Bag Boy golf pervise office staff, coordinate cart, $10 obo; Men’s wet suits, HOME FURNISHINGS office procedures, manage size L, $10 per item; Neoprene Walnut occasional table, with employee work schedules, orgloves and hats, size L, $5 beveled glass top, $30 or best ganize company appointments each. We have photos. Call or offer. We can send photos. and special events, provide text 360-320-0525. Call or text 360-320-0525. excellent customer service and ANIMALS/SUPPLIES respond to inquiries); General LAWN AND GARDEN office skills (answer and route Round bales of grass feeder Natural Barnyard Topsoil: calls on a multi-line phone syshay, barn stored. 360-321Good for flower beds, gartem, prepare correspondence dens, etc. Unscreened, 10 yard 1624 and documents as directed, provide clerical/secretarial sup- load, $225 delivered. South WANTED Whidbey, 360-321-1624 port to company owners and Art, Antiques & Collectibles. managers , maintain personnel MISCELLANEOUS Cash paid for quality items. records to meet federal and Call or text 360-661-7298 Large generator, used only 6 state inspection standards, Was your Dad or Gramps in hours, $500. 425-835-0052 maintain and update the Japan or Germany? I collect (1) training library, assist with old 35 mm cameras and Wind chimes, 21”, $10. We maintaining and operations lenses. Oak Harbor, call 970can send photos. Call or text of office equipment, organize 823-0002 360-320-0525 and maintain office files, assist in ordering/stocking company supplies, perform CLASSIFIED INFORMATION additional duties as assigned. Qualifications: Exceptional US Postal Mail Whidbey Weekly customer service skills, revious Classified Department office management experi PO Box 1098 ence, proficiency in Microsoft

Oak Harbor, WA 98277

E-Mail............classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com Telephone..................................(360)682-2341 Fax.............................................(360)682-2344 PLEASE CALL WHEN YOUR ITEMS HAVE SOLD.

Please try to limit your classified to 30 words or less, (amounts and phone numbers are counted as words) we will help edit if necessary. We charge $10/week for Vehicles, Boats, Motorcycles, RVs, Real Estate Rental/Sales, Business Classifieds and any items selling $1,000 and above. We do charge $25 to include a photo. The FREE classified space is not for business use. No classified is accepted without phone number. We reserve the right to not publish classifieds that are in bad taste or of questionable content. All free classifieds will be published twice consecutively. If you would like your ad to be published more often, you must resubmit it. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date.

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


42

$

95

Full Synthetic

36

$

95

Includes 4X4 & SUV

4295

$

Most cars up to 5 qts. 5W20, 5W30, 10W30. Other grades extra. Some filters cost extra. Vehicles with Skid Plates may be extra. Plus $1 Environmental Disposal Fee.

WE CAN SAVE YOU UP TO $250 ON BRAKE SERVICE VERSUS OUR COMPETITORS. WARRANTIED AT 30K LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE.

TOYO TIRES - PASSENGER, LIGHT TRUCKS AND SUVS STARTERS ALTERNATORS TIMING BELTS SERPENTINE BELTS

BRAKES TIRES TUNE-UPS EXHAUST

UP TO

1

$ 00

Flat Rate Auto Repair only $7995 per hour

PER GAL LON D ISCOUNT T ODAY!

always

Ask for De

tails

FREE ESTIMATES!

At Hilltop Service Center we only repair and replace parts that are needed. We will not oversell or install unnecessary parts. We are highly trained brake technicians, not high pressure sales people.

79

$

7995*

$

4 cyl

95

$

8995*

$

6 cyl

9995*

$

8 cyl

79

95

79

$

95

11995

$