Whidbey Weekly April 25, 2019

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APRIL 25 - MAY 1, 2019 LOCALLY OWNED

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RUN THE BRIDGE

THANK YOU! We want to express our heartfelt gratitude to the over 2,000 participants, the sponsors, volunteers, and the very supportive residents of Whidbey Island for helping make our 2019 Whidbey Island Marathon a resounding success. We hope to see you in 2020!

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ON TRACK with Jim Freeman

Hope your weekend was safe and full of hippity-hop. The highlight of my Easter Sunday, other than a homemade ham sandwich on white bread with lettuce and too much mayo, was watching the 60th anniversary tribute to Motown Records on

CBS. Fortunately, no one was caboosed but me so I could turn the two hour Motown memory revue up really, really loud, like we used to do when our parents were gone. Motown makes me cry. Motown makes me smile. Motown tracks my tears. Motown is the music that tells my story. In college, four of us tried to leg-sync to a Temptations song to impress our guest sorority. We tried the Temptations’ incredible rhythmic synchronicity, but it was fake dancing by four guys in Missouri, not Motown. We were all tempted, but only one of us could do the splits. For that matter, I am not sure he ever got up. Reminisce One of the benefits of the alleged principle of “opposites attract” is one opposite usually talks while the other opposite listens. If you are a talker and in a relationship with another talker, who is listening? If you are a listener and in a relationship with another listener, both of you may just be reading. Our Grandpa Strahan loved to read. He was a smart man. He was a math teacher. He was a track coach. Grandpa also liked to hunt. He had lots of bird dogs. Somewhere in there, Grandpa must have had a need for a beverage with all that quail and pheasant to toast and roast. Why? Because Grandpa had a hidden still we weren’t supposed to know about. Who cares? What 4th grader drinks moonshine? Reading Grandpa never talked when he was reading. Whether he was reading a book, a magazine, or the newspaper, Grandpa just read.

Whidbey Weekly Today, and in recent history, football, baseball, and basketball coaches, usually in post-game interviews, talk about how “resilient” their team or players were that day.

We do not malign Otis Redding and Aretha. They were using an RE word way back, but with RESPECT. In three years of law school, my young ears never once heard a classmate or professor use the word recuse. According to Black’s Law Dictionary, recusation is “the act of disqualifying a judge, or judge disqualifying himself, from a case because of bias or personal interest.” Every time I try to get picked to serve on a completely unbiased Island County jury, I get “recused,” but not because of my prejudice. The word is out that deliberations would take several days longer if I am in the room imitating Henry Fonda in 12 Angry Men, directed by Sidney Lumet in 1957. Rerun This past week with the Mueller Report and Earth Day gave us plenty of time to hear redact and recycle.

Remember the inhalation congestion of league nights? Mom accused us of smoking just because our clothes smelled of Swisher Sweets.

I remember watching Grandpa Strahan read. I would sit on the dark living room floor. He was in his chair, next to the table lamp.

How did we get home? Back then there was no Uber for Goober.

Reflections I am a sharing read. I read aloud. I interrupt another’s thought and activity with my improvisational reporting for the captive in the room.

Read on Have you heard anything about New York Times columnist David Brooks’ latest, The Second Mountain, The Quest for a Moral Life?

So, since no one is in the room right now but us, and you seem to be reading, shall we share what I was reading and learning Easter Sunday while the kids were looking for colored eggs that will soon smell?

After watching Brooks’ recent interview with Judy Woodruff on PBS about his book, I went to the computer to place my order at Sno-Isle library. I am 69th in line for one of 15 copies, so we’ll hopefully start our book club before the Seahawks win the Super Bowl in 2020.

Report During the last couple of years, the sports reporters have re-surfaced a word which lay dormant for many years because few knew what it meant. The word–resilient.

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1131 SE ELY STREET | PO BOX 1098 | OAK HARBOR, WASHINGTON 98277 Publisher......................................................................... Eric Marshall Editor............................................................................... Kathy Reed

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Contributing Writers Jim Freeman Wesley Hallock Kae Harris Tracy Loescher Kathy Reed Carey Ross Kacie Jo Voeller

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PUBLISHED and distributed every week. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The Whidbey Weekly cannot be held responsible for the quality of goods or services supplied by advertisers in this publication. Articles, unless otherwise stated, are by contribution and therefore the Whidbey Weekly is not in a position to validate any comments, recommendations or suggestions made in these articles. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. DEADLINES: The Whidbey Weekly is a submission based editorial with contributing writers. Please feel free to submit any information (please limit to 200 words) that you would like to share with the Whidbey Weekly. You may submit by email to editor@whidbeyweekly.com, by fax to (360)682-2344 or by postal mail to PO Box 1098, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date. For more information, please visit www.whidbeyweekly.com.

I love recycling because I love the people who work there, still smiling through my ignorance while pulling my green Coke bottles out of the clear glass pile. Darn those cataracts.

I am not.

The dictionary!

Favorite varieties; specialty geraniums

Let me just say, post Earth Day, I love recycling. I may not compost, but it is only because I eat everything in those frozen dinners but the waxglazed green beans.

To learn more before you get caught, check out their web site at www.islandcountywa.gov/ PublicWorks/solidwaste/Pages/Home.aspx, or just ask someone who is wearing a vest.

Grandpa was a quiet reader.

GERANIUMS

I love recycling because it gets me outdoors. Driving to Coupeville to recycle has replaced driving to Coupeville to bowl.

With two papers per day to digest, the Hattiesburg American and The Clarion-Ledger, Grandpa spent a lot of time in his chair.

His legs were huge. So were his big shoes. No slippers on this Grandpa. He dressed like Bebe Rebozo before Bebe was a baby.

TOMATOES

Hybrid and Heirloom varieties Chosen for Puget Sound gardens

Webster does not explain the meaning of redact in my collegiate edition. The definition is blacked out.

Not only is it cheaper to recycle than to bowl, recycling is much quieter, plus there is no smoking.

He would be reading the news, morning and evening, from eye to thigh, blocking his face, chest and waist with print.

GARDEN ART • TREATS • RAFFLE

Redact is another word I had never heard. I thought it was a medicine for an upset stomach. Apparently, redacting can cause upset stomachs in some.

You knew he was done when he folded the paper in half before getting up from his chair.

I would be looking at Grandpa’s legs, covered by his dark blue or dark gray suit pants.

Plant Sale

SATURDAY, APRIL 27 ~ 9am-4pm

We statesiders have Websterized resilience to be more specific, as in “capable of withstanding shock without permanent deformation or rupture.”

The excessive usage of a word like resilience has made me aware of three more RE words in the news–recuse, redact, and recycle.

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Resilience is rooted in the Latin resilire which meant “jump back” or “recoil.”

Not to be out done would be the great comic hero, Elastic Boy, who defied physics daily with his resilience as founder of the Bowling League of America, the team which became The Avengers.

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COUPEVILLE GARDEN CLUB

Having never been silient, how does one effectively re-silient?

That definition reminds me of the foremost and greatest anthem about resilience, Rubberband Man, by the Spinners from Detroit. www.youtube.com/watch?v=jdiB3cISeBk.

APRIL 25 - MAY 1, 2019

If I learn anything worth sharing, I will let you know with another RE word–recommend. As Aretha’s back up singers sing, “Re Re Re Re Re.....” To read past columns of On Track in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www. whidbeyweekly.com.

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APRIL 25 - MAY 1, 2019

Whidbey Weekly

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Bits & Pieces crafts. The kitchen is open and serving hot and cold beverages, baked goods and pizza made from scratch.

Letters to the Editor Editor, Just saw a couple of letters to the editor about your movie reviewer, Carey Ross. Just wanted to say her reviews are hilarious, spot on and I always go to her column first when I get your paper. Rock on, Carey! Karen Harder Clinton, Wash.

Editor, South Whidbey Hearts & Hammers would like to extend its heartfelt thanks to David Ossman and Judith Walcutt of Other World Media and to Blake and Lynn Willeford of the Clyde Theatre in Langley for their recent generous contribution to our nonprofit organization. On March 16, Firesign Theatre’s David Ossman and the Road Wranglers band presented “Not Insane 2020! The Hello & Goodbye Tour” featuring a walk down memory lane with Ossman and excerpts of his life with the Firesign Theatre, as well as his performance of “The Old Cart Wranglers Saga,” a full-length comic monologue by playwright Brian Price. Produced and directed by Judith Walcutt with music by Chris Harshman, Keegan Harshman, Steve Showell, Siri Bardarson and Mickey Grimm (aka the Road Wranglers), the show was a big hit, and more than $3,500 of the proceeds from ticket and merchandise sales plus a “pass-the-hat” campaign was donated to South Whidbey Hearts and Hammers by the producer. Thanks so very much to Judith, David, Lynn and Blake for their generosity. Every donation lends crucial support to the Hearts & Hammers first Saturday in May workday, when over 300 volunteers gather to do much-needed repairs on the homes of neighbors in need. To find out more about South Whidbey Hearts & Hammers or to join the volunteer team workday, visit www.heartsandhammers.com. Sincerely, Baz Stevens, on behalf of South Whidbey Hearts & Hammers’ Board of Directors

Second Annual Nettle Festival Launches Tilth Market Season

At noon, Julie Charette Nunn of www.crowsdaughter.com presents “Nettle is Mother Earth’s Milk”, a lively class on stinging nettle. She will talk about the plant as nourishment, how to gather and prepare nettle in a variety of ways and how to utilize nettle for healing many things. She will also explore the ways of shamanic herbalism–developing intimacy with the plant world, listening to the wisdom of the plants, gentle healing and learning to be at home in nature. Learn how to make cordage from the mature nettle stalks at 12:30pm with Bryn McAfee. Fiber from nettle is durable and strong, but it is a process. The annual May Pole winding is at 1:00pm to tunes by Island Strings. Children of all ages are welcome to join in. The traditional May pole song has a special verse about the underrated nettle. The young Island Strings performers will be serenading shoppers all day. Open from 11:00am to 2:00pm, local famers are selling bedding plants and fresh vegetables. Regular vendors include Old School Market Farm, Maha Farm and Forest, Whidbey Island Naturals, Fred’s Produce. In addition, gardeners with extra produce may sell from the Community Produce and Crafts booth – a cooperative of several people; for information contact comm.produce@southwhidbeytilth. org. More vendors are welcome. The market is located at 2812 Thompson Road, on highway 525 between Freeland and Bayview. Look for the scarecrow at the corner. The campus has WiFi, restrooms, children’s play area and plenty of parking. SNAP customers are welcome and receive double value. For more information, email market@southwhidbeytilth.org or leave a message at 360-3210757. Look for updates on Facebook and the South Whidbey Tilth website, www.southwhidbeytilth.org. [Submitted by Susan Prescott]

An Evening with David Roth David Roth, singer/songwriter and weaver of stories, returns to Trinity Lutheran Church in Freeland Monday at 7:00pm. Donations will be accepted at the door. This will be David Roth’s second annual appearance at TLC. David Roth strikes many chords, hearts, and minds with his unique songs, offbeat observations, moving stories, sense of the hilarious, and powerful singing and subject matter. As a singer, songwriter, recording artist, keynote speaker, workshop leader and instructor, David has earned top honors at premier songwriter competitions and taken his music, experience, and expertise to a wide variety of venues in this and other countries full-time for three decades. David’s songs, including Rising in Love, Earth, Manuel Garcia, Nine Gold Medals and I Stand for Love, among many others, have found their way to Carnegie Hall, the United Nations, the space shuttle Atlantis, and on 14 CDs. A Chicago native and former Pacific Northwesterner, David now lives on Cape Cod and leads several songwriting camps and adventures, including being the founder/director of the Cape Cod Songwriters Retreat. Come join David as he sings songs new and old (and some from his new album Last Day On this Earth), and sing along as we work toward a better world for all. Trinity is located at the intersection of Woodard Road and Highway 525. Admission is donation at the door, no one will be turned away.

Skye,”arranged by Ruth Elaine Scram, “Sure on this Shining Night” written by Morten Lauridsen and “Moon River” arranged by Ed Lojeski.

Performances are Friday, May 3, at 7:00pm and Sunday, May 5, at 4:00pm at the First Reformed Church, 250 SW 3rd Ave, Oak Harbor. Oak Harbor High School’s Harbor Singers will also perform Friday. Admission is free, but donations are very gratefully accepted. For more information, call Kay at 360-678-4148 or check the chorus website at https://sites.google.com/site/whidbeycommunitychorus/home. [Submitted by Kay Foss]

St. Petersburg Russia Men’s Ensemble Returns to Oak Harbor The St. Petersburg Men’s Ensemble from Russia returns to Oak Harbor to present a concert of world classic choral sacred music and traditional Russian folk songs. The concert will be held Saturday, May 4, 7:00pm, at Oak Harbor Lutheran Church, 1253 NSW 2nd Ave., Oak Harbor. The concert is open to the public. Free-will donations from the concert go to support the ensemble in their tour of the U.S. west coast. It is hoped the concert will challenge concert goers to experience, through music, a culture and way of life different from their own. For more information and directions, contact Oak Harbor Lutheran Church at 360-6791561, www.oakharborlutheran.org. [Submitted by Ken Grigsby]

WhidbeyHealth Appoints Interim CEO The Whidbey Island Public District Hospital Board of Commissioners and outgoing WhidbeyHealth CEO have come to an agreement in which Geri Forbes has resigned her position as CEO, effective immediately, but will remain employed through July 1 as an executive consultant to provide for a smooth leadership transition. CFO Ron Telles was appointed Interim CEO during a special board meeting held last week. It is the board’s intent to appoint Mr. Telles as full-time CEO at the next regularly scheduled board meeting May 13. A contract for Telles is being drafted by the board presently and is anticipated to be presented to the board for approval at the May 13 meeting. Although Mr. Telles will retain his position as Chief Financial Officer, Jennifer Reed, the current WhidbeyHealth Controller, will take on the day-to-day financial operations of the hospital and clinics. The board and administration will work through the details of these changes over the next few months. Following the success of its April 1 public meeting, the Board of Commissioners will continue to hold regularly scheduled public forum-style meetings, at which residents can speak one-on-one with board members to discuss any questions or concerns regarding the future of WhidbeyHealth. Dates for such meetings are forthcoming and will be posted accordingly. [Submitted by Patricia Duff, WhidbeyHealth]

Volunteer Fire Fighters and EMTs Honored at Awards Banquet

Whidbey Community Chorus Spring Concerts

The South Whidbey Tilth Farmers’ Market opens for its 48th season Sunday. All things Nettle is the first-day feature, including workshops and tasting. The gong at 11:00am signals the opening for shoppers to explore the early season produce, garden starts and

Join the Whidbey Community Chorus as it welcomes spring at its annual spring concerts. “From Sea to Skye,” under the direction of Darren McCoy, will celebrate the wonder, magnificence and influence of these two natural forces. Selections include “Over the Sea to

LOCALLY OPERATED Club. Volunteers and staff responded to 2,697 calls in 2018, breaking records set for all previous years of emergency service provided to the South Whidbey community. The evening opened with a moving performance of patriotic songs by the South Whidbey High School choral group. Langley Police Department Acting Chief Donald Lauer gave a personal and inspiring speech, noting the partnership between law enforcement and all first responders. Chief H.L. “Rusty” Palmer presented the Lifesaver Medal, one of the highest awards presented by South Whidbey Fire/EMS, to Eldon Baker, Terry Welch, Ken Starkweather, Paul Shimada, and Travis Zimmerman. “This medal is given to those individuals who, without the direct assistance of any other person, saved the life of another,” said Chief Palmer. The Carl Simmons Officer of the Year award was presented to Tom Gideon by Commissioner Kenon Simmons. The award is named to honor his father, who volunteered with the department from 1954 to 2005. “Many people see a fire engine or hear an ambulance and become worried,” he said. “I don’t, because I know you are on your way. I know that sound signals your arrival to save someone’s life and property. I know that when you get there, they will feel an overwhelming sense of relief and gratitude. You are everyday heroes and this community is lucky to have you.” District Recruit of the Year was Rene Kisner. District EMT of the Year was Pat McMahon. EMTs Carmen McAdams Guerra and Naomi Blair were also recognized by their stations. District Firefighter of the Year was A.J Agnew. Firefighters Brian Boyd and Rebekah Pomeroy were also recognized by their stations. A special Community Service Citation was presented to Crystal and Eldon Baker, owners of All Whidbey Topsoil and Construction. An unexpected presentation was made by the members themselves to Chief H.L. “Rusty” Palmer, to express their gratitude for the new Station 36 at Bayview. The new station has been a dream for the community for over 10 years, and will be completed by fall. Robert Husom received an individual Letter of Merit for organizing the departments presence at the Island County Fair. Another individual Letter of Merit was presented to Jeff Simmons for his contribution to Fire Prevention Week. Ken Lindenstein was also recognized with an individual Letter of Merit. A Unit Citation for Exceptional Service during a marine fire rescue went to: Billy Piepenbrink, Robbie Husom, Tom Gideon, A.J. Agnew, and Sean McDougald. A Unit Citation for Exceptional Service during an airplane crash rescue went to: Jon Beck, Eldon Baker, Jake Newling, Ken Starkweather, Hershel Rostov, Chris Blasko, Brent Davison, Judith Canfield, A.J. Agnew, Paul Shimada, Kristi Ingram, Robbie Husom, Chuck Baker, Al Charat, Marc Swenson, TerryWelch, Tom Gideon, Sean McDougald, and Dennis Batey Additional Letters of Merit were presented to: Melissa Simmons, Marc Swenson, Christina Turnbull-Agnew, Michael O’Brien, Ken Lindenstein, Jeff Simmons, Robyn Porter, Leah Kalahiki, Rene Kinser, John LeDrew, Pat McMahon, A.J. Agnew, Dennis Batey, Brian Boyd, Anne Collins, Mike Cotton, Jon Gabelein, Hershel Rostov, Paul Shimada, Jesse Jennings, Robbie Husom, and Tom Gideon. Years of Service awards were presented to: Jeff Simmons for 20 years; Vicki Lange for 15 years; Kathy Eyth, Pat McMahon, and Tom Gideon for 10 years; and Brian Boyd, Ken Lindenstein, A.J. Agnew, Kelly Cammermeyer and Ashley Taylor for 5 years.

[Submitted by Karl Olsen] David Prisbrey of Old School Market Farm

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Photo by Michael Stadler

South Whidbey Fire/EMS honored volunteer fire fighters and Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) at its annual awards dinner Saturday, March 16 at Useless Bay Golf and Country

South Whidbey Fire/EMS has provided fire suppression, emergency medical service, marine and rope rescue to residents and visitors since 1950. [Submitted by Sherrye Wyatt] BITS & PIECES

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11:50 pm, Hamilton Dr. Reporting party advising there’s a male standing outside who was asking for an ambulance, stated his insides were burning up.

Island 911

Seriously, we do not make this stuff up! FRIDAY, MARCH 1 6:05 am, SR 20 Reporting party advising male subject, possibly on drugs, is walking around store dancing around, not paying for anything. 8:31 am, SR 20 Advising white male in his 20s, having mental breakdown; bending over and making weird motions like trying “to wipe his butt.” 7:25 pm, SR 20 Abandoned line; on call back, female came up to reporting party saying male was getting kidnapped, but when reporting party started to call, another female told reporting party the female makes things up. 4:04 am, Richardson Ct. Reporting party advising vehicles going in and out, too early for that activity; three vehicles, one sounded like car, one sounded like a diesel, one sounded like a truck, going kind of fast. 4:14 pm, Possession Shores Rd. Caller was on walk with daughter, halfway down the point on beach, advising someone started throwing rocks at her and making strange noises. Reporting

party asked male if he needed help and male said no, he would come down there. 5:56 pm, Oak Harbor Rd. Reporting party very agitated, says feds are watching everything, saying “You guys are shit,” “These assholes in the back aren’t supposed to be in my apartment.” SATURDAY, MARCH 2 3:21 pm, Admirals Dr. Advising child was inside reporting party’s house when they came home. 12:08 pm, Storkson Dr. Reporting party advising white van pulled out with gas hose in it; when reporting party went to get his information, male said reporting party didn’t need it and left toward Bayview.

MONDAY, MARCH 4 11:25 am, Carlton Way Advising a couple of intimidating dogs are roaming the street as the reporting party walks in the neighborhood; medium-sized, one dog is rusty color. Requesting call.

APRIL 25 - MAY 1, 2019

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LOCALLY OPERATED

2:50 pm, SW Eagle Vista Ave. Reporting party advising close encounters of coyotes in front of location. 5:09 pm, SR 20 Caller advising white male in his 50s standing outside harassing Girl Scouts selling cookies. 5:20 pm, Zylstra Rd. Caller states there is an older gentleman in a hospital gown walking on Hastie Lake toward SR 20; Correction – hospital scrubs.

1:33 pm, NW Falls Creek Loop Reporting party advising would like a phone call and is wanting to know what regulations are for snakes.

6:04 pm, Honeymoon Bay Rd. Advising yard service is throwing plastic bags into yards with one business card inside.

2:43 pm, SW 1st Ave. Advising subject laying in driveway of location for the past 10-15 minutes; reporting party does not know him.

6:41 pm, Ridgeway Dr. Reporting party advising he smells strong odor of amonia in area and worried if it’s a drug dealer; states it may be coming from his house or Fort Nugent.

9:36 pm, N Oak Harbor St. Caller advising the driver of a vehicle threw a cup of salsa out the window and it hit him. TUESDAY, MARCH 5 10:03 am, Zylstra Rd. Reporting party advising cows in the road and reporting party’s front yard; unknown who they belong to.

SUNDAY, MARCH 3 2:39 pm, NE 3rd Ave. Party requesting contact referencing finding a footprint in her garden.

11:46 am, Lyndean Ln. Party requesting call referencing neighbor putting signs on her gate telling her that her dogs bark all the time; also put a sign up that told reporting party neighbor has contacted animal control.

8:20pm, SW Barlow St. Caller states there’s a sign on the women’s bathroom that says “Do not use;” the door is locked and none of the employees put it there; believes someone may be inside; states even when bathroom is out of order they don’t lock them.

2:48 pm, SR 20 Reporting party advising following a vehicle, subject in the vehicle is throwing items out of the car window while driving; one item was a pencil, a soda can and another was something large, unknown what.

9:48 pm, SR 20 Advising of a female on Facebook who is saying they have a video of the reporting party doing “things” in the bathroom; female is threatening to post video on social media if reporting party doesn’t pay her. WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6 8:42 am, SE Ely St. Advising elderly female is standing in the middle of the roadway. 9:37 am, Oak Harbor Rd. Reporting party advising around 3 am, heard banging on window; this morning found blood on window, requesting contact at location. 1:01 pm, SR 20 Reporting party advising of ongoing issue while she is crossing the street and cars are trying to “mow” her down. Report provided by OHPD & Island County Sheriff’s Dept.

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APRIL 25 - MAY 1, 2019

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What’s Going On All entries are listed chronologically, unless there are multiple entries for the same venue or are connected to a specific organization (such as Sno-Isle Libraries) in which case all entries for that venue or organization are listed collectively in chronological order under one heading.

Island Herb Vendor Day Friday, April 26, 3:00-6:00pm Island Herb, Freeland Representatives from Phat Panda will be on site with product displays and information. Must be 21 or older. Island Herb is located at 5565 Vanbarr Pl, Unit F. For more information, call 360-331-0140 or visit whidbeyislandherb. com. Marijuana has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Keep out of the reach of children.

Four Voices Friday, April 26, 5:00-6:00pm Whidbey Art Gallery, Langley Come for a special evening of inspiring poetry. Dallas Huth, Faith Wilder, Janice O’Mahony and Dianne Shiner will share some of their work. Bring your friends and family from and meet these wonderful poets. By donation with proceeds to benefit Whidbey Homeless Coalition. For more information, call 360-2217675.

Celebration of Dance Friday, April 26, 7:00pm Saturday, April 27, 2:00pm & 7:00pm Whidbey Island Center for the Arts, Langley The island’s pre-professional dance company will excite the audience and display true talent of young dance artists. Professional and local choreographers are setting a diverse group of works that will showcase many different styles and genres of dance, each piece showing its own unique personality and story. From classical ballet to modern dance and contemporary, you will be sure to witness this dance company’s artistry, passion and true dedication to dance. Drinks available before the performance and at intermission in Zech Hall. For tickets or more information, visit www. widtonline.org or call 360-341-2221.

Walk of Honor Car Show Saturday, April 27, 1:00-4:00pm SE Pioneer Way, Oak Harbor Trophies for top three finishers in People’s Choice voting. $20 per vehicle: entry includes dash plaque. Presented by the Rotary Club of Oak Harbor. The proceeds go towards supporting the citizens of Oak Harbor, particularly the young people. The show is held between Midway Blvd. and Pasek St.

Live Music: Potbelly Saturday, April 27, 7:00pm The Machine Shop, Langley Free all ages show. Doors open at 6:00pm. The Machine Shop is located at 630 Second St.

Live Music: Waking Maya Duo Saturday, April 27, 7:30-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville Waking Maya is a dynamic and unique sound that is always changing and evolving. That is the fun part of making original music. No cover. For more information, call 360-6825747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

Baroque Winds Sunday, April 28, 7:00pm St. Augustine’s in-the-Woods, Freeland Suggested donation: $15, $20 or $25 Chamber music by German, French and Italian composers Antonio Vivaldi, Joseph Bodin de Boismorter, Fortunato Riedel, Johann Joachim Quantz and Georg Philipp Telemann for a variety of instrumental combinations will be performed by specialists on early wind instruments, which are significantly different from their modern counterparts. www. salishseafestival.org/whidbey

An Evening with David Roth

Healing Rooms

Monday, April 29, 7:00pm Trinity Lutheran Church, Freeland

Every Thursday, 6:30-8:30pm 5200 Honeymoon Bay Road, Freeland

David Roth is a singer/songwriter whose music has made it across the country, around the world and out of this world on the Space Shuttle Atlantis! David leads songwriting camps and rafting trips and advertises this concert (part of his PNW tour) as “a rollercoaster ride of song and story.” No set price, just donations at the door. All are welcome.

The Healing Rooms are open to anyone desiring personal prayer for physical, emotional, or spiritual needs. There is a team of Christians from several local churches that are dedicated to praying for healing the sick in our community. All ministry is private, confidential, and free. Teams are available to pray for individuals who drop by on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Thrillusionist David DaVinci

For more information, contact Ann at 425-263-2704, email healingwhidbey.com, or visit the International Association of Healing Rooms at healingrooms.com.

Friday, May 3, 7:00pm Oak Harbor High School, 1 Wildcat Way Spectacular and family friendly. Not just a magician, not just an illusionist, but a thrill-seeking, mind-bending master of prestidigitation. Prepare to be mystified by mind boggling illusions and jaw dropping magic, seamlessly fused with exotic parrots that materialize from thin air. You’ll laugh, you’ll cheer, your jaw will hit the floor, as David DaVinci presents his interpretation of the age-old art of magic and illusions. All proceeds benefit Oak Harbor Boys and Girls Club. Price is $15 to attend. For tickets, call 360-6755953 or contact whidbeycommunications@ windermere.com

Upcoming Sno-Isle Library Events See schedule below Cost: Free Lit for Fun Book Group Thursday, April 25, 9:00-11:00am Freeland Library Join us for a discussion of Helen Russell’s “The Year of Living Danishly,” a funny, poignant record of a journey through Denmark, Russell’s happiest place on earth. For adults. Dyslexia 101 Saturday, April 27, 10:00-11:30am Freeland Library Join Kendra Wagner and learn about why children struggle with reading, how their brain is wired, the myths about dyslexia, and what you can do. Find out what dyslexia is and isn’t. Come with questions. Kendra Wagner is in private practice as a learning specialist in Seattle, specializing in dyslexia and twice exceptional students. Everyone is welcome. Humanities Washington: Are Salmon Doomed? - Hatching a Plan to Save a Northwest Icon Saturday, April 27, 3:00-4:00pm Clinton Community Hall, 6411 Central Ave From climate change to pollution, take a deeper look at the past, present, and future of salmon in Washington State. Presented by Nick Bond, Washington State climatologist. Humanities Washington sparks conversation and critical thinking using story as catalyst, nurturing thoughtful and engaged communities across our state.

Religious Services South Whidbey Community Church Sundays, 9:00-9:45am Adult Bible Study 10:00-11:00am Worship Deer Lagoon Grange, 5142 Bayview Rd, Langley Sunday, April 28: The Work of the Holy Spirit: Presence, Power, and Gifts. Service followed by a light lunch. Loving fellowship included.

Prayer Group Every Tuesday, 4:00-5:30pm St. Hubert Catholic Church, Langley Charismatic Prayer and Praise group. Everyone welcome. For more information, call Bill at 360-222-4080 or email Sobico@comcast.net.

Filipino Christian Fellowship Sundays, 2:00pm Meets at Church on the Rock, 1780 SE 4th Ave., Oak Harbor. www.ohcfellowship.com

Concordia Lutheran Church Sunday service, 9:30am Bible Study & Sunday School, 10:45am 590 N. Oak Harbor Street For more information, visit www.concordiaoak harbor.org or call 360-675-2548.

Teaching Through God’s Word Sundays, 9:00 & 11:00am Calvary Chapel, 3821 French Road, Clinton For more information, visit ccwhidbey.com.

Unitarian Universalist Sunday Service Sundays, 10:00am Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland All are welcome. Values-based children’s religious exploration classes and childcare will be provided. Visit www.uucwi.org for more information. The Unitarian Universalist Congregation building is located at 20103 Highway 525, two miles north of Freeland.

Unity of Whidbey Sundays, 10:00am 5671 Crawford Road, Langley If you’re one of the “spiritual but not religious” people who questions your childhood faith or is looking for something more, Unity of Whidbey may feel like a homecoming. Visit our website: unityofwhidbey.org

Whidbey Quakers Sundays, 4:00-5:00pm Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland Whidbey Islands Friends Meeting (also known as Quakers) meet in silent worship and community, with occasional spoken messages, every Sunday at the Unitarian Universalist building. For more information, contact Tom Ewell at tewell@whidbey.com or go to www. whidbeyquakers.org.

First Church of Christ, Scientist Worship, 10:00am Sunday School to age 20, 10:00am Wednesday Testimony Meeting, 2:30pm Christian Science Reading Room Tuesday & Friday, 11:00am-3:00pm The church and Reading Room are located at 721 SW 20th Court at Scenic Heights Street, Oak Harbor. Call 360-675-0621 or visit christianscience.com Services and Sunday School are also held at 10:30am on South Whidbey at 15910 Highway 525, just north of Bayview and across from Useless Bay Road; testimony meetings are held the first Wednesday of each month at 7:30pm.

Galleries & Art Shows Featured Artist: Ron Apgar Open House: Friday, April 26, 4:00-7:00pm Garry Oak Gallery, Oak Harbor Ron Apgar, imaginative fused glass artist, ceramics painter, and fused glass jeweler, is driven by a passion for self-expression through art. His works are noted for their unique style, elegance, and technique. Ron’s style blends realism with abstract expressionism. More work by Ron can be found at garryoakgallery. com/ron-apgar.

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED

Meetings & Organizations Island County District 3 Town Hall Thursday, April 25, 5:30-6:30pm NWFR Station 22, Taylor Road, Oak Harbor Come listen to Commissioner Janet St. Clair with updates on Island County related issues. Special Guests: Island County Human Services and Island County Sheriff. Following the update there will be time for questions and discussion. For more information, call 360-6797354 or e-mail district3@co.island.wa.us

American Association of University Women Saturday, April 27, 9:30-10:00am First United Methodist Church, Oak Harbor Join the American Association of University Women for a chance to win one of 2 new iPads at a raffle held to raise scholarship funds for island girls! Tickets will be sold on site. At 10:00am, Vickie Churchill, Island County Superior Court Judge, will speak about the superior court system in Washington State and Island County. For further information please contact Candi Rohr at candirohr@yahoo.com or Elree Harris at elree64@gmail.com. Public welcome!

Whidbey Weaver’s Guild Thursday, May 2, 10:00am-2:00pm Pacific Rim Institute, Coupeville Mixing yarn doesn’t work like mixing paint and we’re often surprised by color effects in woven cloth. Sarah Jackson will provide a presentation on the numerous possibilities for successfully translating color into woven cloth and developing greater confidence in the use of color. Bring your own lunch and a cup for tea. For more information, visit www.whidbey weaversguild.org For a list of continuous Meetings and Organizations, visit www.whidbeyweekly.com

Classes, Seminars and Workshops Medicare Presentation Thursday, April 25, 11:00am Oak Harbor Senior Center, 51 SE Jerome St. Are you turning 65 or are you eligible for Medicare based on disability? Are you looking for unbiased facts regarding all facets of Medicare eligibility and enrollment, including financial assistance for those who are income eligible? We can help. Please join Statewide Health Insurance Benefits Advisors for a free Medicare enrollment workshop. SHIBA is a program of the Office of the Insurance Commissioner. No registration required. Questions 360-279-4580

Annual Retiree Seminar Saturday, April 27, 9:00am-1:00pm CPO Club, 1080 W Ault Field Rd., Oak Harbor Military retirees and their spouses, from all branches of the United States Uniformed Services, are encouraged to attend this important annual seminar. Surviving spouses are also encouraged to attend. Exhibitors include: Retired Activities Office Volunteers; Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP), WorkSource WA; Disabled American Veterans (DAV); VFW Oak Harbor Chapter; NAS Whidbey Island Fleet & Family Support Center; and more! Light snacks, coffee and water made available for free thanks to our sponsor US FAMILY HEALTH PLAN. Reservations are not required. Registration will be taken at the door. For more information, call 866-854-0638

Is Genesis History? Tuesday, April 30, Thursday, May 2, Tuesday, May 7, 6:00-7:00pm Concordia Lutheran Church, 590 N., Oak Harbor St A DVD by Dr. Del Tackett, creator of “The Truth Project,” a fascinating new look at the biblical, historical, and scientific evidence for Creation and the Flood. Learn from more than a dozen scientists and scholars as they explore the world around us in light of Genesis. This DVD-led study will be broken into segments followed by a discussion. Please sign up at concordiaoakharbor.org

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Whidbey Weekly

NEWS

Name the Splash Park p. 14

APRIL 25 - MAY 1, 2019

LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

www.whidbeyweekly.com

Carnivals and Klompen: 50th Holland Happening comes to Oak Harbor By Kacie Jo Voeller Whidbey Weekly Rubber ducks have been replaced by klompen, or wooden shoes, as part of one of the traditions from Oak Harbor’s Holland Happening. Attendees can watch the shoes race down a canal as part of the festivities celebrating Whidbey Island’s Dutch settlers. The event, which has its 50th anniversary this year, will offer everything from a carnival starting today to the popular Klompen Canal Races Saturday and Sunday. Carnival tickets are available for purchase at the Oak Harbor Chamber of Commerce for $27 prior to the event and $30 at the carnival, and the shoes for the Klompen Canal Race are available for $7. Vicki Graham, event coordinator for the Oak Harbor Chamber of Commerce, said the 50th anniversary of the event will feature commemorative memorabilia including T-shirts, challenge coins and even chocolate bars. “We actually had challenge coins made and we only have 100 of them,” she shared. “They are golden and one side has the Chamber logo on it and the back has the 50th Anniversary of the Holland Happening from 1969 to 2019. Those are amazing! Then, we had candy bars made that have the 50th anniversary on them because everybody loves chocolate and it is so sweet to come and visit us!”

The event will also feature an artwalk, an international street fair, the Grand Parade and the Rotary Walk of Honor Car Show, among other activities. Graham said the weekend gives the community a chance to gather together. “It is a labor of love and it is a way of giving back to the community,” she said. “We are a small town and everybody in the community knows everybody, and they like to come out and celebrate and have a good time.” Graham said the event is made possible through community participation and contributions from sponsors such as the Auld Holland Inn, Swinomish Casino, Regency of Whidbey and more. “We are a small staff of four and we cannot do this without the help of our sponsors, the help of the business community, the volunteers coming from the community, the ambassadors that we have,” she said. “Without volunteers, this could not happen. We just would not be able to do it, so we greatly appreciate all the help we get from everyone.” Graham, who is in her third year of helping coordinate Holland Happening, said the Klompen race is a must-see for those on and off the island. “I had never seen the klompen race,” she said. “The first year when I was there at the klompen race, I was wondering, ‘Where have I been? I have been here (on Whidbey) since 2008 and I have never seen this!’” Audrey Butler, one of the owners of The Greenhouse Florist and Nursery, initially came up with the idea for the Klompen Canal Race after being inspired by the need for another event for visitors to Holland Happening. “My family is Dutch,” she said. “We were born and raised here, so something that we did was work with Holland Happening and when we needed something for (the event on) Sunday, that is when I thought up the idea.” Butler said rubber duck races hosted by other events had inspired the canal race, but the competition was given a Holland-inspired twist by using klompen instead and calling the waterway a canal.

Steve Berentson Photo Courtesy of Oak Harbor Chamber of Commerce Holland Happening has been an island tradition since 1969, and attendees will see everything from traditional shoes and dress to fun and games at the international festival.

“It (the canal) is 60 feet long and it is built in 10 foot sections, so at certain times because of the way the street is, we only used 50 feet,” she shared. “We have been using 60 the last few years, which makes it a little longer race.”

Steve Berentson Photo Courtesy of Oak Harbor Chamber of Commerce Oak Harbor will celebrate its Dutch heritage at the Holland Happening Grand Parade Saturday at 11 a.m. The 50th annual celebration begins Thursday with the carnival and runs through Sunday in downtown Oak Harbor.

After participants decorate their shoes, they are ready to race around the cans of tulips and other obstacles placed in the canal, but the winner is not the only one who gets a prize there are also awards for the last shoe over the waterfall and the shoe exactly in the middle, Butler shared. “Because of all the obstacles we try to put in there and how things happen, there is always someone who is last, but the crowd stays around and cheers,” she said. “After the first one they do not walk away, the race is not over, so it is really fun to have everybody cheer on even the last guy.” Butler said the race is a way to get the younger generation involved with the celebration. “I like it when the kids are all rooting for the ones that they made,” she said. “It is really fun to see them enjoy it and everybody getting excited about the little wood shoes going down the canal.” Klompen Canal races will take place at 2, 4 and 6 p.m. Saturday and at noon, 2 and 4 p.m. Sunday. The International Street Fair on Pioneer Way will be open from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday and from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. The Grande Parade will take place at 11 a.m. Saturday, beginning on SE Pioneer Way and then down Bayshore Blvd. and back to Pioneer Way. The Rotary Walk of Honor Car Show begins at 1 p.m. Saturday. For a more detailed schedule and information, go to www. oakharborchamber.com.

Plant sales have deep roots on Whidbey By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly If you’re looking for new or different additions to your landscaping, flower beds or vegetable gardens, upcoming plant sales by garden clubs, master gardeners and even the Eagles organization should help satisfy the green thumbs which may be developing right about now.

plants from our gardens, including succulents and herbs, perennials, annuals, shrubs and grasses dug up by a member who wants a change,” said Christine Johnson, with South Whidbey Garden Club. “The plant sale this year will feature an increased number of popular annuals for

These traditional plant sales are springing up just in time to help gardeners of all skill levels. The Coupeville Garden Club and South Whidbey Garden Club plant sales will both be held Saturday at the Coupeville Rec Hall and Bayview Community Hall, respectively. The following weekend the Eagles will host its annual plant sale in Freeland and the Island County Master Gardener Foundation will hold its sale Saturday, May 11 at Greenbank Farm. As one can imagine, there will be plants and starts of all kinds available for purchase, all with Whidbey Island in mind. “We generally have all kinds of plants ranging from vegetable starts to divided, mature

containers as well as “tried and true” perennials including peonies, bleeding hearts, ferns, and decorative grasses,” said Coupeville Garden Club Vice President, Chipper Cromley. “There are over 300 hundred geranium plants including ivy geraniums, fancy leaf, calliope, and zonal from which to choose. There are 60 types of annuals including favorites such as Alyssum, Bacopa, Campanula, Coleus, Dahlia, Fuchsia, Gaura, Heliotrope, Petunia, Verbena and Osteospermum.” And let’s not forget the tomatoes. “We have even more tomatoes this year, close to 1,000,” said Bruce Howard, with the Eagles. “This particular event focuses on tomatoes, geraniums, bedding plants, trees, hanging flower baskets and all things keyed to the spring planting season.”

Photo Courtesy of South Whidbey Garden Club Plant enthusiasts will flock to annual plant sales over the next three weekends. South Whidbey Garden Club and Coupeville Garden Club will both hold sales this Saturday, offering hundreds of local plant and vegetable starts for sale.

“Each year, several varieties of tomatoes are chosen that will “survive and thrive” in our cool Puget Sound Gardens,” said Cromley. “This year, 700 hundred tomato plants have been started from seed, including three

Photo Courtesy of Coupeville Garden Club The Coupeville Garden Club has been holding its annual plant sale for 51 years.

cherry tomato varieties…and five heirloom and hybrid varieties.” One of the best things about shopping at these local plant sales is the opportunity to speak to people who have gardened on Whidbey for a long time – both sales this Saturday will have master gardeners on hand to answer questions and give advice. “People enjoy our interesting, high quality plants and low prices, as well as the opportunity to ask gardening questions of experienced master gardeners.,” said Martha Hollis, vice president of Island County Master

See PLANTS continued on page 14

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8

APRIL 25 - MAY 1, 2019 LOCALLY OWNED

PAINT THE ISLAND PURPLE!

Whidbey Weekly FOR THE MONTH OF MAY, SHOW YOUR SUPPORT FOR WHIDBEY ISLAND RELAY FOR LIFE BY DECORATING WITH PURPLE WEARING PURPLE AND POSTING SIGNS AND FLYERS!

RELAY FOR LIFE OF WHIDBEY ISLAND • MAY 31-JUNE 1, 2019 • OAK HARBOR, WA

RACE FOR A CURE

Put Cancer In The Dust! Come join us and see for yourself what Relay For Life is all about!

CANCER Relay Rally: May 8, 7-8pm Oak Harbor Elks Lodge

relaywhidbey@gmail.com RelayForLife.org/whidbeyislandwa www.facebook.com/whidbeyrelay

THERE IS NO FINISH LINE UNTIL WE FIND A CURE.

Thank You, Gene’s!

Whidbey’s Largest Selection of Fine Art Supplies

GENE’S ART & FRAME SINCE 1967

360-675-3854 • 250 SE Pioneer Way • Oak Harbor genesartframing.com 9:30-6 Monday-Friday • 10-5:30 Saturday • Closed Sunday Custom Framing • Pens & Pencils • Papers • Canvas Brushes • Portfolios • Clay • Easels • Palettes • How-To- Books Calligraphy • Drafting • Airbrush • Artists & Craft Paint Supply Totes • Readymade Frames • Children's Art Kits

LOCALLY OPERATED

Family Guide by Amy Hannold Prairie Days at Pacific Rim Institute: Acquaint yourself with this special piece of Ebey’s Landing National Historic Reserve. Enjoy free birding and photography tours, prairie walks and other activities. Stop by the Native Plant Sale to add local color and heritage to your garden. April 26-27 and May 10-11. Pacificriminstitute.org. Kids Bowl Free: Register your kids (ages 2 to 18) and they’ll enjoy two free games of bowling every day, all summer long. The purchase of “Adult Family Members” and “Summer Shoe Rental” passes complete the package for affordable family fun this summer. Participating centers include Oak Bowl (April 15 to Oct. 1) and NASWI’s Convergence Zone (June through Aug.). Kidsbowlfree.com “Sending Youth to Summer Camp” Sale: Living Word of Oak Harbor (490 NW Crosby Ave.) invites you to a rummage sale, Friday, May 3, 1-6 p.m. and Saturday, May 4, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Car wash, hot dogs and nachos will be available Saturday. “A Night to Remember” Prom: A special evening is planned for individuals with disabilities ages 14 and up in Oak Harbor Saturday, May 4, 6-8 p.m. Admission is free for this event, which will include karaoke, dancing, friends and fun. Please RSVP with your name, number of persons coming and phone number to rsvp.eaglewings@gmail. com or 360-658-6093. Volunteers are also needed to assist Eagle Wings disAbilities Ministries in creating great memories for the guests. Touch-a-Truck in Stanwood: Explore different types of vehicles Saturday, May 4, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. A “no horns” hour from 10-11 a.m. begins the event for those sensitive to noise. Rain or shine, free admission. The fun includes hands-on activities and demonstrations representing first responders, construction and other organizations. Bring ear protection, if desired. 2805 271st St NW, Stanwood. Discoverstanwoodcamano.com.

"When I purchased the painting on silk in an antique store over 35 years ago it had a plain, thin frame. Now, the frame and matting bring out the colors within and it’s become a conversation piece. I’ve worked with numerous framers over the years and Gene’s is by far the best.” Franji C. Oak Harbor, WA

www.whidbeyweekly.com

Touch-a-Truck in Sedro-Woolley: Cascade Middle School (201 N. Township St.), hosts a “Touch-a-Truck” event Saturday, May 18, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., where you will get up close to over 30 larger-than-life vehicles, all in support of building a covered play area at Samish Elementary. A “No Noise Hour” without loud noises, sirens and flashing lights will be 10-11 a.m. There will be guest appearances including “Belle” the Princess and “Spiderman.” Admission is $5/person (over the age of 2) or $25 for a family pack of 6 wristbands. Penn Cove Water Festival: A day of Native American canoe racing, entertainment, crafts and culture Saturday, May 4, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Experience music, story-telling, dance and artist demonstrations, authentic Native food, and youth and educational activities. Penncovewaterfestival.com. May Faire: Whidbey Island Waldorf School presents a spring festival featuring maypole dances, field games, crafts, cake walk, and more Saturday, May 4, 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Activities are free, food and drink for purchase. Wiws.org. Parenting with Love & Logic: Raise children who are self-confident, motivated, and ready for the real world with this win-win approach to parenting. Your children will win because they’ll learn to solve their own problems, while gaining the confidence they

need to meet life’s challenges. And, you’ll win because you’ll establish healthy control – without resorting to anger, threats, nagging or exhausting power struggles. Presented by Dr. Aaron Burdge, psychologist. Homeconnection of Oak Harbor hosts this class Saturday, May 4, 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. The cost to attend is $20 single admission or $30 couples admission. Children ages 18 months11 years can attend for $10 per child (not to exceed $20 per family), and will receive care during the seminar. For more information: Loveandlogic.com. Registration: Homeconnectionpto.brushfire.com/events/453213. 360-279-5900. Plant, Small Animal and Tractor Fair: Plants, shrubs, trees and veggie starts will be for sale at the Skagit County Fairgrounds, Saturday, May 11, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Watch operating antique farm machinery while you shop for master-gardener-grown plants, get gardening advice and stroll a variety of vendors. Meet and greet with 4-H animals, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Free parking and admission. wsu.edu/skagit/mg. Youth are Invited to Luge: Arrowhead Ranch, a 20-acre destination adventure center under development on Camano Island, has been selected as a regional host location for the upcoming White Castle USA Luge Slider Search May 18-19. Incorporating sleds on wheels (traveling much slower than trained, experienced Luge athletes roll), the Slider Search is a recruitment program looking for future Olympic athletes in the sport. The public is encouraged to attend the event, which will give boys and girls, ages 9-13, an opportunity to learn luge and qualify to join the USA Luge Junior National Development team. Children selected in Camano Island will be invited to learn the sport on ice next winter in Park City, Utah, the 2002 Olympic luge site. Two clinics will be offered each day, 9 a.m.-noon and 2-5 p.m.; participants need only attend one. All clinics are free of charge and each participant will be given a Luge Slider Search T-shirt. Coaches guiding the clinics include National and Olympic team athletes, giving each young participant professional instruction and inspiration. More information can be found at Teamusa. org/usa-luge/white-castle-slider-search. Required participant registration may be completed online or by calling 1-800-USALUGE. Youth Mental Health First Aid: Sometimes first aid isn’t a bandage, CPR, or calling 9-1-1. Sometimes first aid is YOU. A person you know could be experiencing a mental health or substance use problem. Anyone 18 or older can take the Youth Mental Health First Aid course, but it is recommended for those who regularly have contact with young people ages 12-18 (teachers, coaches, faith leaders and other caring citizens). This program provides training for recognizing and reacting appropriately to signs of mental health emergencies. Lunch is provided, as is a book that expands on the information presented. Registration is required for this free event Friday, May 31, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Coupeville Library. Sno-isle.org/locations/ Coupeville. Fill It Up: Your calendar will be full of fun to look forward to when you visit WhidbeyIsland.MacaroniKid.com for information on these and other Whidbey-area activities.

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APRIL 25TH THRU APRIL 28TH 2019 | OakHarborChamber.com | 32630 SR 20, Oak Harbor, WA 98277

360-675-3755 “Welcome to the P.I.T.”

Services Available: • Basic Firearm Safety • Home Defense • Concealed Carry • Personalized Training

Come see us after the parade for traditional Dutch Apple Pie, Banket and Almond Rolls!

• Firearm Rentals • Gunsmith • Firearm And Accessory Sales • Indoor Range

951 NE 21st Court • Oak Harbor • 360-720-2619 • PacificIndoorTactical.com

Penn Cove

1191 SE Dock St, #2 • Oak Harbor • chrisbakeryonwhidbey.weebly.com • 360-675-6500

sponsored in part by

Water Festival

SAVE THE DATE

Saturday, May 4, 2019 11:00 am to 5:00 pm Historic Coupeville, WA USA

PennCoveWaterFestival.com PennCoveWaterFestival@gmail.com NON PROFIT 501(c)(3) EIN#46-1637770

OakHarborFestival.com

CALENDAR OF EVENTS THURSDAY, APRIL 25TH

4:00PM | Davis amusement Carnival 5:00-7:00PM | elementary artwalk

FRIDAY, APRIL 26TH

ALL DAY | elementary artwalk 3:00PM | Davis amusement Carnival

SATURDAY, APRIL 27TH

ALL DAY | elementary artwalk 10:00AM-7:00PM | international street Fair 10AM | BanD at Hal ramaley memorial Park 11:00AM | GranD ParaDe 11:00AM | Davis amusement Carnival 1:00PM | rotary walk oF Honor Car sHow 2:00, 4:00, & 6:00PM | klomPen Canal raCes

SUNDAY, APRIL 28TH

ALL DAY | elementary artwalk 10:00AM-5:00PM | international street Fair 12:00PM | Davis amusement Carnival 12:00, 2:00, & 4:00PM | klomPen Canal raCes

360-675-3755 | OakHarborChamber.com | 32630 SR 20, Oak Harbor, WA 98277

May 25th, 2019 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM FT. Nugent Park 2075 SW Fort Nugent Ave Oak Harbor, WA

This is a FREE camp for ages 7-14. Limited spots available. Register today at www.ohfcl.org


HOLLAND HAPPENING FESTIVAL 2019 DOWNTOWN SPRING CLEANUP dinner

brunch

italian inspired farm to table comfort food seasonal menus showcasing local farms, fishermen, wineries

Let’s make downtown Oak Harbor beautiful!

Saturday, May 18, 10am-4pm Volunteers needed to Clean Windows, Paint, Pick Up Trash, Plant Flowers, Remove Graffiti

AIRPORT SHUTTLE & CHARTER SERVICE

Come Check Us Out During Holland Happening! Serving Menudo Every Weekend!

Tackle Football Ages 7-14 • Cheer Ages 6-14 Registration Now Open! Early Registration Discount Ends June 15!

To volunteer or for more information: director@oakharbormainstreet.com 360-499-5850

visit us at www.rusticacafe.com for current hours, menus & events like us on facebook and follow us on twitter

Serving Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner

360.675.4053 oak harbor 670 se pioneer way #102

Come see us at our booth at Holland Happening, Saturday, April 27, 10am-7pm Sunday, April 28, 10am-5pm

The fastest, most convenient way to SeaTac Serving SeaTac Airport with 9 trips a day

360-682-6119 • 830 SE Pioneer Way #106 • Oak Harbor Monday - Saturday 8am to 8pm • Sunday 8am to 3pm

www.seatacshuttle.com 360-679-4003 • 877-679-4003

To register or for more information visit OHFCL.org

Time for a Sweet Treat!

#001

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Booths #5

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Booths #25-28

Booths #29-51

s #19 Booth

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The Store with the Big Heart All proceeds donated to community programs

(360)675-1133

Popcorn, Ice Cream & Sweets

Klompen Canal Race

105 Anthes Ave, Langley, WA

• Free Admission to Education Exhibits

600 SE Barrington Drive • Oak Harbor

KEY

Open Daily: 11am-6pm 851 SE Pioneer Way, Suite 101 (360)240-8937

Open Thursdays through Mondays, 11 am till 5 pm

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Whidbey SeaTac Shuttle Cosmic Ice Cream Tailgate BBQ Sequim Valley Products Island Concessions Mission Out Reach Whidbey Young Life Fil-Am Ohana BBQ Arbia’s Pizza

Chamber Information Booth

11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20.

Hours: Mon-Sat 9am-5:30pm Donation Hours: Mon-Sat 9am-4pm

Portable Toilets

A.B.’s Hillbilly Gyro RTI INC / Rays Foods Kona Ice Bellingham Julie’s Lumpia Orlando’s Fish and Grill WAIF Xtememe Pets Rise Academy of Arts Henna Tattoos Oak Harbor Physical Therapy

21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30.

Color Street Swinomish Casino PBY ICD/WIDC Bombay Trends MOPS OH Life Church Uncle Stinky’ s Magic Comcast ICD/WIDC Bombay Trends

• Kids’ Room

31. Island District Boy Scouts of America 32. Color Street 33. Renewal by Anderson 34. Art to Suit You 35. Bath Fitter 36. Creative Designs 37. Harley Exteriors 38. NAS WI FCPOA 39. Garry Oak Society 40. AT& T

Let Us Help You With Your Party or Event!

• Fun Gift Shop • Whale Sighting Map

BIRTHDAY PARTIES • WEDDINGS GRADUATIONS • BBQ’S & PICNICS CLASS REUNIONS • RETIREMENTS & MUCH MORE!

Follow us on Facebook Orca Network and Langley Whale Center

270 SE Cabot Dr #2 Oak Harbor

360-675-2600

32650 Highway 20 Building D

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Whidbey Golf Club Over the Line Art Natural Way Chiropractic Awesome Anime Gideon International Island Camp Costco OHHS Band Boosters Friday House of Jerky Girl Scouts Western Washington

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Kangen Water Info Freeborn Metal Art Indian Arts -Native Roots Service Alternatives Emerald City Arts Windermere Real Estate Kara’s Creations Touch of Dutch Absolute Nuts Ecuadorian Crafts

60. Camp Fire Samish 61. Oak Harbor Football and Cheer League 62. Skagit Valley College 63. Island County Republican Party 64. Fault line Rocks and Minerals 65. Cool Heat 365 LLC 66. Welcome Home Oak Harbor Senior Memory care

67. Nerfed Oak Harbor 68. Winning Ways LLC 69. ACP Vinyl 70. Mary Kay 71. Arbonne 72. North End Fitness 73. Gutter Helmet 74. Gutter Helmet 75. PNW Expresso LLC 001. Victimsupportservices

Unique “Old World” Charm on Beautiful Whidbey Island

WE HAVE SUPPLIES FOR EVERY OCCASION PLATES, NAPKINS, TABLECLOTHS & CENTERPIECES

360-221-7505 www.orcanetwork.org

Tiptoe through the Tulips then tiptoe on in to Island Thrift for Name brand clothes and merchandise at affordable prices

360-544-3068

SEE US DURING HOLLAND HAPPENING FOR WHIDBEY’S BEST LUMPIA & PANSIT!

Perla’s

LUMPIA & ORIENTAL 360-679-3707 • 1281 SE Ely St DOWNTOWN OAK HARBOR

Dutch architecture, antique furnishings, and colorful gardens. Feel as if you’ve stepped through time. Unique guest rooms with private bath Air Conditioning HDTV Complimentary High Speed Internet Refrigerator and microwave Continental Breakfast The Windmill Suite is lovely and perfect for that special occasion with a separate sitting area, fireplace and jetted tub for two. A Must See! We offer Military & Government Rates reservations@auld-holland.com

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Saturday, May 18, 10am-4pm Volunteers needed to Clean Windows, Paint, Pick Up Trash, Plant Flowers, Remove Graffiti

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60. Camp Fire Samish 61. Oak Harbor Football and Cheer League 62. Skagit Valley College 63. Island County Republican Party 64. Fault line Rocks and Minerals 65. Cool Heat 365 LLC 66. Welcome Home Oak Harbor Senior Memory care

67. Nerfed Oak Harbor 68. Winning Ways LLC 69. ACP Vinyl 70. Mary Kay 71. Arbonne 72. North End Fitness 73. Gutter Helmet 74. Gutter Helmet 75. PNW Expresso LLC 001. Victimsupportservices

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WE HAVE SUPPLIES FOR EVERY OCCASION PLATES, NAPKINS, TABLECLOTHS & CENTERPIECES

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SEE US DURING HOLLAND HAPPENING FOR WHIDBEY’S BEST LUMPIA & PANSIT!

Perla’s

LUMPIA & ORIENTAL 360-679-3707 • 1281 SE Ely St DOWNTOWN OAK HARBOR

Dutch architecture, antique furnishings, and colorful gardens. Feel as if you’ve stepped through time. Unique guest rooms with private bath Air Conditioning HDTV Complimentary High Speed Internet Refrigerator and microwave Continental Breakfast The Windmill Suite is lovely and perfect for that special occasion with a separate sitting area, fireplace and jetted tub for two. A Must See! We offer Military & Government Rates reservations@auld-holland.com

33575 State Route 20 • Oak Harbor • 360-675-2288 • www.auld-holland.com

We have everything you need to get your projects done!

33650 SR 20 Oak Harbor 360-679-6626 diamondrentalsinc.com


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www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

APRIL 25 - MAY 1, 2019

13

LOCALLY OPERATED

require your full energy and attention. All else is secondary on the 25th.

CHICKEN LITTLE & THE ASTROLOGER By Wesley Hallock

ARIES (March 21-April 19) It’s a great week to be open to new discoveries about yourself and your world. Assumptions that you already know everything you need to know become a straitjacket that limits your future. Whatever your game, if you are losing, you have something crucial to learn. You are looking for better ways of handling the world, and the best way to do that is to open yourself to new experiences. Think about this on the 25th. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Money and possessions play a large role this week, especially your joint accounts. This is your opportunity to iron out troublesome complications that may exist in this area. The hidden prize here is that you are learning valuable lessons about other people’s values and how they see life. A broadened perspective being the way to financial independence, you may want to study the events of the 25th closely. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) Changes in your own self-image may trickle down this week and change how you relate to other people. Close relationships are your area of particular attention. Demands imposed on you that you once would have tolerated may no longer be acceptable. Confrontations are a test of your self-knowledge and integrity. If you have been true to yourself, prior commitments made to other people will not become a problem on the 25th. CANCER (June 22-July 22) Emotional considerations may have to be put aside this week while you work on practicalities and necessities. On the other hand, if you have emotional connection to your work, such as improving a home you love, then this can be a highly fulfilling time. Hard work is a given. How that work affects you depends on your attitude. The 25th tells you much about the state of your values and devotions. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Fun activities take on transformative dimensions this week. Creative self-expressions such as art and music become especially profound. The intensity of your experiences in these and other areas may suggest a fated quality. A romance that begins as fun, as one example, might assume a gravity that makes it life-changing. Even the most casual activities on the 25th have weighty potentials. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Your domestic life in all its aspects is on the front burner this week. Pressures both internal and external are likely to build, along with thoughts of either changing your home’s appearance or else relocating entirely. Similarly, parenting and the issues of dealing with parents may be constantly with you. Solutions to these and other issues you face

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Your measure of success this week rests on being pragmatic and practical. Wishy-washy responses get you nowhere in situations that demand reason and logic. Your immediate environment and your most commonly shared beliefs are apt to present your greatest challenges. The trick is to be concerned with what is, and not with what you think should be. Value judgments unnecessarily complicate the 25th. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) The story of who you are and where you are going is on display for all to see this week. It’s the story of how you spend your time and money. To know what this means, look at the people you see everyday. Are they industrious? Are they better off this year than last? They are a reflection of you. If you don’t like what you see, if it’s not the future you aspire to, now is the time to effect changes. Ponder this if all is not well on the 25th. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) It’s easy this week to get so wrapped up in your own point of view that you fail to see how some of those views may be hurting you. It is important to know yourself, but equally important is time spent understanding others. A balance between inner and outer is essential to youi wellbeing. Social activities are your best bet for finding that healthy middle ground. Talking out your issues is especially constructive on the 25th. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) It’s tempting to dwell so much on your failures this week that you forget to acknowledge how much good you do in a day. The best way to avoid this trap is to keep your mind in present time. Negative emotions are a clue you have strayed from the present into past or future. Bring yourself back to the present by shifting your focus away from yourself. The perfect way on the 25th is to focus on helping others. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb 18) The most direct way out of possible difficulties this week may involve changes in your long term planning. Friendships different from any you have known may be either the catalyst or the end result of changes you make. These produce growth and progress, which in the short term can be traumatic, but is nonetheless desirable. Take all in stride on the 25th, the good and not so good alike. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Your reach in the outer world and how to extend it are relevant topics this week. Uppermost in your mind may be failed attempts to achieve a higher rung on whatever ladder you have chosen to climb. The setbacks are temporary, and before too long you will have opportunities anew. In the meantime, it’s important that you consolidate your energies for the next outward push. The 25th is useful for taking stock of your position. © 2019, Wesley Hallock, All Rights Reserved

Chicken Little looks at what is and fears the sky is falling. Wesley Hallock as a professional astrologer looks at what is and sees what could be. Read Wesley’s monthly forecast, with links to Facebook and Twitter, at www. chickenlittleandtheastrologer.com. To read past columns of Chicken Little and the Astrologer in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

CLUES ACROSS 1. Defense Department

36. Disorganization

12. National capital

37. Secret political clique

14. China’s chairman

4. Diminutive hoop- 38. Recounted ster Webb again 8. Cools 39. Converts to leather 10. Chili con __ 11. Quantitative fact 12. Enliven 13. A woman of refinement 15. Where royalty live 16. Beverage made of oatmeal 17. Replaced 18. UK’s largest city

15. Al Bundy’s wife 17. Acid in all living cells 19. Told

40. Consisting of a single element or component

20. Displays heartbeat 23. Softly

41. Therefore

24. Swiss river

42. Clownish

25. Small chapel

43. The habitat of wild animals

26. Electronic countermeasures 27. Asian nation

CLUES DOWN 1. Dreary

28. Neither 29. Peacock network

21. Obamacare

2. Book page size

22. When you expect to get there

3. Become less lively

23. Deutschland

4. Grassy plain

24. Consumed

31. Medieval garment

5. Attached a figure to

32. Type of juice

25. Paddle 26. A way to consume 27. “Walter White” 34. The opera has one 35. Honk

6. Hungry 7. NY-based department store 9. Pedestal

30. List of candidates

33. “Coach” actor 34. Puerto Rican dance music La __ 36. Texas politician Ted

10. Single-celled animal

Answers on page 19

YOUR GUESS IS AS GOOD AS OURS WEATHER FORECAST Thurs, April 25

Fri, April 26

Sat, April 27

Sun, April 28

Mon, April 29

Tues, April 30

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

H-59°/L-47°

H-57°/L-46°

H-55°/L-41°

H-56°/L-42°

H-59°/L-43°

H-61°/L-43°

H-59°/L-43°

Mixed Clouds and Sun

Partly Sunny

Mixed Clouds and Sun

Mixed Clouds and Sun

Mixed Clouds and Sun

PM Rain

Wed, May 1

Showers Possible

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

H-59°/L-45°

H-58°/L-44°

H-54°/L-41°

H-56°/L-40°

H-58°/L-43°

H-60°/L-42°

H-61°/L-43°

Mixed Clouds and Sun

Partly Sunny

Mixed Clouds and Sun

Mostly Sunny

Mostly Sunny

AM Rain

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.

Showers Possible


14 APRIL 25 - MAY 1, 2019

Whidbey Weekly

LOCALLY OWNED

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED

WHAT’S IN A NAME?

Deadline approaching to name Oak Harbor’s splash park By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly Students ages 5 to 18, time is running out to submit your entries in the Oak Harbor clean water facility’s splash park naming contest. All entries must be submitted either online or in person by 10 p.m. Thursday, May 2. The splash park is on track to open with the rest of Windjammer Park on Saturday, June 29 and the city of Oak Harbor would like to christen the seasonal play area with an appropriate name on the day of the grand opening. “It’s almost complete – we’re working on finishing touches,” said Brett Arvidson, project manager. “The splash park is really cool, there’s a lot to it. It’s designed to have a flow-through system that’s built like a little stream and has a maritime theme.” Arvidson said the new park will even have a pirate ship. Water will spray from the creek as well as from several parts of the ship such as the mast, crow’s nest, wheel and cannons. “There’s a lot to it and it’s going to be pretty popular,” he said. “Everybody has been so patient with the park closed, so we wanted to do something special. We thought it would be nice to let the kids do the naming, since they’re going to use it.”

Those interested in participating in the contest should think of a creative, original name that represents Oak Harbor, its heritage, life or nature. The contest is open to all students ages 5-18. Classes of students are able to submit a single, collective entry as well. Entrants are required to write a 200-word description of why that name was chosen. Complete rules and entry forms are available online at oakharbor.org, or they may be obtained at City Hall, 865 SE Barrington Dr. “Once all entries have been received, they will go to a selection committee, which will pick its favorite and a couple of runners up, and then it will be presented to the city council, which will make the final decision,” Arvidson said, adding that the selection will be blind - neither committee members nor the city council will know who submitted the entry until after the final decision has been made. The winning name will be posted in the new splash park. The winner will be recognized during the grand opening ceremony and will receive a commemorative prize. Arvidson said a splash park ranked high when plans for the clean water facility and the park were being discussed. “A lot of parents were interested in having a splash park – it came up as high on a list of what people wanted us to do,” he said. “It’ll be a community favorite.” The splash park will be of seasonal use in the future. Arvidson said he anticipates it will open around the end of the school year, weather permitting, and remain open through Labor Day. The rest of the time, it will just add a bit of nautical character to the park. “It’s located next to a playground and even though it’s designed to be open just three or four months out of the year, it will still be an attractive place to hang out,” Arvidson said. “We have this whole plaza area and the splash park will blend in quite nicely year ‘round. “ If you can’t wait to sneak a peek at the new play area, it is visible through the fence. Arvidson said he is looking forward to the grand opening and seeing people’s reaction.

Photo Courtesy of Brett Arvidson When completed, the pirate ship in the new splash park in Oak Harbor will release sprays of water from several areas and will be a popular part of the attraction, according to the project manager.

“The water treatment plant is hardcore engineering,” he said. “The splash park is outside the normal area. Even though there was complex work to do on it, it was fun to do. This park’s going to turn out very nice.”

PLANTS continued from page 7 Gardener Foundation. “We don’t have a particular gardening focus for the sale, just the favorite plants that local master gardeners enjoy growing and sharing.” “The variety of plants offered will please both the novice and master gardeners,” Cromley said, explaining growing tips and tricks will be included at no additional charge. “The tomato plants include instructions for hardening off before placing them in your garden and several master gardeners will be available during the sale to answer questions on the care and feeding of all of the plants.”

Upcoming Plant Sales: Coupeville Garden Club Saturday, April 27 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Coupeville Rec Hall

South Whidbey Garden Club Saturday, April 27 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Bayview Community Hall

Eagles Plant & Garden Sale Saturday, May 4 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Sunday, May 5 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. 16691 Hwy. 525, Freeland

Island County Master Gardener Foundation Plant Sale Saturday, May 11 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Barn A, Greenbank Farm

Another benefit of buying your plants from local groups is that the money spent will be returned to the community.

“About a month ago, the Eagles presented a check for $15,000 that went to nine or ten local charities,” said Howard, explaining the upcoming plant sale is the group’s largest fundraiser of the year and funds between 80and 90-percent of the organization’s annual community contributions. “We do that every year – we donate between $10- and $20,000 to local charities. If this year’s sale is anything like the last one, our donation will be about the same next year.” “Customers like coming to our plant sale because they know their purchases help fund horticulture-related projects such as educational programs, beautification projects and student scholarships to nonprofits throughout the South Whidbey communities,” Johnson said. All of these plant sales have been going on for at least a decade, or five, in the case of the Coupeville Garden Club, which is celebrating 51 years of plant sales this year.

Derelict vehicles removed from roadside By Kacie Jo Voeller Whidbey Weekly

After months of sitting alongside the intersection of Highway 20, Highway 525 and Race Road, two fifth wheels and a car have been removed from the south side of Highway 20. The vehicles were tagged by the Washington State Patrol for removal March 27. Regumbah Connolly, a Whidbey Island resident, noticed one fifth wheel and a car last October, and after a month, she decided to take action and see if it would be possible to have the vehicles removed. Whidbey Weekly published a story on her efforts last month. “In November I decided it was time to start doing something and I started calling around to get it removed,” she said. Connolly said she was in contact with a number of entities, including the Washington State Department of Transportation, the sheriff’s department, Washington State Patrol, Island County Public Works, and an Island County commissioner. She said she hoped to get answers about how to get the vehicles moved off the roadside and properly disposed of. “I think it was the calls that did it,” she shared. “When [Island County Commissioner] Janet St. Clair started calling around trying to find out what was going on, and people kept getting these phone calls concerning these fifth wheels — I think that is what did it.”

“We use the funds from the plant sale to support our educational garden at the Greenback Farm, educational gardening programs throughout the island, such as Meerkerk Garden’s Botany Adventure tours for elementary school children, Oak Harbor and Coupeville School gardens, as well as a scholarship for horticulturally inclined local college students,” Hollis said. “Over the years, the plant sale has grown larger and more successful and as a result, the garden club’s contribution to community projects has increased,” Cromley said. “In 2002, the Coupeville Garden Club co-sponsored the construction of a greenhouse on the Coupeville high school grounds. The school and the garden club are partners in the operating cost and the members maintain and repair the greenhouse. The greenhouse provides a unique opportunity for high school students to participate in “hands on” science and horticultural lessons.”

Photo Courtesy of Regumbah Connolly Two abandoned fifth-wheel trailers and a car have now been removed from SR20 and SR525, after sitting there for several months.

Connolly shared she felt the proactive steps taken by citizens helped to get the fifth wheels and car removed.

Photo Courtesy of Island County Master Gardener Foundation Smiles and friendly advice accompany purchases at the Island County Master Gardener Foundation Plant Sale, which will be held Saturday, May 11 at Greenbank Farm.

The South Whidbey Garden Club has been holding its sale for well over 30 years, so these are events with a good handle on what appeals to gardeners on Whidbey. In some cases, garden art and baked goods will also be offered. To find out more information on how to get involved in these organizations, check out the sales or find details online: www. southwhidbeygardenclub.com; www.coupevillegardenclub.org; http://Island.WSU.edu; or http://georgebuehler.com/Eagles%20Web/ Whidbey%20Island%20Eagles%20Club%20 Home%20Page.html. There’s a plant sale coming up to meet every need, whether expert or novice and based on their popularity, it seems gardening is always in season on Whidbey. “Our favorite part of gardening on Whidbey Island is the pleasure of seeing the plants respond to the seasons,” said Hollis. “Spring is so exciting with all the new growth bursting forth and bringing blossoms. Summer is great for harvesting homegrown veggies and lovely flowers, and we love to see the garden go into its fall foliage in autumn. Our other favorite season, winter, is nice for resting! We guess there’s no bad seasons for gardening on Whidbey, regardless of the weather!”

“Maybe it was on the list and they just were able to get around to it, but I cannot help but think that getting press helped,” she said. The vehicles were removed after being tagged by the Washington State Patrol, and Connolly said after seeing the vehicles in the same area for so long, it was a relief when they were gone. “The day I went down there and they were gone I could not believe it,” she shared. “I was just over-the-top happy.” Connolly said she received thanks from community members for her persistence in investigating the fifth wheels. “Someone sent a thank you card for having those things removed,” she shared. “That just gave me so much joy, it was really nice. That is the first time that has ever happened. I used to do things in Laguna Beach to try to clean up and make things nicer and no one ever bothered to say thank you, so this shined a light and indicates the caliber of people that live on this island.” Connolly, who describes herself as a preservationist, advocates for citizens to ask questions and take action when situations such as this arise. “It is a matter of just doing it,” she said. “Do not just think about it and don’t think someone else is going to do it, just do it! Be persistent and keep contacting people and it does not take that much time out of your day.”

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


Whidbey Weekly

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OWNED

APRIL 25 - MAY 1, 2019

LOCALLY OPERATED

Film Shorts Courtesy of Cascadia Weekly

FARAWAY ENTERTAINMENT YOUR LOCAL MOVIE THEATER

AVENGERS: ENDGAME PG-13 AVENGERS UNPLANNED R SHAZAM! PG-13

By Carey Ross After: I thought this was a YA movie about a beautiful girl who falls for a bad boy, but instead it’s something called a “new adult fiction” movie about a beautiful girl who falls for a bad boy. I stand corrected. ★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs.)

Gage Creed from the original version of this movie, but don’t ask me to do it unless you enjoy having me appear to you in your nightmares. ★★★ (R • 1 hr. 41 min.)

COMING SOON: THE CURSE OF LA LLORONA, BREAKTHROUGH, 5/3 UGLY DOLLS, 5/10 POKEMON DETECTIVE PIKACHU

Movie Hotline 360-279-2226 Book A Party or Special Showing 360-279-0526 1321 SW Barlow St • Oak Harbor

Avengers: Endgame: It is here. Bow down before your new box-office master. ★★★★ (PG-13 • 3 hrs. 1 min.)

www.farawayentertainment.com

Captain Marvel: Brie Larson, Captain Marvel and real-life hero, on her movie bypassing $1 billion in worldwide box office: “I’m very grateful to have broken this glass ceiling of normalizing the concept that women can also make a billion dollars. I don’t know why that was so hard to comprehend in the first place.” Solidarity, sister. ★★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 8 min.)

Dumbo: I do not wish to see a live-action remake of this animated Disney classic, no matter how much Tim Burton, Colin Farrell, Danny DeVito, and CGI baby elephants might be thrown at it. ★★ (PG • 2 hrs. 10 min.) Hellboy: Guillermo del Toro is still alive and yet somehow he is rolling over in his grave. ★ (R • 2 hrs.) Little: This film about a stressed-out woman who gets a second chance at a carefree youth was pitched and produced by 14-yearold “Blackish” star Marsai Martin, who also stars, and if any critics poop on her movie, they are going to have to deal with me. Get it, Marsai, you tiny movie mogul. Get. It. ★★★★ (PG-13)

FRIDAY, APRIL 26 THRU SUNDAY, APRIL 28

AVENGERS: ENDGAME (PG-13) CAPTAIN MARVEL (PG-13)

Shazam: DC Comics finally scores another win (“Wonder Woman” can’t do it all herself, after all) with this endearing, engaging story of lost boys and the superhero they conjure who possesses great powers but needs a little help when it comes to using them to save the world from evil. ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 10 min.) Us: Jordan Peele, sketch comedian and world’s most unlikely horror auteur, releases his second (the first being the Oscar-nominated “Get Out”) flawless, socially conscious, righteously frightening and scarily entertaining movie, and it’s currently breaking box-office records. ★★★★★ (R • 1 hr. 56 min.) For Anacortes theater showings, please see www.fandango.com. For Blue Fox and Oak Harbor Cinemas showings see ads on this page.

360-679-4003 877-679-4003 www.seatacshuttle.com 9

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THIS WEEKS SPECIALS: FREE CHILI & CHEESE ON HOT DOGS BOX OFFICE OPENS AT 4PM, 1ST MOVIE BEGINS AT DUSK 11 & OVER $6.50; KIDS 5-10 $1.00; 4 & UNDER FREE Go Karts Now Open! Thurs & Fri 4pm-Dusk, Sat 11am-Dusk, Sun 12:30-Dusk *Cash prices

1403 N Monroe Landing Rd • Oak Harbor

360-675-5667 • www.bluefoxdrivein.com

Need a New Mattress? every purchase supports the oak Harbor High School Band and Choir Boosters! 10am to 5pm

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Market Saturday 10-2 On the Community Green Stop by during the Water Festival

AVENGERS: ENDGAME (PG-13)

Pet Sematary: True story: I can do a spot-on Puzzle 1 (Medium, impersonation of back-from-the-dead baby difficulty rating 0.54)

Every row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every column of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9

GROWING SINCE 1979

THURSDAY, APRIL 25 - SINGLE FEATURE ONLY

Missing Link: In the realm of original ideas, Hollywood would do well to traffic in comes this story about fur-covered, 630-pound Mr. Link, who undertakes a Victorian globetrotting adventure with the help of a cast of memorable characters and a whole bunch of the stunning stop-motion animation that has become Laika Studios stock in trade. ★★★★ (PG • 1 hr. 35 min.)

On a scale from 1 to 10...5.4

COUPEVILLE FARMERS MARKET

Now Showing!

The Curse of La Llorona: The title might make this movie sound like a cool arthouse film, but instead it’s yet another forgettable installment of the “Conjuring” franchise. Curses! ★ (R • 1 hr. 33 min.) Disneynature: Penguins: Thus far, the Disneynature movies have been both breathtaking and dignified in that old-school nature movie sort of way. But now a clumsy dork of a penguin named Steve has come along to capture everyone’s hearts and Disneynature will never be the same. ★★★★★ (G • 1 hr. 16 min.)

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Saturday, May 4 OHHS Fieldhouse Custom Fundraising Solutions will convert the Fieldhouse to a “show room” with a variety of mattresses to choose from.

Twin from $229 • Full from $259 Queen from $299 • King from $399 Help Support tHe MuSiC prograMS at oHHS • New, Top Quality, Brand Name Mattresses • Motorized Adjustable Bed Frames, Luxury Z Pillows, Protectors (Simmons, Englander & More) • Delivery and Haulaway Options Available • Wide Variety – Firm, Pillow-top, Memory Foam, Latex, Hybrid & More • Great Customer Service • Full Factory Warranties

Cash | Credit Card | Check | Layaway | Financing (OAC)

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Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/sudoku on Fri Mar 29 18:13:26 2019 GMT. Enjoy!

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16

APRIL 25 - MAY 1, 2019

Whidbey Weekly

LOCALLY OWNED

Let’s Dish! with Kae Harris

THE COOLEST COOKIES IN THE WORLD! It’s almost that time of year again! I say this a lot, so it could be one of a multitude of ‘thattime-of-the-year-again’ refrains. Well, it just so happens the time of year I’m referring to this time is Holland Happening. Oak Harbor plays host to vendors galore, bringing with them their wonderful wares and delicious eats. Holland Happening ushers people in from miles around and exposes us to the uniqueness of life here on Whidbey Island. It also allows us to enjoy many different kinds of food and, even though I love it all, I still have my favorite Holland Happening treat – stroopwafels. For those of you who don’t know what a stroopwafel is, it’s just that, a waffle. Made from a thin batter, what makes this waffle (which to me is more like a cookie) stand apart from all the rest is it’s thin, almost crispy, and features a sandwiched center of thick, gooey, sweet caramel or syrup. Originating supposedly, in Gouda, the Netherlands, this sweet treat’s origins have a couple of versions, with one being attributed to a baker named Gerard Kamphuisen between the years 1810 and 1840. Apparently, the stroopwafel was made as a way to use up all the leftover bits and bobs from the bakery that day – bread crumbs, for example – which were then sweetened with syrup. Until 1870, the city of Gouda was the only place where stroopwafels were made. After that, they could be found at markets and parties outside of Gouda. Lucky for us, because how else would the world be privy to the delectability of the stroopwafel if it had never moved from its home base? The batter for a stroopwafel today consists of sugar, eggs, flour, baking powder and butter. Once cooked, this batter is then smeared or drizzled with syrup or caramel and then another cookie is placed on top of it. When the syrup hardens, it gets a little stiffer, so to combat this, the shape of the wafel is crucial. The fact it is round enables

us to place the stroopwafel atop a hot cup of tea or coffee and then wait for the heat from it to soften the syrup. By this point, I suppose you could always just dunk the entire thing in your warm beverage (minding your fingers and being careful not to burn yourself of course!) and enjoy it that way. I don’t think that was the idea when the stroopwafel was invented, but everyone has their own personal preference when it comes to how food is eaten. Doing my research on stroopwafels and from what I already know about them, I wondered which cookies from elsewhere in the world are kind of like them and I happened upon pizzelle. These Italian cookies get their name from the word pizze, which supposedly means ‘round and flat.’ They are said to be the oldest known ‘cookie’ and whether or not that’s accurate is up for debate, in my opinion. The butter and sugar-based batter is pressed between two hot irons to be ‘baked’ and from as early as the 8th century, pizzelle were being baked and the irons used to press them at the time commonly featured family crests. I guess rosette cookies are somewhat akin to a stroopwafel and therefore also pizzelle, but only in that they’re a thin cookie. So why am I mentioning them? Well, they hail from another part of the world and have since migrated across the globe to become a little more well-known than they were, at least from when they were first conceived. A rosette iron is dipped into thin batter and then deep fried in fat. It is then removed from the iron and left to drain on a paper towel and dusted with powdered sugar. These cookies, also called struva in Sweden, are often made into decorative shapes, much like the Scandinavian folk art they resemble from the culture in which they were invented. Cookies and all the forms, flavors and shapes they hold are truly amazing and unique to the places from which they come. After diving a little into the world of inter-

national cookies, and while we’re on the subject of cookie irons, I found there are actually countless kinds of cookies which can be made using a waffle iron. This surely cuts down on the amount of energy/gas needed to make your treats and, for myself at least, it’s newer and innovative and therefore a novelty! Waffle iron cookies seem to take a fraction of the time the oven-baked varieties take. Fantastic! Oh, the many, many kinds of cookie waiting to be made and enjoyed are endless. There are chocolate waffle cookies, chocolate chip waffle cookies, vanilla cookies, thin and crispy ones, thick and dense kinds and yes, all of them are made in a waffle iron – the type that makes, well, waffles. Dear Readers, with Holland Happening this weekend, I hope you get out and about and enjoy the food, the fun, the people and the ambiance created by this mixture of humans, things and eats! I’m including a recipe for waffle iron cookies with frosting I found on www.geniuskitchen.com, which I myself will be trying out this weekend! Let me know how they come out if you do make them and if you made any changes to the recipe, I’m interested to know about it. Please send any and all comments, questions and certainly recipes you’d like to share to letsdish.whidbeyweekly@gmail.com and we can do exactly that and Dish! Chocolate Waffle Iron Cookies 2 oz. unsweetened chocolate 2 eggs ½ cup butter ¾ cup brown sugar 1 cup all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon vanilla Frosting ¼ cup softened butter 1 ½ tablespoons cocoa 1 ½ cups powdered sugar, sifted 3 tablespoons milk ½ teaspoon vanilla Melt the chocolate and butter together in a double boiler, stirring until smooth. In a medium bowl, combine eggs, sugar and vanilla. Beat until well mixed. Add in the melted chocolate and flour and mix. Heat a waffle iron and drop batter by two teaspoons at a time onto the iron. Cook for 1 and a half minutes or until done. Cool on wire racks. For the frosting, cream the butter and add the cocoa. Mix well and then add in the powdered sugar, milk and vanilla and beat until smooth. Top the cookies with the frosting, serve with a glass of milk and enjoy! www.stroopwafelinblik.nl/en/cms/ dutch-stroopwafels/stroopwafeltin-stroopwafels-stroopwafelblik/ To read past columns of Let’s Dish in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

Dining Guide Enjoy Some Award Winning BBQ after the Holland Happening Festivities

JOIN THE FUN!

601 NE Midway Blvd • Oak Harbor

We will be Televising the NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs Televising All Mariners Games Brewers Night Hosted By Pelican Brewing Friday, April 26, 6pm Featuring Local Craft Beer, Wine & Ciders Live Music Saturday 103 S. Main • Coupeville • 360.682.5747 www.penncovebrewing.com w/ Walking Maya Duo

360-679-3500 • www.thebbqjoint.net

HAPPY HOUR MONDAY-FRIDAY 3-6PM

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED BITS ‘n’ PIECES

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$56,000 in Grant Funds Awarded to Reserve’s Historic Buildings The Trust Board of Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve and the Friends of Ebey’s are pleased to announce nine historic buildings will receive Ebey’s Forever Preservation Grants in 2019. Now in its 9th year, this community-driven grant program supports the preservation, rehabilitation and continued use of historic buildings within Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve by providing annual matching grants to stabilize and sustain iconic heritage buildings listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The grant program is funded entirely through private donations to Friends of Ebey’s, a local nonprofit organization that supports the Reserve. Friends of Ebey’s committed another $50,000 of funding in March. “Last month we had a fundraising event with Coupeville’s Bayleaf that raised nearly $30,000 towards the Grant Program,” said Alix Roos, executive director of the Friends. “People understand the value the landscape adds to our lives. The buildings are storytellers. Along with helping our neighbors and farmers, it has also circulated more than a million dollars into the local economy. The investment is apparent everywhere you turn.” Since its inception, the grant program has funded more than 70 preservation projects, ranging from painstaking roof replacements on Victorian homes to foundation repair for some of the Reserve’s important working barns. Kristen Griffin, Trust Board Reserve manager said, “Each year we are amazed at the dedication of the owners who apply, and grateful to the community that keeps this wonderful program going. Hopefully, ‘Ebey’s Forever’ means just that.” Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve was established in 1978 to protect a rural community and its significant history. Preservation is accomplished through partnerships, conservation easements, local land use regulation, and the cooperation of land owners. [Submitted by Carol L. Castellano, Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve]

Seeking Applicants for Ebey’s Landing Historic Preservation Commission The Island County Board of Commissioners is seeking applicants to serve on the Ebey’s Landing Historic Preservation Commission (HPC). Applicants should have a demonstrated interest, experience or knowledge in history, historic preservation, architecture, design, landscape architecture, cultural landscapes and/or related disciplines. The Board of County Commissioners appoints Historic Preservation Commission (HPC) members for threeyear terms, which may be renewed by mutual agreement. Commission members work with the Town of Coupeville, Island County and Ebey’s Reserve Trust Board staff to process applications for Certificates of Appropriateness for properties located within Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve. Ebey’s Landing Historic Preservation Commission (HPC) consists of nine members, four (4) members appointed by the Council of the Town of Coupeville; four (4) members appointed by Island County; and one (1) member appointed jointly by Island County and the Town of Coupeville. Interested individuals should provide a letter of interest and statement of qualifications by mail, email or fax to: Island County Board of Commissioners, Attn: Pam Dill, Re: Historic Preservation Commission Vacancy, Post Office Box 5000, Coupeville, WA 98239. The fax number is 360-679-7381 and email should be sent to pamd@co.island.wa.us Application materials should be received no later than 4:30pm May 6, 2019. For additional information please phone 360-679-7353 or e-mail Pam Dill at the above address. [Submitted by Pam Dill]

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www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

Life Tributes HENRY “HANK� KOETJE Henry “Hank� Koetje, age 95, lifelong Oak Harbor resident, World War II combat survivor and businessman, passed away Sunday, April 14, 2019 at Summer Hill Assisted Living, surrounded by his family. Mr. Koetje was born in Oak Harbor Sept. 29, 1923, to Ben and Hattie (Meeter) Koetje. He attended Oak Harbor schools, graduating from Oak Harbor High School in 1941. Hank attended the University of Wyoming and the University of Washington. Hank was drafted into the U.S. Army and served during World War II. Christmas Eve, 1944, Hank was on the troop ship SS Leopoldville. They were crossing the English Channel en route to Cherbourg, France, when the ship was struck by a German torpedo. Over 800 perished in the disaster. Hank, one of the survivors, became a recipient of the Bronze Star Medallion.

APRIL 25 - MAY 1, 2019

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LOCALLY OPERATED

SOUTH WHIDBEY EAGLES 21ST ANNUAL PLANT & GARDEN SALE

SATURDAY, MAY 4TH, 9AM-4PM • SUNDAY, MAY 5TH, 9AM-2PM

LOCALLY GROWN • BARGAIN PRICING

HANGING BASKETS • FUCHSIAS • GRASSES • BEDDING PLANTS GROUND COVERS • LANDSCAPING TREES • RHODIES • AZALEAS HERBS • VEGETABLES • FRUIT TREES TOMATOES – BEST NORTHWEST VARIETIES

• RAFFLES • PRIZES • FUN •

360-321-5636 • EAGLES AERIE • LOCATED ONE MILE SOUTH OF FREELAND ON HWY 525 THIS EVENT HELPS SUPPORT OUR ISLAND CHARITIES.

When he returned from the war, Hank founded Koetje Real Estate and Insurance Agency. In 1957, he and his partners started Island Savings and Loan, which later became Interwest Savings Bank. He was also instrumental in the founding of Island Title. He was a member of the Whidbey Presbyterian Church, where he sang in the choir and held the office of an elder. Hank was a great sports fan. His favorite sport to play was tennis. He thoroughly enjoyed watching the Mariners, his beloved Huskies, and the Seahawks. He was a member of the American Legion, Navy League, VFW and Rotary. Hank was an accomplished world traveler. Hank was married to Evelyn Dykstra, and the couple had three children: Gary (who passed away at the age of 10 from leukemia), Gail and Mike. He later married Marilyn (Korthuis) Kincaid in 1987. Hank is survived by his wife, Marilyn, of Oak Harbor; his daughter, Gail Neil (Bruce) of Seattle; son, Mike Koetje (Mary) of Snohomish; step-daughter, Debra Friedly (Howard) of Olympia,; two stepsons, Douglas Smith (Robin) of Lynden and Dwayne Korthuis-Smith (Wendy) of Mercer Island; his grandchildren, Chad Niel, Shaura Larson, Josh, Derek and Nicole Koetje, Adam Smith, Katie Tadema, Courtney Smith, Lauren Spicer, Grace and Claire Korthuis-Smith and numerous great-grandchildren; his brother, Al Koetje (Sherita) of Oak Harbor; his sister, Burleigh Smith (Garry) of Marrowstone Island; his half-brother, James Koetje (Balisa) of Mount Vernon; his half-sister, Kathy Bos (Stan) of Sunnyside; also numerous nieces, nephews and other relatives. He was preceded in death by his son, Gary; his sister, Louise Jensen; and brother, Les Koetje. A Memorial Service will be held Sunday, April 28, 2 p.m. at Whidbey Presbyterian Church, Pastor Jon Draskovich officiating. Military Honors will be presented by the U.S. Army Honor Guard, Fort Lewis. Private interment will take place at Maple Leaf Cemetery. Memorials can be made to Whidbey Presbyterian Church. Family and friends are encouraged to share memories and condolences at www.whidbeymemorial.com.

Caroline C. Mattson Caroline C. Mattson went home to the Lord on Dec.18, 2018. She was born in Salem, Ore., June 19, 1928, where she grew up. She married Edmond Mattson in 1950. They remained in Oregon until moving to Manteca, Calif., in 1964. In 1998, she moved to Cloud Croft, New Mexico, then to Oak Harbor in 1999. While living in Manteca, she was employed as play yard supervisor and at various libraries within the Manteca Unified School District. She also worked at the Manteca Public Library. She was employed by Rough and Ready Island and at the Tracy Defense Depot truck control for several years, then at a daycare in Manteca. She volunteered as an adult literacy tutor for several years, teaching functionally illiterate adults how to read, as well as other volunteer opportunities which fit her interests and skills. Since childhood she loved reading. Over the years she acquired a large collection of books. She also loved to write short stories and for several years she was a member of a writing group in Manteca. She left behind a large number of completed, but unpublished, short stories, some of which were in a series. She liked to write sweet stories as well as stories with a western theme. She learned to sew as a child and took over the sewing for the family until she left home. As a wife and mother, she made her own blouses and dresses. She made all the shirts and pajamas for her husband and sons. She made quilts, curtains and pillow cases as well. In Oak Harbor, she used her sewing skills to make costumes for church performances, for a mission project, and did small sewing jobs for people. In Oak Harbor, she attended Oak Harbor Southern Baptist church, volunteering in the church library and was a child care worker. She really enjoyed participating in her Sunday school class and made friends there. She also enjoyed watching many movies and listening to a variety of music genres. She enjoyed movies and stories where the bad guy gets it in the end. She had a wonderful sense of humor. She always had a story of some type to share as well as a smile and a kind word. She is survived by her three sons, Paul, Philip, and Bruce; her eight grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Family and friends are encouraged to share memories and condolences at www.whidbeymemorial.com .

Vicky Schon Vicky Schon passed away March 20, 2019 after a short battle with cancer. She was born in California and she loved the desert but learned to like the Northwest. No one was a stranger to her and she was loved by all who knew her. She is best known for her compassion and her sense of humor. Her passing will leave a big hole in her community. She is survived by her husband, Rick Schon; her daughter, Verna Haynes, and husband, Ed; Pam Tellefsen, and husband, Ray; her sister, Peggy Wandell, and husband, Jim; her sister, Lynn Ward, and husband, Vic; nephews, Shawn, Gavin, and Gerald; nieces, Dawn and Nico; many cousins and many “adoptedâ€? family. In lieu of gifts or flowers, donate to your favorite charity. A memorial service was held Saturday, April 20 at the American Legion Post #129. Family and friends are encouraged to share memories and condolences at www.whidbeymemorial.com.

Life Tributes can now be found online at www.whidbeyweekly.com

21+ RECREATIONAL & MEDICAL MARIJUANA

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MMCWS MEDICAL • Naturopathic Physician Dr. Lori Olaf, ND Specializing in Chronic Pain / Opioid Reduction / Multiple Sclerosis Epilespy / Seizure Disorder / Stroke / Fibromyalgia Migraines / Neuropathy / Arthritis / PTSD Muscle Spasms / Cancer / Glaucoma / HIV/AIDS Parkinson’s Disease / Crohn’s Disease / Hepatitis C Medical Marijuana Authorization & Primary Care BY APPOINTMENT ONLY • For Ages 21+

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7656 State Route 20, Unit B • Anacortes • 360-422-3623

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REAL ESTATE/RENTALS

7.49 acres for sale. Lovely western view of Puget Sound. Water supplied by a four party well. Power, phone and cable are available. Located just north of Ledgewood, 1899 Pinecrest Avenue, Coupeville. This parcel would be an ideal mini-farm. Owner willing to carry a contract. Price $179,000. Call 360-320-0525 for more information (2)

ANNOUNCEMENTS Pregnant? Need baby clothes? We have them and the price is right–FREE. Pregnancy Care Clinic, open most Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10am to 4pm. Call 360-221-2909 or stop by 6th and Cascade in Langley. Be the difference in a child’s life and become a foster parent today! Service Alternatives is looking for caring, loving, and supportive families to support foster children. 425923-0451 or mostermick@ servalt-cfs.com The Whidbey Island community is encouraged to try out the paddling sport of dragon boating with the Stayin’ Alive team. Our team’s mission is to promote the physical, social, and emotional benefits of dragon boating. It has been shown to be especially beneficial to cancer survivors. Practice with us for up to 3 times for free. Life-jackets and paddles provided. Saturdays at the Oak Harbor Marina, 8:45am. Contact njlish@ gmail.com. More info at our Facebook Page: www.facebook.com/NorthPugetSoundDragonBoatClub?ref=hl

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Imagine Oak Harbor’s first Food Forest, Saturdays 11am3pm, at 526 Bayshore Drive. Each week, we have volunteer opportunities available to help care for our community garden, share organic gardening tips, and learn Permaculture principles. All ages and skill levels welcome. Schedule can change due to adverse weather conditions. If you have any questions, please contact us at: imagineapermacultureworld.gmail.com Mother Mentors needs volunteers! Oak Harbor families with young children need your help! Volunteer just a couple of hours a week to make a difference in someone’s life! To volunteer or get more info, email wamothermentors@

gmail.com or call 360-3211484. Looking for board members to join the dynamic board of Island Senior Resources and serve the needs of Island County Seniors. Of particular interest are representatives from North Whidbey. For more information please contact: reception@islandseniorservices.org

JOB MARKET Regency on Whidbey is hiring a Maintenance Director. Please visit www.regency-pacific.com and click on careers to apply. Incomplete applications will not be accepted. (3) Ace Freeland is hiring the following positions: Seasonal Cashiers - As a valued cashier, you will be expected to provide outstanding customer service at all times, process sales quickly, accurately, and efficiently, and become knowledgeable with all aspects of cash register operations. Must be able to stand all day, work nights and weekends, have a professional appearance and lift 25 lbs. Previous retail/cashiering experience a plus. Full-time/Permanent Garden Center Position - We are seeking a professional, experienced person to join our outside Nursery Team. You must be able to provide amazing customer service, interact with a variety of personalities, and comfortably lift 40-50 lbs. Looking for applicants with relevant experience, self motivation, and commitment. Northwest plant, trees and shrub knowledge a plus. Primary responsibilities will be to process incoming plant and hard goods order, assist customers with selections and be involved in BBQ equipment sales. Must be willing to work outdoors in any type of weather. Full time Paint Dept. Sales Associate - Retail minded person wanted for the Freeland Ace paint department. If you have paint and stain product knowledge, love hardware, and crave the retail career experience then we’d love to hear from you. Working Saturdays and Sundays are required. Must be able to lift 40-50 lbs. How’d youdifficulty do? rating 0.54) Puzzle 1 (Medium, 8

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Qualified candidates please stop by with your resume (with references) and a cover letter, and fill out our application at: Freeland Ace Hardware, 1609 E. Main St, Freeland, WA 98249. Working Saturdays and Sundays are required. 36+ hours per week qualifies for full time benefits: Medical/401k/Discounts/Bonuses/Vacation, after passing a 90-day probationary period. Please think of this as a longterm opportunity for yourself. Employment here is very stable and very satisfying (3) Oak Harbor Main Street Association, a nonprofit downtown revitalization organization, is seeking a full time Executive Director. Deadline for resume submission is May 20, 2019. For information go to www. oakharbormainstreet.com or email devans@oakharbormainstreet.com (3) Need yard help mowing lawn. Self-propelled, walk behind mower. We are in Coupeville on the bus line. Hank, 360678-7591 (2) Holmes Harbor Rod and Gun Club in Langley, WA is hiring! Our private club is an excellent place to work. Our patrons often think of our restaurant, kitchen and bar staff as family. We are looking for a restaurant manager and a line cook. Some positions include benefits. If interested, or if you have a referral, please contact Holmes Harbor Rod and Gun Club: Hiring Manager, Holmes Harbor Rod and Gun Club, PO Box 151, Langley, WA 98260. Email: Target@hhrodandgun. com or call 760-428-8660 (2) Drivers wanted for Whidbey SeaTac Shuttle. CDL/P2 Preferred, Training available for those without. Full Time, Part Time and weekend openings available. Send resume to admin.seatacshuttle@gmail. com (1) Whidbey SeaTac Shuttle is looking for an Office Administrator to oversee a busy front office for its Oak Harbor, No Cheating!

Wash. operations who will report directly to the General Manager. This position requires the candidate to be fully computer proficient in Microsoft Office products and quick to learn other computer programs. Excellent verbal and written communications skills are essential and you should be highly detailed oriented for this position. Proof reading and double checking will be a critical duty. Job duties will include: Supervisory skills (Supervise office staff, coordinate office procedures, manage employee work schedules, organize company appointments and special events, provide excellent customer service and respond to inquiries); General office skills (answer and route calls on a multi-line phone system, prepare correspondence and documents as directed, provide clerical/secretarial support to company owners and managers , maintain personnel records to meet federal and state inspection standards, maintain and update the training library, assist with maintaining and operations of office equipment, organize and maintain office files, assist in ordering/stocking company supplies, perform additional duties as assigned. Qualifications: Exceptional customer service skills, revious office management experience, proficiency in Microsoft Office Suites, self-motivated, great organizational skills, strong social media skills, keen attention to detail, excellent verbal and written communication skills, ability to maintain strict confidentiality, skilled in operating a variety of general office equipment and computers. Details at www. seatacshuttle.com or call 360679-4003 (1)

CLOTHING/ACCESSORIES Men’s shoes: “Reaction,” by Kenneth Cole. Men’s black leather dress shoes, like new, size 8.5. REDUCED $20 or best

offer. We can send photos. 360-678-1167

HOME FURNISHINGS Walnut occasional table, with beveled glass top, $30 or best offer. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525.

LAWN AND GARDEN Straw Hay: Good for bedding, erosion control, mulch, etc. $3 per bale, 20 bale minimum. 360-321-1624 Natural Barnyard Topsoil: Good for flower beds, gardens, etc. Unscreened, 10 yard load, $225 delivered. South Whidbey, 360-321-1624

MISCELLANEOUS Wind chimes, 21”, $10. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525

RECREATION Get ready for baseball 2019! New Balance baseball cleats, size 10.5, well-used for one season, good condition. REDUCED $15 or best offer; Catcher’s glove by Akadema, 33-inch, used for two seasons, fair condition. REDUCED $30 or best offer; Louisville Slugger 916 bat, 32-inch, 29 oz., 2-5/8” barrel, BBCOR certified. REDUCED $45 or best offer; Marucci Cat 8 bat,

33-inch, 30 oz., 2-5/8” barrel, BBCOR certified. REDUCED $150 or best offer. We can send photos of these items. 360-678-1167 Camping items: Brookstone waterproof floating lantern, for camping, patio, poolside, or emergencies, new, $5 or best offer; Old (but clean) Thermos 1-gallon jug, $5; Versatile backpack, the two parts can be used separately, or (for more serious backpacking) together, $15 obo. We have photos. Call or text 360-3200525. Sports items: Bag Boy golf cart, $10 obo; Men’s wet suits, size L, $10 per item; Neoprene gloves and hats, size L, $5 each. We have photos. Call or text 360-320-0525.

ANIMALS/SUPPLIES Round bales of grass feeder hay, barn stored. 360-3211624

WANTED Art, Antiques & Collectibles. Cash paid for quality items. Call or text 360-661-7298 Was your Dad or Gramps in Japan or Germany? I collect old 35 mm cameras and lenses. Oak Harbor, call 970823-0002

CLASSIFIED INFORMATION US Postal Mail

Whidbey Weekly Classified Department PO Box 1098 Oak Harbor, WA 98277

E-Mail............classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com Telephone..................................(360)682-2341 Fax.............................................(360)682-2344 PLEASE CALL WHEN YOUR ITEMS HAVE SOLD.

Please try to limit your classified to 30 words or less, (amounts and phone numbers are counted as words) we will help edit if necessary. We charge $10/week for Vehicles, Boats, Motorcycles, RVs, Real Estate Rental/Sales, Business Classifieds and any items selling $1,000 and above. We do charge $25 to include a photo. The FREE classified space is not for business use. No classified is accepted without phone number. We reserve the right to not publish classifieds that are in bad taste or of questionable content. All free classifieds will be published twice consecutively. If you would like your ad to be published more often, you must resubmit it. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date.

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


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Trying to capture the essence of nature? Want to embody the spirit of the Pacific Northwest? There’s no better way to do this than in the way you style yourself. There’s little else more uniquely you than the clothes you choose to wear. How you represent yourself speaks to your own spirit and if you want a little of the Whidbey Island magic to speak through you, then you’ll definitely want to wear some Island Herb Merchandise Apparel.

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With their T-shirts made from 100% fine-combed, ring-spun cotton, these super soft unisex tees bring a little of their own character to add to yours. Silk-screened by hand using eco-friendly, green, water-based inks to imprint their one-of-a-kind designs onto the tees, takes your style to new and authentic heights. And that’s not all – Island Herb Merchandise has the all-important pull-over hoodie made from 60-percent combed and ring-spun cotton, 40-percent poly-fleece with water-based silkscreen designs in a versatile heather gray. The laid-back look and smooth-to-the-touch feel will have you spending as much time as you can in this!

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Island Herb Merchandise’s iconic ‘Smoke Swirl’ design makes itself known, announces itself and says, ‘local.’ Locally hand-screened with water-based ink, the distinctive pattern is not only eye-catching, it’s a statement piece. Take their olive-green market tote – a 55/45-percent hemp/cotton blend – on any trip you like. Durable, fashionable and functional, the hemp market tote is an organic, eco-friendly way to transport anything you care to. Comfortable to carry and affordable on top of that, this is one bag that’ll serve your needs in the very best ways, time and time again. As if their eco-friendly tees, totes and hoodies aren’t reason enough to stop in and scoop up some of their merch, then maybe their beanies and patches are. The Island Herb sew on patch features the distinctive ‘Smoke Swirl’ design and fits a variety of needs. Whether mending a hole, or simply adding a little flair to a hat, hoodie, bag, shirt or pants, this patch does it all. From a style statement to a personal mantra, the Island Herb patch can rep you in more ways than one. When style and character become one and the same, how you dress and accessorize will match who you are and what you’re about. Let Island Herb Merchandise help you dictate your own fashion trend and be authentically you where ever you are! Island Herb Merchandise can be purchased at the Freeland Liquor Store or Pickles Deli in Clinton. For more information, visit www.islandherbmerch.com

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