Whidbey Weekly April 18, 2019

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April 18 through April 24, 2019

Happy Easter! From you friends at Whidbey Weekly & Printing

More Local Events inside

Teaming for Climate Action Today! April 1 — April 31

Whidbey Earth & Ocean Month

Festivals ● Lectures & Gatherings ● Movies ● Work Parties ● & More!

Visit www.whidbeyearthday.org for events & info!


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Make a Difference By Greg Goforth

Critical Areas Planner, Island County Planning Department

KEEP IT GREEN: CONSERVING SHORELINE VEGETATION

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I find myself continually fascinated by the complex and beautiful shorelines of Whidbey Island – from the wind-whipped high coastal bluffs along Admiralty Inlet and the eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca, to the calmer shores of Saratoga Passage and Holmes Harbor, from sand spits to coastal lagoons – no two stretches of Whidbey Island’s shorelines are exactly alike. Island County’s 200+ miles of shoreline are home to abundant fish and wildlife. Bald Eagle, Great Blue Heron, river otters, waterfowl, forage fish, and salmon (to name a few) all rely upon Island County’s shorelines. In addition to providing habitat for fish and wildlife, Island County’s shorelines have been home to people since time immemorial. Today, Island County has the second-highest percentage of residential shoreline parcels in Puget Sound and many people continue to make the shorelines of Whidbey Island their home. Consequently, people play an important role in maintaining the integrity of Island County’s shorelines and one of the keys to maintaining healthy shoreline habitat is conserving shoreline vegetation. Benefits of Shoreline Vegetation Shoreline vegetation provides many benefits, including habitat for fish and wildlife, natural erosion control, and important hydrologic functions. Shoreline vegetation provides habitat for birds and insects, shading for vulnerable prey species and forage fish eggs, and a source of large woody debris (LWD) for habitat structure. Fish feed on insects from riparian areas, and organic debris from riparian vegetation provides a source of nutrients to the aquatic food web. Native trees and shrubs in the shoreline environment also stabilize banks and provide natural erosion control. Shoreline vegetation can reduce stormwater runoff and improve water quality by capturing pollutants before they reach surface waters. Additionally, shoreline vegetation can also reduce the severity of impacts associated with storm surge and coastal flooding events. How Island County Protects Shoreline Vegetation Since the adoption of the Shoreline Management Act (SMA) of 1972, the State of Washington regulates land use within 200 feet of the “Ordinary High Water Mark” (OHWM) of shorelines of the state to “prevent the inherent harm in an uncoordinated and piecemeal development of the state’s shorelines.” This 200-foot area landward of the OHWM is referred to as “Shoreline Jurisdiction.” The SMA is ultimately implemented by local jurisdictions, like Island County, through the administration of Shoreline Master Programs. Island County’s Shoreline Master Program (SMP) protects shoreline vegetation in a few key ways - the SMP applies regulatory buffers and development standards that limit the encroachment of development within Shoreline Jurisdiction. Applicable buffers and setbacks vary depending upon the character and “Shoreline Environment Designation” (SED) of each section of shoreline, with the intent of facilitating appropriate development while protecting shoreline habitat. Where new or expanded development is permitted to occur within shoreline buffers or setbacks, shoreline enhancement projects may be required to increase native vegetation

along the shoreline. In addition to the application of regulatory buffers and setbacks, Island County’s SMP contains specific standards for the maintenance and conservation of shoreline vegetation. These vegetation standards address activities such as selective pruning of trees for view maintenance, noxious weed removal, and planting, among other activities. What You Can Do to Help Conserve Shoreline Vegetation Shoreline landowners have an important role to play in conserving shoreline vegetation. The following are a few tips for conserving shoreline vegetation: • If you are a shoreline property owner, get to know your Shoreline Environment Designation (SED). Knowing your SED will help you comply with the applicable buffers, setbacks, and land use standards for your shoreline environment. Island County provides an online, interactive map where you can view these designations at https:// bit.ly/2v4DVGk. • Maintain and avoid removal of native vegetation along shorelines and coastal bluffs. • Plant appropriate native shoreline vegetation. Planting native vegetation is encouraged – it requires less water, less maintenance, and provides important habitat for wildlife. Observe which native plants grow naturally along your stretch of shoreline and consider planting the same species. To get you started, learn more about native plants from the Whidbey Island Conservation District’s Native Plant page at www.whidbeycd.org/nativeplants/. • Noxious weed removal is encouraged, but necessitates replanting with appropriate native shoreline species. Shoreline review for noxious weed removal and replanting projects requires a no-fee permit. Please contact the Island County Planning Department before starting your noxious weed removal project within Shoreline Jurisdiction or Critical Areas. For a list of Island County Planning Department contacts, visit www.islandcountywa.gov/ Planning/Pages/contactus.aspx. To learn more about noxious weeds, visit the Island County Noxious Weed Control Board at www.islandcountywa.gov/Health/DNR/ Noxious-Weed/Pages/Home.aspx • Before undertaking selective pruning or thinning of trees for safety or view maintenance, please contact the Island County Planning Department to ensure your proposed activity complies with the Shoreline Master Program (SMP) vegetation conservation standards. • If you are unsure about any proposed use along your shoreline, please contact the Island County Planning Department with your questions. To learn more about Island County’s Shoreline Master Program and resources available to shoreline property owners, please visit www.islandcountywa.gov/Planning/Pages/ Shorelines.aspx. For shoreline and general land use questions, please contact the Island County Planning and Community Development Department at 360-678-7339. Island County Planning staff are happy to help you achieve responsible management of vegetation on your shoreline property.

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ON TRACK with Jim Freeman

Last Sunday, shortly after watching Tiger Woods win the Masters, CBS announcer Jim Nantz hit his own hole in one – “That hug with his children, if that doesn’t bring a tear to your eye if you’re a parent, you’re not human.”

Strunk report Last week’s On Track included a mention of The Elements of Style by White and Strunk. Not only did Greenbank Wayne have to purchase a copy of this classic in pursuit of his Ph.D, Clinton’s Annapoorne Colangelo was a student of William Strunk Jr.’s mother, Ella. One learns a lot using sarcasm. Thanks Annapoorne, and congratulations on your retirement after 45 years of healing others. You are a master. Pulitzer prize Not to be confused with Waylon Jenning’s classic country version of Bobby Emmons’ and Chips Moman’s “The Wurlitzer Prize,” www. youtube.com/watch?v=qHgzxxwAZHw, the Pulitzer Prize is announced annually for achievements in journalism and the arts. Last week’s PBS American Masters airing of the life of Joseph Pulitzer, the namesake of the award, was an eye opener for me. Given journalism is the only private enterprise protected by the Bill of Rights, why did we not spend any time in my public education studying Pulitzer’s influence in our nation, and in the world? If you are an Amazon Prime person, the American Masters series can be viewed for free. I learned more about newspapers in this 90-minute program than I could absorb. The DVD may be worth buying. Check it out at https://shop.pbs.org/american-masters-joseph-pulitzer-dvd/product/AM61706. Here is a Pulitzer quote to stir your medulla oblongata. “What I say is that there are not half a dozen papers in the United States which tamper with the news, which publish what they know to be false. But if I thought I had done no better than that, I would be ashamed to own a paper. You have to make everyone connected with the paper believe that accuracy is to a newspaper what virtue is to a woman.” Read more at: www.brainyquote.com/authors/ joseph_pulitzer No wonder we proofread well at Whidbey Weekly. Check out our talented staff: www. whidbeyweekly.com/about-us/ Our cousin, Adlai Stevenson, added another opinion about Pulitzer’s quote comparing accuracy in print and the virtue of a woman. “Accuracy is to a newspaper what virtue is to a lady, but a newspaper can always print a retraction.” By the way, the Pulitzer Prize winners for 2019 are being announced even as I write this paragraph on Jackie Robinson Day, but no time to share since we are going to press. If you are curious, www.pulitzer.org/prize-winners-by-year/2019. Carnac Q and A Among the many joys in life, the television re-runs of Johnny Carson’s Tonight Show are some of mine. The other night, during a what-is-on-tv-moment, I hit the remote to find Ed McMahon about to introduce my fave Johnny character next to Art Fern, Carnac the Magnificent, in a 70’s episode. Could Carnac ask these questions with answers like these in today’s hyper-sensitive, hypo-allergenic, what kind of society are we in world? Probably not, but we here at the Whidbey Weekly know few people can even see a font this small, so let’s run with it. Remember Ed’s classic intro? “Heaven has no brighter star than our next stellar guest, that omnipotent master of the east and former manicurist to Howard Hughes, Carnac the Magnificent. Welcome once

Whidbey Weekly again, O Great Sage. I hold in my hand these envelopes. As a child of four can plainly see, these envelopes have been hermetically sealed. They’ve been kept in a #2 mayonnaise jar since noon today on Funk and Wagnell’s porch. No one knows the contents of these envelopes, but you, in your divine and mystical way, will ascertain the answers to these questions having never seen them before.” Then Carnac would place the envelope with the question to the side of his head, reveal the answer, and then rip the envelope and blow into the side to release the question. Answer: Tom Snyder’s hair and a resident of Harrisburg, Pa. Question: Name two things that glow in the dark. Answer: Clean air, a virgin, and a gas station open on Sunday. Question: Name three things that you won’t find in L.A. Answer: Black and white and 20 feet tall. Question: Describe Sister Mary Kong. Answer: Sir Laurence Olivier, The Oscars, and the US oil shortage. Question: Name a Lord, an award, and a fraud. Answer: Henry R. Block Question: Name the one person who is rich after April 15th. Ed would then always say something silly so Carnac could close with a classic put-down. Here are two of my faves:

APRIL 18 - APRIL 24, 2019 LOCALLY OPERATED

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Saturday, April 27, 10:00am-2:00pm Bayview Community Hall • 5242 Bayview Rd • Langley Variety of Great Plants • Freshly Baked Goods 17 Raffle Packages • Gardening Items Master Gardeners Clinic • 9 Specialty Growers & Local Artists Proceeds go back to the community! For more information, contact Tonya 360-321-0880 or go to southwhidbeygardenclub.com

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Sno-Isle librarian Sir Ray D. has his fave Carnac Q and A, surely one of the best. Answer: Sissss, Boooom, Baaaaah! Question: Describe the sound you hear when a sheep blows up!! To enjoy more, check out this web site: www. nightscribe.com/Politics/carnacquotes.htm Here ye, Hear ye If you like public forums, the Island County Planning Commission has one last shot at hearing our concerns about Freeland and the development thereof.

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Editor............................................................................... Kathy Reed Graphic Design............................................................. Teresa Besaw

Production Manager......................................................TJ Pierzchala Circulation Manager.................................................... Noah Marshall

Contributing Writers Jim Freeman Wesley Hallock Kae Harris Tracy Loescher Kathy Reed Carey Ross Kacie Jo Voeller

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PUBLISHED and distributed every week. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The Whidbey Weekly cannot be held responsible for the quality of goods or services supplied by advertisers in this publication. Articles, unless otherwise stated, are by contribution and therefore the Whidbey Weekly is not in a position to validate any comments, recommendations or suggestions made in these articles. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. DEADLINES: The Whidbey Weekly is a submission based editorial with contributing writers. Please feel free to submit any information (please limit to 200 words) that you would like to share with the Whidbey Weekly. You may submit by email to editor@whidbeyweekly.com, by fax to (360)682-2344 or by postal mail to PO Box 1098, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date. For more information, please visit www.whidbeyweekly.com.

Freeland has been trying to develop ever since the nudists ran off the utopians in the 1880s. Today in Holmes Harbor, we have shippers instead of strippers. I am all for development. It certainly changed my life. Maybe we can change Freeland’s life Monday, April 22, at 6pm, or 1800 hours my time, at Freeland Hall, when members of the community will have one final voice in considering updates to the zoning code. Take your ID or an old envelope in case zipcodes are checked at the door. If you want to do your homework first, we encourage all advised opinions as we share the draft regulations at www.islandcountywa.gov/ Planning. I wonder why they capitalized the P? Text test Thanks to Beckie Duthie for this chortle: Husband’s text message: “Honey, a car hit me when I was out of the office. Paula brought me to the hospital. They’re doing tests and X-rays. I had a blow to my head, very hard, fortunately it did not cause serious injury, but I have three broken ribs, a compound fracture in my left leg, and they may have to amputate my right foot.” Wife’s response: “Who’s Paula?” Cookie crumbles Years ago I saw a letter to the editor in Country magazine. I clipped it to share with a friend. Will you be my friend? Jeff Miller of Tacoma is the author. “For years I worked at Wal-Mart. I heard a grandfather tell his 8-year-old grandson he could pick out one item as a treat. The boy chose a box of animal crackers, opened it and spread the cookies on the conveyor belt in the checkout line. When scolded, the child protested, ‘Grandpa, I’m looking for the seal. It says if the seal is broken, don’t eat ‘em!’” To read past columns of On Track in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www. whidbeyweekly.com.

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Bits & Pieces remarks about the state’s largest employer, Boeing:

Letters to the Editor Editor, When I choose to spend time and money to see a current movie in a theater I always do my homework first – that includes trailers, a variety of reviews, and sometimes “spoilers!” Unplanned is one of several movies I have recently considered seeing. Upon checking your review, I was really disappointed to see you had no valid opinion. I gather you didn’t see the movie and won’t be seeing it. So, you are letting your personal politics get in the way of your job?! I am an independent thinker and voter, I’m also an equal opportunity “criticizer!” I am not intimidated by a movie I might not agree with in principal – and not afraid I might learn something that may change my opinion. It’s time to grow up, Carey! That’s your job! Lynn Flaaten Greenbank, Wash.

Editor, I was shocked when last week’s reviewer of the movie, Unplanned, admitted she did not even watch the movie and yet gave it a no stars rating. The movie, Unplanned, tells the true life story of Abby Johnson, who dealt with two of her own abortions before working for Planned Parenthood. She worked eight years for Planned Parenthood and became a director of a clinic. One day she was asked to assist in a guided abortion where she sees, for the first time, a thirteen week baby fighting for life. That event causes Abby to go to the “other side of the fence.” She now advocates for life by shedding light on what happens inside the doors of Planned Parenthood. The abortion industry in this country thrives on division and secrecy. We cannot heal unless we allow ourselves to see what needs to be changed. I encourage last week’s reviewer to open her mind to another viewpoint. See the movie! Ellen Mottet Coupeville, Wash.

Editor, I am writing this letter regarding your movie review person, Carey Ross. I was reading the reviews this week as usual and was shocked and offended with her review of Unplanned. I saw this movie and it was well done and a true story. It’s clear how she feels about this issue, but a movie critic should be fair in their review. She didn’t even see the movie! If you can’t bring yourself to say something good, at least be neutral and fair. Let the viewers see it and decide what they think. I really don’t think Carey sees half the movies she reviews. I think it’s way past time to get another person to do this! I’ve thought about bringing this up even in the past, but this I just couldn’t let go by. She puts way too much of her personal bias and beliefs into her reviews. Thank you, Gloria Boncacci Coupeville, Wash.

Reps. Smith, MacEwen Express Disappointment with Governor’s Continued Disparagement of Boeing During a one-hour town hall on CNN Wednesday night, Gov. Jay Inslee made the following

“Boeing should not have been able to threaten the state of Washington to move 20,000 jobs out of our community. We’re the best place to make airplanes and have been for many decades. But they threatened my state and 20,000 jobs unless they got certain tax benefits. I liken that as kind of extortion in a sense.” Gov. Inslee made similar remarks on The Daily Show March 18, stating: “If you’ve ever been mugged, you understand what it feels like … These corporations put a gun to your ribs and say you’re going to lose 20,000 jobs unless you get [them] a tax break … no local community should be blackmailed by any corporation in America.” Following his appearance on The Daily Show, Republican Reps. Norma Smith, R-Clinton, and Drew MacEwen, R-Union, wrote a letter to the governor asking him to explain his comments. They received no response. The lawmakers issued the following statement Thursday: “Throughout his tenure as governor, Mr. Inslee has failed the people of Washington state time and time again. And now, as he makes a bid for the presidency, he is failing them again by publicly disparaging the state’s largest employer with claims of ‘mugging,’ ‘blackmail,’ and ‘extortion.’ Late last month, we wrote a letter to the governor with four simple questions: 1. Did you feel you were being ‘blackmailed’ when you called for a special session, personally pushed for these tax incentives, and hosted a bill-signing ceremony taking credit for the legislation? If so, why did you not share your beliefs with state lawmakers, or the public, at the time? 2. If you did not harbor these feelings at the time, when exactly did you arrive at the conclusion you were being ‘blackmailed?’ 3. Why did you choose to reveal these feelings publicly on a national television show? 4. Finally, it is unclear to us and Washingtonians where exactly you stand on these tax incentives today. Could you clearly explain your position? Are you advocating for their repeal? Instead of addressing our concerns about his comments, the governor has doubled down by repeating them – this time to an even larger televised audience. We are extremely disappointed by his continued mischaracterization of a deal he lauded in 2013 when he said, ‘This is a great day for everyone in Washington.’ We again request he takes a few moments away from the bright lights and cameras to answer our reasonable and sincere questions.” To view the PDF of Smith’s and MacEwen’s letter to the governor, visit http://normasmith. houserepublicans.wa.gov/wp-content/uploads/ sites/39/2019/04/Reps.-Smith-MacEwen-letterto-Gov.-Inslee.pdf [Submitted by Nick Jacob, Public Information Officer, WA State House Republicans]

Mukilteo’s Waterfront Changes as New Ferry Terminal Comes Into View The Mukilteo waterfront is starting to look different. The first walls of the new Mukilteo multimodal ferry terminal are going up at the water’s edge. This milestone marks a major stride in Washington State Ferries’ project to replace the 62-year old seismically vulnerable ferry terminal with a new one located one-third of a mile east on the site of an abandoned U.S. Air Force fuel facility. Work on the new ferry terminal began in 2010 with the environmental review process. In 2016, the pier on the site, including the 7,000 tons of creosote-soaked pilings holding it up, was removed from Puget Sound. “This project has been a long time coming,”

said Director of Terminal Engineering Nicole McIntosh. “We’ve worked with the public, tribal partners and many stakeholders to get here. We hope the new terminal, with its views out to both water and land, will become a centerpiece of the community.”

Earth Day OffersValuable Lessons to Investors

The Mukilteo/Clinton route connects Whidbey Island to the Seattle-Everett metro areas and serves more than four million ferry riders each year.

On April 22, millions of people will observe Earth Day by participating in events that support environmental protection. As a citizen, you may want to take part in a local celebration. And as an investor, you can learn a few lessons from the themes of Earth Day.

What to expect in spring and summer

Here are a few of them:

Activity at the site will heat up as the weather does. For a few weeks in April, trucks will move along a route set up for them to haul in fill for the future holding lanes. To minimize disruption to residents, trucking hours are limited to Monday through Thursday 7:00am to 2:45pm and Friday 7:00am to 1:00pm. Flaggers will be in place during those hours to direct traffic.

Avoid a toxic investment environment. A recurring topic of Earth Day is the necessity of reducing toxins from our air, water and land. And, while you might not think of it in those terms, your portfolio can also contain some “toxic” elements in the form of investments that may be hindering your progress, or, at the very least, not contributing to it. For instance, you might own some investments that, for one reason or another, have consistently underperformed, or are now too aggressive for your risk tolerance, which can change over the years. In these cases, you might be better off selling the investments and using the proceeds for other, more appropriate ones.

The section of the popular pedestrian trail that passes through the work zone will be closed until early fall to work on the new First Street. Commuters and residents can look forward to the new street, a direct route from State Route 525 to the Sounder station and to Edgewater Beach. Waterfront changes continue this summer as the building’s structure is erected and topped off by the roof. “That’s another big milestone in the project,” McIntosh said. “The building outlines will be visible, giving residents and ferry riders a clearer picture of the future waterfront they’ve been waiting for.” A revamped waterfront and improved transit Slated to open in fall 2020, the ferry terminal, holding lanes and overhead bridge for walk-on passengers are designed to handle the projected growth in ridership and reduce traffic congestion and pedestrian/vehicle conflicts during ferry loading and unloading. The project is one part of a larger redevelopment plan for Mukilteo’s waterfront, which will include a replacement of the nearby NOAA research station, improved beach and trail access, the addition of mixed-use buildings, and more. WSF, a division of the Washington State Department of Transportation, is the largest ferry system in the U.S. and safely and efficiently carries 25 million people a year through some of the most majestic scenery in the world. For breaking news and the latest information, follow WSF on Twitter (www.twitter. com/wsferries). [Submitted by Justin Fujioka, WSDOT]

Baroque Winds The Salish Sea Early Music Festival presents “Baroque Winds,” with recorder player Vicki Boeckman, baroque oboist Sand Dalton, baroque flutist Jeffrey Cohan, cellist Caroline Nicolas and harpsichordist Jonathan Oddie in this performance of rarely-heard chamber music from the 18th century for flute, recorder and oboe with cello and harpsichord. Chamber music by German, French and Italian composers Antonio Vivaldi, Joseph Bodin de Boismorter, Fortunato Riedel, Johann Joachim Quantz and Georg Philipp Telemann for a variety of instrumental combinations will be performed by specialists on early wind instruments, which are significantly different from their modern counterparts. The performance will be held Sunday, April 28 at 7:00pm at St. Augustine’s in-the-Woods Church, 5217 South Honeymoon Bay Road in Freeland. Admission is by suggested donation, $15, $20 or $25 (a free will offering), 18 and under free. For more information, visit www. salishseafestival.org/whidbey or call the church at 360-331-4887.

Look for sources of renewable energy. Efforts to protect our environment include a push for more renewable energy sources, such as solar and wind. As an investor, you, too, can look for “renewables” in the form of investments that keep paying you back in one way or another. Of course, the most basic example would be a bond, which pays you regular interest until the bond matures and you get your principal back, provided the issuer doesn’t default, which is generally unlikely with an investment-grade bond. However, you also may want to consider another type of renewable – dividend-paying stocks. By reinvesting these dividends, you can increase the number of shares you own – and share ownership is a good way to help build your portfolio. Some companies have paid, and even increased, their dividends many years in a row, but keep in mind they’re not obligated to do so. Plant seeds of opportunity. Some Earth Day events involve planting trees – many of which won’t be fully grown for decades. When you invest, you are planting seeds in the form of investments you hope will grow over the years. Of course, you will likely see some volatility along the way, but over the long term, investments with strong fundamentals may reward you for your patience. Apart from these ideas, you also can connect the idea of helping protect the environment with investing for your goals. Through socially responsible investing, you can screen out investments in companies whose products you find objectionable, while supporting businesses whose work you believe helps contribute to a better world. And you can find investments, such as mutual funds that emphasize social responsibility, whose returns are competitive, so you don’t have to sacrifice growth potential for your principles. In the nearly 50 years since Earth Day celebrations began, we have taken steps to improve many aspects of our physical world, although the work continues. And by following some of the same techniques, you can improve your investment environment, too. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Jeffery C. Pleet, CLU®, ChFC®

Financial Advisor 630 SE Midway Blvd. Oak Harbor, WA 98277 (360) 679-2558 jeffery.pleet@edwardjones.com

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

[Submitted by Jeffrey Cohan] BITS & PIECES

continued on page

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What’s Going On All entries are listed chronologically, unless there are multiple entries for the same venue or are connected to a specific organization (such as Sno-Isle Libraries) in which case all entries for that venue or organization are listed collectively in chronological order under one heading.

Taming Bigfoot Challenge Thursday, April 18, 10:00am-12:00pm WiFire Coffee Bar, 1651 Main St., Freeland Join this three-month challenge to reduce your carbon footprint with your team. For more info and to get started, email gccwhidbey@gmail. com with “Bigfoot” in the subject line. Deadline is Monday, April 22 at 7:00pm.

Island Herb Vendor Day Thursday, April 18, 3:00-6:00pm Island Herb, Freeland Representatives from Verdelux will be on site with product displays and information. Must be 21 or older. Island Herb is located at 5565 Vanbarr Pl, Unit F. For more information, call 360-331-0140 or visit whidbeyislandherb. com. Marijuana has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Keep out of the reach of children.

Live Music: Original Jim Thursday, April 18, 6:00pm Flyers Restaurant & Brewery, Oak Harbor Forged from the vocal jazz and a cappella scenes, and honed on pop, rock, folk, country and blues, Jim sets up a solid foundation for his tunes with creative arrangements, tasty improvisation, a little keyboard, strong vocals, rhythmic guitars and a fresh approach to percussion. No cover. For more information, call 360-675-5858.

“She Loves Me” Thursdays, April 18 & 25, 7:30pm Fridays, April 19 & 26, 7:30pm Saturdays, April 20 & 27, 7:30pm Sundays, April 21 & 28, 2:30pm Whidbey Playhouse, Oak Harbor Set in Maraczek’s Parfumerie in 1930s Budapest, “She Loves Me” tells the story of co-workers George Nowack and Amalia Balash and their unknown exchange of love letters; the dashing Steven Kodaly and his love-sick sweetheart Ilona Ritter and the rest of the Maraczek’s staff. The ensuing romantic entanglements are pure musical-theater gold. www.whidbeyplayhouse.com

“Next to Normal” Friday, April 19, 7:30pm Saturday, April 20, 7:30pm Whidbey Island Center for the Arts, Langley This emotional powerhouse of a musical features a rock score that shatters through the facade of a suburban family impacted by mental illness. Winner of multiple Tony Awards and the Pulitzer Prize for Drama, this intense, emotional, yet ultimately hopeful musical makes a direct grab for the heart with a story that takes us inside the lives of a ‘typical American family’ that’s anything but typical. www.wicaonline.org

CWSA Charity Shoot Saturday, April 20, 9:00am-1:00pm 397 West Safari Street, Coupeville Charity fun shoot with 22s. This is a novelty event with fun targets like poker hands, darts and charcoal briquettes. The winners and runners-up will receive hams as prizes. Special category for Juniors under 15. All proceeds go to Gifts from the Heart Coupeville food bank. Pistols and rifles available if you don’t have one. For more information visit cwsaonline.org

Junior Ranger Day Saturday, April 20, 11:00am-2:00pm Fort Casey State Park, Coupeville Pick up your Ebey’s Landing Junior Ranger Activity Book then explore the fort. Learn about the history, agriculture, animals and partnerships of Ebey’s Reserve. Complete the

book and receive your Junior Ranger badge. Junior Ranger ctivities are geared to children 7-14, but it’s fun for the whole family, plus it’s a fee free day at state parks. Please dress for the weather. For more information, visit www. nps.gov/ebla or call 360-678-6084 or 360678-1186.

Clinton Community Hall, 6411 Central Ave.

Live Music: SeaStar

South Whidbey Community Church

Saturday, April 20, 7:00-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville SeaStar is a Seattle-based original Celtic and folk music group created in 2007 by singersongwriter Fae Wiedenhoeft. No cover. For more information, call 360-682-5747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

Legends of Rock Benefiting CADA Saturday, April 20, 7:00pm South Whidbey High School, Langley Tickets are $25, available at brownpapertickets. com, cadacanhelp.org, Winderemere in Oak Harbor, bayleaf in Coupeville, or Windermere in Freeland.

Live Music: Just In Time Jazz Duo

Learn basic salve, lotion and lip balm crafting techniques. Explore the properties of carrier oils and infusing healing herbs into oils. Take home product! Please register. 360-341-4280

Religious Services Sundays, 9:00-9:45am Adult Bible Study 10:00-11:00am Worship Deer Lagoon Grange, 5142 Bayview Rd, Langley April 21–Easter: The Importance of the Resurrection: Foundational doctrine of the Apostles from I Corinthians 15. Special presentation

Easter Sunday Service Sunday, April 21, 9:30am Langley United Methodist Church The children will release the Alleluias and then go to Easter activities. After worship we’ll all enjoy a wonderful brunch in the fellowship hall. Langley UMC is on the corner of Third and Anthes.

Sunday, April 21, 11:00am-1:00pm Rustica Café, Oak Harbor

Galleries & Art Shows

Nick’s amazing keyboard stylings and Judy’s mellow vocals give the great jazz standards new life.

Tuesday, April 23, 10:00am-5:00pm Penn Cove Gallery, Coupeville

Coupeville Garden Club Plant Sale Saturday, April 27, 9:00am-4:00pm Coupeville Rec Hall, 901 NW Alexander St, More than 2,000 plants (66 varieties of annuals and perennials) plus eight varieties of hybrid and heirloom tomatoes will be on sale at the 51st annual fundraiser of the Coupeville Garden Club. Garden art, raffle prizes and homemade treats will be available. All profits from this event are returned to the community through the Club’s beautification projects. Cash, checks, or credit cards accepted.

SW Garden Club Plant Sale Saturday, April 27, 10:00am-2:00pm Bayview Community Hall, Langley Great plants at great prices will be offered at this indoor location. Included will be garden art, garden items and books, freshly baked goods, and 17 donated raffle packages from Whidbey Island businesses. Local artists and specialized growers will also be participating. Proceeds from the plant sale help fund nonprofits in our community for horticulture related projects, student scholarships, educational programs and beautification improvements. For more information, contact Christine at 360-221-2203 or go to southwhidbeygardenclub.com.

Upcoming Sno-Isle Library Events See schedule below Cost: Free Whidbey Reads Presents: Meet Author Matthew Sullivan Thursday, April 18, 9:30-10:30am Oak Hall, Room 306, SVC, Oak Harbor Thursday, April 18, 6:00-7:30pm Oak Harbor Library Friday, April 19, 4:00pm Langley United Methodist Church, Third and Anthes Sullivan discusses his award-winning book “Midnight at the Bright Ideas Bookstore” and the evolution of the mystery genre. Book sales and signing following the program. Friends of Clinton Library Book Sale Saturday, April 20, 10:00-3:00pm Clinton Community Hall, 6411 Central Ave. Thousands of books for sale at bargain prices. Additional fiction and nonfiction every month. Proceeds support the Clinton Library. DIY Natural Series: Herbal Beauty Lip Balm, Salves and Lotion Saturday, April 20, 12:00-1:30pm

Featured Artist: Pat Collins

Artist Pat Collins will discuss the inspiration and wood working methods behind his wood sculptures. Pat has been sculpting wood for over 30 years. Working in the genre of stylized sculpture, Pat strives to showcase the beauty and natural figure of fine hardwoods, without being tied to the restrictions of realism.

Meetings & Organizations South Whidbey Republican Women Thursday, April 18 We are hosting two detectives from the Island County Sheriff’s Office who will talk about Internet Security - information we can use ourselves and share with our families. This is a luncheon meeting and light snacks will be served, no charge. For location and time, and to reserve your seat, please contact Mary Olson, RSVP2SWRW@mail.com.

South Whidbey Garden Club Friday, April 19, 9:00am-12:00pm St. Peter’s Church, Clinton SWGC Grant recipients will be present to receive their grant checks at 9:30am. The program at 10:45am is presented by Bill Bromley, a well known lecturer and expert on growing and propagating Peonies. Public is welcome.

PBY Naval Air Museum Wednesday, April 24, 11:30am CPO Club, 1080 Ault Field Road, Oak Harbor The featured speaker at the monthly no-host luncheon will be Bill Papa, author of the upcoming book entitled; “Pass the Suez; the Gulf War Cruise of the USS Saratoga.” The presentation will focus on the participation of the USS Saratoga (CV-60) in operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm. The public is invited to this event. Call 360-240-9500 for directions and more information.

Island County District 3 Town Hall Thursday, April 25, 5:30-6:30pm NWFR Station 22, Taylor Road, Oak Harbor Come listen to Commissioner St. Clair with updates on Island County-related issues. Special Guests: Island County Human Services and Island County Sheriff. Following the update there will be time for questions and discussion. For more information, call 360-679-7354 or e-mail district3@co.island.wa.us For a list of continuous Meetings and Organizations, visit www.whidbeyweekly.com

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED

Classes, Seminars and Workshops NRA Basics of Pistol Shooting Course Friday, April 19, 6:00-9:00pm Saturday, April 20, 9:00am-5:00pm NWSA Range, 886 Gun Club Road, Oak Harbor Cost: $35 This course introduces students to the knowledge, skills and attitude necessary for owning and using a pistol safely. The pistol handling and shooting portion is completed at the NWSA range, where students will learn about safe gun handling, pistol shooting fundamentals, and pistol shooting activities. The Basics of Pistol Course will also help prepare the student for participation in other NRA courses. Students can register online at nrainstructors.org. For questions or to register, call NRA instructor John Hellmann at 360-675-8397 or email NWSA.Training@gmail.com. Additional information can be found at www.northwhidbeysportsmen.org.

Back Pain & Sciatica Workshop Saturday, April 20, 11:00am Rue & Primavera, Oak Harbor This is a free informational workshop. Rue & Primavera is located at 785 Bayshore Dr, Ste 102. For more information or to register, call 360-279-8323.

Laughter Yoga Returns to Whidbey Saturday, April 20, 1:00-2:00pm Freeland Library Meeting Room A unique, playful experience combining easy and fun guided laughter exercises with yoga breathing. Not traditional yoga with mats or poses. All can participate moving, sitting, standing, or lying down and still achieve the scientifically proven health and happiness benefits of a guided laughter practice. Led by experienced Certified Laughter Yoga Leader/ Teacher. Library Laughter Yoga sessions are free. For more information, contact 949-4647843.

Your Good Health Talks: “Bladder Matters” Monday, April 22, 5:30-6:30pm WhidbeyHealth Medical Center, Coupeville Presented by Amy Arisco MD, Offering urology services back to Whidbey Island through Skagit Regional Health in Oak Harbor in partnership with WhidbeyHealth. Please take Birch Street and park behind the café. Enter at café door. All talks are free and open to the public.

Medicare Presentation Thursday, April 25, 11:00am Oak Harbor Senior Center, 51 SE Jerome St. Are you turning 65 or are you eligible for Medicare based on disability? Are you looking for unbiased facts regarding all facets of Medicare eligibility and enrollment, including financial assistance for those who are income eligible? We can help. Please join Statewide Health Insurance Benefits Advisors for a free Medicare enrollment workshop. SHIBA is a program of the Office of the Insurance Commissioner. No registration required. Questions 360-279-4580

Annual Retiree Seminar Saturday, April 27, 9:00am-1:00pm CPO Club, 1080 W Ault Field Rd. Oak Harbor Military retirees and their spouses, from all branches of the United States Uniformed Services, are encouraged to attend this important annual seminar. Surviving spouses are also encouraged to attend. Exhibitors include: Retired Activities Office Volunteers; Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP), WorkSource WA; Disabled American Veterans (DAV); VFW Oak Harbor Chapter; NAS Whidbey Island Fleet & Family Support Center; and more! Light snacks, coffee and water made available for free thanks to our sponsor US FAMILY HEALTH PLAN. Reservations are not required. Registration will be taken at the door. For more information, call 866-854-0638

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Whidbey Weekly

NEWS www.whidbeyweekly.com

Langley poetry party paints an evening of enjoyment

“Shakespeare” at CHS p. 10

LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

APRIL 18 - APRIL 24, 2019

Whidbey boasts a basketful of egg hunts

By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly Poetry, like music, is said to speak to the soul. So, the organizers of The Great Poetry Party, to be held at 7 p.m. Saturday, April 27 at Crawford House in Langley, hope this intimate evening celebrating National Poetry Month will hold special meaning for all who attend the by-donation event. “Since it is National Poetry Month, I thought it would be important to honor that in some way on the Island,” said Andre Feriante, a musician and published poet, who spear headed the evening. “There are so many creative artists here, and so many writers, poets - well known ones at that,” Feriante said in an email to Whidbey Weekly. “My idea for the 27th is very simple - bring together a few of these great local personalities, their stories and poems and share a night of reading. There is no specific theme, everyone will read what is close to their heart that day.” Feriante will join Sheila Weidendorf, Joni Takanikos, Victory Schouten, Shawn Berit, Patrick Donovan and Chris Thorsen in sharing a wide variety of poetic selections. Weiden-

See POETRY continued on page 14

Photo Courtesy of Stephanie Cook Children race to find eggs during the Clinton Easter Egg Hunt, which was started over 35 years ago. This year’s hunt will take place Saturday at 11 a.m.

By Kacie Jo Voeller Whidbey Weekly Egg hunts will abound around the island for the upcoming Easter weekend, with plenty of chances for children to partake in the festivities. While many of the island’s hunts have become tradition, some are in their first year. One of the traditional hunts will take place in Clinton. Stephanie Cook, president of the Clinton Chamber of Commerce, said it will start at 11 a.m., Saturday in Dan Porter Park, although participants are encouraged to arrive by 10:30 a.m. “The Clinton Easter Egg Hunt was started over 35 years ago,” she said. “The Anderson family of Clinton organized the hunt until 2002 and Cozy’s Roadhouse in Clinton organized the Hunt from 2002 to 2013. The Clinton Easter Egg Hunt is now organized and run by the Clinton Chamber of Commerce and funded by the South Whidbey Business Community and residents.” According to Cook, the event brings a large crowd to the park each year and they give out approximately 650 prizes. “Every year we get around 600 people at Dan Porter Park,” she said. “It is the perfect location, with it being so close to the highway and everyone can use the entire park and ride to park for the event. We use the entire park as our hunting grounds, with five different age groups with different levels of difficulty.” Cook said the event provides a way to bring people from the community together and even start their own traditions.

Photo Courtesy of Andre Feriante Award winning guitarist and composer, Andre Feriante, has put together The Great Poetry Party at 7 p.m. Saturday, April 27 in honor of National Poetry Month. The event will be held at Crawford House in Langley.

“The best part of the Clinton Easter Egg Hunt is all of the happy children!” she said. “It is always wonderful to see all the children year after year. Eventually they come back and volunteer their time and bring their own children when they are older. This year’s Easter Bunny came to the hunt every year when she was young and now she wants to help the children have as much fun as she did.”

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Photo Courtesy of Stephanie Cook Whidbey Island will be home to many egg hunts this year, with plenty of opportunities for all ages to enjoy an Easter tradition.

On the northern end of the island, a new egg hunt will take place in Oak Harbor Saturday at 1 p.m. The event will be hosted by the Oak Harbor Main Street Association (OHMSA) and the Oak Harbor Garry Oak Society (OHGOS). Margaret Livermore, a board member for OHMSA, said the event will provide an opportunity for kids and parents alike to receive prizes.

See EASTER continued on page 8

We are so fortunate to live in an extraordinary community. Friends and neighbors generously stepped up to keep the Clinton Community Hall open and serving South Whidbey. You did it... the new septic system is installed and paid for! Special thanks to The Rural Characters who organized Drainfest ‘19 and shared their unique South Whidbey music and humor.....plus, Cozy’s Roadhouse and Island Nosh for donating delicious food for the event. Drainfest put our fundraising over the top. We’d also like to thank our terrific contractors who got us back in business so quickly! Rob Hallbauer, septic designer and Jonny Wilson, installer. Join us for Mayfest on May 25th - 6411 Central Ave. Food, Music, Dancing and Fun!

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Easter Egg Hunt at Holmes Harbor Rod & Gun Club 1:00 PM, Saturday, April 20

All are welcome FREE egg hunting for ages 0 to 11 Years ** The hunt begins at 1 PM SHARP. It is advised that you plan to be there 30 minutes before the 1 PM start to find parking and make your way to the hunt. Lunch is free for kids and by Donation for Adults (hot dogs, chips, and baked goods).

We have four age groups (ages 0-11), candy and prize eggs 3334 Brooks Hill Road Langley

EASTER continued from page 7 “The egg hunt is going to be fun because it is for the kids and we are promoting businesses downtown because some of the eggs will have (besides the candy) coupons to stores so that the parents can actually participate and win a coupon,” she shared. A large portion of the event will be dedicated to unveiling plans for a future mural by Whidbey Island artist Paula Fries, which will depict the Garry oak trees of Oak Harbor. “The mural is going to be almost 15 feet by 70 feet,” Livermore said. “It will be on the whole side of the building. It is going to be a sunset and the trees will be going orange. They (the trees) are going to be from the oak grove. It is going to be really beautiful.” Livermore said the community has come together to help support the project. “We have funding that came from Island

Thrift, from Walmart, and then the Garry Oak Society is putting money into it, too,” she said. “Main Street is also putting money into it and Frontier Industries is going to contribute paint for the project. There is a nice group of sponsorships going on for something to decorate downtown and make it look nice.”

and we enthusiastically agreed. Not only will there be a fun egg hunt for youngsters, there will be interactive exhibits to give people a chance to learn all about Garry oak trees and how important they are in the landscape of our community. Smith Park contains roughly 150 mature oak trees and is the perfect springtime location for such an event.”

In addition to unveiling plans for the mural, the event will serve as a way for the community to learn about the distinctive Garry oak trees through the partnership between the OHSMA and OHGOS. Laura Renninger, president and founder of the OHGOS, hopes to help promote education about the trees through the event, as Smith Park is home to its very own oak grove.

The oak trees are a special feature of the Oak Harbor community, according to Renninger.

“The idea for the Easter Egg Hunt and Garry Oak Education event first sprang from Oak Harbor Main Street Association (OHMSA),” she said. “OHMSA approached us to see if we would be open to partnering with them

“The presence of Garry oaks in our town makes us unique compared to other Whidbey Island communities,” she said. “OHGOS is excited about this event to help raise awareness of the relative scarcity of Garry oaks and their associated ecosystems, and especially to help ensure young people have the opportunity to learn about our living heritage.” In addition to these events, a number of other opportunities to hunt for eggs will take place around the island (see page 9). Make sure to bring a basket and happy hunting!

EASTER IS APRIL 21

Let Us Help You Fill Your Easter Basket! Jelly Beans Truffles Bunnies Chocolate Eggs

easter

brunch specials 10am-3pm live music with just in time jazz duo 11am-1pm

For an Easter treat, visit Sweet Mona’s. Offering a nice selection of chocolates, pastries and gelato.

Sweet Monas

dinner specials 5pm to close family friendly dining reservations gladly accepted 360.675.4053

851 SE Pioneer Way, Suite 101 (360)240-8937 • Open Daily: 11am-6pm

OAK HARBOR MAIN STREET & GARRY OAK SOCIETY PRESENTS

EASTER EGG HUNT & GARRY OAK EDUCATION SATURDAY, APRIL 20 • 1-2 PM SMITH PARK, Oak Harbor

Children ages 1-9 years Garry Oak Tree Education & Activities Find lucky coins and win prizes! Pick up coupons for participating Downtown Merchants

670 se pioneer way • oak harbor rusticacafe.com

Chocolate Boutique

www.SweetMonas.com

221 2ND STREET STE 16 • LANGLEY • 360-221-2728

Hop On In For The Best Savings In Town At The Store with the Big Heart

All proceeds donated to community programs

360-675-1133

600 SE Barrington Dr • Oak Harbor Hours: Mon-Sat 9am-5:30pm Donation Hours: Mon-Sat 9am-4pm

See Us For Your Easter Event & Party Decor! • PLATES • NAPKINS • TABLECLOTHS • CENTERPIECES Whidbey Party Store Party Supplies For Every Celebration Great Customer Service 270 SE Cabot Dr #2 Oak Harbor 360-544-3068 whidbeypartysupplies.com


Homeplace of Oak Harbor April 20 ~ 11 a.m. 171 SW 6th Ave. Ages: All, special area for ages 1-3

“Easter Hoppenings” at the Navy Exchange April 20 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. (Egg hunt at 10 a.m.) 2110 N Coral Sea Ave. Ages: Different divisions from 1 to adult

Coupeville Town Park April 20 ~ 10 a.m.

Clinton’s Dan Porter Park April 20 ~ 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Deer Lake Rd. Ages 0-12 Years

Bayview Community Hall- Langley April 20 ~ 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. (Egg hunt at 1 p.m.) 5642 Bayview Rd. Ages 0-12 Years

Grace Community Church Oak Harbor April 20 ~ 1 p.m.

Auxiliary Of The Fleet Reserve Branch 97 - Oak Harbor April 20 ~ 2 p.m.

29470 State Route 20 Ages: 1-12 and special needs children

311 SE 8th Ave. Ages 0-12

Easter Egg Hunt and Garry Oak Education - Oak Harbor April 20 ~ 1 p.m.

“Welcome Home” - Oak Harbor April 20 ~ 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Smith Park Ages 1-9

Holmes Harbor Rod & Gun Club Langley April 20 ~ 1 p.m.

235 SW 6th Ave. Ages 0-10

VFW Post 7392 - Oak Harbor April 21 ~ 12 p.m. 3037 Goldie Rd. Ages 0-12

3334 Brooks Hill Rd. Ages 0-11

305 NW Coveland St. Ages: Toddlers through fifth grade

EASTER AT FLYERS! April 21st at 9 & 11am s e r v i c e s @ Oak Harbor High School Egg Hunt @ 1015am + kids church Ages 0-5

Freeland

Just in time for Easter

Beautiful Easter Lilies

On Sale April 10 to April 21

$9.99 Reg $14.99 SKU100397

Hardware

1609 E. Main Street • Freeland • 360-331-6799 • acehardware.com • Monday-Saturday 8am-7pm • Sunday 9am-6pm

Clinton Easter Egg Hunt

Saturday, April 20 • Dan Porter Park Bring the kids to our wonderful egg hunt! Sirens go off for the hunt at 11am, please arrive by 10:30am. Hunting for ages 0-12 years. 25,000 eggs, 600 Prizes! Parking is located at the Clinton Park & Ride.

Adult Easter Egg Hunt Saturday, April 20, 3:00pm

Why should kids have all the fun?! Join us for a Grown Up ‘Easter Egg Hunt!’ Growlers! Gift Certificates! Hats! T-shirts & More!

Easter Brunch Sunday, April 21st 10:00 til 1:00 $29 per person Kids $1 per year up to age 12 *Limited Menu Also Available Reservations Highly Recommended

Mussels • Shrimp • Oysters Smoked Salmon Blintzes • Waffles Prime Rib Hash Garden Scramble Shephard’s Pie Bacon, Sausage, Potatoes Prime Rib Carving Station Baked Ham Potatoes Au Gratin Roasted Vegetables Cannoli • Fresh Fruit Cupcakes • Cheesecake

South Whidbey firefighters will bring their fire truck for the kids to explore! Take your photos with our wonderful Easter Bunny! This FREE event is brought to you by the Clinton Chamber of Commerce, Clinton business owners and personal donations from local families.

Dan Porter Park • 7490 Deer Lake Rd • Clinton

360-675-5858 • 32295 SR 20 • Oak Harbor • www.eatatflyers.com


10 APRIL 18 - APRIL 24, 2019 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED

Life Tributes Marlene Fakkema Photo Courtesy of Stefanie Ask, Coupeville High School “Shakespeare in Hollywood,” the spring theater production at Coupeville High School runs tonight (Thursday) through Saturday. Performances start at 7 p.m. each night.

Marlene Fakkema of Oak Harbor, Wash. passed away April 8, 2019. Marlene was born in Neenah, Wis. to Lyle and Florence Cornish. She married Chuck Fakkema in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho in 1955. After Chuck’s time in the Air Force, the couple moved to Whidbey Island in 1972, where they have resided ever since.

Midsummer mayhem takes center stage at CHS

She is survived by her husband of 64 years, Chuck; three sons, Brian (Shirley), Kevin, Alan (Annie); and seven grandchildren, Chris, Mark, Greg, Chase, Madison, Mason and Marissa; as well as various, nieces, and nephews.

By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly

A memorial service for Marlene will be held Friday, 2 p.m. at Wallin Funeral Home with a reception following.

Coupeville High School’s Theatre Troupe has a spring treat for Shakespeare lovers, or for those who simply love to have a good time at the theater.

Marlene enjoyed raising her family. She also loved roller skating. Later she worked with Chuck doing the bookkeeping at Westgate Homes in Oak Harbor.

Life Tributes can now be found online at www.whidbeyweekly.com

The group will be performing Ken Ludwig’s “Shakespeare in Hollywood” at 7 p.m. tonight, Friday and Saturday at Coupeville High School’s performing arts center. The year is 1934 and Hollywood director Max Reinhardt is making a film of the Shakespeare classic “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” However, Shakespeare’s characters, Oberon and Puck, have come to life – complete with magic flowers - and are cast to play themselves in the movie, with hilarious results. “When I read [Ken Ludwig’s] “Shakespeare in Hollywood,” I knew it was a great opportunity,” said Stefanie Ask, theater teacher and the play’s director. “It’s hilarious, it gives us some unique set challenges to think creatively about and it allowed me to do a deep dive with the students on understanding Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” When I realized that Island Shakespeare Festival in Langley was professionally producing A Midsummer Night’s Dream this summer and that the cast could meet up to go see it, I knew it was destiny!” According to Ask, inclement weather and snow days meant a late start for casting and less rehearsal time for the production. The cast and crew of 29 have been working hard to bring everything together. “The most challenging part of our production has definitely been the quick timeframe we have had to put on this play,” said Jaschon Baumann, who plays Dick Powell. “No time to waste!” “With lots of us students also participating in a spring sport, getting everyone to rehearsal and doing a full run-through of the play is definitely challenging,” said Tiger Johnson, who is playing the role of Jack Warner. “There was a lot needed to be done for this play, and we still have some to do, but no matter what happens, the show will go on!” Despite the challenges, those involved have had a lot of fun trying new things and pushing the troupe’s limits with this production, they said.

Photo Courtesy of Stefanie Ask, Coupeville High School A good time will be had by all who attend the Coupeville High School Theatre Troupe’s production of “Shakespeare in Hollywood,” running tonight, Friday and Saturday at the school’s performing arts center.

With a mix of comedy, drama, romance and action, this production comes highly recommended, if cast members do say so themselves. “This play is enjoyable for anyone, and will be a unique and amazing experience for anyone who goes to see it,” encouraged Baumann. “We have put in months of effort and it really shows,” said Rixe. “It’s a truly fun and heartfelt story that everyone will enjoy. Whether you’re a lover of theatre, or just need something to do on a Friday night, you will enjoy what we have created.” “There is never a dull moment in this play,” said Johnson. “A good time is guaranteed.” Tickets are $6 for adults, $4 for children and are free to seniors and students with ASB. Concessions will be available at intermission by donation. Every dollar earned will help fund next year’s productions. “If you want to have a good laugh and support us high school thespians and have a nice night out of your house, I’d strongly recommend you come,” said Nastali. “It’s for three nights. Do you really have plans that important for three nights in a row?” asked Johnson. “If you do that’s fine, we understand, but if you want to laugh, cry and have a good time, there is no better way to spend your time. So, what are you waiting for? Grab some friends and come on in for a great time!”

Seriously, we do not make this stuff up! SUNDAY, FEB. 24 12:56 pm, Heller Rd. Reporting party states there’s a man in reporting party’s trees; tried to wake subject up; subject is getting up out of tree. 3:51 pm, N Oak Harbor St. Caller advising cat has turned, is now aggressive towards everyone; cat screams and growls. Caller is afraid to go near it. 5:35 pm, N Oak Harbor St. Reporting party advising white male with red hair, full beard, camouflage outfit, “Civil War-ish look,” was carrying something “long;” couldn’t tell if it was just a stick or a rifle. 5:55 pm, SW 13th Ave. Caller advising two chickens in his backyard; doesn’t know where they belong. Appear to be someone’s pets. 11:23 pm, SW Stremler Dr. Reporting party asked female to turn music down and female called him a jerk. MONDAY, FEB. 25 2:21 pm, Cambrae Dr. Reporting party received call from someone, went and bought an Amazon card and gave the subject numbers off the card; requesting call – wants to know if anything can be done about this now. 3:03 pm, Mutiny Ln. Reporting party was kicked off road three days ago. Had verbal argument with resident and told him it was a private road; reporting party wants to know if it is a private road, per map it is a county road.

“The funnest [sic] part of this production has been all the experimentation and new things we have tried and discovered,” said Madison Rixe, who plays Max Reinhardt. “We are really treading new ground and pushing the boundaries of what is possible in our theatre program. It’s really amazing!” “This production has been incredibly different compared to any of the plays we’ve done before,” said Tamika Nastali, playing the role of Puck. “With ever-changing sets and scenes, audience interactions, and things happening rapidly all the time, the show’s exciting for everyone involved.”

Island 911

Photo Courtesy of Stefanie Ask, Coupeville High School The spring theater production of “Shakespeare in Hollywood” at Coupeville High School will have audiences laughing, crying and just about everything in between.

3:38 pm, SR 20 Caller states a woman was driving erratically and threw someone out her car window? [sic] Lost connection; upon recall, couldn’t understand name. TUESDAY, FEB. 26 10 am, Main St. Male subject in lobby, urinated, appears

to have been drinking; would like him to be removed. 3:29 pm, Brittney Dr. Advising estranged husband bringing property from previous mutual home to reporting party’s new residence and dumping it there. 6:37 pm, Humphrey Rd. Caller advising there are bats in home; has been trying to get ahold of pest control and hasn’t gotten a response. WEDNESDAY, FEB. 27 9:59 am, Hackberry Ln. Caller reporting neighbor harassing her family. Neighbor is putting trash inside mailbox and moves caller’s trash cans to other driveways in area. 10:03 am, Rolling Dr. Requesting call referencing dogs being let out at 4 am and barking, then bark all day. Wondering if she can buy device to stop dogs from barking. 4:10 pm, April Dr. Advising “crazy girl” on porch; babbling and swearing. THURSDAY, FEB. 28 9:10 am, NW Front St. Advising transient male in area, changing pants in public, left pants near area. 1:03 pm, West Beach Rd. Caller advising subject who was driving female to WhidbeyHealth Medical Center used drugs on her to calm her down during car ride; caller states he also drove 100 mph and threatened to kill her. 9:41 pm, Somerset Ct. Reporting party states roommate threatened him with a gun just before calling reporting party; states roommate did not produce gun, said he would “shoot me if I didn’t shut up.”

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Whidbey Weekly

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OWNED

Island Angler

APRIL 18 - APRIL 24, 2019

11

LOCALLY OPERATED

COUPEVILLE GARDEN CLUB 51st Annual Fundraiser

Plant Sale

SATURDAY, APRIL 27 ~ 9am-4pm

By Tracy Loescher

GARDEN ART • TREATS • RAFFLE TOMATOES

Hybrid and Heirloom varieties Chosen for Puget Sound gardens WHO REALLY ARE THE BEST FISHERMEN? If your fishing addiction or sickness - whichever you choose to call it - is as bad as mine and the small craft wind advisories have you on house lock-down, you too may have found yourself sitting in front of the television in the early morning hours with a fresh, hot cup of coffee watching well-known bass fishermen like Bill Dance, Jimmy Houston, Kevin VanDam and others effortlessly catching largemouth bass, one after another. If you listen carefully to these professionals as they slowly work along the shoreline of a lake or reservoir targeting fish, they will often give a hint like this to the secret of their success: “I see a suspended shadow,” or “I saw a spawning bed.” They know good and well there is a fish in that very spot or a patrolling, protective fish nearby. My point is, they are sight fishing; they actually see with their eyes and the help of some polarized sunglasses, the fish they are trying to catch underwater. Many successful fishing shows involve a great deal of sight fishing; the shallow flats of Florida are a popular filming destination because of the productive waters, a perfect setting to catch Bonefish, Sea trout, Snook, and sometimes beautiful chrome Tarpon. A large percent of the fish hooked and released while filming were all targeted by sight. The tall lookout platforms on many of the bay boats are there to provide a birdseye view of the fish. Regardless of the fact these fishermen can see the fish in front of them and can track their movements, I still consider them very skilled and dedicated fishermen, but are they as good as we are? These bass fishermen spend many hours on the water using a multitude of lures and baits, learning fish patterns based on weather, water clarity, and spawning periods, but in my opinion, nothing builds their fishing confidence and gives the greatest edge to the fisherman than actually being able to see the fish. Even the most advanced fish-locating technologies which can tip the scales in the fisherman’s favor, still take a back seat to seeing a fish’s fin out of water or a shimmering silhouette just under the surface. No one would deny the fact these fishermen, who do most of their fishing in waters averaging three to 12 feet in depth are “good fishermen.” But think about us Pacific Northwest salmon, halibut, and lingcod fishermen - would you put us in the same class as the bass, or shallow water fishermen? You better believe we are! We have the same God-given eyes that can instantly identify a fish. The biggest difference

is we rarely, if ever, get to see the fish we are targeting. This fact puts us in the lead as the best. We are lucky if we catch a glimpse of a salmon jumping out of the water. To this day, I’ve yet to see a halibut or a lingcod come near the surface of the water on their own, at which I could quickly toss a swimbait or rigged herring. I consider us primarily deepwater fisherman. Other than fish caught from a river or stream, the salmon we search for are in water depths of 30- to 130-feet. Halibut and lingcod are almost always on or near the bottom. Can you imagine how much of a difference it would make if we could see a hungry lingcod or a half-buried, ambushing halibut in the sand! We may not get to see our fish, but we do use a trained eye to watch the end of our salmon-trolling rods; I can tell if the line or lure has some eel grass snagged on it, or if I have hooked a very small fish, or when the line cuts through a jelly fish; the rod-tip tells a story. Sunlight doesn’t even reach down where many of the fish we are after live. We rely on electronics, historical information, and plain old time-on-the-water experience to catch fish. In general, feeling a fish strike in five feet of water is a piece of cake compared to feeling a fish strike at 105 feet. I will agree all good fishermen study the bottom topography and landscape to some level. For example, “points point to fish.” This simple rule of thumb holds true no matter where you fish and what species you fish for, but consider our ability to locate, identify, and catch fish in the Puget Sound (which, by volume, is 27 cubic miles of water), all without seeing a single fish with the naked eye. Now that’s impressive! We are truly tenacious fishermen. We methodically search the depths; we utilize deep-water downriggers as an extension of our salmon rods; we calculate for current flow, we gingerly anticipate the bottom, with quick reflexes to avoid snags because there is no way to retrieve that expensive lure. I love all aspects of fishing, and fishing for any species, but in my opinion, shallow water fishermen fall short of us as “who’s the best.” Winter Blackmouth salmon season has come to an end with favorable numbers overall; we should be seeing some salmon quota numbers from the state Fish and Wildlife Department for this year pretty soon. Remember, our licenses expired March 31, so prepare for the silly cost to fish in this state once again. Here is my email address - tlfishmonger@gmail.com. Feel free to drop me a fish story. Good luck trout fishing!

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APRIL 18 - APRIL 24, 2019

Whidbey Weekly

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WONDER PARK (PG) HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON: THE HIDDEN WORLD(PG) SHAZAM! (PG-13) SUNDAY, APRIL 21

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By Carey Ross After: I thought this was a YA movie about a beautiful girl who falls for a bad boy, but instead it’s something called a “new adult fiction” movie about a beautiful girl who falls for a bad boy. I stand corrected. ★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs.)

Disneynature: Penguins: Thus far, the Disneynature movies have been both breathtaking and dignified in that old-school nature movie sort of way. But now a clumsy dork of a penguin named Steve has come along to capture everyone’s hearts and Disneynature will never be the same. ★★★★★ (G • 1 hr. 16 min.) Dumbo: I do not wish to see a live-action remake of this animated Disney classic, no matter how much Tim Burton, Colin Farrell, Danny DeVito, and CGI baby elephants might be thrown at it. ★★ (PG • 2 hrs. 10 min.) Hellboy: Guillermo del Toro is still alive and yet somehow he is rolling over in his grave. ★ (R • 2 hrs.)

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me. Get it, Marsai, you tiny movie mogul. Get. It. ★★★★ (PG-13) Mia and the White Lion: A critic summed up this saga about a girl and her imperiled white lion’s journey across the South African savanna as the “cat video to end all cat videos,” which is the surest way I know to get movie tickets to sell themselves. ★★★★ (PG • 1 hr. 38 min.) Missing Link: In the realm of original ideas Hollywood would do well to traffic in, comes this story about fur-covered, 630-pound Mr. Link, who undertakes a Victorian globetrotting adventure with the help of a cast of memorable characters and a whole bunch of the stunning stop-motion animation that has become Laika Studios stock in trade. ★★★★ (PG • 1 hr. 35 min.) Pet Sematary: True story: I can do a spot-on impersonation of back-from-thedead baby Gage Creed from the original version of this movie, but don’t ask me to do it unless you enjoy having me appear to you in your nightmares. ★★★ (R • 1 hr. 41 min.) Shazam: DC Comics finally scores another win (“Wonder Woman” can’t do it all herself, after all) with this endearing, engaging story of lost boys and the superhero they conjure who possesses great powers but needs a little help when it comes to using them to save the world from evil. ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 10 min.) Us: Jordan Peele, sketch comedian and world’s most unlikely horror auteur, releases his second (the first being the Oscar-nominated “Get Out”) flawless, socially conscious, righteously frightening and scarily entertaining movie, and it’s currently breaking box-office records. ★★★★★ (R • 1 hr. 56 min.) For Anacortes theater showings, please see www.fandango.com. For Blue Fox and Oak Harbor Cinemas showings see ads on this page.

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APRIL 18 - APRIL 24, 2019

13

LOCALLY OPERATED

emotions are more openly discussable. Move with the opportunities as they arise. They are not limited to the 23rd, but neither will they last forever.

CHICKEN LITTLE & THE ASTROLOGER By Wesley Hallock

ARIES (March 21-April 19) If you enjoy surprises, this promises to be a good week. If you know yourself and are comfortable acting to fulfill your own wants and wishes, you may be the one who does something daring that surprises others. The alternative will be others catching you off guard with the surprising things they do. Either way, boring situations won’t remain boring for long. Half measures are unlikely on the 23rd, when actions carry to extremes. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) The generosity of others may be the highlight of your week. This is a time of extremes, when good will and the willingness to give abundantly contrast sharply with stinginess and frugality. You are likely to experience examples of both before all is said and done. Your faith in humanity is likely to increase as a result, and just when you were willing to believe the worst. Take the 23rd as it comes, surprises and all. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) The demands others make on you may be great this week. Even greater than those demands, however, is the supportive circumstance on your side. Far from feeling burdened, you may find yourself responding willingly, even cheerfully, when called upon to give and do. If yours is the act that restores someone’s lagging faith in the world’s inherent goodness, what more can you ask? Small deeds loom large on the 23rd. CANCER (June 22-July 22) At times this week it will be hard to conceal your true feelings, and you shouldn’t try. The times when your emotions are most readily apparent likely coincide with the good times in store. Everyone loves to feel happy, so don’t hesitate to let your happiness out. A possible consequence may be a public appearance on the 23rd. Enjoy your time in the limelight and don’t worry about the attention you may draw. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Something unusual about the week holds promise of making you feel illumined or enlightened, in a way that validates you inwardly. It may be that something you always felt to be true finds confirmation in the outer world. Share the joy if you can, and don’t be dismayed if it is too subtle and deep for others to appreciate. Some of life’s greatest victories are meant for you alone. The 23rd could go either way. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) If you have felt inadequate or unsure about how to convey your true feelings to someone, the time has come this week to try. The lines that divide thought from emotion are thin now. You may notice how concepts may be expressed with greater feeling, and that

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Too much of a good thing is possible this week. If the acquisition of something you value highly begins to dominate your life, you have entered a possible danger zone. Your first clue of this may be an adverse reaction to your behavior coming from someone close. You are lucky if you have the kind of friend who will call you out on a destructive pursuit, rather than enable its continuance. Heed them on the 23rd. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Your relationships are prone to distortions this week, coming in a variety of ways. Those around you need your sympathy, warmth and understanding, but may show it in ways that trigger arguments, instead. If you’re accused of being too self-centered, be sure what people really want is more attention from you. Read between the lines on the 23rd to discover the real motives behind what others say and do. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) This is a good week to really let go and enjoy yourself. You may be given the chance to let loose in ways you don’t often enjoy. Seize the opportunity without hesitation, for the fleeting nature of it all but guarantees it won’t be there tomorrow. Far from being a meaningless self-indulgence, joyful pursuits now have a way of raising your appreciation of life and making you a better person. Serendipity rules the 23rd. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Contact between yourself and friends could be much deeper than usual this week. This may put you in touch with your roots, and it may also free you of troublesome aspects of the past, due to new ideas you may encounter. Your living conditions may feel unsettled for a while as a result, but those will eventually settle down again. You may be of as much help to your friends the 23rd as they are to you. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb 18) You may gain recognition this week for a good work you have done. If you, like most people, have been taught to underrate your achievements, this may come as a surprise. If you have been involved in intellectual pursuits, those could be directly related. Relations with the general public are greatly enhanced the 23rd, and communications at every level go well, largely due to your own inner clarity. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Changes in your material situation prompt the urge for comparable change at other levels this week. If possessions have held you down, breaking suddenly free of them could make you want to celebrate that freedom with travel to places you couldn’t before. Similarly, an influx of money could free you to explore more of life than was within your reach previously. Weigh your options carefully on the 23rd.

CLUES ACROSS

48. Pack neatly

15. Young boy

1. Often romantic composition

50. Forming the bottom layer

17. A way to go on

5. Lunar term

52. How fast you’re going

10. California mountain

53. Sea eagles

12. Spiral staircase pillars

55. Cool!

14. “Heat” director

56. Military mailbox

16. Tellurium

57. Type of lawyer

18. Gateway (Arabic)

58. Type of monk

19. No (Scottish) 20. Greek prophetess

63. Respect due to an ancestor

22. A team’s best pitcher

65. Took to the sea

35. Removed

23. Bard’s way of saying “have”

66. Members of a Semitic people

36. Used to catch poachers

25. Indigenous group of the Philippines

67. A way to march

26. Danish krone 27. Type of squad 28. Possesses

18. Not good 21. A ballet enthusiast 23. Ad __ 24. Bar bill 27. A genus of badgers 29. “No __!” 32. Get off your feet 34. Franklin was one

39. Hit lightly 40. Crony

CLUES DOWN

43. Stroke

1. Political action committee

44. One who obtains pleasure by inflicting pain on others

30. Part of the face

2. __kosh, near Lake Winnebago

31. Very small amount of time (abbr.)

3. When you hope to get there

33. Churches have lots of them

4. Woman who followed Bacchus

49. “Wings” actor Steven

35. Modern day “letter”

5. Cause to become entangled

54. Hair-like structure

37. Della __, singer 38. Informed upon 40. Type of house 41. Folk singer DiFranco

6. Green veggie

46. __ the ante 47. Greek letter 51. Unhappy 59. Pick up 60. Type of transportation

7. Stiff bristles

61. Worn with a suit

8. Pass in Alps

42. A baglike structure in a plant or animal

10. A sharp blow

62. Something similar to another already referred to

44. Car mechanics group

11. Bears engage in it

64. Farm state

45. Belonging to us

13. Prevents progress

9. Atomic #81

Answers on page 15

© 2019, Wesley Hallock, All Rights Reserved

YOUR GUESS IS AS GOOD AS OURS WEATHER FORECAST Chicken Little looks at what is and fears the sky is falling. Wesley Hallock as a professional astrologer looks at what is and sees what could be. Read Wesley’s monthly forecast, with links to Facebook and Twitter, at www. chickenlittleandtheastrologer.com. To read past columns of Chicken Little and the Astrologer in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

Thurs, April 18

Fri, April 19

Sat, April 20

Sun, April 21

Mon, April 22

Tues, April 23

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

H-60°/L-52°

H-56°/L-47°

H-58°/L-43°

H-59°/L-47°

H-62°/L-45°

H-58°/L-43°

H-61°/L-45°

Showers

AM Rain

Clouds and Sun Mixed

Mostly Cloudy

Mostly Cloudy

Mostly Cloudy

Wed, April 24

Showers Possible

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

H-60°/L-51°

H-54°/L-44°

H-57°/L-41°

H-58°/L-46°

H-60°/L-45°

H-59°/L-42°

H-66°/L-45°

Showers

Cloudy and Rainy

Mostly Cloudy

Cloudy

Mostly Cloudy

Cloudy

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Showers Possible


14 APRIL 18 - APRIL 24, 2019 LOCALLY OWNED

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Whidbey Weekly

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Let’s Dish! with Kae Harris

BITS ‘n’ PIECES

Each year, millions of people partake in Easter activities of all kinds. While the reason for the celebration of Easter is to observe and recognize the resurrection of Jesus Christ, some historians suggest the activities surrounding Easter may pe-date Christianity itself. One such activity is the coloring of eggs. Yes, this fun childhood pastime has roots reaching further back than we might have initially thought. For thousands of years, the humble egg has been a symbol of new life, fertility and rebirth, and in Orthodox and Eastern Catholic churches, Easter eggs were and are commonly dyed red to represent the blood Christ shed on the cross. The eggs are then blessed by the priest and with the hard outer shell, a symbol of the tomb in which Jesus’ body was placed, the congregants cracking this outer shell is symbolic of Jesus’ resurrection. So integral a role does the egg play in Christianity, it is one of the primary reasons behind why they are abstained from during the Lenten period, with Easter being the first chance to eat them again. Nowadays, we color our eggs in a vast array of hues, making them absolutely magical. It’s a fun bonding experience and a chance for children and adults alike to get as creative as they possibly can! The very act of coloring and decorating eggs goes back many, many hundreds of years. In ancient China, the birth of a boy was said to be signified by celebrating with red-colored eggs, while more recently the Pennsylvania Dutch colored theirs by boiling them with onion skins, hickory bark, walnut shells and other ingredients known to disperse color over the eggs. In fact, all over the world, decorated eggs have found their own individual niche and this niche could look like anything, depending on the area from which they hail. In the Czech Republic, exceptionally ornate and intricately hand-painted eggs (kraslice) take Easter egg decorating to a whole new level. Persian culture also brings its own touch to egg decorating and it is aligned with the spring equinox. It marks the Persian New Year and is a time for bonding with family and friends. This practice

POETRY continued from page 7 dorf and Feriante will add a musical dimension to the evening by performing on the piano and guitar, respectively. “Looking at the names of our poets, we’ll cover poetry ranging from lyrical to surreal, mystical to sensual and some haiku to boot,” Feriante said. “Sheila [Weidendorf] and I have had a lot of experience providing music for readings, so the two of us will be intuitively offering a bed of musical accompaniment for those who would like; some just want the word and the silence.”

Photo Courtesy of Sheila Weidendorf The salon at Crawford House in Langley serves as a perfect backdrop for The Great Poetry Party, to be held there April 27.

4

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A MOST EGG-CELLENT EASTER!

continued from page

is believed by some to be where the Christian tradition comes from. And what of the eggs we have today? Yes, decorating our own is fun and creative, and yes, boiled eggs are quite tasty, but more often than not I find people prefer the sweeter version – the chocolate egg – over the original. The chocolate egg was conceived in France and Germany in the early 1800s. Until the method for making hollow, molded chocolate eggs was honed and perfected, they were made solid. But the concept of a sweet, delectable rendition of the real thing is thought to be due to some tradition occurring in the 17th and 18th centuries throughout Europe, wherein an eggshaped toy was filled with candies and given to children at Easter. It stands to reason then, some innovative mind would take the idea and make the whole thing an edible treat! Yes, eggs are central to life and this symbolism can be seen everywhere. Actually, when I think about it, eggs truly do make up the crux of many societies, in a way. Take a look at all our food products, read the ingredient lists on any of them and more often than not you’ll find one of the ingredients is egg. What can’t we do with eggs, really? I mean, maybe there are some things we can’t do with them, but there are very few things indeed. One of my all-time favorite things to make with eggs is egg salad sandwiches. Oh, the ways in which we can make this uniquely our own are endless! With a base of mashed, hard-boiled eggs mixed with mayonnaise and mustard, you can take your egg salad in any direction you like. Some people add sweet relish, others chopped up green onion and paprika. And how to serve it? With crackers, on toast, or as a sandwich would be the easiest and most common way. But that’s not all. We can turn eggs into a frittata and in the process, we can go through our vegetable crisper in the refrigerator and use up all those veggies that are not going to be used otherwise. Tomatoes, onions, peppers, celery, cheese and seasonings can make up the foundation for an egg-cellent lunch box inclusion, a picnic perfect snack, or a make-ahead meal for those busy weekday mornings or evenings.

How about something a little simpler, a little less involved? Although they can be somewhat finicky to make, a deviled egg is well worth the mess made when stuffing the centers with the filling. The basic ingredients to form the signature tangy centers of the eggs - mustard, mayonnaise, vinegar, salt and pepper - always seem to make this dish a winner. Like anything and everything in the food world, everyone has their own recipe and style for a dish and you can make this something sensational with your own little twist on it! Dear Readers, with Easter almost here, I want to wish those of you who observe it a blessed one and hope you enjoy the company of friends and family while partaking in all the traditions you hold near and dear to your hearts. I’m including a recipe for deviled eggs and if you try this version, let me know how you like them! Please send any and all comments, questions and certainly recipes you might like to share to letsdish.whidbeyweekly@gmail.com and we’ll do just that and Dish! Bacon Deviled Eggs 8 – 10 large eggs, hard boiled 3 tablespoons mayonnaise 1 – 2 tablespoons Caesar salad dressing 5-6 slices bacon, fried and crumbled ½ teaspoon paprika a squeeze of fresh lemon juice salt and pepper to taste Slice eggs in half and remove the yolks. Place the yolks in a medium bowl and set the egg white halves aside. Mix together the yolks, mayonnaise, salad dressing, crumbled bacon, paprika, lemon juice, salt and pepper until creamy. Spoon or pipe into egg white halves, refrigerate until chilled, serve and enjoy! www.goodhousekeeping.com/holidays/easter-ideas/g191/history-easter-traditions/ www.easteregghuntsandeasterevents.org/ historyofeastereggs.php To read past columns of Let’s Dish in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www. whidbeyweekly.com.

According to Feriante, there is a natural, primal link between words on a page and notes on a scale that can combine to touch people on similar, deep levels.

which Weidendorf has been able to do through monthly events featuring classical chamber music, jazz, improvisational music and poetry events.

“The powerful thing about music is that it is so immediate; instrumental music, non-verbal music speaks to you in a primal way,” he said. “Poetry in a way is like that. The words become paint brushes, colors, sounds that evoke music in your mind. Good poetry gets you listening to the entire gallery of your life with one line. There are so many types of poetry, but I enjoy poetry that flows like music when you read it out loud.”

“This is the third poetry event I’ve had at Crawford House, and second with Andre [Feriante],” she said. “I have written poetry since I was a child and am in love with this idiom of expression. A poem, like music, can paint a picture in the heart; also, it’s like pulling back the curtain and getting a glimpse of a moment of someone’s truth. It’s a beautiful thing!”

“Poetry, to me, is a kind of music - there is melody and rhythm and syntax and both can bypass the overbearing intellect and ego and take you straight to the heart,” said Weidendorf, founder of the nonprofit Island Consort and steward of the Crawford House for the nonprofit Robert E. Crawford (REC) Music Foundation. “In our events, we pair them. The poetry is accompanied by improvisations on guitar (by Andre) or piano (by me). This union further takes the listener into a receptivity and a state of integration of all that is being painted!” The mission of the Crawford House is to keep music and the arts alive at the venue,

Weidendorf hadn’t chosen what she was planning to share when she spoke with Whidbey Weekly via email, but whatever she shares, it will be her own original work. “I will likely share some of my older, nature/ spring-themed poems and some current things which are more Rumi-esque and kiss the connection between the heart and the soul.” Feriante, who plans to present what he calls “song-poems” for his portion of the program, said those who attend The Great Poetry Party will also enjoy the visual poetry that is part of the Crawford House. “The venue is a great setting to listen to someone read,” he described. “It’s an old

Seaside Spa and Salon Welcomes Dr. Catherine Dayhoff, Doctor of Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine The Seaside Spa and Salon, located in downtown Coupeville, warmly welcomed Dr. Catherine Dayhoff, Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine, to their team of spa professionals last week. Catherine received her Doctorate in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine, an advanced degree in her field, at the Oregon College of Oriental Medicine in Portland, Ore. and received her Masters Degree in Acupuncture and Chinese Herbal Medicine from Bastyr University in Seattle. Seaside Spa is thrilled to have Catherine on the team and to be able to offer Acupuncture treatments to the residents of Whidbey Island. Together, they look forward to helping individuals on their path to health and wellness. Catherine specializes in Orthopedic Trigger Point Acupuncture and Integrative Medicine, and is passionate about helping her patients live a pain-free life. She completed a post-graduate 60-hour certificate course in Orthopedic Trigger Point Acupuncture from Whitfield Reaves, a leading practitioner and educator in the field of Acupuncture Orthopedics and Sports Medicine in 2014. Previously during her 4-year Acupuncture Master program, she completed an additional three part Doctoral Pain Management series on Trigger Point Therapy at Bastyr University. In addition to her education in both Eastern and Western medicine, Catherine participated in post-graduate studies with the highly respected neurology specialist, Dr. Lee-Chen Yr, Master Chinese Herbalist, Acupuncturist and author in Taipei, Taiwan. Catherine also specializes in Facial Rejuvenation and Women’s Health. In her free time she enjoys shadowing her colleagues as she loves learning and realizes learning is a journey not a destination. Catherine is passionate about her healing path and believes that Acupuncture and Eastern Medicine is a vital and integral part of our healthcare system today. She often works in tandem with other medical practitioners to create an integrative healthcare team for her patients. She has crafted a gentle approach to healing and offers Acupuncture, dietary, nutrition and herbal therapies based on Chinese Medical theory and diagnosis. She is committed to providing the highest quality care to restore, invigorate, balance and nourish the body deeply. To inquire about Acupuncture treatments with Catherine at Seaside Spa, please call 360-6780508. The team at Seaside Spa looks forward to serving you on your path to health and wellness. world, salon setting. It has comfortable seating, there is a wonderful old grand piano, a harpsichord, and various musical instruments hanging on the walls, so the place has plenty of visual poetry.” “The salon space is, essentially, my living room - the music room where I have my piano, harpsichord, harmonium and a host of other instruments,” Weidendorf said. “It’s a rather magical space, actually.” According to Weidendorf, there is seating available for up to 50 people for the poetry party. Admission is by donation and refreshments will be served. The Crawford House is located at 5023 Langley Road. Those interested in more poetry events can check out Feriante’s multimedia presentation of poetry, photography and music Saturday at 7 p.m. at Anthes Ferments in Langley. Tickets to that event are $15 per person. Seating is limited; call 425-238-0762 to reserve a spot. For information visit andreferiante.com or islandconsort.org. “I like bringing talented artists together that are great at in-the-moment communication,” said Feriante. “Most of the programs I put together there is not a lot of rehearsal. That’s one thing that makes it fun.”

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


REAL ESTATE/RENTALS

information please contact: reception@islandseniorservices.org

JOB MARKET

7.49 acres for sale. Lovely western view of Puget Sound. Water supplied by a four party well. Power, phone and cable are available. Located just north of Ledgewood. This parcel would be an ideal mini-farm. Owner willing to carry a contract. Price $179,000. Call 360-320-0525 for more information (3)

ANNOUNCEMENTS Pregnant? Need baby clothes? We have them and the price is right–FREE. Pregnancy Care Clinic, open most Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10am to 4pm. Call 360-221-2909 or stop by 6th and Cascade in Langley. Be the difference in a child’s life and become a foster parent today! Service Alternatives is looking for caring, loving, and supportive families to support foster children. 425923-0451 or mostermick@ servalt-cfs.com If you or someone you know has been a victim of homicide, burglary, robbery, assault, identity theft, fraud, human trafficking, home invasion and other crimes not listed. Victim Support Services has advocates ready to help. Please call the 24-hr Crisis Line 888-3889221. Free service. Visit our web site at http://victimsupportservices.org

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Imagine Oak Harbor’s first Food Forest, Saturdays 11am3pm, at 526 Bayshore Drive. Each week, we have volunteer opportunities available to help care for our community garden, share organic gardening tips, and learn Permaculture principles. All ages and skill levels welcome. Schedule can change due to adverse weather conditions. If you have any questions, please contact us at: imagineapermacultureworld.gmail.com Mother Mentors needs volunteers! Oak Harbor families with young children need your help! Volunteer just a couple of hours a week to make a difference in someone’s life! To volunteer or get more info, email wamothermentors@ gmail.com or call 360-3211484. Looking for board members to join the dynamic board of Island Senior Resources and serve the needs of Island County Seniors. Of particular interest are representatives from North Whidbey. For more

Need yard help mowing lawn. Self-propelled, walk-behind mower. We are in Coupeville on the bus line. Hank, 360678-7591 (3) Holmes Harbor Rod and Gun Club in Langley, WA is hiring! Our private club is an excellent place to work. Our patrons often think of our restaurant, kitchen and bar staff as family. Some positions include benefits. If interested, or if you have a referral, please contact Holmes Harbor Rod and Gun Club: Hiring Manager, Holmes Harbor Rod and Gun Club, PO Box 151, Langley, WA 98260. Email: Target@hhrodandgun. com or call 760-428-8660 (3) Drivers wanted for Whidbey SeaTac Shuttle. CDL/P2 Preferred, Training available for those without. Full Time, Part Time and weekend openings available. Send resume to admin.seatacshuttle@gmail. com (2) Facilitator/Educator for the Impaired Driving Impact Panel of Island County (IDIPIC). Part-time contracted position starting this spring for applicant in Coupeville or Oak Harbor. Appx. 15 hrs a month, $20 hr, mileage, no benefits. Must present two Saturday panels per month (one in Oak Harbor/one in Freeland), and one Thursday night panel per month (Oak Harbor). Longterm commitment desired. Job training provided. Email idipic@idipic.org for job description, qualifications and requirements. EOE (2) Whidbey SeaTac Shuttle is looking for an Office Administrator to oversee a busy front office for its Oak Harbor, Wash. operations who will report directly to the General Manager. This position requires the candidate to be fully computer proficient in Microsoft Office products and quick to learn other computer programs. Excellent verbal and written communications skills are essential and you should be highly detailed oriented for this position. Proof reading and double checking will be a critical duty. Job duties will include: Supervisory skills (SuHow’d you Puzzle 1 (Very hard, do? difficulty rating 0.84) 3

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pervise office staff, coordinate office procedures, manage employee work schedules, organize company appointments and special events, provide excellent customer service and respond to inquiries); General office skills (answer and route calls on a multi-line phone system, prepare correspondence and documents as directed, provide clerical/secretarial support to company owners and managers , maintain personnel records to meet federal and state inspection standards, maintain and update the training library, assist with maintaining and operations of office equipment, organize and maintain office files, assist in ordering/stocking company supplies, perform additional duties as assigned. Qualifications: Exceptional customer service skills, revious office management experience, proficiency in Microsoft Office Suites, self-motivated, great organizational skills, strong social media skills, keen attention to detail, excellent verbal and written communication skills, ability to maintain strict confidentiality, skilled in operating a variety of general office equipment and computers. Details at www. seatacshuttle.com or call 360679-4003 (2)

shades of blue, $8; Oval amethyst ring set in sterling silver, $45 OBO; White button pearl earrings 8mm, $29 OBO; Pale blue Baroque pearl earrings 9-10mm, $39 OBO. Call 360331-1063 (0)

HOME FURNISHINGS

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Walnut occasional table, with beveled glass top, $30 or best offer. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525.

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Straw Hay: Good for bedding, erosion control, mulch, etc. $3 per bale, 20 bale minimum. 360-321-1624 Natural Barnyard Topsoil: Good for flower beds, gardens, etc. Unscreened, 10 yard load, $225 delivered. South Whidbey, 360-321-1624

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MISCELLANEOUS Over 50 LP (vinyl) albums for sale, various artists, pristine condition, $3 each. Call 360331-1063 (0) Wind chimes, 21”, $10. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525

RECREATION

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Get ready for baseball 2019! New Balance baseball cleats, size 10.5, well-used for one season, good condition. REDUCED $15 or best offer; Catcher’s glove by Akadema, CLOTHING/ACCESSORIES 33-inch, used for two seasons, fair condition. REDUCED Men’s shoes: “Reaction,” by $30 or best offer; Louisville Kenneth Cole. Men’s black Slugger 916 bat, 32-inch, 29 leather dress shoes, like new, size 8.5. REDUCED $20 or best oz., 2-5/8” barrel, BBCOR certified. REDUCED $45 or offer. We can send photos. best offer; Marucci Cat 8 bat, 360-678-1167 33-inch, 30 oz., 2-5/8” barrel, JEWELRY BBCOR certified. REDUCED $150 or best offer. We can Wide silver cuff bracelet with send photos of these items. a 1-1/4” square blue green dichroic glass and wire wrapped 360-678-1167 Camping items: Brookstone beads, $49 OBO; Multi-stone waterproof floating lantern, for (moss agate, chalcedony etc.) camping, patio, poolside, or stretch bracelet, $20 OBO; emergencies, new, $5 or best Chrysoprase pendant with offer; Old (but clean) Thermos interesting silver chain, $75 1-gallon jug, $5; Versatile OBO; Beautiful sterling silver backpack, the two parts can and sapphire earrings, $49 be used separately, or (for OBO; Interesting glass pin in No Cheating!

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more serious backpacking) together, $15 obo. We have photos. Call or text 360-3200525. Sports items: Bag Boy golf cart, $10 obo; Men’s wet suits, size L, $10 per item; Neoprene gloves and hats, size L, $5 each. We have photos. Call or text 360-320-0525.

ANIMALS/SUPPLIES Round bales of grass feeder hay, barn stored. 360-3211624 If you or someone you know needs help in feeding pet(s), WAIF Pet Food Banks may be able to help. Pet Food Banks are located at WAIF thrift stores in Oak Harbor (465 NE Midway Blvd) and Freeland (1660 Roberta Ave) and are

generously stocked by donations from the community. If you need assistance, please stop by.

WANTED Art, Antiques & Collectibles. Cash paid for quality items. Call or text 360-661-7298 Was your Dad or Gramps in Japan or Germany? I collect old 35 mm cameras and lenses. Oak Harbor, call 970823-0002

FREE Bamboo: Already dug up. Vivax (timber bamboo), five clumps weighing 200-500 pounds each. You haul. Call Steve, 360-941-1785. Leave message if no answer (0)

CLASSIFIED INFORMATION US Postal Mail

Whidbey Weekly Classified Department PO Box 1098 Oak Harbor, WA 98277

E-Mail............classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com Telephone..................................(360)682-2341 Fax.............................................(360)682-2344 PLEASE CALL WHEN YOUR ITEMS HAVE SOLD.

Please try to limit your classified to 30 words or less, (amounts and phone numbers are counted as words) we will help edit if necessary. We charge $10/week for Vehicles, Boats, Motorcycles, RVs, Real Estate Rental/Sales, Business Classifieds and any items selling $1,000 and above. We do charge $25 to include a photo. The FREE classified space is not for business use. No classified is accepted without phone number. We reserve the right to not publish classifieds that are in bad taste or of questionable content. All free classifieds will be published twice consecutively. If you would like your ad to be published more often, you must resubmit it. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date.

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


42

$

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Full Synthetic

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95

Includes 4X4 & SUV

4295

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Most cars up to 5 qts. 5W20, 5W30, 10W30. Other grades extra. Some filters cost extra. Vehicles with Skid Plates may be extra. Plus $1 Environmental Disposal Fee.

WE CAN SAVE YOU UP TO $250 ON BRAKE SERVICE VERSUS OUR COMPETITORS. WARRANTIED AT 30K LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE.

TOYO TIRES - PASSENGER, LIGHT TRUCKS AND SUVS STARTERS ALTERNATORS TIMING BELTS SERPENTINE BELTS

BRAKES TIRES TUNE-UPS EXHAUST

UP TO

1

$ 00

Flat Rate Auto Repair only $7995 per hour

PER GAL LON D ISCOUNT T ODAY!

always

Ask for De

tails

FREE ESTIMATES!

At Hilltop Service Center we only repair and replace parts that are needed. We will not oversell or install unnecessary parts. We are highly trained brake technicians, not high pressure sales people.

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