Whidbey Weekly, February 28, 2019

Page 1

February 28 through March 6, 2019

More Local Events inside

RUN THE BRIDGE

Run the famed Deception Pass Bridge! 10% Discount use code

WIM10

Sunday, April 14, 2019 Oak Harbor, WA

- Tech Shirts for All - Personalized Bibs Participants - Free Race Photos - Customized Finisher - Finish Line Medals for All Events Celebration

www.runwhidbey.com


2

FEBRUARY 28 - MARCH 6, 2019

Whidbey Weekly

LOCALLY OWNED

FREE

Life Skills Workshops Presented by

Concordia Community Academy Living the Beatitudes Bible Study Mar 5th/12th 12-2:30 pm Preventing Falls for Seniors Mar 26th see website for update Class that includes fees CPR & AED Certification Class March 16th, 10 am to 1pm Class Fee $40 cash, pay at the class, must pre-register by March 11th on website At Concordia Lutheran Church, 590 Oak Harbor Street • Oak Harbor

More Info and Register at Concordiaoakharbor.org Or call 360-679-1697

New Orleans food at the Taproom and Whidbey Doughnuts!

Beads Costume Prizes

LIVE MUSIC

Ken Pickard & Zydeco Explosion! www.goosefoot.org

MARDI GRAS PARTY! Fat Tuesday, March 5 6–8:30 pm Bayview Community Hall 5642 Bayview Road, Langley

Free admission

Family friendly

Laissez les bon temps rouler!

Where Do Our Relay Dollars Go? Relay For Life is the signature fundraising event for the American Cancer Society. The American Cancer Society provides a variety of information and services to help cancer patients get well. Throughout 2018, the American Cancer Society provided 588 services to 123 patients who live in Island County. Of these 123 people, 82 were recently diagnosed with cancer and 14 were uninsured or on Medicaid. RELAY FOR LIFE OF WHIDBEY ISLAND • MAY 31-JUNE 1, 2019 • OAK HARBOR, WA

RACE FOR A CURE

Put Cancer In The Dust! Come join us and see for yourself what Relay For Life is all about!

CANCER Relay Rally: March 13, 7-8pm Oak Harbor Elks Lodge

relaywhidbey@gmail.com RelayForLife.org/whidbeyislandwa www.facebook.com/whidbeyrelay

THERE IS NO FINISH LINE UNTIL WE FIND A CURE.

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED

Family Guide by Amy Hannold James and the Giant Peach: Whidbey Children’s Theater brings this beloved story to the stage March 8 through March 17. Enjoy an incredible production featuring our community’s talented, young actors. wctmagic.org Are Your Seats Safe?: Caregivers transporting children in vehicles are encouraged to have their car seat/booster seat installation and use checked by a nationally certified Child Passenger Technician in Oak Harbor, at the Oak Harbor Fire Station, any time between 3 – 5 p.m., the first Tuesday of March, May, July, September or November. Car seat checks are free. Reserve a time slot, by e-mail, to CarSeatsNW@gmail.com, with your requested appointment time, as well as the ages of your children. Drop-ins welcome. Bring your vehicle owner’s manual and the car seat’s manual to the safety check. Private appointments are available, contact Safe Kids Northwest for a certified car seat technician. SafeKidsNorthwest.org Mussels for Your Mind: Books will be for sale during the Penn Cove Musselfest at the Coupeville Library, Saturday, March 2 and Sunday, March 3, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Weekly book sales, as part of the Coupeville Farmers Market, begin April 6, when the market opens for the 2019 season. Hiking the Trails of Whidbey, Fidalgo, & Guemes: You don’t have to travel to the Cascades or Olympics to enjoy a great hike. Maribeth Crandell shares her favorite hikes in our neck of the woods Monday, March 11, 5 – 6:30 p.m., at the Coupeville Library. Artisan Maker’s Market: The beautifully renovated events venue, the Ducken Barn in Oak Harbor (451 Ducken Road), is home to the “Spring Makers Market,” featuring 19 vendors of handmade items, Friday, March 15 from 4 – 8 p.m., and Saturday, March 16 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. See facebook.com/ whidbeymakersmarket for a preview of the featured artists. Parade fun For St. Patrick’s Day: Wear your green and head to downtown Oak Harbor for the St. Patrick’s Day Parade Saturday, March 16, at 4 p.m. Spring Bazaar: Enjoy a selection of homemade goods, crafts, direct sales companies and more, at the Oak Harbor Christian School (675 E. Whidbey Avenue), Saturday, March 16, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Child and Babysitter Safety Class: Youth (11 to 18 years old) who are interested in providing babysitting services can receive free training Wednesday, March 20, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m., at the Coupeville Library. This class provides fundamental information in the business of babysitting; proper supervision, basic caregiving skills, and responding properly to ill or injured children or infants. Registration is limited, reserve your seat at the Coupeville Library’s website. Presented by the Heartbeat Safety Center of Oak Harbor and funded by the Friends of the Coupeville Library. 360-678-4911 SICBA’s Home and Garden Show: Interact with over 120 vendors featuring the latest in home and garden trends. There will also be LEGO Build contests, birdhouse building, live music and food vendors. March 22-24, at the Skagit County Fairgrounds. sicba.org

Connecting to the Hearts & Minds of Children: The Connections Conference seeks to increase family and provider effectiveness through new skills and ideas. It’s a resource and educational opportunity designed for infant/toddler, preschool, and school age providers, administrators and directors, and parents. This year’s conference is Saturday, March 23, at the Swinomish Casino & Lodge. Spanish translation is available, as well as clock hours and STARS credits. Lunch is included in your registration; a discount is available through March 1. There’s also a community resources fair, open to the public, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. skagitconnectionsconference. com A Flea Market for Creatives: The Whidbey Island Art & Craft Supply Flea Market will be held at the South Whidbey Community Center Saturday, March 23, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Find the supplies for your spring projects, or rent a table to sell what you’re not using. whidbeyartswap@yahoo.com How to Provide the Guard Rails Kids Need Online: Discover effective ways to stay informed and connected with your child’s activities online. In this free workshop, you’ll learn key strategies for limiting the influence screens have on your family. Tuesday, March 26, 6:30 – 8 p.m., at the Langley Library. The Money Smart Piggy Bank Challenge: Saving money is an invaluable lifelong skill for kids to master, just as important as learning to read. The Opportunity Council presents this program Saturday, March 30, 2 – 4 p.m., at the Oak Harbor Library. Kids ages 5 to 12 are encouraged to make saving money a rewarding experience by designing their own piggy bank. A caregiver and registration are required, visit the Oak Harbor Library’s website to reserve your seat. 360-675-5115 Bids for Kids Dinner & Auction: Enjoy a catered dinner as you bid on live and silent auction items including art, gifts, experiences, concert tickets and more. Tickets for the April 13 event are $85. Proceeds benefit before and after school programs at the Oak Harbor Boys and Girls Club. 360-240-9273 Bowl for Kids’ Sake: Big Brothers, Big Sisters of Island County is hosting its 21st annual “Bowl for Kids Sake” event, Saturday, May 4. Community members and businesses are invited to create teams to help the organization meet its fundraising goals. On the day of the “Star Wars” event, teams enjoy free bowling, pizza and prizes. Every bowler is awarded entry into a prize raffle; grand prizes awarded to the highest fundraising team and individual. An award will also be given to the best dressed bowler. This year’s grand prizes include Disneyland tickets, Victoria B.C. lodging, and more. To register a team, call 360-279-0644, bbbsislandcounty. org Coupons for Our Community: The Whidbey Coupon Club needs your coupon inserts. Coupons are given to coupon users throughout Whidbey Island, some are sent to overseas military families. Bring your coupon inserts to the Whidbey Party Store, Windermere Oak Harbor, the Oak Harbor Senior Center or the Good Cheer Stores or Food Bank. nwcouponclub@comcast.net Spring is on the horizon! Click WhidbeyIsland.MacaroniKid.com to find upcoming events, youth activities, Spring/Summer Break fun and more!

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OWNED

ON TRACK with Jim Freeman

My over half-a-lifelong friend, Cochise, sent me a catalog from CatalogFavorites.com. He shared the pages featuring pictures of slogan-infused T-shirts, available for $17.95 each if you buy two or more.

Were I in need of such fashion, my choices would include, but are not limited to, the following: The Three Kid Trifecta...Three T-shirts with the captions: I’m the Oldest, I Make The Rules; I’m the Middle, I’m the Reason We Had Rules; I’m the Youngest, The Rules Don’t Apply to Me Ho Lee Chit Pretty sure I’m going to be one of those senior citizens who bites everyone PUNK–Professional Uncle No Kids Sorry I’m Late...I Didn’t Want to Come I was normal three dogs ago I don’t have grey hair. I have wisdom highlights. Musician: Someone who packs $5000 worth of gear into a car and drives 100 miles to make $50. So When Is This ‘Old Enough To Know Better’ Supposed To Kick In? I Can’t Believe I Forgot To Go To The Gym Today. That’s 7 Years In A Row. The best thing about the good old days was that I wasn’t good and I wasn’t old We shall conclude with Cochise’s favorite, noting his dad Harry was a career police officer in San Diego back in the day when the neighborhood cop took you home. The Officer said, “You Drinking?” I Said, “You Buying?” We Just Laughed and Laughed... No charge to www.catalogfavorites.com for the previous fee free promotion. We thank them for selling much needed products in a convenient manner. We here at Whidbey Weekly promote humor, no matter the source, but we always give credit, even if we don’t have any ourselves. If I had a T-shirt time machine, I’d knock out a small white shirt with big blue letters and zoom back to the fifth floor hallway of Oil City Senior High to showcase proudly on the front, My dad made me get this haircut and on the back, I’m not allowed to wear jeans. Mystery coin Although our folks let me have a doctor’s kit, hoping I would become a pediatrician with a good bedside manner, I wanted to be a Hardy Boy with a DNA kit. Yesterday, Chuck from Forks appeared to buy me lunch at the Freeland Cafe. Since I was driving, I had a root beer. Since Chuck was buying, he had a vodka tonic. Why not? The sun was out. After a ham and cheese and cheeseburger were ingested over sarcastic interludes, Chuck gave me a coin which said Missouri Athletic Club Pool and Billiards on one side and the faded needle point shaped dot created C. Lackland 457 imprinted between the raised silver leafs shaped like the stuff Julius Caesar wore on his head. By next week, I hope to have contacted this Missouri organization to see if I can return said coin to Mr. Lackland or his family. As a Freelander, I cannot keep something inscribed with the name Lackland. While some may feel a lacking in Freeland, there is nothing free in Lackland.

Whidbey Weekly the Freeland phone book. Apologies to any unlisted Lacklanders. Diary Duo Thanks ever so much to Father Church for sharing this example of how men and women record things in their diaries. My question to Father Church would be, what man has a diary? Wife’s diary: Tonight, I thought my husband was acting weird. We had made plans to meet at a nice restaurant for dinner. I was shopping with my friends all day long, so I thought he was upset at the fact that I was a bit late, but he made no comment on it. Conversation wasn’t flowing, so I suggested that we go somewhere quiet so we could talk. He agreed, but he didn’t say much. I asked him what was wrong. He said, ‘Nothing.’ I asked him if it was my fault that he was upset. He said he wasn’t upset, that it had nothing to do with me, and not to worry about it. On the way home, I told him that I loved him. He smiled slightly, and kept driving. I can’t explain his behavior. I don’t know why he didn’t say, ‘I love you, too.’ When we got home, I felt as if I had lost him completely, as if he wanted nothing to do with me anymore. He just sat there quietly, and watched TV. He continued to seem distant and absent. Finally, with silence all around us, I decided to go to bed. About fifteen minutes later, he came to bed. But I still felt that he was distracted, and his thoughts were somewhere else. He fell asleep. I cried. I don’t know what to do. I’m almost sure that his thoughts are with someone else. My life is a disaster. Husband’s diary: A two-foot putt...who the hell misses a twofoot putt? Weekend fun This Friday at the South Whidbey High School Auditorium, the 20th Annual Whidbey Jazz Concert will be held from 7:30pm until 9:30pm. Tickets are available at the door. This yearly gathering of all five area jazz bands is a must-see for any and all who appreciate a toe-tapping time.

For more info, check their web site at www. thepenncovemusselsfestival.com

It is a tough go.

Thanks to the Coupeville Historic Waterfront Association for coordinating all this pleasure.

I want to return this Lackland coin, a one-of-akind #457, no matter how valuable.

Have a great week. We hope to see you around Paradise.

It will be worth a lot more in Lackland than Freeland.

To read past columns of On Track in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www. whidbeyweekly.com.

As of this printing, there are no Lacklands in

Pork & Beans WHIDBEY Rice of Any Kind HELP HOUSE Tuna Oatmeal (not instant) 1091 SE Hathaway St • Oak Harbor • 360-675-3888

PHONE: 360-682-2341

FAX: 360-682-2344

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Whidbey Weekly LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

1131 SE ELY STREET | PO BOX 1098 | OAK HARBOR, WASHINGTON 98277 Publisher & Editor.......................................................... Eric Marshall Marketing Representatives................Penny Hill, Roosevelt Rumble Graphic Design............................................................. Teresa Besaw Production Manager......................................................TJ Pierzchala Circulation Manager.................................................... Noah Marshall

Contributing Writers Jim Freeman Wesley Hallock Kae Harris Tracy Loescher Kathy Reed Carey Ross

Volume 11, Issue 09 | © MMXIX Whidbey Weekly PUBLISHED and distributed every week. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The Whidbey Weekly cannot be held responsible for the quality of goods or services supplied by advertisers in this publication. Articles, unless otherwise stated, are by contribution and therefore the Whidbey Weekly is not in a position to validate any comments, recommendations or suggestions made in these articles. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. DEADLINES: The Whidbey Weekly is a submission based editorial with contributing writers. Please feel free to submit any information (please limit to 200 words) that you would like to share with the Whidbey Weekly. You may submit by email to editor@whidbeyweekly.com, by fax to (360)682-2344 or by postal mail to PO Box 1098, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date. For more information, please visit www.whidbeyweekly.com.

WHY GO OVER THE BRIDGE FOR YOUR CUSTOM FRAMING & ART SUPPLIES?

Gene’s Has It All!

We Specialize In Custom Framing

If you feel like having a fun couple of hours with some of the most fun people in our community, we’ll see you at 5 p.m.!

Musselfest Bold, briny and blue are the three key words for this weekend’s Penn Cove Musselfest in historic Coupeville. Live music, children’s activities, boat tours, cooking demos, mussel eating competition, mussel chowder tastings, beer and wine gardens, and a mountain bike and poker ride should be enough to keep us all entertained while we mussel out.

LOCALLY OPERATED

We could use your help with these NORTH items:

This Saturday at the Dancing Fish Winery in Freeland, the South Whidbey Builders Association will be holding their annual chili feed auction fundraiser to provide scholarships for local students.

My lunch meats and cheeses should be safe. It would take a lot more flies to open that plastic drawer.

3

DONATIONS NEEDED

Where else can you enjoy five amazing bands for 10 bucks? With three to four songs per band, we’re talking jukebox prices! Hope to see you there.

Cool flying Sometimes it gets so cold in my caboose kitchen the winter flies escape to the inside of my refrigerator to warm up. Fortunately, those Swiss Miss 50-percent more chocolate pudding cups are sealed. No damage done.

FEBRUARY 28 - MARCH 6, 2019

• • • • •

Honest Pricing No Fine Print Friendly Service No Traffic Delays 20% Military Discount Whidbey’s Largest Selection of Fine Art Supplies

GENE’S ART & FRAME SINCE 1967

360-675-3854 • 250 SE Pioneer Way • Oak Harbor genesartframing.com 9:30-6 Monday-Friday • 10-5:30 Saturday • Closed Sunday Custom Framing • Pens & Pencils • Papers • Canvas Brushes • Portfolios • Clay • Easels • Palettes • How-To- Books Calligraphy • Drafting • Airbrush • Artists & Craft Paint Supply Totes • Readymade Frames • Children's Art Kits

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


4

FEBRUARY 28 - MARCH 6, 2019 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

Bits & Pieces Letters to the Editor Editor, Valentine’s Day, we lit 1,217candles in honor and recognition of the anniversary of the Parkland school shooting. The candles were for the 1200 children who died of gun violence in the USA since Parkland, plus the 17 murdered in that orgy of preventable, senseless violence. We could have added 35 more for all the mass murders including Aurora, Ill. and 106 more for the school shootings in the last year. We salute the courage of Marjory Stoneman Douglas students, their families, teachers and staff and others who have organized to call out legislators for their inaction and the NRA for fueling that indifference. If there is any doubt the NRA represents domestic terrorism take a hard look at their history, check out their website and recall the rallies, led by Charlton “out of my cold, dead hands” Heston, after tragic shootings in Colorado and Michigan in flagrant indifference of grieving families and traumatized communities. We have questions: Is militarizing our schools and arming teachers the best we can do? What of politicians, well paid by the NRA, who offer “thoughts and prayers” instead of responsible, compassionate and reasonable actions? Why are we the only country in the developed world where these acts routinely happen and are routinely ignored? What does it say about us, a society that willingly terrorizes and accepts the murder of its own children? And the second amendment? It was primarily there for killing Indians and to respond to slave uprisings. We grieved on Valentines Day and expect to again until there is a shift away from greed to sense and compassion. Gary Piazzon Coupeville, Wash.

Outcast Productions Announces Its Ninth Season Ned Farley, founder and producer of Outcast Productions, is pleased to announce the 9th season of plays being presented at the Black Box Theater at the former fairgrounds in Langley. Farley, who founded Outcast with K. Sandy O’Brien, notes, “We continue to sell close to 90-percent of the seats and are drawing many theater goers who are coming from off-island.” Outcast Productions is a private, 501(c)(3), not for profit theater company incorporated in Washington State. It prides itself on being theater with a social conscience. Farley says, “Our goal is to provoke a dialogue about some of the critical social issues of our time such as oppression, human rights, politics and the psychological and emotional worlds of human beings.” The 2019 Outcast Productions season includes: Handy Dandy, by William Dickson, directed by Ned Farley, March 15-30 Starring Gayle Flemming and Jim Scullin Molly Egan, a feisty, salty-tongued activist nun in her early seventies and District Court Judge Henry Pulaski, a conservative jurist in his sixties, develop a grudging respect for each other and eventually, the two begin to hear each other out on a personal as well as professional level. Shtick, by Henry Meyerson, directed by Jim Carroll, May 17-June 1 Helen is left on the horns of dilemma: How

can she be a nurturing caretaker for a man who has deceived her (with her own sister, yet) while knowing he is a snake with no visible conscience?

ing big ideas and to introduce our community with the influencers and thought leaders shaping our society, with a brilliant lecture given by Professor Siegel.”

Inherit The Wind, a staged reading, by Jerome Lawrence and Robert Edwin Lee, directed by K. Sandy O’Brien, June 29 and 30 The New York News describes this as, “Magnificently written; one of the most exciting dramas of the last decade,” here in a newly visioned staged reading.

A Delicate Balance: Protecting and Restoring Constitutional Democracy takes place March 8, 7:30pm at Whidbey Island Center for the Arts, 565 Camano Avenue, Langley. Tickets are $24 for the lecture only, or $80 for the lecture and private reception with hors d’oeuvres and a selection of local wines. Audience members are encouraged to attend the pre-lecture reception – an extraordinary and intimate opportunity to meet and talk with leaders of Island County’s political movements and parties, elected officials, and Professor Siegel. For tickets or more information, visit www.WICAonline.org.

Shirley Valentine, by Willy Russell, directed by Gail Liston, Sept. 13-28 Starring Suzanne Kelman An ordinary English, middle-class house wife receives an invitation from a girl friend to join her for a holiday in Greece where she has an adventure with a local fisherman and decides to stay. Over My Dead Body (A World Premiere), by Suzanne Kelman, directed by Gabe Harshman, Nov. 1-16 An out-of-work actor can only get a part as a dead body and thinks he has hit rock bottom….until he meets his understudy, who would do anything to play the corpse, even if that means murdering any “body” who stands in his way. Since establishing the theater at the fairgrounds, major improvements and alterations have been done to the building. Now Outcast is hoping to raise an additional $30,000 over time to replace current stage lighting with energy-efficient stage lighting. The first round of new lighting has just been ordered. Season tickets are currently on sale through Feb. 28 and can be purchased through Brown Paper Tickets, www.brownpapertickets.com/ event/251337, or by emailing Outcast Productions at ocp@whidbey.com and requesting a season ticket subscription form. The season ticket package includes tickets to the four full productions: Student/senior $50, Adult $65. Season ticket subscribers may save 10% on tickets for the staged reading if purchased at the same time for $10 per ticket. For more information about Outcast Productions, visit www.outcastproductions.net To be on the patron email list, please go to the website and click on the “Join Us” tab. [Submitted by Carolyn Tamler]

A Delicate Balance: Protecting and Restoring Constitutional Democracy How modern politics and partisanship affect the traditional roles and powers of the three branches of our government Whidbey Island Center for the Arts (WICA) introduces its new Humanities Series with an “Issues of the Day” lecture given by US Constitution authority and Seattle University law professor, Andrew Siegel. Professor Siegel will present A Delicate Balance: Protecting and Restoring Constitutional Democracy – a compelling conversation about how modern politics and partisanship are affecting the traditional roles and powers of the three branches of our government. Set against an historical backdrop, Siegel will address the current perceptions and offer insights about the future of our Constitutional Democracy. A Delicate Balance will focus on: the Judicial Branch and the extent our court system is affected by partisan politics; the role of the Legislative Branch in a time when the Executive Branch wields tremendous power; and an Executive Branch under extreme scrutiny. Barbara Seitle, past President of the League of Women Voters of Washington, will moderate a brief Q&A following each segment of the discussion. “Since 1996, WICA has presented events with leading figures in the world of art, film, literature, music, politics, and theatre,” says WICA Executive Director, Verna Everitt. “It is a great pleasure to launch our new Humanities Series, designed to highlight our tradition of shar-

[Submitted by Jason Dittmer, WICA]

Island Consort Announces 2019 Young Musicians Award Winner Island Consort is pleased to announce that Alexander Amick has been chosen as the recipient of Island Consort’s Young Musicians Award for 2019. The award is based first and foremost on musicality, technical acumen and dedication to their musical craft. The secondary criterion is selecting someone for whom the $500 award will do the greatest amount of good, in keeping with Island Consort’s musical mission. Alexander Amick is a budding pianist and a senior at Oak Harbor High School. He currently studies piano with Dr. Kay Zavislak, a professor at Western Washington University and music theory with island resident and notable composer Janice Giteck, a retired professor from Cornish College of the Arts in Seattle. In addition to his solo piano explorations, he currently accompanies the Oak Harbor High School Choir and has also played for musical theater productions. Born into a Navy family, Alexander is the youngest of three children who also believes in community service. He provides tutoring to other students and is a member of the Big Brother, Big Sister program. Alexander’s personal mission is to “connect with his audience, to provide solace and give people hope” in a way that only music does. Island Consort is thrilled to offer this award to Alexander in support of his evolving musicianship, commitment to music and elevation of our community. [Submitted by Sheila Weidendorf, Director, Island Consort]

Oak Harbor Rotary Opens Grant Applications for Community Service Grants Program The Rotary Club of Oak Harbor is pleased to announce a Call for Grant Applications for its 6th annual Community Service Grants Program. The Friday-noon Rotary initiated its Community Service Grants in 2013 to promote the quality of life in the Oak Harbor and North Whidbey Island Community and is focused on supporting organizations that act on the needs of people in need. In the prior five years, the Club has awarded more than $25,000 and over 20 Grants. Recent recipients include: Whidbey Homeless Coalition, SPIN Café, Impaired Driving Impact Panel, Garage of Blessings, Boys & Girls Club and Habitat for Humanity. Emailed grant applications are due by March 5 and details can be found on the Club’s website - https://ohrotary.org/Stories/7-th-annual-community-service-grants-program. The Club anticipates awarding grants in the range of $1,000 to $500. The Oak Harbor Rotary has a longstanding reputation for its history of leadership in community service. In the past, the Club has spearheaded the drive to build the high school football stadium, donated the swimming Lagoon at Windjammer Park and has awarded over $250,000 in college scholarships to graduating seniors at OHHS.

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED More recently, the Club has initiated the Elementary School Backpack Program, which helps ensure kids have nutritious snacks for the weekends when school lunch programs are not available. Members frequently volunteer to serve meals at SPIN Café and perform nighthost duties at the Haven shelter. The Club has also stepped forward as the principal supporter of the annual Craig McKenzie Team Hydros for Heroes boat racing event. Anyone may make contributions to the Oak Harbor Rotary Club. Checks may be made payable to the Oak Harbor Rotary Foundation, Oak Harbor Rotary Club, PO Box 442, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Rotary is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization and your contribution may be tax deductible. [Submitted by Dan Evans]

NAS Whidbey SAR Rescues Two Snowmobilers Near Mount Baker A Search and Rescue (SAR) team from Naval Air Station (NAS) Whidbey Island conducted a Medical Evacuation (MEDEVAC) from Forks, Wash., Monday. The SAR unit was contacted at approximately 5:15am to MEDEVAC a woman from Forks after it was determined no civilian rescue services were available. The SAR helicopter launched and by 7:20am the patient was loaded onto the helicopter in Forks and flown to Harborview Medical Center in Seattle where they landed at 8:00am. A Search and Rescue (SAR) team from Naval Air Station (NAS) Whidbey Island rescued two snowmobilers during two separate incidents near Mount Baker, Sunday, Feb. 17. At approximately noon Sunday a SAR team was notified of a 39-year-old man who had suffered a broken leg while snowmobiling at Schreiber’s Meadow just south of Mount Baker. Since no civilian assets were available, the SAR team launched at approximately 1:00pm to conduct the rescue. Once located, the patient was hoisted aboard the helicopter and transported to PeaceHealth St. Joseph Medical Center in Bellingham, Wash., where they landed by about 2:00pm. As the crew was transferring the patient at the hospital, they were alerted to another snowmobiler in Schreiber’s Meadow with a broken leg, this time a 45-year-old man. The SAR team returned to NAS Whidbey Island for refueling then flew back to Schreiber’s Meadow. At about 3:40pm they found the patient at a location less than a mile from where the first patient had been found. The second patient was hoisted aboard the helicopter and flown to PeaceHealth St. Joseph Medical Center, where they landed by 4:20pm. NAS Whidbey Island SAR has conducted nine total missions throughout Washington State this year, including one search, two rescues and six medical evacuations. The Navy SAR unit operates three MH-60S helicopters from NAS Whidbey Island as search and rescue/medical evacuation (SAR/ MEDEVAC) platforms for the EA-18G aircraft as well as other squadrons and personnel assigned to the installation. Pursuant to the National SAR Plan of the United States, the unit may also be used for civil SAR/MEDEVAC needs to the fullest extent practicable on a non-interference basis with primary military duties according to applicable national directives, plans, guidelines and agreements; specifically, the unit may launch in response to tasking by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center (based on a Washington State Memorandum of Understanding) for inland missions, and/or tasking by the United States Coast Guard for all other aeronautical and maritime regions, when other assets are unavailable. [Submitted by Thomas Mills, Public Affairs Deputy, NAS Whidbey Island]

State Auditor Gives Sno-Isle Libraries Clean Reports For 32 years in a row, Sno-Isle Libraries has received clean audits from the Washington State Auditor’s Office. The latest in the string of official reports are the accountability audit for the period Jan. 1, 2016- Dec. 31, 2017, and the financial statements audit for the period Jan. 1-Dec. 31,

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


Whidbey Weekly

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OWNED 2017. All audit reports are available on the State Auditor’s Office website by searching for Sno-Isle Regional Library. “The auditors are very thorough when they review our systems, processes, practices and records,” Administrative Services Director Gary Sitzman said. “Taxpayers who contribute library levy funding through property taxes can be assured that our record of clean audits reflects the serious attention we apply to financial management and stewardship.” According to the auditor’s Office, accountability audits assess whether public funds and assets are protected and accounted for, and that government agencies are following laws and regulations. Financial statement audits assess whether state and local government financial reports are accurate and complete. “We are committed to maintaining a strong system of internal controls, financial reporting integrity, and being accountable for the public’s resources,” Sitzman said. “These audit results are the result of the ongoing efforts of library-district staff members dedicated to serving the public. We also appreciate the strong cooperative relationship established with our local State Auditor’s Office team.” [Submitted by Jim Hills, Communications & Marketing Manager, Sno-Isle Libraries]

Local Business News Whimsies Celebrates 2nd Anniversary Whimsies, located at 830 SE Pioneer Way in Oak Harbor, will be celebrating its second anniversary Saturday, March 2 from noon to 5:00pm. Included in the celebration will be tea sampling, discount coupons, an Easter Bunny raffle and CAKE! Drop in and view a variety of handmade items including mosaics, art, pottery, jewelry and gifts, plus specialty teas and tea accoutrements as well as a collection of vintage costume jewelry. Sign up for one of the mosaic classes and create your own 6” X 6” mosaic mirror. The class is by arrangement and can be for just one person or as many as four. The cost is $35 and is in two sessions. Also, new classes will be

available, including making mosaic light switch plates, little treasure boxes made with recycled 8lt. QLQ Mint tins and lighted decorative bottles.

FEBRUARY 28 - MARCH 6, 2019

5

LOCALLY OPERATED

REGISTER TODAY!

Every day the shop offers one or two teas for sampling. Drop in to see what’s new and have a little cup of tea! Join the tea reward club ... buy 10 tins or boxes of tea and receive a FREE tin or box. Whimsies is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10:30am to 5:30pm. For more information, call 360-682-2468, email victoriacharlotte21@yahoo.com, or visit www.westbeachmosaics.com

Eat A Sub: Help Seattle Children’s Hospital Jersey Mike’s Kicks off 9th Annual “Month of Giving” in March Seattle Children’s Hospital is joining forces with 37 Jersey Mike’s Subs throughout the Seattle area for the 9th Annual March “Month of Giving” campaign to fund local charities. During the month of March, customers can make a donation to Seattle Children’s Hospital at the participating Jersey Mike’s restaurants. The campaign will culminate in Jersey Mike’s “Day of Giving” on Wednesday, March 27, when local Jersey Mike’s restaurants will give 100-percent of the day’s sales – not just profit – to Seattle Children’s Hospital. On Day of Giving, local Jersey Mike’s owners and operators throughout the country will donate their resources and every single dollar that comes in to more than 180 different charities including hospitals, youth organizations, food banks and more. Last year’s Month of Giving campaign raised more than $6 million for 170 local charities nationwide. Since 2010, Jersey Mike’s locations throughout the country have raised more than $34 million for local charities and distributed more than 2 million free sub sandwiches to help numerous causes. For more information about Jersey Mike’s Subs Month of Giving, please visit: www.jerseymikes.com/mog.

Run the famed Deception Pass Bridge!

10% Discount use code

WIM10

Race for a day, play for the weekend.

Sunday, April 14, 2019 Oak Harbor, WA

- Tech Shirts for All Participants - Customized Finisher Medals for All Events - Personalized Participant Bibs - Free Race Photos - Finish Line Celebration with Live Music

Register Now at

www.runwhidbey.com

Contractors & Do-it-yourselfers Save Time & MONEY!

Donations Are Tax Deductible

FREE pick up island wide, call for appointment. WANTED: CABINETS • WINDOWS • DOORS • PAINT • LUMBER FLOORING • ELECTRICAL • PLUMBING • HARDWARE TOOLS • APPLIANCES • LIGHTING • GARDENING ITEMS FREELAND • 1592 Main Street • 360.331.6272 southstore@islandcountyhabitat.com

of Island County

DONATIONS ACCEPTED 7 DAYS A WEEK! Volunteer Opportunities Available

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


6

FEBRUARY 28 - MARCH 6, 2019 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

What’s Going On All entries are listed chronologically, unless there are multiple entries for the same venue or are connected to a specific organization (such as Sno-Isle Libraries) in which case all entries for that venue or organization are listed collectively in chronological order under one heading.

Island Herb Vendor Day Thursday, February 28, 2:00-5:00pm Island Herb, Freeland Representatives from Dama will be on site with product displays and information. Must be 21 or older. Island Herb is located at 5565 Vanbarr Pl, Unit F. For more information, call 360-3310140 or visit whidbeyislandherb.com. Marijuana has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Keep out of the reach of children.

Star Party Friday, March 1, 6:30pm Fort Nugent Park, Oak Harbor Explore the night sky and view distant galaxies, planets and nebulas at this free public Star Party hosted by the Island County Astronomical Society (ICAS). No telescope is needed and people of all ages are welcome to attend. Be sure and dress warmly and note that the event will be canceled if the weather is cloudy. For more information, contact Bob Scott at ICAS_ President@outlook.com or visit www.icas-wa. org.

Whidbey Jazz Concert Friday, March 1, 7:30pm South Whidbey High School Auditorium, Langley The 20th annual Whidbey Jazz Concert features jazz bands from all Whidbey Island middle and high schools in an evening of toe-tapping fun. Tickets $10; available at Click Music and Whidbey Party Store in Oak Harbor, Moonraker Books in Langley or at the door. Proceeds benefit Whidbey Island Jazz Society scholarships for graduating high school seniors.

In Concert: Marley Erickson, Haeyoon Shin and Mark Findlay Friday, March 1, 7:30pm Whidbey Island Center for the Arts, Langley Known for her expressive musical style and technical virtuosity, 15-year-old Marley Erickson is a top prize winner of both the Louis Spohr and Piccolo Violino International Violin competitions and has appeared as soloist with orchestras on both sides of the Atlantic. She will be performing with Mark Findlay and Award-winning cellist Haeyoon Shin. Featuring Beethoven’s rousing Piano Trio Op. 1, No. 3 in C Minor and Antonín Dvorák’s heartwarming “Dumky” Piano Trio. Also on the program are works by Paganini, Piazzolla and Rachmaninoff. All Seats $20. www.wicaonline.org

Live Music: Nick Vigarino Friday, March 1, 7:30-9:30pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville No cover. For more information, call 360-6825747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

Luz, an evening of Flamenco Friday, March 1, 8:00pm Bayview Community, 5642 Bayview Road Seattle-based Flamenco dancer, Savannah Fuentes brings her latest show, Luz, an evening of Flamenco, to Whidbey Island, joined by two exceptional Spanish Flamenco artists; acclaimed Spanish-Romani guitarist Pedro Cortes and singer/percussionist/dancer Jose Moreno. Tickets: general admission $22, VIP seating $34, student $12 child $8, available at www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3896641

Penn Cove Musselfest Saturday & Sunday, March 2 & 3, 10:00am-4:00pm Coupeville Celebrate the bold, briny and blue this weekend in Coupeville. Enjoy guest chefs, great tastings and lots of fun for the food enthusiast! www.thepenncovemusselsfestival.com

Live Music: Brooke Pennock & Wendy McDowell Saturday, March 2, 5:00-7:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville No cover. For more information, call 360-6825747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

Live Music: Ireland Woods & Richard Williams Saturday, March 2, 7:30-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville No cover. For more information, call 360-6825747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

5th Annual Mardi Gras Party Tuesday, March 5, 6:00-8:30pm Bayview Community Hall, Langley This is a free, family friendly event. Dance to Ken Pickard and Zydeco Explosion as they play new, old, and some very old authentic Zydeco and Cajun music. Costume contest with prizes for Most Original, Most Comical, Best in Show, Best Couple, Best Child, and Best Mask! Beads do not count as a costume, but you can grab some free at the door. Call 360-321-4246 for info or visit www.goosefoot.org.

Edward Jones - Freeland Open House Wednesday, March 6, 3:00-6:00pm 1688 Main Street, Suite 101, Freeland We’ve moved! Come celebrate our new location with financial advisors Kristi Price and Melissa Cates and staff. Hors d’oeuvres will be served. RSVP to 360-331-4450

Upcoming Sno-Isle Library Events See schedule below Cost: Free Lit for Fun Book Group Thursday, February 28, 9:00-11:00am Freeland Library Join us for a discussion of M. Blanchet’s “The Curve of Time,” a biography and astonishing adventure story of a widow who packed her five children onto a 25-foot boat in Canadian waters. For adults. Used Book Sale Saturday, March 2, 10:00am-2:00pm Freeland Library Large selection of great books for all ages at bargain prices! Proceeds support Friends of the Freeland Library. Tech Petting Zoo Saturday, March 2, 3:00-4:30pm Oak Harbor Library Join us for hands-on experience with a variety of STEAM-related tech demonstrations and experiments. Ages 8 - 12. Caregiver required for each session. Whidbey Write-In Group Quiet Time to Write Mondays, March 4 & 18, 9:00am-1:00pm Freeland Library This writing group is different from others. All genres, ages, writing tool use, are welcome to come in for a quiet place and time to work on writing projects. There are no presentations or critiques of work in this group, just the act of writing. Take the opportunity at the breaks to meet other writers on the island. Soft jazz will be playing for those who need some ambient sound. Coffee and tea will be provided. Fresnel Lens at the Admiralty Head Lighthouse: Gleaming Eye of the Sea Monday, March 4, 1:30pm Coupeville Library Have you ever stood admiring Admiralty Head Lighthouse at Fort Casey State Park? Did you wonder about its gleaming light? Learn about the power behind lighting the way for all at sea from Whidbey’s own Admiralty Head Lighthouse. Significance is relative when discussing time and technology. Monumental in size, history and intricacy, discover the journey of the Fresnel lens.

Discuss the Classics with Rita Drum Monday, March 4, 1:30pm Oak Harbor Library Please join us as we discuss Anne Morrow Lindbergh’s classic “A Gift From the Sea.” A quick overview will be shared followed by a lively discussion of the wisdom and encouragement held within this precious and classic tale. The Art of the Mini Memoir Mondays, March 4, 11, 18 & 25, 2:00-4:00pm Freeland Library We all have stories, and you can have a wonderful time telling yours! Instructor Margaret Bendet, a professional writing coach and memoirist leads this four-session class which is an introduction to memoir writing. Preregistration required. Each week you will be inspired to write. By the end of the class, you will have some beautiful, polished gems to share with your friends and family and you may have started writing a book! Bring a notebook and pen or a portable electronic device. Preregistration is required. Whidbey Reads Presents Moonraking 47 Years in the Book Business Tuesday, March 5, 2:00-3:30pm Freeland Library Josh Hauser will talk about her 47-year-old love affair with books, the residents of South Whidbey and the trials and tribulations of running your own store. She and her husband, Glenn, started Moonraker Books from scratch with no prior retail or business experience. Come hear their tales and celebrate this community treasure. Whidbey Read Presents: Altered Books Wednesday, March 6, 2:00-4:00pm Oak Harbor Library Discover your creativity! Make art with old books. Bring your imagination, and we’ll supply the rest. Race to Alaska Wednesday, March 6, 2:00-3:30pm Freeland Library R2AK is the first boat race of its kind and North America’s longest human and wind powered race. Join Daniel Evans and learn about this exciting race from Port Townsend, Wash., to Ketchikan, Alaska. Entering its fifth year, some say it’s like the Iditarod, on a boat, with a chance of drowning, being run down by a freighter, or eaten by a grizzly bear. There are squalls, killer whales, tidal currents that run upwards of 20 miles an hour, and some of the most beautiful scenery on earth. Funded by Friends of the Freeland Library.

Religious Services South Whidbey Community Church Sundays, 9:00-9:45am Adult Bible Study 10:00-11:00am Worship Deer Lagoon Grange, 5142 Bayview Rd, Langley Pastor Darrell Wenzek Communion message will be “Celebrate the event: the Death of the Savior.” Service is followed by a light lunch.

Prayer Group Every Tuesday, 4:00-5:30pm St. Hubert Catholic Church, Langley Charismatic Prayer and Praise group. Everyone welcome. For more information, call Bill at 360-222-4080 or email Sobico@comcast.net.

Filipino Christian Fellowship Sundays, 2:00pm Meets at Church on the Rock, 1780 SE 4th Ave., Oak Harbor. www.ohcfellowship.com

Healing Rooms Every Thursday, 6:30-8:30pm 5200 Honeymoon Bay Road, Freeland The Healing Rooms are open to anyone desiring personal prayer for physical, emotional, or spiritual needs. There is a team of Christians

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED from several local churches that are dedicated to praying for healing the sick in our community. All ministry is private, confidential, and free. Teams are available to pray for individuals who drop by on a first-come, first-serve basis. For more information, contact Ann at 425-263-2704, email healingwhidbey.com, or visit the International Association of Healing Rooms at healingrooms.com.

Concordia Lutheran Church Sunday service, 9:30am Bible Study & Sunday School, 10:45am 590 N. Oak Harbor Street For more information, visit www.concordiaoak harbor.org or call 360-675-2548.

Teaching Through God’s Word Sundays, 9:00 & 11:00am Calvary Chapel, 3821 French Road, Clinton For more information, visit ccwhidbey.com.

Unitarian Universalist Sunday Service Sundays, 10:00am Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland All are welcome. Values-based children’s religious exploration classes and childcare will be provided. Visit www.uucwi.org for more information. The Unitarian Universalist Congregation building is located at 20103 Highway 525, two miles north of Freeland.

Unity of Whidbey Sundays, 10:00am 5671 Crawford Road, Langley If you’re one of the “spiritual but not religious” people who questions your childhood faith or is looking for something more, Unity of Whidbey may feel like a homecoming. Visit our website: unityofwhidbey.org

Whidbey Quakers Sundays, 4:00-5:00pm Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland Whidbey Islands Friends Meeting (also known as Quakers) meet in silent worship and community, with occasional spoken messages, every Sunday at the Unitarian Universalist building. For more information, contact Tom Ewell at tewell@whidbey.com or go to www. whidbeyquakers.org.

First Church of Christ, Scientist Worship, 10:00am Sunday School to age 20, 10:00am Wednesday Testimony Meeting, 2:30pm Christian Science Reading Room Tuesday & Friday, 11:00am-3:00pm The church and Reading Room are located at 721 SW 20th Court at Scenic Heights Street, Oak Harbor. Call 360-675-0621 or visit christianscience.com Services and Sunday School are also held at 10:30am on South Whidbey at 15910 Highway 525, just north of Bayview and across from Useless Bay Road; testimony meetings are held the first Wednesday of each month at 7:30pm.

Galleries & Art Shows Hidden Pearls Anniversary Celebration Saturday & Sunday, March 2 & 3, 10:00am-5:00pm 901 Grace St., Coupeville Hidden Pearls Gallery is celebrating its one-year anniversary! Call 360-678-3117 or go to hiddenpearlsgallerycoupeville.com.

Mid-Winter Group Show Extended Saturday, March 2, 5:00-7:00pm Rob Schouten Gallery, Langley Since February brought us record snows and the gallery was closed for a number of days, we have decided to extend the show through March. Included in the exhibit are handmade jewelry, fine sculptures in bronze, stone, wood and steel, original paintings in a variety of styles and mediums, and some extraordinary fine art glass including handblown, sculpted and fused glass. Many artists will be in attendance and light refreshments will be served. 360-222-3070 or email info@robschoutengallery.com WHAT'S GOING ON

continued on page

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.

12


Whidbey Weekly

NEWS

Growler operations decision soon p. 10

FEBRUARY 28 - MARCH 6, 2019

LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

www.whidbeyweekly.com

Photo by Denis Hill The festival offers an opportunity for tourists and locals alike to enjoy mussels during their prime season.

Community: Musselfest’s key ingredient

By Kacie Jo Voeller Whidbey Weekly

Sixteen restaurants will vie to be selected as the mussel chowder champion as part of the annual Penn Cove Musselfest in Coupeville Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Photo by Denis Hill Souvenir Musselfest mugs provide the perfect cup for tasting the 16 different chowders featured at the festival.

The event, which is in its 34th year, started when local restaurants from Coupeville decided to start a friendly competition in the month of March to see who could make the best mussel chowder. From there, the friendly competition grew into a festival, made possible by a number of local organizations, including Penn Cove Shellfish, the Coupeville Historic Waterfront Association and a number of sponsors. The event now features live music, a mussel eating competition, beer and wine garden, boat tours, and much more. Tickets for chowder tasting can be purchased for $10 for four tastings at the Coupeville Recreation Hall starting at 10 a.m. Saturday.

as much as we can from the area that will compliment the mussels well.”

For Andreas Wurzrainer, owner of Christopher’s on Whidbey and a master chef, the key to a good chowder is mixing things up while keeping the focus on locally-sourced ingredients, especially the mussels themselves.

Vickie Chambers, executive director of the Coupeville Historic Waterfront Association, said just as mussel chowder combines different ingredients to make a delicious dish, Musselfest features a number of offerings which come together to make a successful event.

“The big start of it is our mussels – the mussels are fantastic product especially at this time of year when they are just in their prime,” he said. “What I like to do here, and I think this will be our 18th year doing the festival here, is never repeat a recipe. We try to make it different for each year, and what is really important to me is that I am always trying to incorporate local ingredients from local farms. This year, for example, we are doing Bell’s Farm carrots; last year we did Sherman Pioneer Farm’s squash – we are just trying to incorporate

Wurzrainer, whose mussel chowder was named the best at last year’s festival, said a sense of community was another key ingredient in the success of Musselfest. “I think the biggest part is the community and the way the event gets us together, not just the restaurant community but all around,” he said. “At this point, Musselfest has become so big it impacts all of Coupeville in a positive way and to me that is probably the most important part.”

“There is the combination of having a little bit for everybody and the ability to walk around, do the boat tour, you can see the cooking demos, and we have live music,” she said. “It is a food show and there are a lot of food opportunities for all ages.”

See MUSSELFEST continued on page 9

Oak Harbor veteran starts community run to remember By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly

Those interested in participating in a monthly wear blue: run to remember event should circle the second Saturday of every month on their calendar, starting next week. Gino Wolfe, a 30-year Navy veteran and former Command Master Chief at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, is kicking off what he hopes will be a recurring monthly event Saturday, March 9 at 9 a.m. at Veterans Memorial Park, located near the intersection of SE Pioneer Way and Regatta Drive in Oak Harbor. “I would like to see the community and the

military come together and make this a huge success as a monthly event,” he said. “Oak Harbor is so good to the military and its veterans; [this is] one more way to thank the community and our military for what they do for this country.” Participants do not have to be in the military to join in – anyone who has a military connection, or just supports the country’s military in general, is welcome. “It’s not just our veterans that I want to acknowledge, but the whole Oak Harbor community, because of the way they embrace and take care of the military,” said Wolfe. “It’s a community event.”

wear blue: run to remember is a national nonprofit organization that strives to honor the service and sacrifice of America’s veterans through staging these running events, which the group describes as living memorials. There is no cost to participate and people of all ages and abilities are welcome to take part or to come and cheer participants on. The events always begin with a Circle of Remembrance, according to Wolfe. “We will start by circling up and remembering those military members who have given

See BLUE continued on page 9

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly Retired Navy Command Master Chief, Gino Wolfe, is organizing a wear blue: run to remember event, set to take place at 9 a.m. Saturday, March 9 at Veterans Memorial Park in Oak Harbor. Wolfe hopes the event will become a monthly community activity.

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


8

FEBRUARY 28 - MARCH 6, 2019

Whidbey Weekly

LOCALLY OWNED

Life Tributes

Seriously, we do not make this stuff up!

September 17, 1956 – February 17, 2019

Ivy moved quietly into eternity Sunday, Feb. 17, surrounded by the love of her family. Ivy has resided in Coupeville, Wash. for over 17 years. A Gypsy soul, Ivy has lived in many locales around the world including England, Japan, California, Oregon, Florida and Vermont. Possessing an amazing intellect, Ivy traveled through life on her own terms. She loved to research genealogy with a special interest in her Celtic ancestry, she followed national politics daily, was a fearless and fabulous cook who would try her hand at any cooking challenge. Of primary importance to Ivy was maintaining her loving connection with daughter, Mara.

SATURDAY, JAN. 12 8:10 am, Heggenes Rd. Advising red Honda Accord left on property where reporting party keeps his cows; vehicle parked at gate with gate open. Vehicle is unoccupied, unlocked. 8:38 am, SR 20 Advising male in 60s with scruffy, dark hair has been in store a long time, has no shoes on; they are under table. Has been told several times he is welcome to stay if he puts his shoes on but he is refusing.

Ivy was preceded in death by her father and her infant brother, James S. Cobban Sr. and Jr. respectively, as well as her beloved mother, Emily Ramsey. She is survived by her daughter, Mara, from Southern California, her step-father, Sal Rizzo, of Coupeville; her two sisters, Tracie, of Massachusetts and Dee Dee, of Oregon. An example of how to live life in her own unique style, we all yearn for her to find the solace and light she sought in this life. Her beaming smile will be missed, and Ivy will be mourned and grieved but never forgotten.

11:46 am, Mobius Lp. Reporting party advising was in accident in 1979 on Morris Rd.; requesting call to see if there really was an accident. States friend is now telling reporting party it was all a dream and never happened.

Kathleen Joyce (Hofkamp) Nienhuis

12:32 pm, Golf Course Rd. Caller is caretaker of property. Is at location today and has found bunker-type holes in backyard.

August 16, 1946 – February 18, 2019

Kathleen Joyce (Hofkamp) Nienhuis, age 72, of Oak Harbor, Wash., passed away Feb. 18 at home in the arms of Eldred, her husband of 54 years. Born Aug. 16, 1946 in Worthington, Minn., she moved to Oak Harbor with her family in 1957 from their farm in Leota, Minn. Kathy was a breast cancer survivor and then died after a brief battle with pancreatic cancer. She graduated from Oak Harbor High School in 1964 and married Eldred July 10, 1964. Their wedding was the first one held in the current First Reformed Church building. Kathy was a very active lifetime member of First Reformed Church. You could generally find her in the kitchen cooking for church dinners, Holland Happening, or providing meals to church and community members in need. Anyone was welcomed into her home and always had baked goods on the table. She especially loved children, and had an in-home daycare for many years. Several of the children and families in her daycare are still close family friends. Most of all, she loved her family and spent many summers camping at Baker Lake, Lake Curlew, and Lake Pearrygin. Kathy is survived by her husband, Eldred; brothers, Ken, Keith and Kevin Hofkamp; sister, Patty Syreen; her children, Wendy (Randy) Pleasance, Nathaniel (Lanae) Nienhuis, Matthew (Elizabeth) Nienhuis, and Sarah Nienhuis; and the grandchildren she loved the most, Emily (Jose), Meredith, Grant, John, Titus, Anika and Phoebe. The family would like to thank WhidbeyHealth MAC nurses, WhidbeyHealth Hospice, nurses Jeremy and Luka, and Dr. Sanders for her end of life care. Please direct any memorials to First Reformed Church-Children of the Promise orphanage in Haiti. A memorial service will be held Sunday, Feb. 24, 3 p.m. at First Reformed Church, Oak Harbor. Family and friends are encouraged to share memories and condolences at www.whidbeymemorial.com.

Life Tributes can now be found online at www.whidbeyweekly.com Puzzle 1 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

1

2

1

On a scale from 1 to 10...4.4 Every row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every column of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9

7

5

1

2

5

2

7

9 2 9

8

3

5

7

6 5

4

3

2:48 am, Rickover Dr. Female keeps yelling at reporting party when reporting party takes her dogs out. 3:22 pm, Penn Cove Rd. Reporting party advising is on beach; there are bones that look very odd; may be animal but seem very large. 4:55 pm, Vanderwell Rd. Caller states let cows out to roam property while cleaning their pen; cannot find them now. Four cows, all brown in color. 4:55 pm, Olympic Bay Ln. Reporting party has four big, brown cows in front yard. SUNDAY, JAN. 13 2:21 am, SR 20 Reporting party lives across from location and can see weird white lights in the sky. 5:48 pm, SE Barrington Dr. Requesting call referencing someone “on Whidbey Island” posting pics of her butt on social media. 8:47 pm, SW Erie St. Caller was walking into Walmart, male in white Expedition was taking photos of caller and family.

3:37 pm, Crosswoods Cir. Pitbull at caller’s front door. Won’t leave.

1

7

2:07 pm, Hill Valley Dr. Party requesting call referencing gun given to a friend several years ago; states friend is stating there will be warrant for reporting party’s arrest because of gun.

3:13 pm, Bounty Lp. Reporting party advising she doesn’t know what is wrong, says she is locked out of her car; has keys but cannot get in. Sounds very hesitant and confused.

7 8

4 Answers on page 15

9

3

5

LOCALLY OPERATED

Island 911

Ivy Lynn Cobban

6

www.whidbeyweekly.com

MONDAY, JAN. 14 8:23 am, West Beach Rd. Caller advising she ran over herself with her vehicle; started her vehicle, it got away from her, fell out of vehicle, it ran over her and vehicle is in the pond. Female is out, up and on the deck. 8:41 am, Dewey Dr. Chickens from neighbor have been running loose since big power outage; neighbor told caller to let his dogs out to eat chickens. Also advising chickens have attracted coyotes to the neighborhood.

8:49 am, Patmore Rd. Advising someone has “dumped” a brown horse onto reporting party’s property overnight; unknown owner. 11:22 am, Deer Lake Rd. Caller advising she just saw what appeared to be a wolf in her garden area; states it was not a coyote or a dog. Not requesting contact at this time, reporting for information only. 11:42 am, Windimere Ln. Requesting call to report missing firearm from location, possibly missing for at least the last year; just discovered. Also advising it was possibly left at shooting range. 1:22 pm, Hett Ln. Caller advising a big cow with horns and its calf at location; not contained. 4:39 pm, Shipping View Dr. Reporting party advising has had issues with subjects at location; subjects are not supposed to be there; states thought issue was taken care of. 6:07 pm, Ackley Ln. Caller advising friends broke into caller’s residence; states pulled into driveway and saw friends there; walked in the house and found things scattered around and items missing from caller’s room. TUESDAY, JAN. 15 12:48 am, SR 20 Caller advising an RV is parked at intersection; states looks like it’s trying to hide behind trees. White and brown RV. 7:16 am, Jones Rd. Bus driver reporting car went into ditch at location; did not stop and did not provide description of car. 3:04 pm, Edgecliff Dr. Reporting party advising ongoing issue with coyotes coming into yard; wants to know what can be done about them. 6:25 pm, Homestead Rd. Caller advising is trying to get into mailbox at location; key is not working. States has important mail in there; letting law enforcement know in case someone calls subject in. 7:38 pm, SR 525 Reporting party advising blue Chrysler Plymouth with lights off at location for two minutes; when reporting party turned around, vehicle took off, then turned around and is back at location. WEDNESDAY, JAN. 16 12:26 pm, SE Barrington Dr. Reporting party advising every time she gets in vehicle things are moved. Concerned someone may be using vehicle or breaking into it. 3:23 pm, SE Barrington Dr. Caller advising vehicle pulled into location, male had slurred speech and smelled like alochol. Asked him not to drive away because he was drunk, male agreed and “went for a walk.” 4:21 pm, NW Fairhaven Dr. Party advising has not had power for past few days; PSE is unable to assist her and no electricians are available; needs help pushing button. Report provided by OHPD & Island County Sheriff’s Dept.

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/sudoku on Thu Jan 31 19:02:59 2019 GMT. Enjoy!

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


Whidbey Weekly

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OWNED

MUSSELFEST continued from page 7 Chambers also said the nature of the community hosting the event also contributes to the event’s success. “I think, finally what it is, is that we are a small community, we have maybe 1,700 people in Coupeville, and central Whidbey is not heavily populated either, and this is all about the Coupeville businesses that are here year round,” she said. “It gives them an opportunity to shine and it gives them an opportunity to put their best foot forward and have all these visitors come in March when they have not seen a whole lot of traffic for the last few months.” Chambers said the festival also offers the chance for visitors to see top chefs from restaurants like those in the line of Tom Douglas Seattle Kitchen or Elliott’s Oyster House. “Another special offering, which is free, is inside the recreation hall from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., and we have professional chefs from some of the best restaurants in the Pacific Northwest come and give us their time and cook a mussel recipe – their favorite recipe that involves mussels,” she said. “The audience is listening and learning and they are talking about how they do that, and then when their dish is complete, they share it with the audience. That is really fun because these chefs are just so creative and it is so delightful to work with them, and you get a little taste.” In addition to learning how the mussels are prepared, for $10 attendees can purchase a ticket for a trip out to the mussel farm in a heated, covered tour boat, Chambers shared. “It is a very educational trip and it is the only two days of the year tour boats are allowed to go out to the mussel farms,” she said. “I just find it is the most fascinating 45-minute trip and they teach you everything about it. I would encourage people to take a moment to do that because it is very cool and you have to wait until next Musselfest to do it again.”

FEBRUARY 28 - MARCH 6, 2019

9

LOCALLY OPERATED

From Concept To Completion We’ve Got You Covered! Full Service Graphic Design & Printing!

Chambers said an important piece to note for those planning to go to Musselfest is parking. “We run a free shuttle, non-stop, up and down Main Street for people parking at the Coupeville High School and Coupeville Middle School, and it is free,” she said. “Once they get out of their car, within 20 minutes a shuttle will be there.” The event has become a tradition in the area and draws many returning visitors, who then get to enjoy the new additions to the event over the years, Chambers said. “It is an event that is tried and true, and for 33 years, people have gone and know it is good, so we find a large majority of our visitors have been to one or more Musselfests prior,” she said. “They come and enjoy themselves and return.” For more information and a complete schedule of events, please visit thepenncovemusselsfestival.com.

In addition to being your favorite source for news and events on the island we are now your source for:

Photo by Denis Hill The mussel eating competition pits participants against three 16 ounce cups filled with shell-on mussels.

BLUE continued from page 7 their life for our country,” he explained. “Participants or those there to watch may also speak out names of military friends, family, etc., who they want to remember. We will hold a moment of silence and begin our event.” The Oak Harbor route is three miles, starting at the park, following the Walk of Honor and continuing along the waterfront. Wolfe, who has self-funded this project, plans on placing American flags and flags from each of the armed forces along the route. People are welcome to run or walk the entire route, or just part of it. As mentioned, anyone wanting to cheer runners and walkers on along the way is also welcome. “People can walk, run or stroll at their own pace and go as far as they want,” Wolfe said. The wear blue: run to remember events are not geared at supporting any particular branch of the military nor any particular era of service. It is strictly about honoring those who have served or are currently serving. “This is for all veterans, regardless of service, including members we have lost and those still serving today,” said Wolfe. “I think the

country understands the sacrifices of our veterans and fully embrace us; however, there are veterans from certain eras that were not embraced, but that has changed or is changing.” According to the wear blue: run to remember website, the organization was founded after the redeployment of 5-2 Stryker Brigade Combat Team, which sustained heavy losses in Afghanistan. During the deployment, a group of spouses and battalion support staff met weekly to run, creating a support network for one another. Upon the brigade’s return, Army wives and avid runners, Lisa Hallett and Erin O’Connor, turned the small group into a nationwide movement. There are now dozens of Saturday Run Communities across the country, and now Oak Harbor is joining the wear blue movement. Anyone interested in learning more about wear blue: run to remember can find information online at www.wearbluetoremember. org. You can also email oakharbor.community@wearbluetoremember.org with any questions or concerns. Volunteers are always welcome.

Logos • Brochures • Flyers Posters • Business Cards Loyalty Cards • Postcards Mailers • Rack Cards Magnets • Cards • Invitations Printing • Copying • Folding Comb Binding • Laminating Cutting • Direct Mail Services Notary Public

1131 SE Ely Street • Oak Harbor • 360-682-2341 advertise@whidbeyweekly.com

www.whidbeyweekly.com

“Come out and see what it is all about,” encouraged Wolfe.

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


10 FEBRUARY 28 - MARCH 6, 2019 LOCALLY OWNED

www.whidbeyweekly.com

Whidbey Weekly

LOCALLY OPERATED

Final decision on Growler operations moving closer By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation has issued comments to the Secretary of the Navy regarding the impact of Growler operations on central Whidbey historic properties, which means the Navy is closer to making a final decision on flight operations at Coupeville’s Outlying Landing Field and Ault Field in Oak Harbor. “The Navy is in receipt of the ACHP comments, and we are in the process of reviewing them,” said Ted Brown, installations and environmental public affairs officer for U.S. Fleet Forces Command. “The Office of the Secretary of the Navy will provide a response to these comments as required under 36 CFR 800.7(c)(4) and that response will be made public.” According to the ACHP, the letter to Navy Sec. Richard Spencer includes findings and recommendations on how to “further assess, monitor and resolve noise impacts to historic properties from Growler expansion.”

Some of those recommendations include working with the community to identify and carry out appropriate mitigation measures; establishing partnerships to help with the preservation of properties; continuing to pursue technology to help minimize noise from the aircraft; and improving coordination between environmental and historic preservation reviews. The ACHP letter was prompted when the Navy terminated consultations on Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act Nov. 30 of last year, when parties were unable to reach an agreement. ACHP staff held a public meeting in Coupeville Dec. 19, 2018, to listen to the views of consulting parties in the process and the public. Written comments were also accepted through email and regular mail, and all comments were considered in ACHP’s comments to Spencer. The next move, it would appear, is up to the Navy. “When the Secretary of the Navy provides his response to the ACHP and the consulting parties and makes it available to the public, the Section 106 process will be concluded,” said Brown. According to Steve Bristow, president of the Oak Harbor Council of the Navy League, the comments from the ACHP were about as expected and he said he feels the local activist groups which got involved in the process did the consultations a disservice.

File Photo Courtesy of Joe A. Kunzler, Avgeek Joe Productions The Navy could soon release its Record of Decision on Growler operations at NAS Whidbey Island, following the receipt of a letter from the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation. The Navy announced its preferred alternative for operations last summer, which included a four-fold increase in Field Carrier Landing Practice operations at Outlying Landing Field in Coupeville.

“There were no surprises in the ACHP letter,” he said. “Protestors pinned their hopes on this, that it would proceed down the line and enable them to push their own narrative that ‘jets are going to destroy central Whidbey.’ They are trafficking in activism and I think it did them a disservice.”

Opponents to the Navy’s proposal to increase Field Carrier Landing Practice operations four-fold at OLF have been very vocal in their mission and seemed to use the ACHP meeting in December as an opportunity to stage an anti-Growler rally. The Oak Harbor Navy League, which has come down squarely on the side of the Navy, issued a press release stating “activists were inaccurately portrayed as reflecting the Whidbey community” [as a whole] and stated “any acceptance of mitigation measures was considered to be a sell-out and ‘blood money.’” While activists, as well as the State Historic Preservation Officer, lobbied for the Navy to expand the Area of Potential Effects (APE) from the increased operations, Bristow said there just wasn’t any evidence to support that, claiming the Navy has acted in good faith throughout the process. “The Navy has always been a good neighbor – it’s been a long-term neighbor,” he said, noting the Navy predates Col. Ebey by a decade and OLF predates Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve by 35 years. Bristow said Naval Air Station Whidbey Island brings much more to the island than noise. “In addition to our young pilots who truly need this training, the base brings young families to the island who participate in community activities; we have a great economy, one of the best around; and we have a civilian-military relationship here that is second to none,” he said. “So what are they protesting?” Bristow asked. “They should at least have viable, objective data to back up their claims, but they just don’t.” Whidbey Weekly reached out to the Town of Coupeville and to the National Park Service,

which owns the Ferry House, one of the properties potentially impacted by the proposed Growler expansion, for their reaction to the ACHP letter, but did not receive a response by press time. A final decision by the Navy does not mean an end to the controversy over flight operations, however. It appears the next battle will be a legal one. According to the Citizens of Ebey’s Reserve website, the group is already preparing a legal challenge to any decision made by the Navy, stating “Our next push in the courts is coming – our fight is far from over.” While the Navy’s response to the ACHP letter will conclude the Sec. 106 process, it doesn’t mean community conversations have come to an end or that there will be no mitigation. “The Navy is considering ACHP’s comments along with its prior offers of mitigation,” said Brown. “No decision has yet been made on future mitigation proposals. “The Navy remains committed to resolving the undertaking’s adverse effects to historic properties,” continued Brown. “The Navy will continue discussions with community leaders regarding other issues that should be addressed outside of the NHPA Section 106 process. The Navy has a long, collaborative relationship with the local community on mutual concerns, and looks forward to continuing that relationship.” According to Brown, the Record of Decision about Growler operations will be issued shortly after Spencer’s response to ACHP is complete. The ROD will be made available on the Growler EIS website, www.whidbeyeis. com and copies will be provided to public libraries in the area.

Concert showcases Whidbey’s young jazz musicians By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly Music lovers of all kinds, and jazz in particular, will enjoy the 20th annual Whidbey Jazz Concert at 7:30 p.m. Friday at South Whidbey High School Auditorium in Langley. The event, sponsored by the Whidbey Island Jazz Society, showcases middle and high school jazz groups from all middle and high schools on the island. Jerry Jones, along with his wife Ginny, has organized the event since it began. “It’s the outgrowth of a group that played at local restaurants about 25 years ago,” he explained. “We would get donations when we’d play and give the money to folks we knew who needed it. We wanted to make it bigger, and one day we thought ‘why not bring school teachers in on it?’ and convinced teachers the extra effort would be okay, and that’s how we made it a school activity.” Jones said he knew from the start they had something special with this all-island youth jazz concert. “Our first one was in Coupeville to celebrate the opening of the new performing arts center,” he said. “It was so successful the fire marshal had to come in and take people out because we were overloaded. There was such vitality and enthusiasm on the part of the people attending, we knew we had something special.” Following the over-capacity crowd of the first concert, organizers had to move it to larger spaces, so the concert now alternates each year between Oak Harbor and South Whidbey high schools. In all, there will be five jazz groups performing at Friday’s concert: middle and high school groups from Oak Harbor and Langley and a combined middle/high school group from Coupeville. The cost to attend is $10, and all proceeds go towards funding college scholarships for graduating Whidbey Island seniors who intend to pursue music studies in college. Three awards of $1,000 each are presented each year, and according to Jones, the group has given away about $90,000 in scholarships. “Not only is this a celebration of jazz in our schools, it is also a scholarship fundraiser,” said Brandon Nelson, Oak Harbor High School band teacher. “Every year, the Whidbey Island Jazz Society awards college scholarships to students from Whidbey Island who hope to bring music to the world. The scholarship requires that students take music classes in college, but recipients do not have to be music majors. Attend-

Kathy Reed/File Photo The Oak Harbor High School Jazz Band is one of five Whidbey Island middle and high school groups performing at the 20th annual Whidbey Jazz Concert, to be held at 7:30 p.m. Friday at the South Whidbey High School Auditorium in Langley.

ees can feel proud to not only be there to support music in our schools, but to support kids from Whidbey Island in their journey through college.” Whidbey Weekly columnist, Jim Freeman, will keep things on track as the evening’s master of ceremonies. “The coolest thing to me is seeing the kids from all six jazz bands enjoying each other and their music,” he said. “This show has never been a competition, but a showcase of talent, skill, and sheer joy!” “Getting to hear and perform for the other music programs on the island is an essential educational and community-building experience,” said Nelson. “The kids get to know their musical neighbors as more than just a point on a map and enjoy celebrating in their special talent, together. There is some rivalry, but since the event is not a contest, it’s very healthy and subjective.

“Following this event, I see my students hanging out with students from the other high schools, showing up to play at each other’s sports events, or even dating across schools,” he added. And if anyone had any doubt regarding the caliber of the talent, Jones said folks will be impressed. “I haven’t heard any better,” he said. “I love listening to those bands play. The music they play today is far more complicated as far as instrumental work than when I was younger. They’re keeping jazz alive.” Tickets are available in advance at Click Music and Whidbey Party Store in Oak Harbor, Moonraker Books in Langley and at the auditorium entrance on the night of the show. “The 20th year of this jazz production is a reason to celebrate the gifts of our community - our kids,” said Freeman.

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


Whidbey Weekly

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OWNED

Film Shorts Courtesy of Cascadia Weekly

By Carey Ross A Dog’s Way Home: A lost dog makes a 400-mile journey to find its owners, spreading joy wherever it roams because that’s what dogs do. They can’t help themselves. Fact: I will make it roughly five minutes into this movie before I begin crying and I won’t stop until the end credits roll. ★★★ (PG • 2 hrs. 17 min.) Alita: Battle Angel: James Cameron, legendary filmmaker, tries his hand at writing a manga-based script about a human/cyborg hybrid who looks like a Snapchat filter. Worth noting, writing has never been the strong suit of James Cameron, legendary filmmaker. ★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 5 min.) Cold Pursuit: This darkly comedic action movie had a lot going for it: An excellent turn by Liam Neeson in full-on revenge mode, a sharply funny script, critical acclaim-and then Neeson gave an interview in which he spoke of once fantasizing about killing a black man. You were good while you almost lasted, “Cold Pursuit.â€? ★★★★ (R • 1 hr. 58 min.) Fighting With My Family: No, this is not the story of my life on the big screen, but a heartwarming comedy tracing the origin story of WWE wrestler Paige in which Dwayne Johnson plays the Rock, which should be a real stretch for him. Will he be able to pull it off convincingly? ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 47 min.) Glass: M. Night Shyamalan reunites several characters from his previous films–Bruce Willis, Samuel L. Jackson, James McAvoy– because it’s not enough for him to destroy his own career with spectacularly disappointing movies, he wants to take everyone else down with him. ★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 50 min.) Green Book: Remember when “Moonlightâ€? won a Best Picture Oscar and many of us finally thought the world was ready to support and reward stories about black lives as told by black people? Yeah, I guess we got more than a little ahead of ourselves there. ★★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 10 min.) Greta: Chloe Grace Moretz is a naive ingĂŠnue just trying to make it in New York City and Isabelle Huppert appears to be a lonely but refined piano teacher. The former needs a mother figure, the latter seems to need a friend–and the only surprise when Greta goes completely off the rails is how gleefully the ever-glorious Huppert leans into every bit of it. ★★★ (R • 1 hr. 38 min.) Happy Death Day 2 U: A question: When the premise of a horror movie is essentially “Groundhog Dayâ€? but with a lot more blood and killing, how do you know where the first

360-682-2341 • www.whidbeyweekly.com

Tyler Perry’s A Madea Family Reunion: I’m so irritated with Hollywood’s refusal to honor stories about people of color told by people of color that Madea is almost starting to look good to me. ★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 42 min.) The Upside: Serious question: How badly do you think writer Paul Feig and costars Bryan Cranston and Nicole Kidman wish someone other than Kevin Hart had been cast in their inspirational true story right about now? Real badly? All of the badly? ★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 6 min.) What Men Want: Hollywood, lacking creativity and bankrupt for ideas as usual, went to a very shallow well and came back with the idea to remake a particularly forgettable Mel Gibson movie, but with Taraji P. Henson in the starring role. Hollywood, leave Taraji alone. She deserves better. ★★ (R • 1 hr. 57 min.) For Anacortes theater showings, please see www.fandango.com. For Blue Fox and Oak Harbor Cinemas showings see ads on this page.

HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON: HIDDEN WORLD PG ISN’T IT ROMANTIC PG-13 THE LEGO MOVIE 2 PG

Movie Hotline 360-279-2226 Book A Party or Special Showing 360-279-0526 1321 SW Barlow St • Oak Harbor

www.farawayentertainment.com

Now Showing! Friday, March 1 thru Sunday, March 3

The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part: The first Lego movie was wacky and warmhearted and downright inspired. The Minifigs are back for another breakneck adventure, and they’ve lost none of their wit and very little of their charm. Everything is still awesome! ★★★★★ (PG • 1 hr. 30 min.) Run the Race: Sometimes these faith-based tragedy-into-triumph-of-the-Holy Spirit movies all blur together to me because I am an admitted heathen who only went to Young Life camp to avoid being grounded that one summer. However, this film bears the distinction of being produced by Tim Tebow, whose biggest accomplishment as a football player was he knelt on the field and got away with it. ★★ (PG • 1 hr. 41 min.)

FARAWAY ENTERTAINMENT YOUR LOCAL MOVIE THEATER

COMING SOON: COLD PURSUIT, PRODIGY, ISN’T IT ROMANTIC, FIGHTING WITH MY FAMILY, HAPPY DEATH DAY 2 U, 3/8 CAPTAIN MARVEL

Like us on:

How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World: This beloved and beautifully rendered animated trilogy comes to a close with yet another installment that manages to hit almost all of its marks. Why do I get the feeling this might not be the last we see of these dragons? ★★★★★ (PG • 1 hr. 50 min.)

11

LOCALLY OPERATED

360-679-4003 877-679-4003 www.seatacshuttle.com

installment leaves off and the sequel begins? ★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs.)

Isn’t It Romantic: Which would you rather watch: This obligatory-yet-harmless rom-com starring Rebel Wilson and “Workaholics’� Adam DeVine? Or a new season of “Workaholics� with special guest star Rebel Wilson? Trick question. The first thing really exists, the second only lives in my hopes and dreams. ★★★ (PG-13)

FEBRUARY 28 - MARCH 6, 2019

HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON: THE HIDDEN WORLD (PG) GLASS (PG-13)

SPECIAL: $2.50 CORN DOGS BOX OFFICE OPENS AT 4PM, 1ST MOVIE BEGINS AT 7PM 11 & OVER $6.50; KIDS 5-10 $1.00; 4 & UNDER FREE Go Karts Now Open! Fri. 4pm-Dusk, Sat. 11am-Dusk, Sun 12:30-Dusk *Cash prices

1403 N Monroe Landing Rd • Oak Harbor

360-675-5667 • www.bluefoxdrivein.com 21+ RECREATIONAL & MEDICAL MARIJUANA

FREELAND CANNABIS & ANACORTES CANNABIS FREELAND STORE NOW OPEN 9AM-9PM DAILY! ANACORTES STORE OPEN New Year, 8AM-10PM MON-SAT, 9AM-9PM SUN. New Deals 15% OFF DAILY DEALS! Best Selection SENIOR SUNDAYS 20% OFF FOR 55+ Best VETERANS & MEDICAL MARIJUANA Prices PATIENTS 20% OFF Best Service $5 ONE GRAM PRE-ROLL EVERYDAY! WHIDBEY ISLAND NATURAL MEDICINE 18646 SR 525, Unit B Freeland (in the U-Haul building) 360-544-8440

CANNABIS

ANACORTES NATURAL MEDICINE

AnacortesCannabis.com FreelandCannabis.com

7656 State Route 20, Unit A, Anacortes (at Sharpes Corner) 360-588-6222

This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. Keep out of reach of children. Marijuana products may be purchased or possessed only by persons 21 years or older.

MMCWS MEDICAL • Naturopathic Physician Dr. Lori Olaf, ND Specializing in Chronic Pain / Opioid Reduction / Multiple Sclerosis Epilespy / Seizure Disorder / Stroke / Fibromyalgia Migraines / Neuropathy / Arthritis / PTSD Muscle Spasms / Cancer / Glaucoma / HIV/AIDS Parkinson’s Disease / Crohn’s Disease / Hepatitis C Medical Marijuana Authorization & Primary Care BY APPOINTMENT ONLY • For Ages 21+

MMCWS.com

7656 State Route 20, Unit B • Anacortes • 360-422-3623

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


12

FEBRUARY 28 - MARCH 6, 2019 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

Let’s Dish! with Kae Harris

A DOSE OF VITAMIN SEA We humans have a knack for turning just about anything into food. I’m always fascinated by the multitude of dishes we serve all over the world, using almost anything to comprise them. We use plants – every part of certain plants, mind you – and different kinds of animals and of course, this includes marine critters too. We use shrimp, lobsters, mussels, clams, oysters, fish etc; all of which come from the water. So many different things become part of our diet. Some we could consider your run-of-the-mill ingredients, others less so. While I’m on the topic of waterway ingredients, I thought of the things we don’t see served as often in restaurants, here in the states at least, and just how interesting these items are. A sea cucumber is certainly not something I have tried and despite it’s innocuous name, a sea cucumber is in fact, not a type of aquatic vegetable. It’s an echinoderm, like urchins and starfish – a marine animal. There are around 1,250 species of sea cucumber, which is astounding because when I’m snorkeling and happen across these little guys, they all look similar to me. But I’m no expert, so it’s pretty easy to see why I wouldn’t know how to tell them apart too well. Sea cucumbers can be thought of as the ocean’s earthworms, in that they feed on things like algae and waste products, which they break down into much smaller parts, essentially recycling them and depositing it back into the ocean, so they’re incredibly important to our ocean’s ecosystems. Even though their name belies what they are – they aren’t a plant – they are still consumed in parts of the world in different types of dishes. I’ve heard sea cucumber itself has a bland flavor and its taste is enhanced by the flavor of whatever dish it’s put into. As for its texture, it’s supposedly a little slimy if prepared fresh, so if you haven’t a stomach for such consistencies, perhaps it would be best to avoid a sea cucumber dish of any sort. While freshly prepped sea cukes are less than appealing in terms of their soft, gelatinous make up, they are often dried

for preservation and transportation purposes. It seems sea cucumbers feature more prominently in Chinese cuisine and they are best served in soups and stews. I’ve heard as well, because of their bland, non-descript flavor, and the fact they are rather full of sand, the means of prepping a sea cucumber is a pretty involved process and much of the work also entails infusing the cuke with a taste. It makes me wonder then, what’s the point in even bothering with turning it into a dish at all? Apparently, it is believed sea cucumbers are good for ailments such as tendonitis and arthritis, in addition to purported aphrodisiac properties. I guess the way in which we prepare foods is what counts – what really determines whether a dish is going to be full of flavor and just wonderful, or whether it will fall short of the gustatory mark. It’s the same for any ingredient we use and a sea cucumber isn’t the only one that seems to be ‘off-the-well-trodden-food-path’ for some of us. Still springing out of our waterways are the likes of starfish and sea urchins. Sea urchins are a different story as far as their flavor goes. They aren’t bland in the least and actually have a sweetness to them, with a delicate texture. These spiny creatures are best prepared and served as fresh as fresh can be, because any urchin served past it’s prime has a rather unpleasant taste. The roe within the spiny shell of the urchin is the highly prized treasure which makes it a delicacy along coastal regions, particularly in Japan. But what makes urchins a delicacy? Is it their flavor? Their consistency? There’s a science behind why they might be as delectable as some people find them and it’s all due to their habitat. Sea urchins, unlike fish or some other marine life, do not have skin. The outer shell is comprised of calcium carbonate, which means the ocean of saltiness they reside in has an effect on them. The salt within the water has the potential to turn them into little marine prunes and yet it doesn’t. Why is that? Because urchins have the unique ability to draw in and hold on to sugars, salts and amino acids which tend to draw water to them and prevent the pruning of the urchin. This is what gives

them their wonderful flavor, a natural brining process, although I don’t think it’s what the urchins intended for their own evolution. So how is this strange-looking sea fare served? Apparently, many people enjoy it raw and as fresh as possible and I’ve even heard of it served on toast. Not something you see every day on my breakfast table that’s for sure, but certainly a culinary adventure in and of itself! So many things come out of our oceans, and while urchins and sea cucumbers are the less well known, possibly less commonly consumed things here, seaweed is a bit more ‘conventional,’ I think. It’s served in sushi dishes, has become part of seasonings, is mixed into smoothies, turned into salads, soups and stews which in my eyes, makes this marine ‘grass’ a very versatile ingredient indeed! Let’s not forget seaweed is packed with minerals like iodine, magnesium, zinc and calcium as well as omega3 fats and vitamins A and D – healthy much? Dear readers, we’re surrounded by ocean and there’s an abundance of that which we can choose to consume from these waters, all of which have their own unique way of being prepared and served. I am including a recipe for a refreshing seaweed and cucumber salad I found at www.rubiesandradishes.com/2016/07/09/ paleo-seaweed-and-cucumber-salad and it really is quite delightful. If you try it, let me know how you like it! Please send any and all comments, questions and definitely recipes you might like to share to letsdish.whidbeyweekly@gmail.com and we’ll do just that and dish! Seaweed and Cucumber Salad ½ cup wakame flakes 3 tablespoons rice vinegar 1 tablespoon sesame oil 2 tablespoons coconut aminos 1 teaspoon grated ginger 1 tablespoon lime juice ½ teaspoon garlic, minced pinch of red pepper flakes 1 teaspoon honey 2 teaspoons sesame seeds 1 cup thinly sliced cucumber Cover the wakame (seaweed) with water and allow to soak for ten minutes. Drain, raise and squeeze. Add the cucumbers to the seaweed and in a small bowl, combine coconut aminos, sesame oil, red pepper flakes, honey, rice vinegar, lime juice, garlic and ginger. Mix well and pour over the seaweed and cucumbers. Sprinkle the sesame seeds over this, serve and enjoy! www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/invertebrates/group/sea-cucumbers www.integrativenutrition.com/blog/2015/11/7ways-to-eat-more-seaweed-and-why-you-should To read past columns of Let’s Dish in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www. whidbeyweekly.com.

Dining Guide

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED WHAT’S GOING ON

continued from page

6

First Saturday Art Walk Saturday, March 2, 500-7:00pm Whidbey Art Gallery, Langley Come see lots of new artwork from our members and guest artists, Sydnee Elliot and Kristine Mcinvaille. Our featured artist for March is Susan Jensen. Bring your friends and family and enjoy light refreshments. You can stop by any time during March and see this inspiring work.

Opening Reception: Capturing Moments Sunday, March 3, 11:00am-12:15pm UUCWI, 20103 SR 25, Freeland You are invited to meet the artists at an opening reception showcasing the work of the Whidbey Island Sketchers, in both “work on the wall” and a selection of the artists’ sketchbooks. A peek into the way sketchers view the ordinary, the extraordinary, vistas large and small, and objects which bring us joy. Gallery is located in the building’s entrance foyer. Show runs through May 2.

Featured Artist: Deborah Francis Tuesday, March 5, 10:00am-5:00pm Penn Cove Gallery, Coupeville Jewelry and sculpture artist Deborah Francis will demonstrate techniques she uses in creating her jewelry. While often working in a series, many of her necklaces and bracelets are one-of-a-kind pieces. Polymer clay as well as a variety of metals provide the right combinations of contrasting textures, colors and shapes. www.penncovegallery.com

Meetings & Organizations Whidbey Weavers’s Guild Thursday, March 7, 10:00am-2:00pm Pacific Rim Institute, 180 Parker Rd, Coupeville Business meeting is followed by show & tell. Program is Kris Abshire, who does weaving, dyeing and surface design. Bring your own lunch and your own cup. Go to www.whidbey weaversguild.org.

AAUW Presents Women in History Saturday, March 9 9:30am St. Augustine’s in-the-Woods Episcopal Church, Freeland Members of American Association of University Women Whidbey Island Branch will dress in costume to present some women in history for Island 5th grade students. Prospective members welcome! $30 discount on dues at this meeting. Please contact Candi Rohr at candirohr@yahoo.com or Elree Harris at elree64@gmail.com for further information.

Israeli Circle Dance Saturday mornings from 11-12 Noon Bayview Senior Center Ages 10 and up, offered on a donation basis For a list of continuous Meetings and Organizations, visit www.whidbeyweekly.com

Classes, Seminars and Workshops Tame Your Sugar Habit Monday, March 4, 10:00-11:30am Lotus Tea Bar and Studio, Oak Harbor

Want More than Mussels? Stop by for Whidbey’s Best BBQ after the Penn Cove Musselfest! We Cater!

360-679-3500

601 NE Midway Blvd Oak Harbor Follow us on Facebook & Twitter

JOIN THE FUN! MusselFest 2019 “Mussel Chowder” Contest - 11AM Sat 3/2 & Sun 3/3 Live Music 103 S. Main • Coupeville • 360.682.5747 Friday & www.penncovebrewing.com Saturday! FEATURING LOCAL CRAFT BEER, WINE & CIDERS

In this free workshop, you will learn three keys to overcome sugar cravings. Seating is limited. Please RSVP at drjanehealthcoach@gmail.com or 360-331-1726.

Medicare Presentation Tuesday, March 5, 11:00am Oak Harbor Senior Center, 51 SE Jerome St. March offers special opportunities for Medicare eligible individuals. Missed your Medicare Initial Enrollment Period? This is your chance to enroll in Parts A and B for 2019. Dissatisfied with your Medicare Advantage Plan? You can change plans between now and March 31. Get the facts. Presented by SHIBA, a program of the Office of the Insurance Commissioner. No registration required. 360-279-4580

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

13

FEBRUARY 28 - MARCH 6, 2019 LOCALLY OPERATED

Money spent on self-indulges could be the catalyst that sets it all up. Pleasure pursuits mix appropriately with the practical on the 2nd.

CHICKEN LITTLE & THE ASTROLOGER By Wesley Hallock

ARIES (March 21-April 19) Surprise events from out of the blue can be upsetting when they strike your life unexpectedly, but this week they can also be your best friend. Weather the surprises gladly, for they offer freedom from unrecognized constraints. There is an area of life where you are bound in ways you may not fully realize, until something happens to show you true freedom. The unveiling process is in full swing on the 2nd. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) The push-pull of opposing forces now so obvious in your life reaches an extreme this week. This is much more than a contest of wills. Like a rubber band being pulled back, energies in opposition can snap you forward if used wisely. Great accomplishments are possible now, perhaps more than you can imagine. Issues in play on the 2nd run deeper than surface appearance. Do not judge them on logic alone. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) The flow of events this week is apt to be fast and varied, satisfying to even the strongest of tastes for intrigue. In order to get the maximum benefit of all that happens, speak your mind at every turn, however powerful the impulse to hold back. A winnowing process is at work, here, a lightening of your load. By drawing back from it, you do yourself a disservice. Family members play a key role on the 2nd. CANCER (June 22-July 22) Be thankful for that key partner who runs resistance for you this week. With them holding the fort, you are free to pursue your wants and desires with a clear mind. There may be a struggle or two along the way, making such clarity a double blessing. Focus in the moment on doing what you must do, but later on, don’t forget the one who made it possible. Expressions of gratitude make the day on the 2nd. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Your responsibilities must come first this week, but that doesn’t mean giving up your heart’s desires. Keep those alive at all costs. Fund them out of pocket, if necessary, for they are what keep you going forward. Equally important to remember is that rules are rules. No fair changing them in the middle of the game. The temptation to try doing so on the 2nd may be overwhelming. Be strong. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) A fancy bit of teamwork may be necessary to get you where you’re going this week. The key players are most likely already to be found among your peer group. Even so, don’t rule out an unexpected boost from a stranger, for luck may play a critical role.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Events this week are likely to accentuate major differences in how men and women think. If it is hard for you to step outside your own viewpoint, it is going to be a difficult week. Mixed-sex social events could prove particularly triggering. The turns are fast and treacherous, and could land you in the weeds. Family events are no safer, due to subtle inner tensions. Gender identity politics are the downfall of the 2nd. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You are in position to accomplish and overcome, so hold your head high and go for it. Should anyone tag you as arrogant, wear the label proudly. Hesitance and insecurity have no place here. Success may demand that you depart from convention and move against the norm, an act of courage not all will understand. Uninformed advice is not worth your time on the 2nd. The opinion that matters is your own. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Duty calls with monotonous regularity these days, but it won’t be so forever. Tending to your responsibilities often brings fortunate breaks that aren’t entirely luck, and this promises to be such a week. Take the good as it happens, because you have earned it. And if it doesn’t come, do not lose hope. The path to any goal is never direct. Expenses are an expected part of the game on the 2nd. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) At work and at play, the final authority in all that you do this week is you. This may be an enviable state in the minds of most, but such control comes with a price. The price is overwork, and it is a real danger if you take life too seriously. Balance between work and leisure thus becomes a worthwhile goal for the immediate future. If you feel corrective steps are in order, look no farther than the 2nd. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb 18) Your fighting spirit could be aroused in a variety of ways this week. At the same time, short-sightedness is a real danger. In a dispute, therefore, ignorance is the real enemy. You may not understand everything you know about the situation that triggers you. If it is your own misperceptions.that you fight against., you risk finding yourself out on a limb with nowhere to go. Innocent actions on the 2nd are rife with implications. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) A goal held in common with others is likely to make you an accidental leader this week. Because the others look up to you, your opinion in key matters is the weighty one. This conferred leadership means that your style is going to emulated by some. With your influence so high, what you say is important, but even more important is what you do. Opportunities to set a good example abound on the 2nd.

CLUES ACROSS

53. Indicates silence

1. Got paid

55. Protein-rich liquids

7. Sets free

56. Samoan monetary units

13. Domestic hybrid cattle

18. An ugly, evil-looking old woman 21. Widely used 24. Makes into pages

58. “__ your i’s, cross your t’s”

26. Afflict in mind or body

59. Forms the bottom

27. Set up

16. Doctor’s helper

60. Potato state

30. Toilets

17. Not holding back

61. Toy that spins around

32. “Life of Jesus” theologian

64. Barium

35. A big deal on Wall St.

14. Quality of one’s character

19. Type of degree 20. Short but severe 22. 007’s creator 23. Linguistics icon 25. Large integers 26. Upset 28. Former 29. Peyton’s younger brother 30. An Irish dance 31. Title of respect 33. Small lump 34. Baroque musical instrument 36. The third sign of the zodiac 38. The 1st letter of the Hebrew alphabet 40. A group of nine 41. Garment 43. Capital of Yemen

65. Type of molding 69. Sounds the same

38. Free from contamination

70. Come into view

39. Type of dog

CLUES DOWN

42. Revolver

1. Nix

43. High schoolers’ exam

2. Indicates position

46. San Diego ballplayers

3. Quantitative facts 4. Strong and healthy 5. Former measure of length

47. Hit the sack 49. Suitable for crops 50. Red mineral

6. Dads tend to be this

52. Yellowish-brown

7. Parts of a movie

54. Lowest point between two peaks

8. An animal’s foot 9. Expression of sorrow or pity 10. Saudi Arabian money

55. Late TNT broadcaster 57. Thin strip to align parts 59. Swiss wind

44. One point south of due east

11. One billion gigabytes

45. Drain

12. Smallest musical interval

47. Moved quickly

37. Western Thai people

67. Closes again

62. A way to chill 63. Jewel 66. Rhodium

48. Bar bill

13. A rugged box (usually made of wood)

51. An idiot

15. Cheese dish

68. The top lawyer in the land Answers on page 15

© 2019, Wesley Hallock, All Rights Reserved

YOUR GUESS IS AS GOOD AS OURS WEATHER FORECAST Chicken Little looks at what is and fears the sky is falling. Wesley Hallock as a professional astrologer looks at what is and sees what could be. Read Wesley’s monthly forecast, with links to Facebook and Twitter, at www. chickenlittleandtheastrologer.com. To read past columns of Chicken Little and the Astrologer in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

Thurs, Feb. 28

Fri, March 1

Sat, March 2

Sun, March 3

Mon, March 4

Tues, March 5

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

H-43°/L-32°

H-45°/L-32°

H-46°/L-33°

H-47°/L-33°

H-47°/L-33°

H-49°/L-33°

H-55°/L-35°

Showers

Mostly Sunny and Chilly

Mostly Sunny and Chilly

Mostly Sunny and Chilly

Sunny

Mixed Clouds and Sun

Wed, March 6

Cloudy

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

H-42°/L-30°

H-44°/L-31°

H-44°/L-31°

H-44°/L-33°

H-45°/L-33°

H-47°/L-34°

H-56°/L-35°

Showers

Sunny and Chilly

Parlty Sunny and Chilly

Mostly Sunny and Chilly

Partly Sunny

Mixed Clouds and Sun

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.

Cloudy


14 FEBRUARY 28 - MARCH 6, 2019 LOCALLY OWNED

42

$

95

Full Synthetic

www.whidbeyweekly.com

Whidbey Weekly

LOCALLY OPERATED

36

$

95

Includes 4X4 & SUV

4295

$

Most cars up to 5 qts. 5W20, 5W30, 10W30. Other grades extra. Some filters cost extra. Vehicles with Skid Plates may be extra. Plus $1 Environmental Disposal Fee.

WE CAN SAVE YOU UP TO $250 ON BRAKE SERVICE VERSUS OUR COMPETITORS. WARRANTIED AT 30K LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE.

STARTERS ALTERNATORS TIMING BELTS SERPENTINE BELTS

BRAKES TIRES TUNE-UPS EXHAUST

UP TO

1

$ 00

Flat Rate Auto Repair only $7995 per hour

PER GAL LON D ISCOUNT T ODAY!

always

Ask for De

tails

FREE ESTIMATES!

At Hilltop Service Center we only repair and replace parts that are needed. We will not oversell or install unnecessary parts. We are highly trained brake technicians, not high pressure sales people.

79

$

7995*

$

4 cyl

95

$

8995*

$

6 cyl

9995*

$

8 cyl

79

95

79

$

95

11995

$

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


ANNOUNCEMENTS Seeking? Not interested in church right now? Free DVD on the history of Christianity and how to unlock the Bible and make sense of it. It is a great playbook for the game of life. Non-denominational. Hank, 360-630-6536 (1) Pregnant? Need baby clothes? We have them and the price is right–FREE. Pregnancy Care Clinic, open most Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10am to 4pm. Call 360-221-2909 or stop by 6th and Cascade in Langley. Be the difference in a child’s life and become a foster parent today! Service Alternatives is looking for caring, loving, and supportive families to support foster children. 425923-0451 or mostermick@ servalt-cfs.com The Whidbey Island community is encouraged to try out the paddling sport of dragon boating with the Stayin’ Alive team. Our team’s mission is to promote the physical, social, and emotional benefits of dragon boating. It has been shown to be especially beneficial to cancer survivors. Practice with us for up to 3 times for free. Life-jackets and paddles provided. Saturdays at the Oak Harbor Marina, 8:45am. Contact njlish@ gmail.com. More info at our Facebook Page: https://www. facebook.com/NorthPugetSoundDragonBoatClub?ref=hl Medical Marijuana patients unite; If you need assistance, advice, etc. please contact at 420patientnetworking@gmail. com. Local Whidbey Island help. If you or someone you know has been a victim of homicide, burglary, robbery, assault, identity theft, fraud, human trafficking, home invasion and other crimes not listed. Victim Support Services has advocates ready to help. Please call the 24-hr Crisis Line 888-3889221. Free service. Visit our web site at http://victimsupportservices.org

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Imagine Oak Harbor’s first Food Forest, Saturdays 11am3pm, at 526 Bayshore Drive. Each week, we have volunteer opportunities available to help care for our community garden, share organic gardening tips, and learn Permaculture principles. All ages and skill levels welcome. Schedule can change due to adverse weather conditions. If you have any questions, please contact us at: imagineapermacultureworld.gmail.com Mother Mentors needs volunteers! Oak Harbor families with young children need your

help! Volunteer just a couple of hours a week to make a difference in someone’s life! To volunteer or get more info, email wamothermentors@ gmail.com or call 360-3211484. Looking for board members to join the dynamic board of Island Senior Resources and serve the needs of Island County Seniors. Of particular interest are representatives from North Whidbey. For more information please contact: reception@islandseniorservices.org

JOB MARKET Whidbey Community Foundation is looking for our first staff member, a part-time Program Support Specialist. Make a difference for nonprofits serving our community. Provide administrative and bookkeeping support on a flexible schedule, with potential to grow in the future. See the full program announcement at www.whidbeyfoundation.org. Applications due March 14. (1) Regency On Whidbey is hiring for the following positions: Caregiver(s), LPN, Housekeeper. Apply Online www. regency-pacific.com, Click on “Careers” (2) Whidbey Island Conservation District is accepting applications for two full-time, non-exempt, salaried, and benefited positions: Natural Resource Planner and Conservation Program Support Specialist. Job descriptions, including qualifications, duties, and benefits, plus application materials and submission instructions available at www.whidbeycd.org/ job-opportunity/. Application deadline March 8, 2019 (1) Full-time/Permanent Garden Center Position: Freeland Ace Hardware is seeking a professional, experienced person to join our outside Nursery Team. You must be able to provide amazing customer service, interact with a variety of personalities, and comfortably lift 40-50 pounds. We are looking for applicants with relevant experience, self motivation, and commitment. Northwest plant, trees and shrub knowledge is a plus. Your primary job will be to process incoming plant and hard goods order, assist How’d you do? Puzzle 1 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44) 8

6

3

1

7

5

2

6

5

3

4

8

9

2

1

9

3

8

6

8

7

9

5

4

1

9

3

9

2

7

4

1

8

6

5

2

9

7

4

5

1

9

7

3

5

8

2

5

6

3

9

7

4

2

4

8 7

3 2

6

1

2

5

8

7

1

6

9

6 4

4 1

5 3

6 4

1

3 7 8

2

WANTED!

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE: We are looking for a dynamic Account Executive. Applicant has to be able to work autonomously and be self-motivated; must possess exceptional customer service and organizational skills; marketing or advertising background desired. If you want to join an expanding organization and have a strong work ethic, we want to talk to you. Email your cover letter and resume to operations@whidbeyweekly.com 1131 SE Ely Street • Oak Harbor 360-682-2341 www.whidbeyweekly.com

customers with their selecDrivers wanted for Whidbey preferred. Dimensions are: ANIMALS/SUPPLIES 5-6”W X 17”L. Contact me at tions and be involved in BBQ SeaTac Shuttle. CDL/P2 PreRound bales of grass feeder ljohn60@gmail.com. equipment sales. You need to ferred, Training available for hay, barn stored. 360-321be willing to work outdoors in those without. Full Time, Part 1624 RECREATION any type of weather. QualiTime and weekend openings If you or someone you know Get ready for baseball 2019! fied candidates please stop available. Details at www. needs help in feeding pet(s), by with your resume (with seatacshuttle.com or call 360- New Balance baseball cleats, size 10.5, well-used for one WAIF Pet Food Banks may be references) and a cover letter, 679-4003 (3) season, good condition, $25 and fill out our application able to help. Pet Food Banks CLOTHING/ACCESSORIES or best offer; Catcher’s glove at: Freeland Ace Hardware, are located at WAIF thrift by Akadema,33-inch, used for 1609 E. Main St, Freeland, WA Men’s shoes: “Reaction,” by stores in Oak Harbor (465 NE two seasons, fair condition, 98249. Working Saturdays and Kenneth Cole. Men’s black Midway Blvd) and Freeland $45 or best offer; Louisville Sundays are required. 36+ leather dress shoes, like new, (1660 Roberta Ave) and are Slugger 916 bat, 32-inch, 29 hours a week qualifies for full size 8.5, $30 or best offer. We generously stocked by donaoz., 2-5/8” barrel, BBCOR time benefits: Medical/401k/ can send photos. 360-678tions from the community. If certified, $60 or best offer; Discounts/Bonuses/Vacation, 1167 you need assistance, please Marucci Cat 8 bat, 33-inch, after passing a 90-day probastop by. ELECTRONICS 30 oz., 2-5/8” barrel, BBCOR tionary period. Please think of certified, $200 or best offer. this as a long-term opportuSamsung flat screen TV. Like WANTED We can send photos of these nity for yourself. Employment new, seldom used is spare Art, Antiques & Collectibles. here is very stable and very bedroom. Purchased at Costco items. 360-678-1167 Cash paid for quality items. Camping items: Brookstone satisfying. (2) for approximately $380. waterproof floating lantern, for Call or text 360-661-7298 Asking $175. Coupeville, 360Fulltime Paint Dept. Sales DRUMMER: Need expericamping, patio, poolside, or 914-4481 (0) Associate: Retail-minded peremergencies, new, $5 or best enced, solid rock drummer son wanted for the Freeland HOME FURNISHINGS offer; Old (but clean) Thermos with great meter. Practice Ace paint department. If you 1-gallon jug, $5; Versatile Walnut occasional table, with have paint and stain product weekly in Oak Harbor in fully backpack, the two parts can beveled glass top, $30 or best knowledge, love hardware, equipped rehearsal/recording be used separately, or (for offer. We can send photos. and crave the retail career studio. Mostly rock, blues and more serious backpacking) Call or text 360-320-0525. experience then we’d love to acoustic originals plus some together, $15 obo. We have hear from you. Working Saturcovers. Plan to play concerts/ MISCELLANEOUS photos. Call or text 360-320days and Sundays are required. festivals and work on CD. Rich 0525. 6-foot step ladder, 50-inch Must be able to lift 40-50lbs. at rswitzer55@netzero.net or Hitachi TV, computer/utility Sports items: Bag Boy golf Wages and benefits are based 360-675-5470 before 9 pm. table, exercise stepper, moving cart, $10 obo; Golf umbrella, on qualifications and will be Was your Dad or Gramps in $3; Men’s wet suits, size L, reviewed during the interview. boxes. Coupeville, 360-6787591 (1) $10 per item; Neoprene gloves Japan or Germany? I collect 36+ hours per week, qualifies old 35 mm cameras and and hats, size L, $5 each. We for full time benefits: MediWind chimes, 21”, $10. We lenses. Oak Harbor, call (970) have photos. Call or text 360cal/401k/Discounts/Bonuses/ can send photos. Call or text 823-0002 320-0525. Vacation, after passing the 360-320-0525 probationary period. Qualified Looking for Xmas, Bday, candidates, stop by with your Father’s Day, or just Gifts in resume (with references) and general? These are LOCAL CLASSIFIED INFORMATION a cover letter, and fill out our made crafts, I have about US Postal Mail Whidbey Weekly application at: Freeland Ace 50-60 of these available. They Hardware, 1609 E. Main St, Classified Department are $16 ea, plus shipping if Freeland, WA 98249 PO Box 1098 you want them mailed. CASH No Cheating!

Oak Harbor, WA 98277

E-Mail............classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com Telephone..................................(360)682-2341 Fax.............................................(360)682-2344 PLEASE CALL WHEN YOUR ITEMS HAVE SOLD.

Please try to limit your classified to 30 words or less, (amounts and phone numbers are counted as words) we will help edit if necessary. We charge $10/week for Vehicles, Boats, Motorcycles, RVs, Real Estate Rental/Sales, Business Classifieds and any items selling $1,000 and above. We do charge $25 to include a photo. The FREE classified space is not for business use. No classified is accepted without phone number. We reserve the right to not publish classifieds that are in bad taste or of questionable content. All free classifieds will be published twice consecutively. If you would like your ad to be published more often, you must resubmit it. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date.

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


Business Spotlight Honoring the memory of your loved one

HARADA PHYSICAL THERAPY Your Hometown Therapists

• Sports Rehab • Post-Op Treatment • MVA/L&I Claims • Injury Screening

As a family-owned and operated funeral home, we take our commitment to your family personally.

Meghan Jones, PTA Oak Harbor

Coupeville

Serving all Whidbey Island and beyond

210 SE Pioneer Way #2 101 S Main Street www.HaradaPT.com 360-679-8600 360-678-2770

746 NE Midway Blvd • Oak Harbor

360-675-5777 info@whidbeymemorial.com www.whidbeymemorial.com

Your Hometown Therapists

www.HaradaPT.com

Join the Cutting Edge Team at the Side Door Barbershop By Kathy Reed

360-675-2600

thrivecommunityfitness.com 32650 Highway 20 Building D, Oak Harbor, WA

Our primary care providers are here for your lifetime of good health. Seth Grisham, PA-C WhidbeyHealth Primary Care Goldie Street • 360.679.5590 1300 NE Goldie Street • Oak Harbor

www.whidbeyhealth.org

GEAR UP FOR WINTER

11 8

$

MOSS B WARE® MOSS KILLER 3 LB $11.99

99 $ 99

7166127

Sue Johnson, owner of the Side Door Barbershop in Oak Harbor, is building a dynamic team of barbers and is looking for more to join her! Annual Membership Fee of $59 (plus tax) auto-billed 45 days after sign up.

RED HOT BUYS!

The newly-opened Side Door Barbershop in downtown Oak Harbor has booth rental spaces available for experienced, professional, positive, friendly and hardworking individuals who are a cut above when it comes to barbering. The Side Door is open seven days a week and can meet all your barbering needs, when you need them! Johnson, who has 45 years of experience in hairdressing and barbering, loves what she does and it shows. She loves cutting hair and she loves her customers, working hard to establish a clean, comfortable atmosphere, where people can come and enjoy their experience. Just think how much more enjoyable it is to get your hair cut by someone who wants to do their best to please you and make you feel right at home during the process. That’s what Johnson has done with the Side Door Barbershop.

30 SECONDS® OUTDOOR CLEANER CONCENTRATE 1 GALLON $8.99 7130834

Offer Expires 03/31/19

150 SE Pioneer Way • Oak Harbor • 360-679-3533

Everybody Wants A Clean Shell!

You can rest assured Johnson and her team of barbers simply stick to the best, full-service barbering you can hope to find in Oak Harbor. Whether you need a military-style cut for work, something professional, basic or more cutting edge, the team at the Side Door Barbershop will be happy to give you the cut and style you want. Johnson is excited to offer a full range of barbering services to her customers. She is looking for people who will care about their customers’ satisfaction as much as she does, people who are friendly and enjoy working with others, who will treat their customers with the utmost care and respect while creating and sharing a positive experience with their customers and co-workers alike. Here’s a heads up for new barbers: The Side Door Barbershop may be just what you’re looking for! Think about joining a team of experienced fellow barbers who can help you hone your skills, sharing what they have learned from their years in the profession. Those interested in becoming a part of this dynamic team of professionals should get in touch with Johnson by calling 360-672-8622. This could be your opportunity to get involved in something truly special.

We have the muscles to help you, give us a call!

CRYSTAL CLEAN

W NDOWS & MORE LLC

360-675-3005 - Anywhere on Whidbey FREE ESTIMATES • LICENSED & INSURED www.crystalcleanwindowswhidbey.com

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

The Side Door Barbershop

I

N

S

U

R

A

N

C

E

Experienced Barbers wanted! The Side Door Barbershop is seeking experienced barbers for booth rental opportunities in a new location. For more information, call Sue Johnson at 360-672-8622

AUTO

HOME

BOAT

LIFE

BUSINESS

BONDS

tradewindsins.com

679-4949

ISLAND HERB MERCH AVAILABLE AT

31975 SR 20 Suite 1 Oak Harbor, WA

FREELAND LIQUOR STORE 5565 VANBARR PL # 2, FREELAND

PICKLES DELI

11042 SR 525, CLINTON

1131 SE ELY STREET • OAK HARBOR

A locally-owned, independent insurance agency