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November 15 through November 21, 2018

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NOVEMBER 15 - NOVEMBER 21, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

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ON TRACK with Jim Freeman

In the categories of friends, one might use the adjectives best, closest, oldest, nicest, kindest, or real. One might also use those adjectives from the other side of the tracks, like weirdest, loudest, stingiest, or

former. Reader’s Digest used to run a monthly segment called “Most Unforgettable Character.” We have an island full. Before I met my most unforgettable character friend in 1971, while he was pounding on and expletivating to our law school coffee machine trying to get his dime back, the candidates for my future most unforgettable character friends were already a battalion full. Call it the Law of Attraction in action, the Law of Mental Equivalents, the Law of Correspondences, or the Law of Judge Roy Bean, West of the Pecos. Likes attract. Forget magnets. For one thin dime, and a spot in line at the right time, I got to meet Eugene Jewel Toler while he was berating the law school’s busted – weak dripped-questionable caffeine infested – coffee machine. Closing arguments for our hung-over jury. The words Gene used to accompany the pummeling of the soon-to-be-repaired machine cannot be shared in this free family weekly so close to Thanksgiving. Young people over for turkey gravy may be reading this in your recycle bin next week. Curious about the familiar accent I was hearing in a Point Loma, California palace of jurisprudential anxiety, I asked this long haired tall boy with the brown leather pilot looking jacket where he was from. “West, by God, Virginia.” 47 years later, the opportunity to hear Butch Toler’s accent again will be confined to un-erased voice mails, video tape recordings, and attempted imitations by friends. Three weeks ago, after much prayer and agony-infested deliberation, Gene’s family from Washington, Oregon, Michigan, and West Virginia decided to relinquish life support on their most unforgettable character, Uncle Butch. In the coming months and years, friends, family, and extended kin will share their Butch and Gene memories, some lived, some exaggerated, and some never to be forgotten. My last assignment for my buddy Gene (he never let me call him Butch, adding “They don’t call lawyers Butch”) was to help find homes for his precious children, three golden retrievers, Mattie, Toby, and Alice. Toby is the former Cody. Gene did not like that name. Figuring Toby sounded close enough to the name Cody, which the pup had only heard for seven months, why would the dog mind a name change? No court appearance was even required. Alice is the only golden of Gene’s during my 20 years of throwing tennis balls to actually drop the ball after the retrieval. Alice may be a mutant. For over two decades, I have tossed balls (Gene preferred the Wilson three in a can green tennis balls) to both Sam 1 and Sam 2, Buck, Sophie, Gracie, Rocket, Bandit, Trouble, Mattie, Toby, and Alice. Only Alice drops the ball. Years ago, Gene asked me to watch his goldens as well as those of the breeder while Gene was semi-conducting semi-conductor business in Taiwan. Distinguishing and delivering the nutritional nuances of a dozen goldens when one is used to staring at one basset hound slurping bacon grease is a crash course in body slams. Ever try to feed a dozen dogs, each with a different medical need, without getting knocked over? A few were even goldens with hot spots, but not the Wi-Fi kind. Taking care of a friend’s kids, whether two or

four legged, pins the responsibility meter, even more than with one’s own. Additionally, when the children one cares for are allowed to do things your own children would not be allowed to do, forget discipline. Forget obedience. Wear armor and a Mount St. Helen’s mask, with one of those smelly car pine trees hanging from your ear. It is tough to please such a diversified audience as a dozen golden retrievers, who, to a layman named Freeman, all seemed to look alike. Wrong, dog breath. All different. All unique. All with tongues hanging out, looking at you with an expression that changes with each moment. No one I know has ever loved his golden children more than Gene.

Gene felt toward his goldens like our law school dean, Robert Castetter, felt about life. “Every day is a good day but some days are better than others. Every day is a holiday and every meal a feast.” Gene might paraphrase, “Every golden is a great golden, but some goldens are greater than others.” Those greater goldens were Gene’s.

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When Gene was readying for his double lung transplant a decade ago at the University of Washington Medical Center, he told me if anything happened, he would like me to move to his ranch in Brush Prairie to take care of his dogs.

Publisher & Editor.......................................................... Eric Marshall

“Gene, I can’t move down there. I have a job up here. I have plenty of land. I can take care of your kids up here.”

Circulation Manager.................................................... Noah Marshall

“You ain’t got #^&*. No, that won’t work.” That was the end of the discussion until October 23, the Tuesday the hospital called to tell me I was first choice as Gene’s DPOA. Having done the durable power of attorney job for others too many times, I knew I was once again, the Designated Person of Angst, with the assignment to do whatever Gene would want me to do on his behalf, but with his intent.

Marketing Representatives................Penny Hill, Roosevelt Rumble Graphic Design............................................................. Teresa Besaw Production Manager......................................................TJ Pierzchala

Contributing Writers Jim Freeman Wesley Hallock Kae Harris Tracy Loescher Kathy Reed Carey Ross

Volume 10, Issue 46 | © MMXVIII Whidbey Weekly PUBLISHED and distributed every week. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The Whidbey Weekly cannot be held responsible for the quality of goods or services supplied by advertisers in this publication. Articles, unless otherwise stated, are by contribution and therefore the Whidbey Weekly is not in a position to validate any comments, recommendations or suggestions made in these articles. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. DEADLINES: The Whidbey Weekly is a submission based editorial with contributing writers. Please feel free to submit any information (please limit to 200 words) that you would like to share with the Whidbey Weekly. You may submit by email to editor@whidbeyweekly.com, by fax to (360)682-2344 or by postal mail to PO Box 1098, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date. For more information, please visit www.whidbeyweekly.com.

No pressure there. How do you measure a life-long friendship? By years? By moments? By hassles? By the number of dogs? By the number of cars, trucks, boats, and tractors? Here are a few thoughts from others: A true friend laughs at your stories even when they’re not so good, and sympathizes with your troubles even when they’re not so bad. ~Evan Esar One’s friends are that part of the human race with which one can be human. ~Santayana A friend is a present which you give yourself. ~Robert Louis Stevenson Recipe for having friends: be one. ~Elbert Hubbard Real friends are those who, when you’ve made a fool of yourself, don’t feel that you have done a permanent job. ~Edwin T. Randall It is great to have friends when one is young, but indeed it is still more so when you are getting old. When we are young, friends are, like everything else, a matter of course. In the old days we know what it means to have them. ~Edward Grieg

Open enrollment started November 1st. Visit Washington Healthplanfinder today at www.wahealthplanfinder.org to set up an account for a health or dental plan by December 15th to get coverage that begins January 1st. You can also apply for or renew coverage for Washington Apple Health (Medicaid). This is the only time that you can apply for health insurance coverage without a qualifying event. If you need assistance or would like a second opinion, there is no additional charge for a broker to help. Simply set up your account at www.wahealthplanfinder.org and click on the Partner with a Broker, then type in Shelli Trumbull and partner. Once that has been done, simply call Shelli at (360) 682-2162 to set up a time to meet and review your healthcare options.

When one’s friends get to know one’s friends, then one knows. When one’s friends remain friends after The friend is gone, then we all know. ~God bless you, Butch. I bet Aunt Daisy gave you an ear full when you got to where you did not think you were going. In case you come back to surprise us again, we’ll leave the light on for you. Just follow the bouncing ball. A dozen goldens will be chasing it.

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They even drank his wine, from his glass, from his mouth, or from his floor. They ate his pork tenderloins, fried chicken, rib eye steak, and homemade country sausage gravy. Aunt Bee!

NOVEMBER 15 - NOVEMBER 21, 2018

Northwest

Shelli Trumbull • 360-682-2162 31650 State Route 20, Suite 1, Oak Harbor

shelli-trumbull@leavitt.com • www.leavitt.com/northwest/cascade

Gene’s obituary can be viewed on our Life Tribute page 16. To read past columns of On Track in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

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NOVEMBER 15 - NOVEMBER 21, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

Bits & Pieces Stress Testing on Whidbey is More Convenient Than Ever

and kizomba) has been described by the Los Angeles Times as “seamless and infectious.” Tickets are $22 for adults, $20 for seniors $15 for youth and are available at 360-221-8268 or online at https://tickets.wicaonline.org. Piano Bar opens one hour before each performance. [Submitted by Fritha Strand, Marketing Manager, WICA]

Letters to the Editor Editor, Stephan Schwartz [schwartzreport.net] recently posted a link to an article by Christopher R. Browning that not only gave me chills, but scared the hell out of me. Mr. Browning is a historian specializing in the Holocaust, Nazi Germany and Europe in the era of world wars. His work is entitled “The Suffocation of Democracy” recently published in The New York Review of Books. This should be read by every adult in the country, particularly those who generally don’t like to read, hear or see any information that might be contrary to their established mindset regarding our current commander-in-chief. If those who fit the above description do, in fact, give it a read, they will likely be as concerned as I am about how the current situation in our United States resembles the interwar period and the rise of fascism in Europe. I encourage all who care about the future of this country to take the time to read Mr. Browning’s important document. After you read it, please let me know what you think... bhoward@whidbey.com Bruce Howard Freeland, Wash.

Fire Departments Welcome New Members

The Brightest Holiday Fundraiser on South Whidbey: The Giving Tree

Dr. Zina Hajduczok has been named Medical Director of the Stress Testing Outpatient Lab at WhidbeyHealth Medical Center.

There are a variety of reasons your doctor might recommend a stress test, including: • Help to assess symptoms, such as chest pain, shortness of breath or palpitations, to determine whether they are coming from the heart • See if enough blood flows to your heart as you get more active • Learn how your heart medications are working • Find out if it’s likely you have coronary heart disease • Identify abnormal heart rhythms • See how well your heart valves are working • Help you develop a safe exercise program Dr. Hajduczok is a Board Certified Cardiologist and a Fellow of the American College of Cardiology with 28 years of experience in cardiology. She is also currently a hospitalist at WhidbeyHealth Medical Center.

Pictured left to right: South Whidbey Fire/EMS Deputy Chief Wendy Moffatt and new volunteer firefighters Rene Kinser, Couran Therien, and Jake Newling. Photo by Sherrye Wyatt

South Whidbey Fire/EMS and Central Whidbey Island Fire and Rescue welcomed a total of six new volunteer firefighters at a special evening graduation event Nov. 3 in Freeland. The event recognized graduates who recently completed a combined fire academy. Each new member successfully participated in an intensive six months of work, involving more than 150 hours of study, training, and testing. As members of their respective departments, they will continue to participate in weekly drills and frequent training opportunities, in order to keep their skills sharp. The 2018 academy graduates serving Central Whidbey Island Fire and Rescue are Justin Burnett, Antwon Byrd, and Ken Lindenstein. Those serving South Whidbey Fire/EMS and their assigned stations are Rene Kinser and Couran Therien, Station 33 (Maxwelton); and Jake Newling, Station 31 (Freeland) “We celebrate your successful completion of a long journey through the fire academy,” according to South Whidbey Fire/EMS Chief H.L.”Rusty” Palmer. “We are proud of each of you for persevering through your individual challenges to complete such an achievement.” The department is currently looking for new candidates to fill the next academy. To learn more visit the department’s website at www. swfe.org. South Whidbey Fire/EMS has provided fire suppression, emergency medical service, marine, and rope rescue to residents and visitors since 1950. Volunteers and staff keep busy each and every day responding to the community’s needs, and in 2017 responded to 2,525 calls. [Submitted by Sherrye Wyatt]

Stress tests are covered by Medicare and Medicaid if ordered by your doctor. Please call Central Scheduling Services for a stress testing appointment at 360-678-7607 or visit whidbeyhealth.org to find out more. [Submitted by Patricia Duff, WhidbeyHealth]

Ricardo Lemvo and Makina Loca - World Music Series Whidbey Island Center for the Arts (WICA) is thrilled to welcome world class artist/musician Ricardo Lemvo and his band Makina Loca Friday at 7:30pm. Be prepared to move in your seat! Since forming his Los Angeles-based band, Makina Loca, in 1990, Ricardo Lemvo has refined his craft and vision, raising his joyous voice with strength, singing songs that celebrate life. Lemvo’s roots reach all the way to San Salvador in northern Angola, where his grandfathers were born. Lemvo hails from São Salvador Do Congo (M’Banza-Kongo), Zaire in Northern Angola. He is the embodiment of the Afro-Latin Diaspora, which connects back to Mother Africa via the Cuban clave rhythm, and is truly multi-cultural and equally at home singing in Spanish, Portuguese, Kimbundu, Turkish, Lingala, and Kikongo. Lemvo came to the U.S. more than 30 years ago to pursue a law degree, but ended up devoting his life to music.

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Share Your Financial Abundance with Your Family

Thanksgiving is almost here. Ideally, this holiday should be about more than turkey, football, Black Friday and Cyber Monday. After all, the idea behind Thanksgiving is to share what we have with our loved ones. But if you want your family to take part in your abundance, you will want to look beyond one day in November. To help ensure you leave the type of legacy you desire, you will need to follow a detailed plan of action, including these steps: Review your estate plans. If you haven’t done so already, take this opportunity to review your plans for managing your estate – and if you haven’t yet drawn them up, it’s never too soon to start. You may want to work with a legal professional to create a will, living trust and other documents essential to your plan.

Stress Test Medical Director, Dr. Zina Hajduczok and radiology technician, Misty Orga, administer a stress test to a WhidbeyHealth Medical Center patient.

With the installation of new stress-testing equipment, WhidbeyHealth Medical Center is expanding its cardiac services and providing more availability for outpatient stress test appointments at the hospital. This makes a stress test much more convenient for island patients, who would otherwise have to leave the island for this service.

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In its fifteenth year, The Giving Tree will be decorated with handcrafted ornaments made by the staff and volunteers of non-profit organizations located on Whidbey Island. The Giving Tree will be on display from Nov. 30 to Dec. 31 at two locations: The Bayview Cash Store and the Island Athletic Club (IAC). The Giving Tree is sponsored by Goosefoot, a nonprofit organization that brings neighbors together to build a sense of place and community, to preserve rural traditions, to enhance local commerce and to help create a healthy, sustainable future for South Whidbey Island, and Island Athletic Club, working for a healthier South Whidbey. Local groups representing all of Whidbey Island and working toward a variety of needs are represented on the Giving Tree each year. A suggested minimum donation is set by each organization and all proceeds from the purchase of ornaments go back to the organization. Information on each charity is available to take away. After choosing their ornaments, Cash Store visitors may take them to either of three shops—Side Market, Salon Bella, or the Taproom—for purchase. At the IAC, the front desk will be handling ornament purchases. Please bring cash or checks as credit/debit cards won’t work for these sales. Prices range from $5 to $25 per ornament. The ornaments make wonderful gifts and stocking stuffers, perfect for clients, employees, or gift exchanges. This year’s ornaments come from groups like Equestrian Crossings, Girl Scout Troop 43514, Mother Mentors, Ryan’s House, South Whidbey Historical Museum, South Whidbey Tilth, Toddler Learning Center, You Here Now NW, and more. Please call 360-321-4246 for further information. The Giving Tree will be on display through Dec. 31 in the Bayview Cash Store and at the Island Athletic Club. The Cash Store is located at 5603 Bayview Road, right off of Highway 525, on the corner of Bayview Road and Marshview Avenue. The Island Athletic Club is located at 5522 Freeland Avenue in Freeland [Submitted by Sami Postma, Goosefoot]

Soroptimist International of South Whidbey Seeking Grant Applicants Soroptimist International of South Whidbey Island is now accepting applications for grants to fund local community nonprofit organizations. Please submit your request in writing by Nov. 30, 2018. Submit requests to: SISWI, Attention: Grants and Awards, PO Box 633, Freeland, WA 98249. [Submitted by Marlane Harrington, Soroptimist International of South Whidbey]

Local Business News

Although exposed to Cuban music since his childhood, his formal introduction took place during one of his school breaks. His cousin had a huge record collection, where he spent hours listening to vintage Cuban LPs.

Side Door Barber Has a Flair for Hair

Lemvo’s blend of Afro-Cuban rhythms with pan-African styles (soukous, Angolan semba

He began mastering his craft by doing his own hair along with his siblings’, and friends’. As a

Preserve your financial independence. If your financial independence were to be jeopardized, your adult children might be forced to use their own resources to help support you – an outcome you obviously would never want. How can you protect yourself and your financial assets? For one thing, it’s a good idea to work with your legal professional to create a power of attorney, which would enable someone – possibly a grown child – to make financial decisions for you, should you become incapacitated. Also, you may want to guard yourself against the devastating costs of long-term care, such as an extended nursing home stay. Consider this: The average annual cost for a private room in a nursing home is more than $97,000, according to a survey by the insurance company Genworth. Furthermore, Medicare typically pays very little for these expenses. Consequently, you may want to consider protecting yourself in advance by purchasing long-term care insurance or permanent life insurance with a long-term care provision. A financial professional can help you evaluate your options and recommend which ones might be appropriate for your needs.

Share your wishes with your family. It can take some time to put your plans in place – and, even then, you may need to make changes periodically, based on altered circumstances in your life, such as changes in your marital status, new family members, new property, etc. In any case, as your estate- and legacy-based plans evolve, you’ll want to communicate them to your family – because, by doing so, you can help spare them some potentially unpleasant surprises when it’s time to settle your estate. Also, by making your wishes known to your family far ahead of when any action needs to be taken, you’ll help prepare the right people for the roles you wish them to assume – power of attorney, executor of your estate, and so on. You’ll also want to acquaint your family with the legal, tax and financial professionals you’ve selected to work on your estate and legacy plans. By introducing these professionals early on, you can provide your family members with a greater degree of confidence in the overall estate-planning process.

Thanksgiving goes by in a blur. But by taking the steps described above, along with others, you can demonstrate the spirit of sharing with your family for years – and possibly generations – to come. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Edward Jones, its employees and financial advisors are not estate planners and cannot provide tax or legal advice. You should consult your estate-planning attorney or qualified tax advisor regarding your situation.

Jeffery C. Pleet, CLU®, ChFC®

Financial Advisor 630 SE Midway Blvd. Oak Harbor, WA 98277 (360) 679-2558 jeffery.pleet@edwardjones.com

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

The difference between style and fashion is quality. Charles Boyles, better known as C’Bo, has been cutting hair since he was 12 years old.

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www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OWNED soldier in the U.S. Army, C’Bo cut the hair of his fellow soldiers while on deployment. That camaraderie and love of barbering allowed him a chance to build meaningful connections, and it’s that same love C’Bo extends to his clients today, providing them with the best possible look and experience. After his decade-plus of military service, C’Bo came back home to Whidbey Island to be closer to his family and his ministry. With the love of barbering never too far from his mind, he made the choice to go school and expand his barbering skills. He is now a graduate from Paroba Beauty College and has earned his Barber’s License.  C’Bo, now a barber at The Side Door Barbershop in Oak Harbor, is excited to be a part of Oak Harbor’s newest hotspot and once again is looking forward to serving his community. He is available by appointment and walk-ins for all your barbering and shaving needs. To schedule your next cut, call C’Bo at 360-7287702 or go to your mobile app store and download “theCUT,” where you can follow C’Bo and set your next appointment. The Side Door Barbershop is located at 1131 SE Ely Street, Suite 102.

Oak Harbor Motors Presents Stuff-A-Truck Food Drive Oak Harbor Motors is helping to drive out hunger this November by accepting donations of non-perishable food items, school supplies and personal care items for North Whidbey Help House. Those who donate 5 or more items will receive $10 off any service completed at Oak Harbor Motors in the month of November. Donations will be accepted in the Oak Harbor Motors showroom at 75 SE Pioneer Way daily from 8:00am to 5:00pm during the month of November. For more information, call 360-675-5901.

owner and gives one-on-one excellent attention with cuts, colors, perms and waxing. She proudly is a OPEN TO ALL business, where one can feel comfortable, relaxed and welcomed. She uses Redken hair color and is proud to announce having Oway, a professional organic hair color that is formulated with biodynamic botanicals, organic ingredients, and pure essential oils. All Oway products are certified cruelty-free and are free from common toxic ingredients. For retail, Kim offers, Loma, Malibu Wellness, Kenra and Samish Bay Soaps. All retail is 17-percent off the month of November. Call 360-969-2014 for your appointment or come by to set up one at 285 NE Midway Blvd. Suite 1, Oak Harbor.

NOVEMBER 15 - NOVEMBER 21, 2018

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Community Works When We All Give What We Can!

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12 Days of Whidbey is Back December 1-12 is a special time of year on Whidbey Island. Island Senior Resources is holding its second annual 12 Days of Whidbey raffle, which supports essential programs for seniors, adults with disabilities, and those who care for them. Tickets are available for purchase at Island Senior Resources (Bayview), at Senior Thrift, and at Oak Harbor Senior Center (Mon., Wed., and Fri. at lunchtime). Other purchase locations will be announced at www.senior-resources.org and on Facebook at facebook. com/islandseniors. Tickets are $5 each and each ticket enters the purchaser into all 12 drawings for fabulous prize baskets worth $250 - $1,000 each. The basket for each day has a different theme: Wine and Chocolate Covered Island, Cook It Up in the Kitchen, Golf on the North End, Family Night in Oak Harbor, Family Fun on the South-End, Caffeinated Whidbey, Reader’s Treasure, Spirits of Whidbey, Beautify for Winter, Garden Dreaming, Holiday Cheer, and That’s Italian.

Hair Happenings Celebrates 17 Years in Business

A full list of prizes is available at www.12daysofwhidbey.com

Hair Happenings is celebrating 17 years in business. Kim Welch is sole operator and

For more information call Skye Dunn at 360-331-5720.

Good Cheer Food Bank & Thrift Stores Thanks Whidbey Weekly for giving local non profits a place to be seen and heard! Good Cheer Thrift Stores 2nd & Anthes, Langley 360.221.6455 Ken’s Korner, Clinton 360.341.2880 Stores Open 9:30am - 5pm

QUALITY FURNITURE, APPLIANCES AND MATTRESSES AT AFFORDABLE PRICES New mattresses at Both Stores!

20%

! S T A E S E V O L & S A F O S L OFF* AL *Blue Price

of Island County

2 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU!

FREELAND • 1592 Main Street

OAK HARBOR • 290 SE Pioneer

southstore@islandcountyhabitat.com

store@islandcountyhabitat.com www.habitatfurnitureandmore.info

360.331.6272

FREELAND STORE ONLY We carry building materials: Cabinets, hardware, doors and flooring. (Bring donations of building supplies to Freeland location)

360.675.8733

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED AT BOTH STORES!

DONATIONS ACCEPTED 7 DAYS A WEEK! Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.

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NOVEMBER 15 - NOVEMBER 21, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

What’s Going On All entries are listed chronologically, unless there are multiple entries for the same venue or are connected to a specific organization (such as Sno-Isle Libraries) in which case all entries for that venue or organization are listed collectively in chronological order under one heading.

Island Herb Vendor Day Thursday, November 15, 2:00pm-5:00pm Island Herb, Freeland Representatives from Suspended will be on site with product displays and information. Must be 21 or older. Island Herb is located at 5565 Vanbarr Pl, Unit F. For more information, call 360-331-0140 or visit whidbeyislandherb.com. Marijuana has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Keep out of the reach of children.

The Hotel Belleclaire Thursday, November 15, 7:30pm Friday, November 16, 7:30pm Saturday, November 17, 7:30pm Outcast Theater Black Box, Langley Once again, Outcast Productions is presenting a world premiere: “The Hotel Belleclaire,” with books and lyrics by June Rachelson-Ospa and music by Kezia Hirsey, directed by Outcast Productions Founder and co-Artistic Director, Ned Farley. The show is being performed at the Outcast Theater Black Box at the Whidbey Island Fairgrounds. Tickets are $16 students/ seniors and $20 for adults; all tickets for the November 15 show are $14. Tickets may be purchased at Brown Paper Tickets, www. brownpapertickets.com/event/3657241, or by emailing Outcast Productions at ocp@whidbey. com to reserve tickets and pay at the door by cash or check.

Dine Out For Kids Friday, November 16, see times below Oyster Catcher Restaurant, Coupeville Come have a meal and a portion of the proceeds support Coupeville Schools Foundation. Lunch from Noon-3:00pm, Dinner from 5:00pm-8:30pm.

The Green Room Vendor Day

VFW Auxiliary Auction

Lighting of Langley

Saturday, November 17, 5:30pm VFW Post 7392, Oak Harbor

Saturday, November 24, 4:00pm Langley Park, Second & Anthes

Enjoy hors d’oeuvres, a silent auction and a live auction. All proceeds benefit Veteran and Auxiliary affairs. Advance tickets available at the canteen or at the door, $10 each or $18 per couple. VFW Post 7392 is located at 3037 Goldie Rd.

Langley kicks off the season with its annual tree lighting ceremony. This well attended local event includes caroling, a jazz band, and a visit from Santa. Enjoy a hot cider or hot cocoa while you await the winter fairy who will light the tree with the help of the children. Stores stay open later on this day.

Live Music: Ronnie Nix Saturday, November 17, 7:00pm-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville Ronnie Nix plays a variety of music from the 50s to today. No cover. For more information, call 360-682-5747 or visit www.penncove brewing.com

Of Myths and Miracles Saturday, November 17, 7:30pm Whidbey Island Center for the Arts, Langley Sunday, November 18, 3:00pm First Reformed Church, 250 SW 3rd Ave, Oak Harbor Pre-concert chat starts 45 minutes prior to each concert. Program to include Rossini, Sergei Rachmaninoff, Stacy Garrop, and Ludwig van Beethoven. For tickets or more information, visit www.sowhidbey.com or call 360-929-3045.

Hearts for the Homeless Sunday, November 18, 5:00pm-9:00pm Greenbank Farm, 765 Wonn Road Donate and celebrate with Whidbey Homeless Coalition. Donate online at whidbeyhomeless.org. Free entry, music and dancing, raffle, beverages and eats, with special guest auctioneer, Mr. South Whidbey. Contact 360-9003077 for more information.

Live Music: Original Jim Wednesday, November 21, 7:00pm Flyers Restaurant & Brewery, Oak Harbor Jim sets up a solid foundation for his tunes with laid-back arrangements, tasty improvisation, ​strong vocals, rhythmic guitars, a little keyboard and a unique way to the groove. No cover. For more information, call 360-6755858.

Friday, November 16, 3:00pm-6:00pm The Green Room, Oak Harbor

18th Annual North Whidbey Community Harvest

Representatives from Legit Infused Pre-rolls will be on site with product displays and information. Must be 21 or older. The Green Room is located at 1640 N Goldie Road. For more information, call 360-682-5755 or visit www. thegreenroomwa.com. Marijuana has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Keep out of the reach of children.

Thursday, November 22, 11:00am-4:00pm Oak Harbor Elks Lodge, 155 NE Ernst St.

Ricardo Lemvo and Makina Loca Friday, November 16, 7:30pm Whidbey Island Center for the Arts, Langley WICA welcomes world class artist/musician Ricardo Lemvo and his band, Makina Loca. Be prepared to move in your seat! Since forming his Los Angeles-based band Makina Loca in 1990, Ricardo Lemvo has refined his craft and vision, raising his joyous voice with strength, singing songs that celebrate life. Tickets are $22 for adults, $20 for seniors, $15 for youth, and are available at https://tickets.wicaonline. org or by calling 360-221-8268. Piano Bar opens one hour before each performance.

Comedy Night Friday, November 16, 8:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville No cover. For more information, call 360-6825747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

Dine Out for Kids Saturday, November 17, 8:00am-2:00pm The Salty Mug Coffee, Coupeville Come have a beverage and a snack and a portion of the proceeds support Coupeville Schools Foundation.

Join this community Thanksgiving dinner. Need delivery or want to volunteer? Call 360-2401477. Donations are appreciated. All are welcome!

Island Herb Vendor Day Friday, November 23, 2:00pm-5:00pm Island Herb, Freeland Representatives from Phat Panda will be on site with product displays and information. Must be 21 or older. Island Herb is located at 5565 Vanbarr Pl, Unit F. For more information, call 360-331-0140 or visit whidbeyislandherb. com. Marijuana has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Keep out of the reach of children.

Eagles Holiday Bazaar Saturday, November 24, 10:00am-3:00pm Eagles Aerie #3418, Freeland Find yummy and unique items for holiday giving! Arts, crafts, baked goods, raffles & specialty items. Something for everyone! Call 360-321-5636 for more information. Eagles Aerie #3418 is located at 16691 SR 525.

Model Railroad Open House Saturday, November 24, 10:00am-4:00pm Sunday, November 25, 10:00am-4:00pm 508 Broadway, Coupeville One of the best layouts in Washington. See the latest additions and watch trains run. Handicap accessible. Please bring an item for the Food Bank. For more information, call 360-678-5120.

Sip ‘N Shop On The Cove Saturday, November 24, 4:00pm-7:00pm Coupeville Rec Hall, 901 NW Alexander St. Tickets $20 available from Coupeville Chamber, and online at eventbrite.com. From 11:00am to close you can spend the day shopping and exploring historic Coupeville for your one of a kind holiday gifts and when you are done shopping start sipping. Ticket holders receive a gift bag, tastings from wineries, distilleries and breweries on Whidbey Island and samplings from local restaurants, bakeries, and chocolatiers while enjoying live music and drawings for some great prizes. For more information, call 360-678-5434.

Live Music: Chuck Dingee Saturday, November 24, 7:00pm-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville Chuck Dingée has been playing guitar and singing professionally for over 40 years. His extensive repertoire of classic rock, folk-rock, and other tunes is quite diverse. No cover. For more information, call 360-682-5747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

Island Herb Vendor Day Friday, November 30, 2:00pm-5:00pm Island Herb, Freeland Representatives from Rogue Raven will be on site with product displays and information. Must be 21 or older. Island Herb is located at 5565 Vanbarr Pl, Unit F. For more information, call 360-331-0140 or visit whidbeyislandherb. com. Marijuana has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Keep out of the reach of children.

Live Music: Mussel Flats Friday, November 30, 7:00pm-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville Mussel Flats is a classic rock/blues band living and playing music on Whidbey Island. No cover. For more information, call 360-6825747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

Teddy Bear & Character Breakfast Saturday, December 1, 9:00am & 10:30am Oak Harbor Elks Lodge, 155 NE Ernst St. Two seating times available. Tickets can be purchased at Alaska USA Mortgage Company, Big Brothers/Big Sisters, or online at bbbsisland county.org. $5 for 10 years and younger. $15 for 11 years and older. Bring a new stuffed animal to donate to a child in a crisis situation.

Christmas for Kids Saturday, December 1, 9:00am-3:30pm Concordia Lutheran Church, Oak Harbor Children ages 3-10 are invited to make projects, sing songs, play games, celebrate Christmas, make and eat snacks. Pre-registration is required by Nov. 28. Children attending must be at least 3 years old and potty trained. For more information and to register visit concordiaoakharbor.org.

Jingle Trail 5k Run/Walk Saturday, December 1, 10:00am Camp Casey, Coupeville Run, walk or stroll the five-kilometer route through the unique and scenic trails of Camp Casey and Fort Casey State Park. Sweeping ocean vistas, evergreen and salal canopies, crisp winter air, and very likely an eagle or deer sighting. At the end of your adventure, enjoy some light refreshments. All ages are welcome to participate and costumes are encouraged.

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED On site registration begins at 9:00am. Entry forms available at www.jingletrailrun.com

Holiday Faire Saturday, December 1, 10:00am-1:00pm Whidbey Island Waldorf School, Clinton Free Admission Join Whidbey Island Waldorf School for a fun-filled Family Day that includes children’s craft-making, a holiday craft shoppe, Pocket Wizard, Puppet Play, music, a holiday café, and more! Holiday fun for the whole family. Cash and checks accepted. WIWS is located at 6335 Old Pietila Road.

Wildcat Holiday Bazaar Saturday, December 1, 10:00am-4:00pm Oak Harbor High School, #1 Wildcat Way An Oak Harbor Athletic Department Fundraiser. For more information, email jwichers@ ohsd.net or call 360-279-5850.

Holidays in the Vineyard Saturday, December 1, 5:30pm Dancing Fish Vineyards, Freeland You are invited to a fun filled evening with heavy hors d’oeuvres, sweet treats, and wine to benefit Big Brothers Big Sisters of Island County and Soroptimist International of South Whidbey. Tickets $100 per person. Call 360-279-0644 or visit www.bbbsislandcounty. org

Live Music: Tom Mullin Saturday, December 1, 7:00pm-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville Playing acoustic favorites of the Woodstock generation. No cover. For more information, call 360-682-5747 or visit www.penncove brewing.com

11th Annual Elf Chase Sunday, December 2, 10:00am South Whidbey Community Park, Langley A 5K fun walk/run presented by Saratoga Dental & Orthodontics and South Whidbey PTSA. Chase an elf and get a prize! Costumes are encouraged. Hot chocolate and snacks available. Register online at https://swhsptsa. weebly.com or day of event at 9:00am.

Open Skate Fridays Every Friday, 6:00pm-8:00pm Roller Barn, 98 NE Barron Dr, Oak Harbor Proceeds support Boys & Girls Club. $5 per skater and $3 for general admission. Last Friday of the month, skate with the Whidbey Island Roller Girls! Sorry, checks not accepted, credit card fees apply. For more information, call (360) 240-9273.

Upcoming Sno-Isle Library Events See schedule below Cost: Free Lit for Fun Book Group Thursday, November 15, 9:00am-11:00am Freeland Library Join us for a discussion of Jim Lynch’s “Before the Wind,” the story of the Johannssens, a sailing family: adventurous, fanatical, and, for now, a complete and total mess. For adults. South Whidbey at Home Book Group Thursday, November 15, 3:00pm Freeland Library Join us for a great book discussion of Timothy Egan’s “The Big Burn: Teddy Roosevelt and the Fire that Saved America.” You don’t need to be a member to attend - everyone is welcome! Insect Safari Friday, November 16, 1:00pm Coupeville Elementary School Multipurpose Room Insect Safari gives you a rare opportunity to see lots of amazing preserved insect specimens up close. An exiting and inspiring educational experience for kids ages 5 and up and their caregivers. Diabetes 101 Friday November 16, 1:30pm-3:30pm Oak Harbor Library More than 100 million U.S. adults are now living with diabetes or pre-diabetes, according to a report from the CDC. Learn about diagnosis, management, and resources to maintain healthy blood sugars with WhidbeyHealth diabetes educators. This event is free and open to the public. No preregistration is required. WHAT'S GOING ON

continued on page

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Whidbey Weekly

NEWS

Saratoga Orchestra concerts p. 14

LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

www.whidbeyweekly.com

NOVEMBER 15 - NOVEMBER 21, 2018

Fun for all at Coupeville’s Jingle Trail, Greening By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly Let Peter Cottontail have his bunny trail – here on Whidbey Island we’ve got the Jingle Trail 5K Run and Walk, which sets the pace for a delightful holiday kickoff in Coupeville. The annual fun run and walk for all ages will take place at 10 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 1 at Camp Casey, where festive folks from all over the area will jingle their merry way through five kilometers of trails at Camp Casey and Fort Casey State Park. Title sponsor for this year’s event is Harada Physical Therapy. Opportunities to enjoy the scenic beauty of our island home and quite likely see some of its wilder residents, like eagles and deer, will abound.

“We want to kick off the holiday season with something people can enjoy while appreciating the outdoors,” said Lynda Eccles, executive director of the Coupeville Chamber of Commerce which puts the event together. The run has grown steadily since it began several years ago and easily draws more than a hundred people from all around the area, according to Eccles. “It’s surprising how many come over for this event,” she said. “They come from off-island – Seattle, the Olympic Peninsula. People really love the scenery and families enjoy it, too,” she said. “It’s something you can bring children to and you don’t necessarily have to run; you can walk the whole trail and still enjoy it.” If you may be wondering what exactly puts the jingle in the Jingle Trail 5K, it’s very simple: all participants get jingle bells to wear. Many of those taking part dress up, as well. Costumes are highly encouraged and contribute to the event’s festive mood. “People do it just to have fun,” Eccles said. And the weather? It simply doesn’t seem to have an impact. “What amazes us every year is that people don’t seem to care about the weather,” said Eccles. “Those of us who volunteer are concerned about staying warm, but the people who participate will run it rain or shine.” Medals will be awarded to the top three finishers in the men’s, women’s and youth divisions, and light refreshments will be served following the race. The Fort Casey Inn is also offering special discounted rates to participating runners.

Cynthia Woerner Photo Courtesy of Coupeville Chamber of Commerce Fun, festive costumes are part of the merry-making at the Jingle Trail 5K run/walk, taking place Saturday, Dec. 1 at Camp Casey.

Cost to enter the Jingle Trail 5K run/walk is $30 in advance with a T-shirt or $20 without, $25 the day of the race. Deadline to pre-register for a shirt is Tuesday, Nov. 20. Children 10

and under are free but must be accompanied by a participating adult. Those interested can register online at www. jingletrailrun.com. Same-day registration and check in takes place from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. at Camp Casey. Organizers say there is plenty of free parking available as well. But the fun doesn’t end there. The annual Greening of Coupeville Parade will take place at 4:30 p.m., beginning at 1st and Main and heading down North Main Street to Front Street, then will move up Alexander Street to the Coupeville Library. “We really encourage people to dress up and decorate, making it a parade of lights,” said Eccles, adding there will be caroling and the lighting of the tree at Cooks Corner Park immediately following the parade, at approximately 5:15 p.m. Shops and restaurants in the historic downtown will be open late to accommodate shoppers. In addition, the Oak Harbor Yacht Club’s lighted boat parade is expected to pass by the Coupeville wharf at approximately 5:45 p.m., weather permitting. “There’s just a uniqueness and magic about the parade,” she continued. “I encourage everyone to make the best float they can or gather their friends and co-workers to take part in this home town tradition. It’s a great way to kick off the holiday season.” Prizes will be awarded for best parade float and for best decorated walkers. All groups, businesses, organizations and clubs are encouraged to participate in the Greening of Coupeville parade. Applications and registration information are available online at www.coupevillechamber.com. There is no cost to participate, but the deadline to register is Monday, Nov. 26. Call the Coupeville Chamber at 360-678-5434 with questions.

500 issues and big moves at Whidbey Weekly! By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly There is exciting stuff happening at Whidbey Weekly! The only locally owned and operated paper on Whidbey Island is celebrating its 500th issue this week, a milestone for any publication, but one especially sweet for publisher, Eric Marshall. But that isn’t the only milestone Whidbey Weekly is celebrating. As of Nov. 1, Whidbey Weekly is now Whidbey Weekly & Printing. “Jack Stiltz retired and closed Bay Printing [in Oak Harbor]. Whidbey Weekly has purchased the building and the equipment,” explained Marshall. While Bay Printing is closed, Whidbey Weekly & Printing still retains all files and customer records from the previous business, so there will be no gaps in service. Marshall is quick to point out the road leading to this achievement is not one he has traveled alone. He said none of this would have been possible without the support of his family and friends and a team of dedicated people working hard to ensure Whidbey

Weekly’s success. From its past employees to current production manager, T.J. Pierzchala, graphic designer Teresa Besaw, advertising representatives Roosevelt Rumble and Penny Hill, to a growing slate of talented columnists including Jim Freeman, Tracy Loescher, Kae Harris, Carey Ross, Wesley Hallock and Helena Bailey and the expansion of its news section, Whidbey Weekly - and now Whidbey Weekly & Printing, will continue to work hard to serve Whidbey Island and its residents. The move is one that fits with Marshall’s overall business philosophy. “Our philosophy has not wavered since the beginning - try to use our publication to honor God and serve our community,” he said. “Most of us who live on Whidbey Island realize how special it is. Whidbey Weekly is here to share the stories and events that make our island so unique. Our continued growth is part of our commitment to our advertisers who make printing our paper a possibility each week. We are continually striving to reach more readers in order to put our advertisers’ message out to a wider audience.

“Our business model for Whidbey Weekly & Printing will mirror our current business model - providing quality products at competitive prices with exceptional customer service,” Marshall continued. “We understand the importance of branding and the need for a return on investment. Whidbey Weekly & Printing will make sure your printed products well represent your business.” Since Whidbey Weekly has been asked to take on more and more printing jobs to serve its clients, the move made sense, said Marshall, who added it was a decision made slowly and carefully and one he feels was part of a bigger plan. “It’s something Jack and I been talking about for the past couple of years but, suddenly God put the right person in my office to make this happen,” said Marshall. “From that point on, the whole process was too easy for me not to believe He was behind the entire thing. Believing this is His plan gives me the courage to take on the challenge.” The purchase of the Bay Printing building at 1131 SE Ely St. means Whidbey Weekly will be moving its offices to that location by

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly Dan Haigh, longtime employee of Bay Printing, is now part of the Whidbey Weekly & Printing team.

Dec. 1. Whidbey Weekly will continue to operate as it always has, providing exclusive, local content to its readers at no charge each week and providing outstanding customer service to its advertisers. To that end, Dan Haigh, a longtime employee at Bay Printing, is now part of the team and will be working to improve the quality of Whidbey Weekly & Printing’s products and services. “Without Dan I wouldn’t even have considered trying to continue what Bay Printing was doing,” Marshall said. “He’s vital to our future success.”

See WEEKLY continued on page 18

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NOVEMBER 15 - NOVEMBER 21, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

www.whidbeyweekly.com

Whidbey Weekly

LOCALLY OPERATED

Island Angler By Tracy Loescher

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You might be wondering, what is a winter “Blackmouth?” The word winter we are all familiar with, but unless you are a winter salmon fishermen the term Blackmouth could be confusing. Don’t worry, it’s self explanatory. The name Blackmouth was given to these fish by salmon fisherman, and is used to describe the small number of resident Chinook salmon and the very black gumline inside their mouths. These Chinooks were raised in approved hatcheries where the fish are held and then released after a very specific time frame. Because of this calculated release, these fish think of the local Puget Sound as their ocean. Most of these young salmon will not head north to the Bering Sea to grow to adulthood, but remain close by and grow for approximately four years, when they too will swim up river, returning to their respective hatchery. During the spring and summer months some of these four-year resident fish are caught alongside the migrating Chinook, but it is during the winter months, when all of the migrating fish are gone, when these fish become a real prize to avid salmon fishermen and women. There is nothing better during the holidays than a baked fillet or a large piece of pan-seared salmon basted with compound butter made with fresh chopped rosemary, ground black pepper and fresh squeezed lemon juice – yum! Some of the Blackmouth may seem a little on the skinny side compared to their migrating cousins; this is due to the fact they are not feeding longterm in the rich Alaskan waters. But don’t let your guard down - these seven-pound average fish will bend your rod over just the same. I think of the resident Blackmouth as extremely fit athletes. They are constantly on the hunt for food here in the Sound which makes them lean and mean.

Fishing for and catching winter Blackmouth is basically no different than fishing for the summer time salmon, other than the cold. I use the same size flashers and spoons I use to catch spring and summer fish. The only areas I change things up in are 8-1 and 8-2; for some reason I’ve not figured out yet the salmon in these areas like a green or sometimes blue spoon over the outer banks where black/white, purple, pink and Mother of Pearl seem to be the go-to colors. The Blackmouth will be right on the bottom; he will turn on his side and skim along the bottom, snapping up shrimp, small crabs and any half buried sand lance that he may encounter, so troll your downrigger ball and terminal tackle as close to the bottom as you dare without getting hung up. Blackmouth will strike at Cut-Plug Herring, Ace-Hi flies and Hoochie Squids. I troll a lot of artificial lures because, in my opinion, they need less attention and the longer the lure is down with the feeding fish, the better my chances are of hooking a keeper. The icy waters of the Puget Sound are cold enough, but add in 40- to 45-degree air temperatures and it doesn’t take long for your hands and fingers to get so cold they hurt, let alone try tying on a lure. When it’s this cold we carry a 3- to 5-gallon bucket of hot, fresh water in the boat with us and after having our hands in the sea water, it feels good to plunge my hands into the warm water and keep the dexterity in my fingers. If you have an outboard engine, I know a few guys who used a “T” fitting on the water pump water outlet tubing and routed the warm discharge water into their splashwell. As long as the engine was running, they had warm water to use; just remember this will be saltwater, so take care and keep it isolated to the splashwell.

The Blackmouth season can be very productive and because of this, the state has put a quota on the number of fish that can be kept for the entire season. Each Marine Area For me, one of the greatest things about will have its own quota of retainable fish, having winter Blackmouth in the area is so be sure to watch the emergency closure almost year round salmon fishing. Marine information on the Washington Department Areas 8-1 and 8-2 open December 1, folof Fish and Wildlife website before heading lowed by Marine Area 7, 9, and 10 opening out to fish. If you decide to fish for winter January 1, then areas 5 and 6 open the first Blackmouth or just out for a crisp boat ride, of February. Most definitely winter fishing, give yourself a little extra time for safety’s but for the prepared fisherman, this can be Puzzle 1 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.51) sake. Be careful out there and GOOD LUCK!! great fishing.

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On a scale from 1 to 10...5.1 Every row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every column of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9

5 9

4

3

9

2 5

7 1

1 7 4

6

6

5 7

Answers on page 19

4

2

1

9

3

4

2

8

6

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5 5

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/sudoku on Thu Oct 25 18:42:20 2018 GMT. Enjoy!

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Whidbey Weekly

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OWNED WHAT’S GOING ON

continued from page

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Books2Movies Friday, November 16, 2:00pm-4:30pm Freeland Library This group will focus on books that were made into movies. Read/Listen to the book then join us for the movie and a lively talk. This month we discuss “Wonder� by R.J. Palacio. Enjoy coffee/tea candy and popcorn and meet with fellow book lovers. Brandon Henry who you may have seen at The Clyde Theater will lead the discussion. Sticker by Number Friday, November 16, 2:00pm-3:30pm Coupeville Library Just like paint by number, you can create your own art using stickers! A variety of images will be available. For ages 6 and up (children under 9 with a caregiver). Please register. Friends of the Clinton Library Book Sale Saturday, November 17, 10:00am-3:00pm Clinton Community Hall, 6411 S Central Ave. Thousands of books for sale at bargain prices. New fiction and nonfiction every month. Huge Native American selection donated from Gray Eagle’s estate. Proceeds support community programs for the Clinton Library. Write Now: World Building in Historical Fiction Monday, November 19, 2:00pm-4:00pm Freeland Library Join Valerie Stein and learn to build compelling historical worlds using a combination of facts and genuine voice to transport your reader to another time period. In this two hour workshop, you’ll not only discover resources for delving into the history that most interests you, but you’ll get some time to write and receive input from the instructor (and other participants, if you desire) about how to bring your story to life by the addition of interesting everyday period details, authentic language, and important historical events. Please come with a time period and locale in mind, if possible. Suitable for pre-teens through adults. Please preregister.

3rd Tuesday Book Group Tuesday, November 20, 9:30am-11:00am Freeland Library Join us for a great book discussion of Andrew Mayne’s “The Naturalist.� Professor Theo Cray is trained to see patterns where others see chaos. So when mutilated bodies found deep in the Montana woods leave the cops searching blindly for clues, Theo sees something they missed. Something unnatural. Something only he can stop. Tech Pros: Preventing and Responding to Identity Theft Tuesday, November 20, 10:30am-12:00pm Oak Harbor Library

NOVEMBER 15 - NOVEMBER 21, 2018

spiritual needs. There is a team of Christians from several local churches that are dedicated to praying for healing the sick in our community. All ministry is private, confidential, and free. Teams are available to pray for individuals who drop by on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Religious Services

For more information, contact Ann at (425) 263-2704, email healingwhidbey.com, or visit the International Association of Healing Rooms at healingrooms.com.

South Whidbey Community Church Sundays, 9:00am-9:45am Adult Bible Study 10:00am-11:00amWorship Deer Lagoon Grange, 5142 Bayview Rd, Langley Sunday, November 18: Pastor Darrell Wenzek “Thanksgiving� You are invited to a Thanksgiving Banquet following the service to give thanks to God for the blessings He has provided. Open to all. Please RSVP to 360-221-1220 so we can anticipate the number of people coming. Loving fellowship included.

Holiday Digital Photo Gift Ideas Wednesday, November 21, 10:00am-11:30am Freeland Library

Thursday, November 22, 10:00am 721 SW 20th Court, Oak Harbor

Made by Hand Rock Wraps Saturday, November 24, 10:00am-12:00pm Freeland Library Create a special, unusual Whidbey gift that you can make in a few hours. Come and learn the basic techniques of “wrapping� a rock with natural materials with weaver Jan Smith. Please preregister. Write Now: Five Keys to Creating Compelling Characters Wednesday, November 28, 2:00pm-4:30pm Freeland Library Creating characters that readers love or love to hate is the goal of every writer, but how do you do it? Join Roberta Trahan and find out! Using a five-focus profiling tool you will

LOCALLY OPERATED

develop in class, learn how to build characters that are not only compelling, but also complex enough to carry your story. Bring a brief bio of 1-2 main characters from your current work in progress to workshop in class, or start the process from scratch. Please register.

Identity theft is serious. In this class you’ll learn to protect yourself, including how to read and monitor your credit report. You’ll also learn what to do if it happens to you, and what your rights are as a victim of identity theft. Presented by Kimi Nolte, Lead Victim Services Coordinator at Victim Support Services.

Turn all those photos on your phone into fun family gifts! This class will show you how to get started using the online photo album creation sites. Learn tips and insights from experienced photo album creators.

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First Church of Christ, Scientist

Hymns, Scriptural reading, prayer, Presidential Proclamation, testimonies of gratitude, public invited to this one-hour service. No collection. Call 360-675-0621 or visit christianscience. com

Prayer Group Every Tuesday, 4:00pm-5:30pm St. Hubert Catholic Church, Langley Charismatic Prayer and Praise group. Everyone welcome. For more information, call Bill at (360) 222-4080 or email Sobico@comcast.net.

Filipino Christian Fellowship Sundays, 2:00pm Meets at Church on the Rock, 1780 SE 4th Ave., Oak Harbor. www.ohcfellowship.com

Healing Rooms Every Thursday, 6:30pm-8:30pm 5200 Honeymoon Bay Road, Freeland The Healing Rooms are open to anyone desiring personal prayer for physical, emotional, or

Concordia Lutheran Church Sunday service, 9:30am Bible Study & Sunday School, 10:4 5am 590 N. Oak Harbor Street For more information, visit www.concordia oakharbor.org or call (360) 675-2548.

Teaching Through God’s Word Sundays, 9:00am& 11:00am Calvary Chapel, 3821 French Road, Clinton For more information, visit ccwhidbey.com.

Unitarian Universalist Sunday Service Sundays, 10:00am Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland All are welcome. Values-based children’s religious exploration classes and childcare will be provided. Visit www.uucwi.org for more information. The Unitarian Universalist Congregation building is located at 20103 Highway 525, two miles north of Freeland.

Unity of Whidbey Sundays, 10:00am 5671 Crawford Road, Langley If you’re one of the “spiritual but not religious� people who questions your childhood faith or is looking for something more, Unity of Whidbey may feel like a homecoming. Visit our website: unityofwhidbey.org

Whidbey Quakers Sundays, 4:00pm-5:00pm Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland Whidbey Islands Friends Meeting (also known as Quakers) meet in silent worship and WHAT'S GOING ON

continued on page

We seek to provide each client with confidential, timely and technically proficient skills and advice each need to pay the least amount of tax possible. Trust us with your accounting and tax work so you can focus on your business.

   

  Our professional services include: Individual and Business Tax Return Preparation • Accounting Services Bookkeeping • Business Consultation • Non-Profit Consultation • IRS Representation • Payroll Services QuickBooks Accounting Help and Assistance • Retirement Planning • Trusts and Estate Planning Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.

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10 NOVEMBER 15 - NOVEMBER 21, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED WHAT’S GOING ON

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9

community, with occasional spoken messages, every Sunday at the Unitarian Universalist building. For more information, contact Tom Ewell at tewell@whidbey.com or go to www. whidbeyquakers.org.

Meetings & Organizations Jet Expansion Update and Action Fair Thursday, November 15, 5:00pm-7:00pm Coupeville High School Commons Program starts at 5:45pm. Learn the status of the Growler expansion. Get update on the No New Jets Campaign. Take action and get involved. Sponsored by Sound Defense Alliance.

South Whidbey Garden Club Friday, November 16, 9:00am-12:00pm St. Peter’s Church, Clinton Making Holiday arrangements from our gardens with landscape consultant Jennifer Carlson. Public is welcome.

Island County Astronomical Society Monday November 19, 6:30pm-8:30pm Hayes Hall, Room 137, SVC, Oak Harbor Anyone interested in astronomy is invited to attend. There will be short presentations on current topics in astronomy and a good time is guaranteed for all. For more information about ICAS or club events, contact Bob Scott at ICAS_President@outlook.com or visit www. icas-wa.org.

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Whidbey Island Camera Club Tuesday, November 20, 6:00pm-8:00pm Oak Hall, Room 306, SVC, Oak Harbor Social time 6:00pm-6:30pmand meeting 6:30pm-8:00pm. The theme for November is “Dynamic Tension.” You may submit 3 photographs for discussion during the meeting to absolutescience@hotmail.com. Whidbey Island Camera Club, a community club, is open to the public. If you have questions, please email tina31543@comcast.net

National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Whidbey Island Fourth Thursday, 7:00pm-8:30pm Trinity Lutheran Church, Freeland NAMI is the largest grassroots organization dedicated to making life better for people with a mental illness and their friends and loved ones. The group is nonreligious but meets at Trinity Lutheran Church, 18341 State Route 525. It isn’t necessary to preregister. Please contact Kathy Chiles, (206) 218-6449 or k.chiles22@live. com for more information.

LOCALLY OPERATED

All are welcome. Coupon-clipping, money-saving conversation and new friends. Our motto is “Eat Better, For Less”. Kids welcome. Money-saving classes are available. Find us on Facebook :”Whidbey Coupon Club” and via email: nwcouponclub@comcast.net. The church is located at 1411 Wieldraayer Rd. For further information, please call (360) 675-2338.

Overeaters Anonymous Every Monday, 6:00pm-7:00pm Langley Fellowship Hall, Langley Is food a problem for you? Do you eat when you’re not hungry? Do you binge, purge or restrict? No dues and no fees! No weigh-ins, no diets, no judgments. Just caring support, hope and abstinence.

Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG) Second Mondays, 6:30pm-8:00pm Unitarian Universalist Congregation Whidbey Island, Freeland

Classes, Seminars and Workshops NRA Basics of Pistol Shooting Course Friday, November 16, 6:00pm-9:00pm Saturday, November 17, 9:00am-5:00pm NWSA Range, 886 Gun Club Rd, Oak Harbor Cost: $35 This course introduces students to the knowledge, skills and attitude necessary for owning and using a pistol safely. The pistol handling and shooting portion is completed at the NWSA range, where students will learn about safe gun handling, pistol shooting fundamentals, and pistol shooting activities. The Basics of Pistol Course will also help prepare the student for participation in other NRA courses. Students can register online at nrainstructors. org. For questions or to register call NRA instructor John Hellmann at 360-675-8397 or email NWSA.Training@gmail.com

For more information and support contact: WhidbeyPFLAG@gmail.com; Chapter President, Sharon Kabler at (360) 222-4028; or Chapter Secretary, Erick Westphal at (360) 331-3393.

“Right Brain Mind Power – Practical Pendulum Class”

Every Tuesday, 7:00pm-8:00pm St. Peter’s Lutheran Church, Clinton

Parkinson’s Support Group

NAR-ANON family groups are world-wide for those affected by someone else’s addiction. St. Peter’s Lutheran Church is located at 6309 Wilson Place.

First Tuesday, 10:00am Trinity Lutheran Church, 18341 SR 525, Freeland

Sandra H. Rodman, Author, Right Brain Aerobics. Learn easy intuition techniques to use pendulums for new answers, finding things, food/health or medicine/remedy testing, readings. For creative, practical daily pendulum discoveries. Why asking the right questions matters. How to use cards with pendulums for “blind tests.” Fun! Sound Meditation for mind power focus. $15. Bring your pendulum or get

NAR-ANON

North Whidbey Coupon Club Every Friday, 10:00am-11:30am Christian Reformed Church, Oak Harbor Cost: Free

First Friday, 1:00pm Oak Harbor Senior Center, 51 Jerome St.

No one need struggle with Parkinson’s alone. Gain new friends, get the facts. Call 360-6759894. For a list of continuous Meetings and Organizations, visit www.whidbeyweekly.com

Friday, November 16, 6:30pm-8:30pm Llynya’s Gifts and Crystals, Freeland

WHAT'S GOING ON

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Tickets $20

Benefitting Island Senior Resources

available from Coupeville Chamber of Co mmerce and online at eventbrite.com

Raffle tickets $5 Each

December 1-12, 2018

12 DAYS OF WHIDBEY 1 Ticket = 12 Chances to Win Themed prize packages each day valued from $250-$1100 Day 1 - Wine & Chocolate Covered Whidbey Day 7 - Readers Treasury Day 2 - Cook it up in the Kitchen Day 8 - Spirits of Whidbey Day 3 - Golf on the North End Day 9 - Beauty for Winter Day 4 - Oak Harbor Family Night Day 10 - Garden Dreaming Day 5 - Family Fun Day 11 - Holiday Cheer Day 6 - Caffeinated Whidbey Day 12 - That’s Italian Tickets Available At Oak Harbor Senior Center (Mon., Wed., Fri. at lunchtime) Bayview - Island Senior Resources, Freeland - Senior Thrift, More locations to come!

Winners will be posted online at: www.facebook.com/island senior *Winner’s will be notified and need not be presernt to win.

www.12daysofwhidbey.com

ticket Your Sip 'n' Shop Bag, t Gif r ou s include neries, Wi m fro s ng sti ta Breweries on Distilleries and d samplings an d an Isl ey Whidb urants, sta re from local olatiers oc ch d an s, rie bake usic and m e liv g while enjoyin me great prizes. drawings for so

Sip 'n' Shop On The Cove 2018 & Shop Small Business Saturday Saturday November 24 From 11 am - Close When you have finished Shopping you can start Sipping!! 4pm - 7pm the Sipping and Tasting begins in the Coupeville Rec. Hall

Live Music Every Saturday Night At 6pm through the end of the year. Thanksgiving Dinner Sold Out! Looking to do a holiday/company party? Contact us at events@captainwhidbey.com

Christmas Day Dinner 5-9pm, Tuesday, December 25 Four course plated dinner $55 per person $19 for kids underl 12

2072 Captain Whidbey Inn Road • Coupeville 360-678-4097 • captainwhidbey.com

Reservations can be made at captainwhidbey.com

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Promote your holiday events and bazaars island wide with Whidbey Weekly! 1/8-Page $75, 1/16-Page $40, 1/32-Page $25 ADD FULL COLOR TO ANY SIZE AD FOR ONLY $25! This section will publish every Thursday through December 14. Deadline is the Thursday prior to publication.

To learn more about advertising in Whidbey Weekly Call: 360-682-2341 or email: publisher@whidbeyweekly.com

OHHS Athletic Fundraiser

Wildcat Holiday Winter Bazaar Saturday, December 1st 10-4 pm Oak Harbor High School Fieldhouse

"Black & White" Friday Sale Friday, November 23rdSunday, November 25th. Discount on most Black & White Orca items! Bring your guests in to see our educational exhibits and shop our unique gift shop. Sales & refreshments all weekend!

Langley Whale Center Gift Shop Open Thursdays through Mondays 11 am till 5 pm

105 Anthes Ave, Langley, WA Shop online at our Orca Network Webshop; #1 Wildcat Way, Oak Harbor, WA 98277

shop.orcanetwork.org

NOVEMBER 15 - NOVEMBER 21, 2018 LOCALLY OPERATED

GREEN TICKET CASH GIVEAWAY $1,000 Cash, $500 Cash or a $100 Oak Harbor Main Street Gift Certificate Shop, Walk, Dine in Historic Downtown Oak Harbor

NOVEMBER 1 - DECEMBER 22, 2018 For more information and list of participating businesses visit

OakHarborMainStreet.com

Concordia Lutheran Church Presents play games

make projects

celebrate Christmas

sing songs

make and

eat snacks December 1st, 9am to 3:30pm 3-5 year olds 9:00-12:00 • 6-10 year olds 9:00-12:00 Sack lunch 12:00 - 12:30 • 6-10 year olds 12:30-3:30

Pre-registration is required by November 28th. Register at concordiaoakharbor.org Children attending must be at least 3 years old and potty trained. For our 3 - 5 year olds the day will go from 9 am to 12:00. We will be breaking the day into two parts for our 6-10 year old groups If your child stays the entire day, please provide a sack lunch. Go to our website for more information and registration for this free program.

2018

TEDDY BEAR

& CHARACTER

BREAKFAST

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1 OAK HARBOR ELK’S LODGE TWO SEATINGS: 9 & 10:30 AM PLEASE BRING A NEW STUFFED ANIMAL TO DONATE TO A CHILD IN A CRISIS SITUATION.

11

5 10UNDER& $15 11OVER&

$

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT: ALASKA USA MORTGAGE COMPANY BIG BROTHERS / BIG SISTERS ONLINE: WWW.BBBSISLANDCOUNTY.ORG

The Festival of Trees is a benefit for Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Island County. For more information, please call 360-279-0644.

FESTIVAL OF TREES GALA FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30

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NOVEMBER 15 - NOVEMBER 21, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Let’s Dish! with Kae Harris

STUFFING THIS IN THANKSGIVING! I wonder who it was who first said “You know, I think if we mix some bread and seasonings and stick it up the back end of the turkey we’re going to cook, it could be quite delicious!” Whoever it was, they weren’t wrong, because let’s face it, stuffing is incredibly tasty. Thanksgiving wouldn’t be Thanksgiving without the stuffing, whether or not it makes the traditional entrance and exit via the rear of the turkey. Regardless, the name of the dish – stuffing – implies it is stuffed inside something, even if today we can just buy the boxed version, add a little butter and water and prepare it on the side. Over many, many hundreds of years, versions of stuffing can be found in different regions of the world. From the 2nd century AD, recipes for stuffed items like chicken, rabbit, pig and dormouse (yes, dormouse) have been noted to include ingredients such as herbs, vegetables, nuts and chopped liver and brain. I have not yet come across stuffed dormouse on any Thanksgiving menu - I feel it might be a little too small for any large-scale feast, perhaps - and I just prefer turkey. But even if you weren’t in the mood for turkey (or dormouse), can you just have the stuffing by itself? In the 2nd century AD, maybe not, today however, you most certainly can have just the stuffing sans bird or dormouse. Since 1975, when General Foods was awarded a United States Patent for Instant Stuffing Mix, the American public has been able to enjoy the most speedily prepared version of the stuff normally, well, stuffed into the turkey, but entirely separate from the bird. This means stuffing needn’t be consigned to a once-a-year holiday, where one has to wait anxiously for the 365 days prior to it, before indulging in one of the best parts of the whole Thanksgiving meal. You could whip some up any time the fancy takes you. One of the most wonderful things about

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stuffing is you can make it really unique; take a basic recipe and turn it into something all your own, start a tradition even, for years to come! And with all our focus these days being on healthy and finding wholesome ways to eat and live, the plethora of recipes for stuffing most definitely does not exclude the health conscious among us! In fact, I recently came across a recipe for a low carb keto cauliflower stuffing consisting of a head of cauliflower chopped and pulsed to make fine grain, a couple stalks of celery, finely chopped, a couple carrots, finely chopped, an onion, finely chopped, a couple cups of mushrooms, chopped, 1 tablespoon rosemary, 1 tablespoon dried oregano, ¼ cup fresh parsley, ½ cup vegetable stock, salt and pepper, 3 to 4 tablespoons of butter. Melt the butter in a deep skillet and sauté the celery, carrots and onions until tender. Add the pulsed cauliflower and chopped mushrooms. Stir to mix, add salt and pepper and cook for about 10 minutes. Add the stock and herbs, season again as needed, cover and simmer until the stock is absorbed, while stirring occasionally. Sounds delicious! How about another one I found, which I actually tried a similar version of years ago? It’s a crescent roll stuffing, and let me just say the buttery flavor of the crescent rolls lends itself so delectably to the whole experience of eating this stuffing dish, you won’t be sorry if you choose to make this your go-to stuffing side for years to come! It uses a tablespoon of butter, ½ lb pork sausage (no casings), 2 cloves garlic, 1 carrot, finely chopped, 2 celery stalks, finely chopped, 1 onion, finely chopped, ¼ cup fresh parsley, 3 teaspoons dried or fresh rosemary, salt and pepper to taste, ½ cup chicken stock, two tubes of crescent rolls, 1 egg, whisked. Cook sausage in a large skillet until browned all over, ensuring to break up the meat as it cooks, drain off the fat, remove sausage and clean the skillet. Next, melt the butter in the skillet and cook the onion, carrot and

celery. Stir in herbs and sausage and season. Remove from heat and set aside. Preheat oven to 375° F and cut crescent roll triangles into thirds and roll each third into a ball. In a large bowl, combine the sausage mixture with crescent roll balls, egg and stock and mix gently. Transfer mixture to a casserole dish and bake for 45 minutes to an hour, until the top is golden and dough is cooked through. Allow to cool slightly, serve warm and enjoy! To be sure, a meaty side of stuffing isn’t the only way to enjoy this inside-served-out dish. There are options suitable for those who live a vegan lifestyle and allow me to say, they are positively mouth-watering! Not only are most vegan stuffing recipes tasty, they’re wholesome, hearty, flavorful and satisfying. What more could you ask of a stuffing on Thanksgiving? So, for one of the tastiest vegan recipes I’ve tried, this particular one calls for a loaf of French bread, ¼ cup vegan butter, ½ onion, diced finely, 2 stalks of celery, finely diced, 3 cups vegetable stock, 1 teaspoon dried parsley, 1 teaspoon dried rosemary, 1 apple, peeled, cored and finely chopped. Cut French bread into 1-inch pieces and lay out overnight, covered with a clean kitchen towel. Preheat oven to 375°F. Melt the vegan butter in a pan and sauté onion, apple and celery until tender. Add vegetable stock, parsley, rosemary, salt and pepper and adjust seasoning as needed. Allow to simmer. Arrange bread into casserole dish and ladle the broth mixture over the bread in ½ cup increments until you feel the stuffing is as moist as you’ll like. Cover with foil and bake for 20 minutes, remove foil and bake for another 10 minutes or until top is slightly crisp. Serve warm and enjoy! There are so many ways we can turn stuffing into something so much more than a filling for a main dish. We can create brand new side dishes, use all the amazing fall produce available to us and we can flex our inventive culinary muscle in the process! We can make it a family affair and prepare our dishes with loved ones and really enjoy the company of those special people in our lives. Dear readers, I hope your Thanksgiving celebrations are truly wonderful and filled with fun, family, friends and gratitude. If you have any comments, questions and certainly recipes you might like to share, please feel free to send those to letsdish. whidbeyweekly@gmail.com and we’ll do just that and dish! www.delish.com https://ladyandtheblog.com www.nytimes.com/2005/11/23 To read past columns of Let’s Dish in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

LOCALLY OPERATED WHAT’S GOING ON

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one at Llynya’s – 1679 Main Street, gold building entrance, Charmer’s Bistro corner. Reserve: 360-331-3696 or Sandra@RightBrainAerobics. com.

Back Pain & Sciatica Workshop Saturday, November 17, 11:00am Rue & Primavera, Oak Harbor This is a free informational workshop. Rue & Primavera is located at 785 Bayshore Dr, Ste 102. For more information or to register, call 360-279-8323

Lunch & Learn: Dealing with Grief and Loss Tuesday, November 20, 12:30pm-1:30pm Island Senior Resources, Langley Free There are common elements in moving through grief and loss at any age. Are there particular issues that arise for seniors going through this process? Alison Krizer, with Bereavement Care at WhidbeyHealth Hospice Care, will talk about bereavement and the many ways it is expressed and some ways to cope. Optional lunch by donation is at 11:45am. The Bayview Senior Center is located at 14594 SR 525.

Free ACA (Affordable Care Act) Health Insurance Enrollment for the Public Monday, November 26, 1:30pm-5:00pm Freeland Library, 5496 S. Harbor Ave. Tuesday, November 27, 12:30pm-4:30pm Oak Harbor Library, 1000 SE Regatta Dr. Sign up for ACA health insurance (available to all) for your family. This is a walk-in, free event for the public and most can be signed up in less than 30 minutes. Brokers and navigators for this event are specially trained for ACA enrollment. The enrollment period is November 1 - December 15. For more information, email wehrman57@gmail.com.

Lunch & Learn: Simple & Elegant Holiday Snacks Tuesday, November 27, 12:30pm-1:30pm Island Senior Resources, Langley Free Learn how to make beautiful holiday appetizers and snacks with ease! Come by the Bayview Center to see and taste delicious snacks prepared by the Island Senior Resources Nutrition Program. Optional lunch by donation is at 11:45am. The Bayview Senior Center is located at 14594 SR 525.

Dining Guide Who Has The Best Pies, Breads And Rolls for Thanksgiving?

WW11

The holidays are quickly approaching, see us for: Cakes, Pies, Cookies, Rolls, Bread & More!

Call Now To Order 360-675-6500 1191 SE Dock St, #2 • chrisbakeryonwhidbey.weebly.com

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10%

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Whidbey Weekly

NOVEMBER 15 - NOVEMBER 21, 2018

13

LOCALLY OPERATED

one’s jealousy over the good effects of what you presently have going for you. The 17th is a day to keep your eyes open to both possibilities.

CHICKEN LITTLE & THE ASTROLOGER By Wesley Hallock

ARIES (March 21-April 19) Cross your t’s and dot your i’s this week. Silly little mistakes that you would not make at any other time could prove maddeningly difficult to prevent. The gremlins that make plans go awry and which are all but impossible to spot in advance are the very thing you should anticipate. Knowing these little spoilers are on the move will give you at least a fighting chance to keep them at bay. Goof ups on the 17th come sugar-coated. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Intense people who exude power and confidence will play a prominent part in your week. If you are easily starstruck, it may be difficult to know how far you can trust these fast talkers who sound so good. Normally these will be only the talking heads and media people to which all of us are exposed. Should you find such a person manifest in your life in a more personal way on 17th, be sure you exercise good judgment. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) High-minded philosophies won’t get the job done for you this week. Your quest is for grounded and practical solutions, and in the search, you will almost certainly enlist your spouse or some other person close to you. You are among the lucky ones if that person isn’t also somehow contributing to the problem you must solve. How to tactfully inform them of that fact may become the sticky agenda on the 17th. CANCER (June 22-July 22) Easy explanations for your actions are probably not forthcoming this week. The reason may be that you do much of what you do without knowing why you do it. No problem, you say; feeling-based activity is a way of life--for you. Answering to someone for whom unplanned and spontaneous actions are not the way could be tricky for you on the 17th. As a last resort, forgiveness might come easier than permission. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) For reasons known only to you, it’s likely that a hidden agenda is the prime driving force of your week. So well is it hidden, you may have to stop and think even to realize how much of your time is spent on concealing your thoughts from others. Someone close is in position to recognize when you are less than forthcoming with your purpose and may call you out on it. The 17th could be an interesting day in that regard VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) The zeal and newly-found optimism that are the drivers behind your current competitive spirit are sure to attract attention to you this week. All is well where the result is the joy of friendly competition. At the same time, do not let yourself be blindsided by some-

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) It’s time to devote yourself to forgetting the negative that is going on around you. It may cost you in terms of time and resources to really cut loose and enjoy yourself, but the results will be more than worth the expense. Some seem committed to learning painful lessons the hard way, but you need not be one of them. Pick a playground and let yourself go out to play. Someone on the 17th may wish to join you. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) It’s possible at times to be happy for absolutely no reason at all, other than that you are alive. This week is one of those times. You can, if you wish, find ample reason to be morose, but why bother? Seize the moment, and the moment will take you where you want to go. Probably not in the way you envisioned, but the surprises may be the best part of the journey. Watch the 17th for a case in point. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Life-changing moments often go by unnoticed, until an introspective day much later. You are in position this week for such an introspection. At the same time, something that is altering your life course could be happening right in front of you. Matters on the 17th probably contain an element of one or both of those possibilities. Past and future are playing out for you simultaneously. Are you paying attention?

CLUES ACROSS

51. Pulls apart

19. Small island (British)

1. Taxi

55. City in western Finland

21. Dry or withered

4. Long periods of time

58. Wing shaped

9. Boiled cow or sheep

59. Paddling

24. “Last of the Mohicans” actress

14. Ottoman military commander

60. Player

25. Manufacturers need one

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You are presently in powerful position to erase anything you do not want in your life. This can happen via a voluntary action. It can also be involuntary, meaning that something passes from your grasp that you once wanted, but would now be happier without. A good thing this week would be to apply those terms when trying to understand anything out of the ordinary that happens. This includes the capricious 17th.

15. Pig

64. Japanese classical theater

16. Don’t go near

65. S-shaped lines

27. Makes free of moisture

17. Benin inhabitants

66. Coined for one occasion

31. Semitic titles

67. Pitching stat

34. Gregory __, US dancer

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb 18) Your sudden bursts of energy and aggression are bound to puzzle those around you, but never mind what others may be thinking. These outbursts won’t be with you indefinitely, so do utilize them to maximum advantage. Used wisely, a lot can get done in the coming weeks. Be aware, some of that bounteous energy of yours may be entirely cerebral. Marvelous insights are not limited to the 17th.

28. Tax collector

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) In your more eloquent moments, which may number many this week, normally wordless thoughts may work themselves into your speech. Treasure these insights for what they are--creative gifts from the realm beyond. It’s a magical time for you to be with and enjoy, not something to be seized upon with intent to make yours forever. Casual contacts made on the 17th could have profound impact later.

18. Pop star 20. Removes 22. Your sibling’s daughter 23. Trade

26. Tidal bore

68. “M” actor

35. -__, denotes past

69. Some are noble

36. Makes nicer

70. Lair

40. Indicates position

CLUES DOWN

24. Dabbled

32. Inappropriate

41. Made a priest

1. Places to eat

29. Atomic number 73

2. Marketplace

30. Russian emperor

45. Sixth month of Jewish calendar

3. Unoriginality

31. Broad-winged bird of prey

47. One who refrains

4. Administrative officials

48. Type of top

33. Pale brownish yellow

5. Female sheep and a loch in Scotland

52. Pay increase

37. A type of bill

6. Something to drill for

38. One or a sum of things

7. Midway between north and northeast

39. Stiff, untanned leather 41. Naturally occurring solid material 42. Promotional material 43. Beer mug 44. Nostrils 46. Very rich 49. Atomic number 10 50. Not even

53. Curved shape 54. Keeping down 56. Sleep sound

8. Cassia tree

57. Tiny Iranian village

9. Founder of medical pathology

59. Only one time

10. Long-legged wading bird

61. Before the present

60. Elected official

11. __ and goers

62. Genus of grasses

12. Go quickly

63. Autonomic nervous system

13. Used to cut and shape wood

Answers on page 19

© 2018, Wesley Hallock, All Rights Reserved

YOUR GUESS IS AS GOOD AS OURS WEATHER FORECAST Chicken Little looks at what is and fears the sky is falling. Wesley Hallock as a professional astrologer looks at what is and sees what could be. Read Wesley’s monthly forecast, with links to Facebook and Twitter, at www. chickenlittleandtheastrologer.com. To read past columns of Chicken Little and the Astrologer in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

Thurs, Nov. 15

Fri, Nov. 16

Sat, Nov. 17

Sun, Nov. 18

Mon, Nov. 19

Tues, Nov. 20

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

H-56°/L-48°

H-55°/L-43°

H-54°/L-43°

H-55°/L-42°

H-55°/L-43°

H-53°/L-44°

H-57°/L-44°

Mostly Cloudy

Cloudy

Partly Sunny

Rain and Drizzle Possible

Cloudy Rain Possible

Chance of PM Rain

Wed, Nov. 21

Mostly Cloudy

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

H-55°/L-47°

H-54°/L-45°

H-54°/L-44°

H-54°/L-43°

H-52°/L-44°

H-53°/L-43°

H-57°/L-44°

Mostly Cloudy

Mostly Cloudy

Partly Sunny

Rain and Drizzle Possible

Cloudy Rain Possible

Chance of PM Rain

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Mostly Cloudy


14 NOVEMBER 15 - NOVEMBER 21, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

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Saratoga Orchestra creates mythical musical tour By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly

Whidbey Island’s Saratoga Orchestra is preparing to open its 2018-2019 season with a taste of magic. The group will present the program “of myths and miracles” at 7:30 p.m. Friday at Whidbey Island Center for the Arts in Langley and again at 3 p.m. Sunday at First Reformed Church in Oak Harbor. That’s two opportunities to be swept away on a musical journey. “This year we are interested in different ways of storytelling through music,” said Larry heidel, executive director of Saratoga Orchestra. “Whether it is from the perspective of orchestra members, the composers or our audience, we all come together to create the overall concert experience.” “We begin our season with the music of Gioachino Rossini, Sergei Rachmaninoff, Stacy Garrop, and Ludwig van Beethoven,” described Dr. Anna Edwards, the orchestra’s music director. “Whether it be a master among opera composers, or the almost

mythical status of Beethoven, each of these composers are storytellers in their own right and we love to bring these diverse stories and perspectives to the audience.”

According to Heidel, audience surveys help the orchestra choose which instrument will be featured throughout a season or during a particular concert. Based on that feedback, this year’s spotlight will shine on the “middle voice” of the string family, the viola. “Lucky for us, we have one of the region’s best players right here in Saratoga Orchestra,” Heidel said. “Christopher Foerstel, our principal violist, is an extremely versatile player, evident on his performance resumé, playing with both traditional symphony orchestras to the likes of Macklemore and DJ Spooky.” Foerstel said it is his job to use the viola to tell a story and carry the audience along with him. “For me, this program creates a fantastic soundtrack in one’s imagination,” he said.

“The four pieces in this concert come from different eras within the classical concert music spectrum and each will tell you a story. However, since these pieces don’t tell a specific tale in the traditional programmatic way, the story will be personalized to each audience member.

“These pieces are interesting and unique, but also just plain enjoyable to listen to,” Foerstel continued. “As the soloist on Rachmaninoff’s ‘Vocalise,’ the deeply rich, romantic character of this piece is the aspect I’ll be concentrating on most. I have a story to tell with my solo and I hope to bring everyone along with me.” Another unique aspect of what Saratoga Orchestra does is its pre-concert chats, which begin 45 minutes before each performance. “The pre-concert chat is a time for me to talk and answer questions about the music in a more informal, personal and up-close fashion,” said Edwards. “I try to discuss different aspects of the music people can grab hold

Photo Courtesy of Saratoga Orchestra Christopher Foerstel, principal violist, will be the featured soloist at Saratoga Orchestra’s opening concerts of the season, to be held this weekend in Langley and Oak Harbor.

of when they are listening and hopefully the information will enhance their experience

See SARATOGA continued on page 18

Historic Whidbey purchases historic Haller House By Kacie Jo Voeller Whidbey Weekly After a nearly six-year campaign, local nonprofit Historic Whidbey has announced its purchase of the historic 1866 Granville and Henrietta Haller House and part of the Penn Cove Shoreline effective Oct. 30. Lynn Hyde, executive director of Historic Whidbey, said the purchase of the Coupeville property was made possible with contributions from the National Park Foundation, the National Park Trust, the Norcliffe Foundation, the Coupeville Lions and a number of private benefactors. “We are really grateful to everybody,” Hyde said. “Coupeville is a small town, but we have had close to 200 individuals who have made contributions over the last few years. Everybody says, ‘I do not have much, but this is what I have got.’ And you just need a lot of those people. We are really grateful for everything everyone has done for us. We are really looking forward to the community adopting this site as its own special place.” Hyde said the journey began in November of 2012, when the Haller House was placed on the market. She and Annie Matsov, a former area resident, made plans to start the campaign to save the historic home.

“(The National Parks Service) was interested in what they call a cultural landscape, which is a marriage of the natural landscape plus the way people have inhabited it,” she said. “Penn Cove has always been an important place for Salish people and the Skagit people, and then it instantly became a county seat as soon as white settlers started to populate here, so it has always had a cultural significance. Haller himself was involved in so many movements in our local history that he makes a good poster child for our founding era here. It is the significance of the land and the guy who built the house that has brought us all together.” Hyde said the campaign reflected the importance of saving and preserving historical sites in a changing modern landscape. “I think with these historic places, especially ones that have a strong historical narrative attached to them, every generation has a chance to interpret that place to be relative to its own time,” she said, “Maybe 30 years ago we would have looked at the Haller House and just talked about pioneers coming to the island, but now we have the opportunity to use the house

“We immediately started getting people together to form a fundraising team and to see what alternatives there were for getting it off the market,” she said. Hyde said the mission to save the home and its historic value brought together organizations from the area and beyond. According to Hyde, the home is historically significant due in part to the life of Col. Haller, an Army officer whose broad career involved territorial disputes with native peoples, and also because of the importance the area had to the Salish people.

Photo Courtesy of Samuel E. Beetler II and Historic Whidbey Future plans for the Haller House include a historically accurate restoration of the home and landscaping that will also reflect the appropriate period.

to tell the stories of the Salish people and all the cultural conflicts that went on with the pioneers coming to this place. I think historic places are important as tools to see where we have been and where we are going.” Now that the house has been purchased, Hyde said efforts will focus on stabilizing the home from any further damage. The next stage involves a rehabilitation process for the house, beginning with a new cedar shingle roof planned for the spring, followed by the addition of a new perimeter foundation. “Once we have got the bottom and the top stabilized, that will buy us a lot of time to raise money for rehabilitation,” said Hyde. Eventually, plans for the home include an interpretive space for educational programs, a mercantile store and office space rentals. Hyde said the team is currently working to create a program to coordinate volunteers to help make these plans a reality. The hope is to start introducing the program at a donor appreciation event on Dec. 1. “We are going to be showing people ways they can be involved, whether they are interested in working at the site on landscape restoration or if they are builders who want to swing a hammer,” she said. “Maybe there are architects, or students, or people who want to develop public programming, or do exhibit design, because eventually there will be interpretive exhibits. “There are a lot of ways for people to be involved, so we are formalizing a program that will have something for everyone,” Hyde continued. “We will be launching that at our Dec. 1 event. Ultimately, we will have it all up on our website so people can look and see what is going on and get involved.” For more information about the Haller House, please visit www.historicwhidbey.org.

Morrow chosen to lead Island Transit By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly

The Island Transit board of directors has selected Todd Morrow as the agency’s next executive director. Interviews for the position were conducted last Friday and Morrow was selected from a field of four candidates. He is currently a project management analyst for Intercity Transit in Olympia, Wash., and spent 15 years with Community Transit of Snohomish County before that. He said he is humbled by his selection to lead Island Transit. “I am looking forward to working with a dedicated group of coach operators and staff who are clearly motivated to provide the best in public transit service,” Morrow told Whidbey Weekly via email. “Under the direction of the board of directors, we will maintain that service, and to the extent possible, expand and improve it.  Being involved in the community is also very important to me, and to Island Transit. Community service is a passion of mine.”

In a brief statement from Island Transit, board members said each of the four candidates was well qualified. At a public reception last week, leadership ranked high on the list of priorities for a new director. “The top priority is leadership skills, experience and communication skills,” said board chairman Rick Hannold. “The right director will have to be able to communicate well with staff.”

“We need a good manager with good people skills,” said board member Beth Munns. “We need a people person, someone people can relate to, who will allow people to do what they need to do.” Morrow said he was interested in the Island Transit position because it presents both opportunities and challenges and said his experience will help him leverage Island Transit’s current resources to help find new sources of funding in the future. His immediate goal is to see the transition to his new role goes smoothly.

“Island Transit will continue to provide great service to the community,” he said. “Thanks to the board of directors and a great staff, the agency is in solid financial shape and has a sustainable plan for the future. I am committed to supporting our employees as they provide the best in transit service.”  Morrow said living on Whidbey Island will definitely be a bonus. “Those who come to the island as tourists wish they could live here,” he said. “When I was traveling on the Mukilteo ferry last week, a pod of Orcas swam by.  Where else in the lower 48 states does that occur?  And I really like the fact that Island residents care about each other. I know I will like living on Whidbey Island and becoming part of the community.” Morrow has a Bachelor of Arts in Linguistics from Stanford, a law degree from the University of Washington School of Law and a master’s of public administration from the University of Washington.

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly Todd Morrow has been selected as the next Executive Director for Island Transit.

He anticipates beginning his new job sometime in December. Morrow takes over the position vacated last month by Mike Nortier, who served as executive director since March, 2016.

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Film Shorts Courtesy of Cascadia Weekly

By Carey Ross Beautiful Boy: Watch as Timothee Chalamet earns an Oscar nomination for the second year in a row right before your very eyes in this based-on-a-true-story account of a beloved son’s descent into drug addiction and the father (Steve Carell, quietly devastating) who tried to save him. ★★★ (R • 1 hr. 52 min.) Bohemian Rhapsody: We all wanted this long-gestating Queen biopic to be worthy of its subject. It’s not, but probably still worth seeing to watch Rami Malek as Freddie Mercury pumping out all those righteous stadium jams. ★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 14 min.) Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald: Sure, it’s not the best film in the J.K. Rowling canon, but it’s gorgeously shot, has enough references to the Harry Potter universe and features reliably good performances by its reliably star-studded cast. ★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 14 min.) The Girl in the Spider’s Web: Much like I don’t know Stieg Larsson’s Millennium series (“The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo,” et al) really needed a fourth installment not written by him, I don’t know that we really need a movie based on the book. But here we are anyway. ★★ (R • 1 hr. 57 min.) The Grinch: Nice try (again), Hollywood. But we all know the only true Grinch movie is the 1966 television special “How the Grinch Stole Christmas,” directed by Chuck Jones, in which the Grinch is voiced by Boris Karloff. Step off, other lesser Grinches. ★ (PG • 1 hr. 26 min.) Instant Family: Mark Wahlberg and Rose Byrne are a married couple looking to adopt one foster child and somehow end up with three. Presumably hijinks ensue until they become one big, happy family. ★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 57 min.) Nobody’s Fool: Not to be confused with the excellent 1994 Paul Newman movie of the same name, this comes to us courtesy of Tyler Perry’s entertainment empire. It stars Tiffany Haddish, who joins Melissa McCarthy and Kate McKinnon in a group of very funny

women Hollywood has no idea how to write good roles for. ★ (R • 1 hr. 50 min.) The Nutcracker and the Four Realms: Oh dear god, it’s a Christmas movie already. Leave Clara alone, Disney. At least until after Thanksgiving. ★★ (PG • 1 hr. 39 min.) Overlord: American soldiers have to fight Nazi-created monsters on the eve of D-Day in this retro action/horror hybrid that I might otherwise mock if it did not have the stamp of J.J. Abrams all over it. I know better than to second-guess the Nerd King. ★★★★ (R • 1 hr. 49 min.) A Private War: Rosamund Pike turns in a career-best performance as war correspondent Marie Colvin whose drive to expose the world’s dark corners caused her to lose an eye to a grenade in Sri Lanka before embarking on the even more dangerous mission of covering the war in Syria. ★★★★ (R • 1 hr. 46 min.) A Star is Born: The fourth version of this toxic-but-somehow-romantic love story sees Bradley Cooper (who also directed) and Lady Gaga play the musical couple in question– and the Oscar buzz is already building, although I remain loyal to the super-cheesy 1976 version. Barbra Streisand and Kris Kristofferson forever. ★★★★★ (R • 2 hrs. 15 min.) Venom: A rare Marvel miss I will still probably see on account of how Tom Hardy’s presence can make up for a variety of cinematic ills. ★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 53 min.) Widows: If Hollywood is a mirror for what’s going on in society, I predict we are about to see a whole bunch of movies about women who are pissed off and not taking it anymore, beginning with this heist flick directed by Steve McQueen and starring Michelle Rodriguez, Elizabeth Debicki, Michelle Rodriguez, and the inimitable Viola Davis. ★★★★★ (R • 2 hrs. 8 min.) For Anacortes theater showings, please see www.fandango.com. For Blue Fox and Oak Harbor Cinemas showings see ads on this page.

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Life Tributes PAT QUINN A Celebration of Life for Pat Quinn will be held Sunday, Nov. 18, 2018, 2 p.m. at Oak Harbor Elks Lodge. Arrangements by Whidbey Memorial, 360-675-5777.

Shirley Ann Simmons Shirley Ann Simmons, age 88, longtime Clinton resident, passed away peacefully at her home, following a brief illness, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2018, surrounded by family. Mrs. Simmons was born in Fort Lewis, Wash., Sept. 5, 1930, to Frank and Roseanna (Perra) Novarra. At an early age she moved with her family to Fort Casey, where her father was stationed at the time. The family moved once again to Freeland, where she attended and graduated from Langley High School. June 26, 1954 Shirley married her high school sweetheart, Gordon P. Simmons. Gordon, along with his brother Melvin, started Simmons Garage and Towing in Clinton. Shirley commuted for almost 10 years working in the office at the Seattle Times. She then became the bookkeeper for Simmons Garage, greeting customers like old friends all the while keeping the business running smoothly. She was a longtime member of St. Hubert Catholic Church in Langley, the Ryder Club, and volunteered helping with PTA and 4-H clubs and anyone else who would ask. Shirley’s heart was so full of love she needed to share even more. She and Gordon built their home on Humphrey Road and adopted their daughters, Sonya in 1961 and Sharon in 1965. This made her family and her heart complete. She raised her girls with a strong but gentle hand, being sure they were prepared for the world outside, and never once letting them forget how much she loved them. Shirley was generous and loving, helping many people in the community if they needed a hand up. Her door was always open with coffee on and fresh cookies on the plate. She spent her spare time gardening, sewing and knitting but mostly being there to support her family with all their activities. Shirley served the Lord, her church, her family and her community with love, grace and humility and she will be greatly missed. Shirley is survived by her husband Gordon; two daughters, Sonya Simmons (Gary Peterson) of Freeland and Sharon Eickhoff of Clinton; two grandchildren, Makenzie and Jonathon Peterson; two brothers, Francis Novarra (Alice) of Clinton and Ralph Novarra (Noella) of Rochester, Wash.; also, numerous nieces, nephews and other relatives. She was preceded in death by two sisters, Dolores Wolgamott and Patricia Sampair and by one brother, Vincent Novarra and her son-in-law Gary Eickhoff. A Funeral Mass will take place at St. Hubert Catholic Church Saturday, Nov. 24, 2018, 1 p.m., Rev. Rick Spicer, Celebrant. Interment will be at St. Peter’s Cemetery in Clinton. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to WhidbeyHealth Hospice, 101 N. Main St., Coupeville, WA 98239. Family and friends are encouraged to share memories and condolences at www.whidbeymemorial.com.

Scott Swaer Scott J. Swaer, age 55, passed away unexpectedly Oct. 12, 2018 in his home in Coupeville, Wash. Scott was born June 22, 1963 in Oconto, Wis. to the late Bonnie (Crane) Swaer as the youngest of four children. Scott married his soul mate, Debra Engelhardt, in the Bahamas in 2011; Debra preceded him in death Nov. 26, 2014 after a long and courageous battle with cancer.

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Seward, Alaska, where their first set of twins, Dorothy and Ann, were born. From Seward, they moved to Moose Pass, Alaska. Elizabeth’s stories of their life in Alaska, from month-long power outages to snow drifts as high as the house to landing a huge cod when she was nine months pregnant imparted how much she loved her years there. From Alaska, Elizabeth and Fred trekked to Great Falls, Mont., which is where their second set of twins, Susan and Kurt, made a grand entrance. The twins’ combined weight, over 17 pounds, put them in the hospital’s record books; local radio coverage gained the family at least 15 minutes of fame.

Scott graduated from Oconto High School in 1981. He served in the U.S. Navy from 1981-1988, and received an honorable discharge upon completion of service. Scott was hired into the Boeing Company in April of 1988 as an inspector on the 737 program. He later transferred to the 767 program in Everett. Scott also worked on the 777 and 787 programs before joining the AOG team where he traveled worldwide in support of customers’ aircraft. Scott joined AOG management in 2015 and continued traveling for Boeing. Scott’s military career led him to eventually settle on Whidbey Island in Washington State where he enjoyed leisure life on the island, beach fishing at Admiralty Bay and Bush Point, scuba diving at Keystone Jetty, canoeing in Admiralty Inlet, and camping at Deception Pass. He lived on Whidbey Island for 30+ years in the heart of Seahawks Country but remained a dedicated Packers Fan. Scott is described by friends and family as kind, caring, funny, sharp-witted, and a true friend who was willing to go out of his way to help anyone. As a young man growing up, he had a passion for wrestling, baseball and drumming on anything he could find. His adventurous nature even led him to shark cage diving. He was very generous and made many special friends along the journey of his life. Scott was loved and respected by many whose lives he touched and will be deeply missed. Scott is survived by his three sisters, Judith Crane of Cypress, Texas, Patricia (Paul) Dumas of Lena, Wis., Charlene Baier of Oconto, Wis.; two nieces, Tressa (Garrett) Weber of Green Bay, Wis., and Nicole Baier of Oconto; two nephews, Joshua Baier of Oconto, and Justin Dumas of Oconto Falls, Wis.; one great-nephew Mavrik Scott Weber; and one great-niece ShayLeigh Weber. Scott’s family extends special gratitude to Kim, Philip and Taylor Brotemarkle of Coupeville for their kindness, patience, generosity, and hospitality during an extremely difficult time. The family also thanks Wallin Funeral Home and Cremation, LLC in Oak Harbor for its patience and understanding in helping work through this emotional process. A special thanks to Attorney Molly McPherson for her knowledge and willingness to help the family work through this as well. An informal gathering will be held at the American Legion located at 690 SE Barrington Dr., Oak Harbor Nov. 25, 2018, 4 p.m. All who would like to join in remembering Scott, reminiscing, and watching the Green Bay Packers play that day are invited to come.

Elizabeth M. Galloway Elizabeth M. Galloway passed away Sept. 28, 2018. Condensing her life into a few column inches is a challenge, for there are the facts of her life and there are the stories. Elizabeth loved a good story. Hers began June 8, 1933, in Newark, N.J., where she was born to Kurt and Elise Weber. Her growing-up years in Irvington, N.J. revolved around her parents’ church, a Methodist congregation made up of many immigrant German families. Elizabeth shared stories of what it was like as a first-generation child of immigrants–the push and pull between two cultures. When Elizabeth was 12, her brother Walter was born. He had Down syndrome, which set her up for a lifetime of appreciating those who had a different way of being in the world and the unique gifts they could offer. The church, her German heritage and parents, and her brother’s life challenges inspired many great stories from this time in her life. Elizabeth was called to study nursing, which used her gifts well. She trained at Orange Memorial Hospital in Orange, N.J., and graduated in 1954 with her RN degree. Her stories of nursing school escapades and mishaps revealed her sense of adventure, humor and her ability to connect with people–whether with those who were to become lifelong friends or shorter encounters that imprinted on her what it meant to provide comfort and ease suffering. In 1955, Elizabeth married Fred Galloway. They lived in Maryland while he finished his army service. There, they welcomed their first daughter, Kathleen. Once discharged, Fred began his career in the U.S. Forest Service, which launched them westward to Ketchikan in the Territory of Alaska. Their son, Bill, was born there. The Forest Service life was one of frequent moves. Their next stop was

In 1968, Elizabeth’s family moved to Kettle Falls, Wash., and in 1972, Bonners Ferry, Idaho. Life in small towns suited Elizabeth. Neighbors became fast friends. People responded to her gift of being so present with them in appreciating the ordinary moments of life; she was never too busy for a cup of coffee with a friend. In each town, she found a Methodist church to join. Also, in each town she worked at the small community hospitals where her competence and caring nature could shine. As her children grew, she and Fred stressed the importance of reading and education (the first stop in any new town was the library). But more important than this, they stressed the power of family bonds. Dinner at 6 p.m. was the rule, where stories of each person’s day were shared– stories that regularly inspired teasing, debates, unsolicited commentary, and lots of laughter; stories that created a lifelong sense of belonging and of what it means to hold together. In the early 1980s, Elizabeth experienced two life-changing events–cancer and divorce. She survived both thanks to her faith, family, and friends. In 1985, she moved to Oak Harbor. She had always wanted to live on an island. She scouted Vashon, Bainbridge, and the San Juans, but Whidbey Island spoke to her. She built a life in Oak Harbor around her work at Whidbey Medical Clinic as Dr. Bailey’s nurse. She also found her beloved church community at First United Methodist Church. She made many friends in Oak Harbor through her singles and coffee groups, through the Pandorans, through the Whidbey Playhouse where she acted in several plays and had season tickets. Once she retired, she volunteered for Oak Harbor schools, where they called her the Reading Angel. She kept active in her church’s programs, especially the We Care group. She loved to walk and hike, especially Ebey’s Bluff. She loved to read. She loved dogs. She loved being a redhead. She loved her Toyota Tercel. She loved music, especially Leonard Cohen and Willie Nelson. And she loved to travel–a trip to Germany and Spain was a highlight after her retirement. She treasured her nine grandchildren and made many trips to Seattle, Port Hadlock, Las Vegas, North Carolina, Georgia, and even Ireland to spend time with them. She was their beloved Miss Betty. She loved that she got to add great-grandma to her resume. Thanks to all whose cards, visits, and calls throughout her final illness let her know how much she was loved. There is no way to put into words the ways she will be missed. Her sadness about leaving this world was she wouldn’t get to see how her beloved family’s and friends’ stories turned out. But family and friends can be sustained by memories of her and the stories they shared with her while she was here and by her belief that though her story on earth would end, she’d start a new one in Heaven. Elizabeth was preceded in death by her parents, Kurt and Elise Weber, and her brother, Walter. She is survived by her six children, Kathleen (Mark), Bill (Beck), Dorothy (Jaime), Ann (Mike), Susan (Jose), and Kurt (Greta). She is also survived by her nine grandchildren, Elizabeth, Anand (Alyssa), Bram (Jessica), Wyatt, Genevieve (Stephen), Karl, Aidan (Trish), Ian (Shelby), and Emma Rose. And her great granddaughter, Breya (Bram and Jessica). Donations may be made in Elizabeth’s name to WAIF or a charity of choice. Or just as important to Elizabeth would be those who loved her take time to share a story with someone. Sit over a cup of coffee or glass of wine to talk. Be present and listen. And most of all laugh.

Fred Joel Hayden Sunday, Oct. 28, 2018, Fred Joel Hayden passed from earth to heaven. He died at home, in the presence of his wife, Fran, after having struggled with many health issues. It was where he wanted to be when he graduated to the next phase of his life. Fred was born to James and Victoria Hayden July 17, 1941 in San Diego, Calif., the first of five children. He was preceded in death by his parents and survived by his sisters Linda and Ruth and brothers John and Paul.     Feb. 9, 1963, Fred married Frances Lee Jenkins. They have three children, Lynn (Brian) Dillon, Robin Sveen, and Cath-

erine (Duane) Flikkema, eight grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. In 1962, Fred enlisted in the U.S. Navy where he served for 20 years, retiring as Chief. During this time, he was stationed in COMSTA Guam, Brindisi, Italy, Anchorage, Alaska and Adak in the Aleutian Islands. He also was schooled and later instructed at various military bases. After retiring from the Navy, Fred taught at USN Great Lakes, and then became an instructor for Landis & Gyr, traveling weekly across the United States. In the last 14 years of his retirement, Fred was an employee of Walmart, able to answer anyone’s question, fill in in any department (even cutting fabric once) and where everyone was a friend. Fred had an inquisitive mind, always questioning, always learning, was quick with humor, and gentle. He is at home

now, enjoying being the only child of his parents (till the rest of us arrive) and without pain or restriction.    A celebration of Fred’s life will be held Saturday, Nov. 17, 2018, 2 p.m., at Family Bible Church, 2760 Heller Road, Oak Harbor, Wash. 

Eugene Jewel Toler Eugene Jewel Toler, 72, of Brush Prairie, Wash., died Monday, Oct. 29,2018, after suffering cardiac arrest. He was born Nov. 13, 1945, in Wharncliffe, W.Va., the son of Lee and Leta Toler. He was preceded in death by his parents, his brother Bert Toler, his sisters Shirley Toler, Freda Lamb, Jonita Oldham, and his nephews, Tommy Lee Lamb, Dwight Mooney Lamb and Matthew Oldham. Surviving are his brother Dwight Toler (Wilma Staten) of Oceana, W.Va.; Diana Ihlenfeld (William Ihlenfeld) of Wheeling, W.Va.; nieces Cynthia Kay Bertrand, Shannon Toler, Janet Toler Burtner, Suzy Stafford, Amy McCormack, Mary Lamb, Caroline Dillon, and nephews Gregory Toler and William Ihlenfeld, II; sister-in-law Shela Toler, and brother-in law Bob Oldham; as well as several greatnieces and nephews. Gene was devoted to his dogs and leaves behind his beloved Golden Retrievers. After graduation from Gilbert High School, he served in the U.S. Navy aboard the USS Long Beach, a nuclear cruiser, and shipped from Norfolk, Va., to ports from the Mediterranean to the Panama Canal. He was a proud sailor and served as a Gunners mate. He received his undergraduate degree from West Virginia University and his law degree from California Western School of Law. Gene was General Counsel for Western Pacific Railroad in San Francisco, Calif., and S & P Corporation in Marin County, Calif. He retired from WaferTech in Camas, Wash. Gene was an avid gardener, loved fishing and hunting, and became a novice beekeeper during his retirement. He valued his many friendships with his childhood friends, Navy buddies, college friends, business associates, and neighbors. Gene was also a proud property tax payer in Island County, and was never late! A celebration of life for Gene will be held at the Freeland Café sometime down the road.

Dianne Fisher Dianne Marie Fisher, of Oak Harbor, died Saturday, Nov. 3, of natural causes in her home. She was born Dec. 21, 1951 to Phyllis and Robert W. Adams in Concord, Mich. Dianne attended Albion High School and Western Michigan University. She married Jim Fisher Sept. 2, 1977 and they had one child, Erica Fisher. Dianne worked as an Administrative Assistant and retired from Whidbey General Hospital. She was an avid reader and enjoyed sewing. Her real love though, was her grandchildren. Dianne is survived by her husband, Jim; daughter, Erica; and grandchildren, Aundrea, Alexa, and Colin. She is also survived by her sister, Judy (Tom) Bybee; brother, Craig (Debbie) Adams; and her father, Robert W. Adams. She was preceded in death by her mother, Phyllis Adams. A Celebration of Life in Dianne’s honor will be held at a later date. Memorials or donations may be made to Dianne’s GoFundMe account put together by her granddaughter, Aundrea at www.gofundme.com. Arrangements are entrusted to Wallin Funeral Home, Oak Harbor, WA.

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Island 911

Seriously, we do not make this stuff up! THURSDAY, OCT. 25 12:24 am, Maple Cove Rd. Reporting party is a transfer from Seattle, advising believes his sister (did not know her address) is in danger from being murdered; when asked why reporting party feels this way, party advising “because she doesn’t know she’s in danger.” 12:20 pm, S. Main St. Male on line stating “If you get a call from Mobile One gas station in Coupeville accusing me of stealing items, it is false.” Accused of stealing toilet paper, other items. FRIDAY, OCT. 26 12:20 pm, Witter Rd. Advising neighbor has removed posted no trespassing signs; placed in own yard pointed in reporting party’s direction. 1:30 pm, Holst Rd. Caller requesting contact. Has wallet to turn in. B&B renter accusing her of blackmail for holding on to wallet she found while cleaning. Advising the renters owe her money and left with one of her keys. 4:54 pm, Wintergreen Dr. Advising someone who lives on Wintergreen Drive is getting ready to go kill people. Reporting party “just has a suspicion” it’s happening. 5:13 pm, Harbor Ave. Reporting orange Chevrolet car with male driver has been in parking lot for past 15 minutes, just sitting in the car bobbing his head. 8:47 pm, SR 20 Caller advising male is walking down middle of the highway. 11:51 pm, Wintergreen Dr. Reporting party states it sounds like someone is being killed across the field from house. Heard a few minutes ago. SATURDAY, OCT. 27 1:23 pm, Timberline Rd. Received call 45 minutes ago from female advising she was in trouble in a van, like she had been kidnapped. Then male voices came on the line and were yelling obscenities at reporting party and told him to hang up. 5:10 pm, Keystone Hill Rd. Advising subject in green Silverado suddenly pulled into driveway and made sexual suggestions. 5:12 pm, Bayview Rd. Caller advising her car is parked on Goldsmith; she entered woods on north side of Goldsmith. Says she was mushroom hunting and is now lost in the woods. Sunday, Oct. 28 7:11 am, Rockwell Lane Caller advising was at location for repossession. Male came out from property and fired gun. Unsure if weapon was fired at caller or in the air. 9:27 am, West Beach Rd. Caller states new wave power cooker was taken; male subject came into house and took the water cup for the cooker. Occurred last night. 3:12 pm, April Dr. Caller states son had been dancing on the roof but now is down and cursing at

caller; grabbed a machete and told caller he would cut her. 5:27 pm, SR 525 Male advising has a solution to solving the assassinations in the world; would like to talk to law enforcement about it. 10:105 pm, Oak Harbor Rd. Caller stating “I already called once, you know the address, I’m sure you’ll figure it out;” line disconnected. MONDAY, OCT. 29 2:40 am, Oak Harbor Rd. Advising male was standing in road, reporting party swerved to miss him, male went off side of road and started hitting himself in the head saying “Go ahead.” 10:21 am, Hansen Dr. Someone has been dumping deceased animals between Hansen Drive and Elsica on Bob Galbreath Road; caller states this is the fourth time deceased animals have been found there. 5:04 pm, Blakely Ave. Caller reporting burglary to location; states landlord broke into house and was taking things. Not there now. Noticed things missing yesterday and then at 1:30, caught landlord in her jeep. 6:05 pm, SR 525 Reporting party states in area of Race Road, male subject is walking into oncoming traffic. States male is high. 6: 50 pm, Bayview Rd. Reporting party very upset with call-taker; states “I don’t want you to do anything for me. I’m a citizen, I deserve the right to have someone do something right from what was stolen from me. Sick of this clown attitude. They’re not gonna help me.” Requesting phone call. 9:56 pm, Maple Cove Rd. Patrol car versus trash can, no injuries. TUESDAY, OCT. 30 11:23 am, Mutiny Bay Rd. Herd of sheep going down Lancaster Road towards water; dark brown sheep with horns. 2:11 pm, Barr Rd. Sheep in roadway on Wahl Road headed towards Barr Road; holding up traffic.

Thank You Whidbey Island For 13 Great Years! Come Celebrate with US! Customer Appreciation Night, Saturday, November 17th, 2018 Food & Drink Specials 13th Anniversary Beer Release F-13 Junker “The Kings Plane” A Belgium Style Strong Pale Live Music 7pm to 10pm Prizes

3:38 pm, Admiralty Way Caller reporting group of loose sheep has now left his house; moving southbound on Admiralty Way toward Wahl. 4:58 pm, W Crescent Harbor Rd. Vehicle rolled off trailer, hit pole, rolled down hill. Unoccupied. Security on scene. 5:19 pm, 2nd St. Reporting half-dressed female by restrooms. 7:02 pm, Paradise Place Reporting party stating suspicious vehicle is parked halfway in reporting party’s driveway; states they went out and physically removed vehicle. 8:43 pm, Morning Mist Lane Caller states someone is looking in callers windows with flashlight; states subject saw caller then got into van and drove to neighbor’s house. Heard subject say “this is bs” then got back in van and left.

32295 SR 20 • Oak Harbor 360-675-5858 www.eatatflyers.com

Report provided by OHPD & Island County Sheriff’s Dept.

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


18

NOVEMBER 15 - NOVEMBER 21, 2018

Whidbey Weekly

LOCALLY OWNED

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED

WEEKLY continued from page 7

Nov. 17

Rossini

Overture to Italian Girl in Algiers

7:30 pm 6:45

Rachmaninoff

Pre-concert Chat

Vocalise

Whidbey Island Center for the Arts, Langley

with Christopher Foerstel viola soloist

Nov. 18

Garrop

3 pm 2:15

Shadow from Mythology Symphony

Beethoven

Pre-concert Chat

First Reformed Church Oak Harbor

Symphony No. 2 in D major, Op. 36 TICKET OUTLETS ClickMusic - Oak Harbor bayleaf - Coupeville Moonraker Books and Blue Sound Music - Langley

TICKETS $25 - Adults $20 - Seniors/Military FREE for Students under 18

ONLINE Tickets & INFORMATION www.sowhidbey.com orchestra@whidbey.com 360-929-3045

21+ RECREATIONAL & MEDICAL MARIJUANA

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly The old Bay Printing building on Ely Street in downtown Oak Harbor is to be the new home of Whidbey Weekly & Printing. Work is now underway to facilitate a move by Dec. 1. Whidbey Weekly purchased the building and will now offer customers a full range of print products in addition to continuing to provide local news, event and special interest features to Whidbey Island residents.

The bottom line for Marshall has always been about building relationships, which is what he plans to continue doing as he takes on this new business venture. “Without a doubt, the best part of Whidbey Weekly has been the relationships that have been established,” he said. “I am blessed to be able to call so many wonderful people my friends. Without the paper, I would never have gotten to know people like Vern Olsen, Jim Freeman, Jackie Feusier, and so on. People like them make our island a great place to live.” The hard work, he said, has been worth it, part and parcel of what owning a small business is all about. “I’ve had to put in a lot of hours and make a lot of mistakes,” said Marshall. “I’m still learning, the curve just isn’t as steep as it used to be. Our biggest challenges are the same as many small businesses - working capital and finding ways to keep up with customers’ needs.” Now, almost 10 years and 500 issues later, there are even more exciting things on the horizon. “It’s a little surreal; there were times I doubted we would get here. At the same time, it’s just another issue and hopefully one of many more to come,” Marshall said. “When businesses stop changing or growing is when they start dying. My family and I are excited about the future. People will have to keep reading to find out what we have in store.” To learn more about Whidbey Weekly & Printing, go to www.whidbeyweekly.com.

SARATOGA continued from page 14

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Photo Courtesy of Saratoga Orchestra The brass section of Whidbey Island’s Saratoga Orchestra prepares for this weekend’s season opening concerts, to be held Saturday in Langley and Sunday in Oak Harbor.

with the music when performed in concert. We also invite the soloist or featured guest to share their perspectives on the repertoire and talk a bit about their journey of being a professional musician.” Heidel said the upcoming season continues to reflect Saratoga Orchestra’s commitment to diversifying its repertoire. “It is no secret that in the world of concert music, women and people of color are grossly underrepresented,” he said. “It is the smaller orchestras across the country that are leading the way to help rectify this problem. We have an easier time of personalizing these composers and allowing them to bring their stories and voices to our audiences. Major orchestras are worried about filling large concert halls and tend to program on the safe side of the concert repertoire.”

General admission tickets are $25 for adults, $20 for senior citizens and military. Youth and students under 18 are free. Those 14 and younger must be accompanied by an adult ticket holder. Tickets are available online or at Moonraker Books and Blue Sound Music in Langley, bayleaf in Coupeville and Click Music in Oak Harbor. Tickets can also be purchased at the venue one hour before each performance. You can find more information at www.sowhidbey.com. So, pack your imaginations and check out Saratoga Orchestra’s “of myths and miracles” this weekend. “Hopefully the takeaway for the audience is to have gone on an adventure,” said Foerstel. “The course of this adventure is up to everyone’s imagination and our job is to provide a live soundtrack to each audience member’s story.”

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


Foster Homes Needed!

Experienced Barbers wanted!

Family Tails Dog Rescue needs foster homes! We can't save dogs from high kill shelters without homes for them to stay at while they wait to find their forever home. 1 week to 3 months, a fun and rewarding way to be involved with rescue and also have a dog without the full time commitment. We pay for everything, you just provide the love and the home. Please call 360-969-2014 for more info or for an application.

GARAGE/ESTATE SALES If you purchased a lawn mower at Hilltop Terrace Garage Sale, we found an attachment that goes with it. 360-341-2209 (0)

ANNOUNCEMENTS Pregnant? Need baby clothes? We have them and the price is right–FREE. Pregnancy Care Clinic, open most Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10am to 4pm. Call 360-221-2909 or stop by 6th and Cascade in Langley. Be the difference in a child’s life and become a foster parent today! Service Alternatives is looking for caring, loving, and supportive families to support foster children. 425923-0451 or mostermick@ servalt-cfs.com The Whidbey Island community is encouraged to try out the paddling sport of dragon boating with the Stayin’ Alive team. Our team’s mission is to promote the physical, social, and emotional benefits of dragon boating. It has been shown to be especially beneficial to cancer survivors. Practice with us for up to 3 times for free. Life-jackets and paddles provided. Saturdays at the Oak Harbor Marina, 8:45am. Contact njlish@ gmail.com. More info at our Facebook Page: https://www. facebook.com/NorthPugetSoundDragonBoatClub?ref=hl Medical Marijuana patients unite; If you need assistance, advice, etc. please contact at 420patientnetworking@gmail. com. Local Whidbey Island help. If you or someone you know has been a victim of Homicide, Burglary, Robbery, Assault, Identity Theft, Fraud, Human Trafficking, Home Invasion and other crimes not listed. Victim Support Services has Advocates ready to help. Please call the 24-hr Crisis Line 888-3889221. Free Service. Visit our web site at http://victimsupportservices.org

CHILDCARE Wanted: In our home childcare needed for 8-mo. old baby, a few hours a day, flexible but 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. desired. Stroller available for short walks near

The Side Door Barbershop is seeking experienced barbers for booth rental opportunities in a new location. For more information, call Sue Johnson at 360-672-8622

home. Text 360-302-0965 and we will contact you for further information. Retired teacher or nurse type background would be wonderful. (0)

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Imagine Oak Harbor’s 1st Food Forest, Saturdays 11am-3pm, at 526 Bayshore Drive. Each week, we have volunteer opportunities available to help care for our community garden, share organic gardening tips, and learn Permaculture principles. All ages and skill levels welcome. Schedule can change due to adverse weather conditions. If you have any questions, please contact us at: imagineapermacultureworld.gmail.com Mother Mentors needs volunteers! Oak Harbor Families with young children need your help! Volunteer just a couple of hours a week to make a difference in someone’s life! To volunteer or get more info, email wamothermentors@ gmail.com or call 360-3211484. Looking for Board Members to join the dynamic Board of Island Senior Resources and serve the needs of Island County Seniors. Of particular interest are representatives from North Whidbey. For more information please contact: reception@islandseniorservices.org

JOB MARKET Sound Water Stewards of Island County: Now hiring part time Executive Director. Degree in field related to marine environment; 3 years successful experience: management, technical (web) proficiency, grant success, volunteer coordination, communications, PR, agency collaboration. Contact: board@soundwaterstewards. org (3) How’d youdifficulty do? rating 0.51) Puzzle 1 (Medium, 3 7

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HOME FURNISHINGS Walnut occasional table, with beveled glass top, $30 or best offer; Stained glass terrarium, with matching cover, plus wood stand. 26-1/2” tall x 101/2” diameter of cover x 14” diameter of base. $50 or best offer. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525. Quilted wall hangings, purchased at the Houston International Quilting Conference. In excellent condition, ready to hang on your wall! Quail (20” x 11”), Duck (22” diameter), $10 each or best offer. We can send photos. Call or text 360320-0525. Fireplace tool sets: brush, shovel, and poker, in a sturdy stand. One set is 30” tall, the other set is 21” tall, $15 ea. obo; Sturdy, brown leather log tote by Eddie Bauer, never used. $10 obo. We can send photos. Call or text 360-3200525. “Happy Holidays” painted sign, 21-1/2” x 16-1/2”, $5 obo. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525.

MISCELLANEOUS Wind chimes: prices range from $10 for 11”, $15 for 21”. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525 Looking for Xmas, Bday, Father’s Day, or just Gifts in general? These are LOCAL made crafts, I have about 50-60 of these available. They are $16.00/ea, plus shipping if you want them mailed. CASH No Cheating!

preferred. Dimensions are: 5-6”W X 17”L. Contact me at ljohn60@gmail.com.

RECREATION Scotty Cameron Futura RH 5W Putter. This putter is in “as new” condition. RH 35”, with stock grip, steel shaft, and head cover. $345 or best offer. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525. 12-volt boat winch, $25 obo; Small anchor, weighs only about 3 pounds, but has a design that will keep your small boat on the beach where you left it. $5 obo. We can send photos. Call or text 360320-0525. Camping items: 2 single air mattresses, “as new” condition, $10 each or best offer; Brookstone waterproof floating lantern, for camping, patio, poolside, or emergencies, new, $15 or best offer; Old (but clean) Thermos 1-gallon jug, $5; Vintage Coleman stove, with protective denim cover, $15 or best offer; Versatile backpack, the two parts can be used separately, or (for more serious backpacking) together, $15 obo. We have photos. Call or text 360-3200525. Sports items: Bag Boy golf cart, $15 obo; Golf umbrella, $5; Men’s wet suits, size L, $10 per item; Neoprene gloves and hats, size L, $5 each; Water skis: Terry Competition slalom ski, with carrying bag, $30 obo; O’Brien Competition slalom ski, Kevlar/Boron, $30

The Side Door Barbershop obo; Wiley wood water skis, $25 obo. We have photos. Call or text 360-320-0525.

ANIMALS/SUPPLIES Yorkie/Llaso Apso mix puppies. 4 boys, born 9/5/18, approx. 9 pounds full grown. First shots/vet check given. $325 each. $25 discount for military, seniors or disabled. Call 360-682-2633. Oak Harbor (0) Excellent Grass Hay, good for horses, $7 per bale, 20 bale minimum. 360-321-1624 If you or someone you know needs help in feeding pet(s), WAIF Pet Food Banks may be able to help. Pet Food Banks are located at WAIF thrift stores in Oak Harbor (50 NE Midway Blvd) and Freeland (1660 Roberta Ave) and are generously stocked by donations from the community. If you need assistance, please stop by.

WANTED Looking to buy an older Campervan that has been maintained, not a Class B Motorhome. If you have one or know of where one is please contact jad.rd63@yahoo.com or 632-2179 (1) Art, Antiques & Collectibles. Cash paid for quality items. Call or text 360-661-7298 (0) DRUMMER: Need experienced, solid rock drummer with great meter. Practice weekly in Oak Harbor in fully equipped rehearsal/recording studio. Mostly rock, blues and acoustic originals plus some covers. Plan to play concerts/ festivals and work on CD. Rich at rswitzer55@netzero.net or 360-675-5470 before 9 pm. Was your Dad or Gramps in Japan or Germany? I collect old 35 mm cameras and lenses. Oak Harbor, call (970) 823-0002

DID YOU KNOW MOST CLASSIFIED ADS ARE FREE? Contact us for more info! classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com

CLASSIFIED INFORMATION US Postal Mail

Whidbey Weekly Classified Department PO Box 1098 Oak Harbor, WA 98277

E-Mail............classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com Telephone..................................(360)682-2341 Fax.............................................(360)682-2344 PLEASE CALL WHEN YOUR ITEMS HAVE SOLD.

Please try to limit your classified to 30 words or less, (amounts and phone numbers are counted as words) we will help edit if necessary. We charge $10/week for Vehicles, Boats, Motorcycles, RVs, Real Estate Rental/Sales, Business Classifieds and any items selling $1,000 and above. We do charge $25 to include a photo. The FREE classified space is not for business use. No classified is accepted without phone number. We reserve the right to not publish classifieds that are in bad taste or of questionable content. All free classifieds will be published twice consecutively. If you would like your ad to be published more often, you must resubmit it. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date.

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


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Whidbey Weekly, November 15, 2018  

Jingle Trail Run Whidbey Weekly News Island 911 On Track with Jim Freeman Let's Dish Chicken Little & The Astrologer Bits & Pieces What's Go...

Whidbey Weekly, November 15, 2018  

Jingle Trail Run Whidbey Weekly News Island 911 On Track with Jim Freeman Let's Dish Chicken Little & The Astrologer Bits & Pieces What's Go...