Whidbey Weekly, October 25, 2018

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October 25 through October 31, 2018

INSIDE

FREE Community Halloween Fun on Midway Blvd in Oak Harbor!

MIDWAY F R HOT EE DO

GS

WH ILE S UPP LIES LAS T!

MONSTER

MASH

Oct. 27 • 4pm-7pm

Free Family Fun at Traders Village: Trunk or Treat, Music, Food, Crafts & Games! Please call 541-280-1333 for more information. This event is proudly sponsored by these participating businesses:

Richard Voit

Old ish

Stuff

Jeff Pleet, CLU, ChFC Financial Advisor

Whidbey Playhouse

More Local Events inside

uncommon threads

NOVEMBER

15th annual whidbey weavers guild sale

2 & 3 • 2018

unique locally handcrafted wearables, home decor and more NORDIC HALL 63 Jacobs Road, Coupeville, WA 98239 approx. 1 mile S. of Hwy 525 & Main St. Coupeville

FRIDAY 10 - 7 SATURDAY 10 - 3 whidbeyweaversguild.org


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OCTOBER 25 - OCTOBER 31, 2018

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YES for Pool Park & Rec on the November 6 Ballot The North Whidbey Pool, Park, & Recreation District is asking voters for a levy of 20 cents per $1000 of assessed property value for a six-year term on the November 6 ballot. This levy will revitalize recreation in our community, giving us all more recreation options locally for very little cost. What Will the District Do with the Levy Money?

• The median home value in Oak Harbor is around $300K, which would be a levy amount of $5 per month • If the levy passes, the District estimates receiving approximately $689,000 in total levy money in 2019 • The Board of Commissioners has agreed in 2019 to target at least: • $75,000 toward updates and maintenance • $40,000 for improved facilities and programs • $40,000 to the reserve fund • The draft Strategic Plan for 2019-2024 includes: • $520K for updates and maintenance • $200 for improved facilities and programs • $240K for the reserve fund • This strategic plan will be completed and adopted in 2019 with opportunities for public review and input

What About Facility Maintenance? Substantial items on the District’s Comprehensive Maintenance Plan anticipated for maintenance or replacement in this levy cycle include: • HVAC System • Hot Tub Water Heater • Submerged Pool Lights • Hot Tub Shell • Locker Room Hair Dryers & • Chlorine Distributor Electrical Outlets • Main Pool Boiler • Locker Room Showers • Patron Shower Boiler • Pool Liner • Costs for the maintenance or replacement of these items is estimated around $475K and the strategic plan includes allotting over $520K from years 2019 to 2024 • Pool Building Roof • Pool Building Lighting (Inside and Out) • Secondary Pool Pump • Hot Tub Filtration System • Hot Tub Jet Pump

What Community Programs Will Be Offered? If the levy passes, the District will have funds to fully restore its programs and services like: • Group Swim Lessons • Private Swim Lessons • Water Aerobics

• Lap Swimming • Water Volleyball • Open Swim

• Special Needs Swim Time • Red Cross Safety Classes • Dog Park Upkeep

It will also allow the District to expand its offerings to include things like: • Community Events • Summer Camps for Kids • Exercise Classes • Running Club • Trip Offerings • Enrichment Courses And it will enable our partners who rent space to offer programs like: • High School Swim Team • Scuba Lessons • Physical Therapy • Private Swim Club • Kayak Lessons

A Sustainable Future for A Healthier Community North Whidbey, but it is not the only element. Other initiatives which will go hand-in-hand with the Maintenance and Operations Levy are: • Creating Strong Community Partnerships • North Whidbey Community Pool and Recreation Foundation • Oak Harbor School District • Mayor’s Office and the City of Oak Harbor • Service Organizations • Local Businesses • Grant Writing for Improvements and Upgrades • Pursuing LTAC, .09 Development Funds, Energy Grants, et al • Increased Transparency for Taxpayers • Annual “State of the District” to share how levy money is being spent • Improved information and navigation on District website • Addition of New Revenue Streams • Advertising and sponsorship offerings • Non-aquatic programs and trips • Long Range Planning • Looking further than the current levy cycle to plan for community needs in the next decade and beyond Paid for by Change for Pool Park and Rec

“Janet listens. She brings people together to meet the needs of her community.” -Commissioner Helen Price Johnson Endorsed by Island County Employees AFSCME 1845, CIFR Local 4033, Washington Conservation Voters, Senator Mary Margaret Haugen, Representative June Robinson and over 250 residents, representing Republicans, Democrats and Independents. She will represent all the people of Island County. Paid for by The Committee to Elect Janet St. Clair

SHERIFF ELECT

Rick Felici ISLAND COUNTY SHERIFF www.rickfelici.com Facebook@rickfeliciforsheriff GOP Uniquely Qualified 24 Years with the Island County Sheriff’s Office • Patrol Deputy & Sergeant • Major Crimes Detective • Detective Sergeant • Chief Criminal Deputy Proactive Leadership • Budgeting, Operating and Financial Management • Hiring, Training & Management – All Criminal Division Employees • Management of Equipment Assets PROVEN EXPERIENCE, QUALIFIED & COMMITTED TO COMMUNITY Paid for by The Committee to Elect Rick Felici for Sheriff (GOP)

Training • Graduate of FBI Command College • International Association of Chiefs of Police Legacy Leadership Program • Member of Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs • Currently pursuing The FBI LEEDA Leadership Trilogy, 120 hours of law enforcement leadership & management coursework

Ballots Have Mailed. PLEASE VOTE!

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Whidbey Weekly

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with Jim Freeman

I would ask Siri or Alexa or Cortana the origin of the word curiosity, but I fired them all for being technologically illogical and digitally disagreeable.

No matter the age, no matter the birth year.

She said she did not pray.

Try it. It will add up to 2018. Don’t cheat.

The next time will be 3018. By then, PayLess, Safeway, Albertsons, Haggen, The Prairie Market, Red Apple, The Clinton Food Mart, and The Goose will probably be legally selling pot-infused doughnuts at their wonderful bakeries. Of course, these in-the-very-distant-future- statelicensed-whacky-donuts would most likely only be available in glazed. Curiosity cures So I was multi-tasking, brushing my teeth horizontally, but standing vertically, thinking about things. What else can a guy do while brushing? One cannot always run the water unnecessarily out of the faucet into the sink drain just for the sound. May as well think too. Years ago while brushing, I had a pocketful of ideas. The hygienist had measured it a seven pocket, a grade of C in gum. I was shooting for a 10 pocket, but the hygienist said that was an F, not an A. Anyway, like I started to say before interrupting myself, which also happens while brushing, I got curious about the importance of curiosity. Without it, I might not have any questions while brushing. Like tonight. While circumventing a back molar, one of the few remaining, I realized that were it not for the Hardy Boys and The Range Rider and Superman and my other childhood teachers of all things good, I might not have been so exposed to the importance of curiosity.

Alexa said she would not get political as she was not programmed for politics or religion or anything to do with Notre Dame football.

Adam & Eve One of my irregular column readers remarked to me today that my column disappoints him because I have no dirty jokes, just old ones. He also chastised me for not using political humor. Dirty jokes and political humor? Same thing, different day?

Is our communication pattern going backwards? Has brevity replaced verbosity?

Outside was my room Outside I could be curious. Outside, where I could climb a tree, shoot a basket, or squirrel away on my red Schwinn 3-speed with a cherry Coke, biking my way to the Tremont pool to see if Christy Culp might be there in her white bathing suit. Can you join me in singing the first line of Where the Boys Are?

Publisher & Editor.......................................................... Eric Marshall Graphic Design............................................................. Teresa Besaw Production Manager......................................................TJ Pierzchala

Contributing Writers Jim Freeman Wesley Hallock Kae Harris Tracy Loescher Kathy Reed Carey Ross

Volume 10, Issue 43 | © MMXVIII Whidbey Weekly PUBLISHED and distributed every week. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The Whidbey Weekly cannot be held responsible for the quality of goods or services supplied by advertisers in this publication. Articles, unless otherwise stated, are by contribution and therefore the Whidbey Weekly is not in a position to validate any comments, recommendations or suggestions made in these articles. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. DEADLINES: The Whidbey Weekly is a submission based editorial with contributing writers. Please feel free to submit any information (please limit to 200 words) that you would like to share with the Whidbey Weekly. You may submit by email to editor@whidbeyweekly.com, by fax to (360)682-2344 or by postal mail to PO Box 1098, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date. For more information, please visit www.whidbeyweekly.com.

See Spot jump. See Spot do funny things with his body. The expression, “I have it on my Kindle” makes me want to buy the Kindler some antibacterial salve. I cannot grow up this fast. I don’t want to shorten my sentences just to talk to the youth of America. In fact, I don’t want to complete many of them. Give me a run-on sentence with a dangling modifier, split infinitives through-out, and a dozen or more gerunds any-day.

Pink in Is it just me or is the TV ad with the Pepto Bismol song which accompanies the dancing trio of guys wearing only pink a bit over the top?

If I had a Slinky, a deck of cards, or a Perry Como ‘45, I was winning the lottery. Mom never had to tell me to go outside and play, or go to my room.

390 NE MIDWAY BLVD | PO BOX 1098 | OAK HARBOR, WASHINGTON 98277

See Spot run.

Were it not for curiosity, I never would have gone to law school.

Bored under Never once did Mom hear me say, “I’m bored, Mom, there is nothing to do.”

LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

Has texting and tweeting shortened all sentences from now until the Instagram becomes something you buy at a drive-up pot store?

See Spot mess with Dick and Jane.

Boredom.

Whidbey Weekly

Circulation Manager.................................................... Noah Marshall

Were it not for curiosity, I never would have been a Marine.

Curiosity may kill the cat, but, for me, curiosity has cured me of something that has never been a problem.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Expressions like, “Hi!” and “Hello.”

Maya certainly offers me none of the rambling you get here for free. With internet fees, I am paying good money for one word greetings from my kin.

Orchestra

A 501(c)(3)Organization

FAX: (360)682-2344

Marketing Representatives................Penny Hill, Roosevelt Rumble

Does anyone read Chaucer anymore?

Were it not for curiosity, I never would have moved to Whidbey, opened a post office box, and bought a double hulled Livingston without oars.

PHONE: (360)682-2341

Dick & Jane When e-mailing my grand nieces Willow and Maya, often any replies I get are limited to three or fewer words. Maya has this down. Maya might go for it and also add a yellow smiley face or a cute cat with orange ears to add to her one word greetings.

EY ISL DB

Our thoughts & prayers are with Sherry Kloss as we wish for her complete recovery. Admission is free. Donations appreciated, they keep us alive membership@whidbeyislandorchestras.org

“Alexa, do you know who your parents are? Want me to ask Siri?”

Superman had Lois Lane to keep him curious. Perry White had Jimmy Olsen. Sacco had Vanzetti.

I can still hum Home on the Range while I brush my teeth.

Special Appearance by Maestro Gabriela Garza Verdi~La Traviata: Sempre Libera Respighi~Ancient Airs and Dances for Lute Italian Folk Festival Overture Solista substitution by highly acclaimed violinist Dr. Cynthia Morrow to perform the West Coast Premiere of Alberto Curci’s Concerto Romantico

So, I am doing a DNA check on Alexa through Ancestry. It will help my curiosity anxiety syndrome, aka Thinkus interruptus, to prove to myself my curiosity, considered by some a waste of time, is still valid for me in securing my eternal avoidance of boredom.

Maybe Dick and Jane had it right after all.

And it took them no more than 30 minutes, with commercials, and opening and closing credits.

7pm Friday, October 26th 3pm Sunday, October 28th Trinity Lutheran, Freeland

I said I did not either, but with the upcoming elections I wanted to start.

Hardy har har The Hardy Boys were always solving a problem, not because they had any authority, but because they were curious. Why couldn’t their Dad, Fenton, the town policeman, figure out where their missing chums were?

The Range Rider and his sidekick, the cowboy term for significant other but not necessarily in the Biblical sense, were always figuring out stuff.

WHIDBEY ISLAND ORCHESTRA

I asked Alexa on my Kindle Fire if she would be my prayer partner.

D AN

This cerebral nuance supposedly happens only once every 1000 years.

ITA LI A !

Curiosity must be a Latin word or a Greek word that was linked to Socrates or Plato or Aristotle or Romulus and Remus.

If you were in the know last Thursday, the 18th of October, you added your present age with your birth year to reveal the present year, 2018.

LOCALLY OPERATED

WH I

ON TRACK

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OCTOBER 25 - OCTOBER 31, 2018

Maybe under the bottom? See for yourself at www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=5&v=AoV1eyLy9Iw. Don’t forget to wash your hands after viewing. Ballots out Ballots went in the mail last week. The county’s election guide was mailed some time ago. That 8 by 10 black and white masterpiece is about as thick as the South Whidbey phone book, or one of those half Windsor knots the news anchors wear.

AND SAVE $

Save Money & Support Your Local Food Bank Custom Framing Sale Save Up To 25%! For every 5 non-perishable food items receive 5% off your custom framing, up to 25%.

Food items will be donated to North Whidbey Help House. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Expires 10-31-2018

Read as much of the voting guide as you want, but vote, even if you don’t know what or whom you are voting for. We surely have elected people before we knew what we had voted for, or am I the only guy jumping up and down in the back of the bus wanting to get off? To read past columns of On Track in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

250 SE Pioneer Way • Downtown Oak Harbor 360-675-3854 • www.genesartframing.com

9:30am-6:00pm Mon-Fri • 10:00am - 5:30pm Sat • Closed Sunday

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OCTOBER 25 - OCTOBER 31, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

Bits & Pieces Letters to the Editor Editor, Whether you are a Republican, a Democrat or an Independent, I think you’ll all agree the “swamp” back in Washington, D.C. is much larger and firmly entrenched than we ever imagined. You’ve probably seen emails advocating for term limits for congress, for obvious reasons: The longer a senator or congressman is in office, the more beholden he/she becomes to lobbyists, PACs and special interests. Maria Cantwell has been in office for 18 years with little to show us for it, other than being one of the “career politicians.” It is time to replace her with a new face, one that is extremely familiar with the issues we face in this state...and how to deal with them. Susan Hutchison is a breath of fresh air! Many of you know Susan from her years as a News Anchor at Channel 5 in Seattle. She later became Chairman of the Washington State Republican Party, revitalizing it as she served. Fortunately for us, she survived a primary in which there were 29 candidates for the office. The fact there were that many candidates is a good indication of the dissatisfaction Washingtonians have with the incumbent’s performance. Very warm and cordial, Susan has the determination, energy and civility to work across the aisle with the other party to look after our best interests and bring about the changes we need here in Washington State. Please join me in voting for Susan Hutchison for U.S. Senator! Fred Wilmot Oak Harbor, Wash.

Editor, I would like to endorse Commissioner Rick Hannold for re-election in District 3. I have just retired from Island County as the HR Labor Relations Manager, and have had the privilege of working with “Commissioner Rick” for many years. I have found him to be fair, consistent and dedicated to his employees and to the people of Island County. I have seen him fiercely defend Island County employees, and he is ever cognizant of the fact that he is the steward of the taxpayer’s money. I have particularly appreciated the fact that he has made sure Camano Island, where I live, has finally been treated as an equal partner in Island County. This has not always been the case. Commissioner Rick has championed a new Annex Building on Camano, helped create new parks, increased staffing levels to ensure better service to Camano Islanders and has negotiated fair wages and contracts for Island County employees. He has the experience to do the job, and the dedication and drive to represent ALL of the people of Island County. And, as a multi-generational Democrat, I can whole-heartedly endorse Commissioner Rick for re-election. Sometimes candidates go beyond party, and actions speak for themselves. Re-elect Commissioner Hannold. He is the best person for the job. Linda Fryant Island County Human Resources (Retired) Camano Island, Wash.

Editor, VOTE NO ON I-940! Just watching the morning news and see a retired SPD Chief endorsing 940...I have to wonder how long ago he was Chief ... His comment of needed training is so out of date ... our current officers already receive that training! This poorly written Initiative is another piece that gives me continued

cause to be in favor of changing the process by which “initiatives” are allowed on to the ballot. In this particular case, under the leadership of Representative Dave Hayes, other members of our Washington State Legislature, from both sides of the aisle, as well as the originators of I-940 and statewide law enforcement representatives, worked diligently, introduced and had passed into law, legislation that included and refined/fine tuned I-940.... In a bi-partisan legislative effort, it was passed and signed into law ... then on a technicality, a liberal court struck it down and forced the original/faulty initiative back on the ballot! VOTE NO on I-940, and allow the legislature to do its job, properly, as it intended!

Mike Hobbs Oak Harbor, Wash.

Editor,

helps. When you donate and shop at Island Thrift, you are helping support programs and services that make our community better. Island Thrift generously helps organizations that we are all familiar with: The Boys and Girls Clubs of Oak Harbor and Coupeville, Big Brothers Big Sisters, Oak Harbor Pigfest, Oak Harbor Music Festival, Oak Harbor Senior Activity Center, Saratoga Orchestra, PBY Naval Air Museum, and many more. We salute Island Thrift, they are a community agency that consistently gives back to the people on Whidbey Island. As we enter the busy holiday period, Halloween through the New Year, IDIPIC wants to remind everyone to drive sober on our roads. A month ago, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) released fatal traffic crash data for 2017. Nation-wide 37,133 people lost their lives in 2017. In 2016, 37,461 lives were lost on U.S. roads. A decrease. However, Washington State had a total of 565 fatalities in 2017 versus 536 deaths in 2016. Of the 565 deaths in 2017, 178 were alcohol impaired versus 160 alcohol impaired in 2016. Our numbers are up. NHTSA has abundant and sobering information at this link: www. nhtsa.gov

I am hoping we can leave divisive politics for a moment and discuss something to bring us together. In Jonathan Rabans book “A Passage to Juneau,” he makes a solitary voyage in a sailboat from Seattle to Juneau. Along the way he lands in a remote island village described as a place where “loose ends naturally collect and lost objects are likely to be found.” Oddly, the dysfunctional inhabitants help him begin to reconcile his conflicted life. I found an unpretentious group of volunteers whose weekly gathering gives me a bit of that reconciliation without having to buy a sailboat or commit to a four-month journey. We gather for two hours a week, sharing movie reviews, the latest political atrocities, a good recipe or the newest composite boat science. Views expressed are respectful, positive and tolerated. There are men, women, couples and singles. Sometimes participants bring treats. I had the best cookies I have ever tasted there. I should also mention that we remove trash from our beaches. It is incidental but extremely satisfying… a reason to visit our outdoors, a cause we can agree on. We pick the beaches, talking as we go or going alone within our own minds. We are “loose ends,” united on a mission to gather “lost objects” from our fast-paced lives. We are blessed that our beaches are some of the cleanest in the world. Sadly, we always fill our bags. Perversely, we have extra good days as evidenced by the picture I have provided. The picture represents the effort of two people, 90 minutes and 1000 ft. of beach. It is the toxic dandruff of our society. We never get it all. No need to argue or rant. Newspapers and research journals provide the facts. Start a journey with us. Expand your mind or heal in solitude. If you stick with it, you will find more than trash. We are coordinated by a refreshingly understated, warm and welcoming Stinger Anderson from the WSU Extension office in Coupeville. No applications, no fees, no dress code, no pressure. All participants over 18 years of age are welcome. For more information: mailto:stinger.anderson@wsu. edu or call 360-639-6060. You will get a great weekly newsletter. Dar Christopherson Oak Harbor, Wash.

Editor, Gratitude and Traffic Data 2017 Once again, Island Thrift has fulfilled the Impaired Driving Impact Panel of Island County (IDIPIC) grant request for $5,000 (matching grant.) This is no small amount when you consider how many organizations Island Thrift

Our state has legalized marijuana. Impaired driving can involve not only alcohol, but combinations of marijuana, prescription drugs, illegal drugs, and alcohol. We can and must do better. How can you help prevent impaired driving? Plan ahead, have a conversation with your family and friends about the consequences of driving impaired. One poor choice can lead to a lifetime of pain and suffering. Talking about impaired driving, urging your friends and family to make good choices, all of this will remind you to be responsible for yourself and others. For additional information about IDIPIC, please visit our website (http://idipic.org/ and the link to our Facebook site). On behalf of all of our volunteers, speakers, supporters, and “Partners in Prevention” (donors), I wish you a safe, joyous, and satisfying holiday season. Mike Diamanti, IDIPIC Director Oak Harbor, Wash.

Skagit Valley College Whidbey Island Campus to Unveil New Outdoor Heritage Mural

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED Participating Langley merchants will have treats waiting for the kids from 2:30pm to 5:00pm Wednesday, Oct. 31. Look for the moon and crow sign in the window of participating businesses letting families know that they are part of the fun. After the trick or treaters have had their fill, stay in town for dinner, warm up with a hot chocolate at one of the great coffee shops, or sample some local wines in one of the wine tasting rooms. The whole town is dressed for the season, with everyone in costumes, lighted trees, crows, pumpkins and more decorating the town. Sponsored by Langley Main Street Association, made possible by the downtown Langley merchants. For more information, email mainstreet@whidbey.com. [Submitted by Michaleen McGarry, Langley Main Street Association]

Outcast Productions’ New World Premiere Musical: The Hotel Belleclaire Once again, Outcast Productions on Whidbey Island is presenting a world premiere: The Hotel Belleclaire, with books and lyrics by June Rachelson-Ospa and music by Kezia Hirsey, directed by Outcast Productions Founder and co-Artistic Director, Ned Farley. The show is being performed at the Outcast Theater Black Box at the Whidbey Island Fairgrounds from November 2 - 17. Marilyn, Eve and Gloria, played by local artists Kathy Stanley, Gail Liston and Coreen Beckman, meet over five years, sharing their collective journeys toward their inevitable golden years. They muddle through divorce, loss and graying hair, accompanied by a fun, uplifting original score, discovering that love and enduring true friendship are the real ingredients making all the difference in the world at The Hotel Belleclaire. Performances are Nov. 2, 3, 9, 10, 15, 16, and 17 at 7:30pm and Sunday, Nov.r 11 at 4:00pm. Tickets are $16 students/seniors and $20 adults for adults; tickets for the Thursday, November 15 show are $14 for all tickets. Tickets may be purchased at Brown Paper Tickets, https://www.brownpapertickets. com/event/3657241, or by emailing Outcast Productions at ocp@whidbey.com to reserve tickets and pay at the door by cash or check. [Submitted by Carolyn Tamler]

Deana Duncan Named Artistic Director of WICA

Thursday, Oct. 25, Skagit Valley College Whidbey Island Campus invites the public to attend the unveiling of a new outdoor Heritage Mural at Hayes Hall. The celebration will take place at 12:30pm outdoors at the courtyard, weather permitting. The Heritage Mural was funded by SVC students, with the goal of reflecting and celebrating the rich history of the College and Whidbey Island community at large. The project was created by artist Gabrielle Abbott, an award-winning, internationally recognized artist based in Seattle. Her diverse practice includes site-specific installation, mixed media painting, digital video and community activism. Gabrielle’s murals and chalk drawings are commissioned by clients around the world, including The Hague City Government and Bellevue Art Museum. She exhibits internationally, winning awards for her paintings and digital illustrations. As a teacher and activist, she focuses on serving the needs of her community and fostering creative empowerment within her students. In addition to her own creative practice, she partners with various organizations to direct community art projects. [Submitted by Arden Ainley, Chief Public Information Officer, SVC]

Bring the Family for Trick or Treating in Langley Langley invites families to bring their super heroes, goblins, and ghosts to downtown Langley for a safe and fun trick or treating experience this Halloween.

Deana Duncan, long-time Program and Production Director of the Whidbey Island Center for the Arts, has been named Artistic Director of the Langley, Wash. based organization. Serving at WICA for the last 18 years, Duncan has been instrumental in the offering and artistic oversight of thousands of events in theatre, dance, music, literary, and visual arts. As Artistic Director, Duncan produces all WICA shows, and manages the booking and supervision of guest productions. She has control of the theatrical, musical, and creative direction of the organization. “This community has worked hard to build and support this organization and we are honored to be a cultural hub not only for Langley, and South Whidbey but the Pacific Northwest and beyond. I’m thrilled to be able to serve this community and so happy to step us as Artistic Director and help hone the creative vision to our audiences,” says Duncan. BITS & PIECES

continued on page

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Whidbey Weekly

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OWNED

t Re-Elec RICK

HANNOLD

ISLAND COUNTY COMMISSIONER, DISTRICT 3 (GOP)

Real Leadership Real Results

Retired Navy Chief Petty Officer Rick Hannold and his wife Amy have roots deep in the heart of Island County. He’ll protect our Navy Community and all our families.

"We’re grateful to our all-volunteer campaign and all who are helping us. We are local folks. We understand local issues and we didn’t hire outside ‘consultants’ to ‘hone our message.’ It’s just us, your neighbors, and friends asking for your support and your vote.” -Rick Hannold.

As your Island County Commissioner, Rick Hannold:

* HELD THE LINE on new county taxes and fees in the face of sharply higher state education taxes; * PROTECTED NAS WHIDBEY and our NAS Whidbey community; * SAVED Island Transit from bankruptcy and restored lost bus routes; * IMPROVED Senior and Veterans services; * LED THE FIGHT to stop open net fish farms from polluting our Island waters;

Re-elect Rick Hannold! He’s one of our own. He’ll protect our communities, preserve our lifestyle, and stop higher taxes. Paid for by the Committee to Re-Elect Rick Hannold P.O. Box 502, Oak Harbor, WA 98277

OCTOBER 25 - OCTOBER 31, 2018

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LOCALLY OPERATED

Herstory

Stories of Old Lesbians Join us for

Herstory: Stories of Old Lesbians

Sunday, October 28 3:00-5:00 p.m. WICA 565 Camano Avenue Langley What was it like to be a lesbian at a time when being "out" carried a real risk of violence, arrest, confinement in a mental institution, or loss of a job and standing in the community? How did lesbians define themselves when there were no websites, TV shows, magazines, or books that represented their lives in a realistic way, or advocated for them? These stories, collected by the Old Lesbian Oral Herstory Project, tell a fascinating and emotionally charged story. Stories will be introduced by Major General Trish Rose, USAF (Ret.), and read by Whidbey Island residents Judy Lynn, Rose Hughes, Mully Mullally, Dr. Jo Moccia, and Marsha Morgan. Join us for this exciting special event. Sponsored by PSARA (Puget Sound Advocates for Retirement Action) Education Fund. Co-sponsored by WhidbeyGiving Circle, Whidbey Institute, Hedgebrook, Puget Sound Old Lesbians Organizing for Change, Washington State Labor Council, and Unitarian Universal Congregation of Whidbey Island. All are welcome. A donation of $10-$20 will be requested to help cover costs and support the Old Lesbian Oral Herstory Project.

The Best Breast Cancer Prevention is in Your Own Backyard WhidbeyHealth’s Diagnostic Imaging Medical Director, Dr. Felix Nautsch, previously of Yale New Haven Hospital, is thrilled to now have world-class 3D mammography at our Medical Center. Our brand new Mammomat Revelation system provides better patient comfort and more detail of your breast tissue, making early and accurate detection of even small cancers achievable. Call Central Scheduling Services at WhidbeyHealth Medical Center

360.678.7607 (No doctor’s order is needed for a screening mammogram.)

www.whidbeyhealth.org

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OCTOBER 25 - OCTOBER 31, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

What’s Going On All entries are listed chronologically, unless there are multiple entries for the same venue or are connected to a specific organization (such as Sno-Isle Libraries) in which case all entries for that venue or organization are listed collectively in chronological order under one heading.

Halloween Howl Friday, October 26, 3:30pm-6:30pm Board the bus for a free twilight tour to Deception Pass State Park with Native American storyteller Lou Labombard, Sno-Isle librarian Jessica Aws and others sharing tales in a shelter by the fire. Dress in costume and bring a flashlight. Those under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. To RSVP call 360-678-9536 or email: Travel@IslandTransit.org

Kaleafa Halloween Friday, October 26, 5:00pm-8:00pm Kaleafa, Oak Harbor DJ Leo presents a spooktacular night of fun and music. Must be 21 or older. Kaleafa is located at 33858 SR 20, Suite 102. For more information, call 360-682-2420. Marijuana has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Keep out of the reach of children.

Haunted Fort Friday, October 26, 6:30pm-10:00pm Saturday, October 27, 6:30pm-10:00pm Fort Casey State Park, Coupeville Explore the scary labyrinth of the forts in this special haunted event. For smaller kids there is trick or treat lane, a bounce house, ghost stories, and games. Tickets are $8 per person or $30 for a family up to six people. A Discover Pass is required. Proceeds go to restoration of the Admiralty Head Lighthouse at Ft. Casey State Park.

Frightville XVIII Friday, October 26, 7:00pm-12:00am Saturday, October 27, 7:00pm-12:00am Wednesday, October 31, 7:00pm-12:00am Roller Barn, 98 NE Barron Dr, Oak Harbor Haunt fee $13 per person. Learn more at www.facebook.com/frightville. All proceeds benefit the Oak Harbor Boys and Girls Club.

Practical Magic Movie Night Friday, October 26, 7:00pm Masonic Hall, 804 N Main, Coupeville Celebrating the 20th anniversary of “Practical Magic.” Presented by the Coupeville Historic Waterfront Association. $5 suggested donation.

Game Night Fundraiser Featuring a Family Feud Tournament Friday, October 26, 7:00pm-9:00pm Elks Lodge, Oak Harbor $10 per person Mighty To Save Ministries (MtSM) hosts an annual fundraiser to raise operational funds for the ministry and raise awareness about the difficulties people in active addiction face when transitioning from jails, prison, or treatment facilities, back into society. This is a family-friendly environment providing answers about MtSM. There will be raffle prizes, coffee, tea, and delicious dessert. For more information, please call 360-929-2959 or visit www.MightyToSaveMinistries.org

Live Music: Michele D’Amour and the Love Dealers Friday, October 26, 7:00pm-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville Michele D’Amour and the Love Dealers play blues and R&B from the 50’s to today. The band, based in Seattle, has played together since 2012. No cover. For more information, call 360-682-5747 or visit www.penncove brewing.com

Italia! Concert Friday, October 26, 7:00pm Sunday, October 28, 3:00pm Trinity Lutheran Church, Freeland

Join the Whidbey Island Orchestra for a special concert filled with the romantic sounds of cherished Italian composers, Verdi, Respighi, Curci and more. Solista substitution by highly acclaimed violinist Dr. Cynthia Morrow to perform the West Coast Premiere of Alberto Curci’s Concerto Romantico. Special appearance by Maestro Gabriela Garza. Admission is free (although donations are accepted and greatly appreciated) followed by a reception with orchestra & refreshments. For more information, cnewman@whidbey.com

Halloween Pancake Breakfast Saturday, October 27, 9:00am-11:00am Island Senior Resources, Langley Suggested Donation: $7 Enjoy pancakes, scrambled eggs, sausage links, fresh fruit, juice, milk, coffee or tea. Gluten free links and pancakes available too. Try your luck to win 1 of 3 raffle baskets, tickets $2 each. For more information, call 360-321-1600 or 360-678-3373. Island Senior Resources is located at 14594 SR 525.

The Home Depot Public Safety Event Saturday, October 27, 9:00am-1:00pm The Home Depot, 31800 SR 20, Oak Harbor There will be health and safety exhibits, games, give-aways and free lunch! Come join and interact with our firefighters, law enforcement, EMT and first responders. Learn ways to help and be better prepared for emergencies while making some new friends. For more information, call 360-675-0105.

Fall Bazaar Trunk or Treat Saturday, October 27, 9:30am-3:00pm Olympic View Elementary, Oak Harbor The Fall Bazaar will feature many different vendors to help start your holiday shopping early. There will be direct sellers, local crafters and business owners at this event. The bazaar is held inside the school gym. The Trunk or Treat will be held in the upper parking lot of the school from 11:00am to 1:00pm. Make sure you come dressed in your costume for some spooky fun. The school is located at 380 NE Regatta Dr.

Sons of the American Legion Halloween Party & Membership Drive

Herstory: Stories From the Lives of Old Lesbians Sunday, October 28, 3:00pm-5:00pm Whidbey Island Center for the Arts, Langley What was it like to be a lesbian in a time when being “out” presented real risks of violence, arrest, confinement in a mental institution, or loss of a job and standing in the community? How did lesbians define themselves when there were no websites, TV shows, magazines, or books that represented their lives in a realistic way, or advocated for them? The Old Lesbian Oral Herstory Project has been collecting stories to document this untold legacy, with more than 600 individual interviews. The women’s stories will be presented through readings from the original interviews, supplemented with a DVD that documents additional stories and helps explain how the stories were collected. A donation of $10-$20 will be requested to help cover costs and support the Old Lesbian Oral Herstory Project. For more information contact Robby Stern, PSARA Education Fund President, psaraedfund@psara.org, 206-3916998.

South Whidbey Schools Creepy Concert & Carnival Monday, October 29, 6:00pm South Whidbey High School, Langley

Saturday, October 27, 12:00pm-4:00pm Roller Barn, NE Barron Dr, Oak Harbor

Wednesday, October 31, 9:00am-6:00pm Oak Harbor Chamber of Commerce, 32630 SR 20

$4 per person. No scare, no ghouls, ghosts, or monsters! All proceeds benefit the Oak Harbor Boys and Girls Club.

Looking for a safe Trick or Treat spot? Stop by the Oak Harbor Chamber of Commerce and visit their Chamber of Secrets. Free drinks and treats are available while supplies last. For more information, call 360-675-3755.

Enjoy the King of Rock & Roll as performed by Shane Cobane. Come in costume if you dare. Tickets for dinner (pork roast or veggie lasagna, both with all the trimmings and desert) and the show are $25, must be 21 or older. Call 360-321-5636 between 2:00pm - 7:00pm daily. Dinner at 4:30pm, show 6:30pm. Proceeds from this event help fund our local charities.

Halloween Costume Party & Brewers Night Saturday, October 27, 6:00pm-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville Enjoy a Brewers Night hosted by Sumerian Brewery and live music from Mussel Flats. Everyone that comes will receive a raffle ticket, wear a Halloween costume and get a second ticket for a change to win swag & prizes. No cover. For more information, call 360-6825747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

Saturday, November 3, 9:00am-3:00pm Oak Harbor Lutheran Church, 1253 NW 2nd Ave. Featuring handmade gifts, Seahawks crafts, knitted crafts, quilted items, wreaths, Giant Jenga, handmade dolls, birdhouses, dress dish towels, wooden snowmen, baked goods, Lefse, awesome silent auction items, and much more.

Inside: A Journey of the Sea & Soul Thursday, October 25, 6:00pm-7:30pm Oak Harbor Library

Chamber of Secrets

Saturday, October 27, 4:30pm Eagles Aerie, 16691 SR 525, Freeland

Holiday Bazaar

Halloween party, open to the public aged 21+, to be held by the Sons of the American Legion to increase membership in the American Legion and its auxiliaries. Entry is $10 and includes one drink ticket redeemable for a beer or well drink. Halloween themed music will be played. Games including cornhole, pool & darts will be available. A full cash bar with drink specials. For more information, call 360-675-2411.

Frightville Kiddie Matinee

Elvis at the Eagles

Featuring handcrafted items, antiques and collectibles, baked goodies and lunch. The church is located at 250 SW 3rd Ave.

Upcoming Sno-Isle Library Events

Presented by the Women of St. Hubert Church. Shop for crafts, books, baked goodies, lunch, and more.

Saturday, October 27, 9:30am-3:00pm St. Hubert Church, 804 Third St., Langley

LOCALLY OPERATED

Saturday, October 27, 7:00pm American Legion, 690 SE Barrington Dr, Oak Harbor

Ghoulish games, prizes, cake walk, face painting, tricks & treats from 6:00pm-7:00pm. The concert begins at 7:30 and features spooktacular hits and ghostly jams by the middle school and high school bands. Wear your costume. Admission by donation. All donations benefit the middle school band program.

Holiday Bazaar & Bake Sale

www.whidbeyweekly.com

“No Tricks, Safe Treats” Wednesday, October 31, 5:00pm-7:00pm Downtown Oak Harbor Free Tour Pioneer Way for free treats from participating downtown merchants. SE Pioneer Way will be closed to traffic between Ely & Midway Streets. Sponsored by Oak Harbor Main Street Association and Walmart.

Uncommon Threads Friday, November 2, 10:00am-7:00pm Saturday, November 3, 10:00am-3:00pm Nordic Hall, 63 Jacobs Road, Coupeville Start your holiday shopping early. Beautiful handcrafted wearables, home decor and more by local fiber artists. Don’t miss this sale; it’s amazing! www.whidbeyweaversguild.org

Holiday Bazaar & Bake Shop Saturday, November 3, 9:00am-1:00pm First Reformed Church, Oak Harbor

See schedule below Cost: Free

Put any human in a tiny vessel and send them up a perilous 1,200-mile stretch of the Inside Passage of British Columbia and SE Alaska -- and they are bound to have stories! Susan Marie Conrad’s stories are not just filled with intrigue and adventure, but they have heart, inspiration, acceptance and gratitude. Please join us as Susan shares stories and images from her journey of the sea and soul. Books available for purchase and signing following the program. 3rd Annual Clinton Fall Festival - Featuring Don Ehlen’s Insect Safari Saturday, October 27, 1:00pm-3:00pm Clinton Community Hall, 6411 S. Central Ave. Come in costume! See a display of hundreds of creepy-crawlies in Don Ehlen’s Insect Safari collection, paint a spider watercolor with Carla Walsh, do a wool craft with Cordula Hetland , trunk-or-treat courtesy of the Clinton Chamber of Commerce, decorate a pumpkin, while supplies last, along with more fall-related fun!

Religious Services South Whidbey Community Church Sundays, 9:00am-9:45am Adult Bible Study 10:00am-11:00am Worship Deer Lagoon Grange, 5142 Bayview Rd, Langley Sunday, October 28, Guest Speaker Kenon Simmons Sunday, November 4, Pastor Darrell Wenzek “Godly Leadership” and Communion Worship is followed by a potluck lunch and great fellowship. For more information, call 360-221-1220.

Meetings & Organizations Island County Master Gardener Foundation Thursday, October 25, 6:00pm Coupeville Rec Hall, 915 Alexander St. Our presentation this month is by Anza Muenchow: Master Gardener, Organic Farmer and School Garden Creator. She will be teaching us about Managing Your Soil for Great Food Production. Social time will be followed by a brief business meeting, Anza’s talk begins at 7:00pm. This free presentation is open to all. If you require special accommodation, please contact Loren Imes at 360-639-6059.

Island County Business Luncheon Tuesday, October 30, 12:00pm-1:00pm Oak Harbor Yacht Club, 1301 SE Catalina Dr. Join for an engaging look at how to build a stronger, more inclusive workforce. RSVP to www.sherwoodscs.org/event For a list of continuous Meetings and Organizations, visit www.whidbeyweekly.com

Classes, Seminars and Workshops Emergency Readiness for Businesses Thursday, October 25, 10:00am-2:00pm Oak Harbor Fire Department, 855 E Whidbey Ave. Learn how to prepare for a variety of emergencies for your business. Free lunch while supplies last. For more information, call the Oak Harbor Chamber of Commerce at 360-675-3755.

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Whidbey Weekly

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OWNED

OCTOBER 25 - OCTOBER 31, 2018

7

LOCALLY OPERATED

your local specialists in ductless heating and cooling

Make a Difference By Kyle Ostermick-Durkee

ASK ABOUT FINANCING!

Whidbey Camano Land Trust Stewardship Specialist

ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION: LESSONS FOR LANDOWNERS If you are a Whidbey Island resident, there is a good chance you live here, at least in part, to enjoy the bounty of natural settings this place provides. The beauty of the island is no secret: our home is known all across the region for its scenic character, bountiful wildlife, and the quality of life all this brings. Of course, we don’t live in an untouched wilderness, but a landscape that has been shaped by human activity. Since the pioneers of the 1850s arrived, many unique ecosystems have been ravaged: some lost forever and some greatly reduced, waiting for their chance to rebound. Now, with the techniques developed over the past 40 years by ecological restorationists, we can begin to recover our losses. The work to provide wildlife with ample habitat can be done with newfound optimism. We aren’t condemned to just hold the line by preventing loss of forests and other ecosystems, we could gain ground by recovering them. So now you, dear neighbor, want to do your part to repair the ecosystems and help wildlife on your property. Maybe it’s as simple as providing more pollinator habitat around your garden, or you’re replanting a section of forest that was cleared years ago – well, what should you know? As a stewardship specialist at the Whidbey Camano Land Trust, ecological restoration is a love of mine; I revel in it. With my colleagues on the stewardship team at the Land Trust, we are actively restoring over 750 acres of forest, wetland, prairie, and shoreline habitat. We have learned many lessons over the years and would like to share some key concepts and useful tips for the novice restorationist. The first and most important part of any successful restoration project is gathering information about your property. Before you begin laying out a planting plan and ordering trees and shrubs, take stock of what you have around you. This can be difficult for those of us who are eager to get to work healing the planet, but patience is key! Observation will reveal what the land does and does not want to become. What plant species are already growing nearby? How much sun and moisture do you have? What types of animals are, or could be, using the area? These are all questions we must consider before we can devise a plan. They will get you thinking about goals for your project, and what strategies you might use. So this brings us to the all-important question: what are your goals for your project? We have to look at what restoration is to answer this one. Restoration can be something of a misnomer in fact, because we simply cannot recreate, exactly, what a piece of land historically was. Rather, we are restoring ecological function back to the landscape. This is important to keep in mind when we go about selecting plants. We have to be thinking about ecological communities – plants, animals, fungi, etc. that associate with one another – when we’re putting it all together. If we’re picking our favorite tree species from a list, well, that’s an arboretum, not a restoration project. And there’s nothing wrong with that! But if you are seeking to provide the best wildlife habitat, sequester the most carbon, and grow something more resilient to the effects of climate change, most of the time you want a native ecosystem. This means understanding what these ecosystems look like, and what their components are. There is no substitute for having a clear image in your head of a healthy forest or wetland you are trying to recreate. So perhaps that sequoia – which many among us want to provide refuge for, given California’s prospects in a changing climate – has a place in your landscaping. But will it integrate well into our native forests? It likely won’t harm anything. The question is, can our birds, insects, and fungi,

which didn’t co-evolve with these trees, make as much use of them as they could, say, a western red cedar? Not likely. Simply put, go native with your plants! There is something to be said about bringing plants from warmer climes to your restoration project. This is a concept called “assisted migration,” meaning, on a rapidly heating planet (re: Earth) it may be necessary for human intervention to help get all the right plant genes in the right geographic locations. The planet is warming faster than the plants themselves can migrate. In the Pacific Northwest, our overall rainfall is expected to increase, but our summers are becoming drier and drier. If you’re planting conifers, we want them to still be here in 50, 100, 250 years. In other words, what you plant will not just have to survive in today’s climate, but will have to bear the full brunt of climate change. Today, many local nurseries are sourcing their Douglas fir from places like the Willamette Valley in Oregon, where the summers are drier and 10-15 degrees warmer, and the trees are already adapted accordingly. In fact, most of the plant species native to our island have natural ranges that extend into warmer, drier climates all over the Pacific Northwest, and it is increasingly common for restorationists to use genetic stock from southern and eastern Washington and Oregon in their plantings. Regardless of how drought-tolerant your plants may be, in the end, success all comes down to one thing: maintenance, maintenance, maintenance. Depending on what you’re doing, you may have to water plants for the first few summers until things are established. Weeds will compete with your plants. And prepare to do battle with grazing deer and rabbits. The thing to remember is nothing will be more stressful, or doom a project more quickly, than biting off more than you can chew. It is far better to piecemeal your work out over several seasons than have a massive project you cannot properly attend to. This work is for the long haul, and the first five years will be critical to its success. The best way to make a difference is to do what you can, but do it well.

Serving WhidBey & Anacortes www.islandheatpumps.com 360.321.4252

You’re Invited! Sherwood’s Business Luncheon Tuesday, October 30th - 12 pm - 1 pm Please join us for an engaging look at how to build a stronger, more inclusive workforce

Oak Harbor Yacht Club

1301 SE Catalina Dr., Oak Harbor, WA 98277 Sponsored by: The Nysether Family Foundation

Come have lunch with us! www.sherwoodcs.org/events Registration Required

Ballet Victoriaas

Frankenstein

I will leave you with this final thought about “going with the flow,” a lesson we all learn sooner or later in restoration and in life. Many times my coworkers and I have been humbled by Mother Nature when, after many hours of thoughtful planning and execution, it became clear her plans differed from ours significantly. This happened recently at a Land Trust property in Central Whidbey. Over the course of several months, we cleared a sizeable area of invasive blackberry, put together a planting plan, ordered native plants, rounded up a crew, and planted away. Several months later we returned to monitor the progress, and what did we find? Beavers had moved in, dammed a stream, and now our plants were being flooded and dying! At first I wanted to pull my hair out, we had put so much work into this! Then I reflected on the true goal of this project. We had set out to remove invasive plant species that reduced wildlife habitat. In its place, we wanted to establish native plants which would provide better habitat. By removing the blackberry, we allowed these beavers to move in and establish a new home – wildlife habitat achieved. Not only that, but by flooding this area the beavers had stopped the blackberry in its tracks, saving us time and money on maintenance. What I initially saw as a problem was, in fact, a gift. The Whidbey Camano Land Trust is a nonprofit nature conservation organization which actively involves the community in protecting, restoring, and appreciating the important natural habitats and resource lands that support the diversity of life on our islands and in the waters of Puget Sound. For more information, visit www.wclt.org, email info@wclt.org, or call 360.222.3310.

Whidbey Island Center for the Arts

WICAonline.orgg// 360.221.8268

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8

OCTOBER 25 - OCTOBER 31, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Mighty To Save Ministries Presents

Oak Harbor Lutheran Church Holiday Bazaar

Saturday, November 3 • 9am-3pm 1253 NW 2nd Ave • Oak Harbor

A Game Night Fundraiser Featuring a Family Feud Tournament Friday, October 26, 2018 7pm - 9pm Elks Lodge, Oak Harbor Join the Fun! Gather Your Family & Friends $10 Per Person • RAFFLE PRIZES COFFEE, TEA & DELICIOUS DESSERT Mighty To Save Ministries (MtSM) hosts an annual fundraiser to raise operational funds for the ministry and raise awareness about the difficulties people in active addiction face when transitioning from jails, prison, or treatment facilities, back into society. This is a family-friendly environment providing answers about MtSM.

For more information, please call 360.929.2959 www.MightyToSaveMinistries.org

Hand Made Gifts

Seahawks Crafts, Knitted Crafts, Quilted Items, AWESOME Wreaths, SILENT Giant Jenga, AUCTIONS Bird Houses, Handmade Dolls, Dress Dish Towels, Wooden Snowmen, Baked Goods, Lefse & Much More!

St. Augustine Church Holiday Bazaar Saturday, November 3 10am-3pm New This Year:

Holiday Gift Boutique Lladro, Hummel, Dept. 56 Village & other Unique Gifts Plus: Handmade Stitchery Craft Specialty Items Grannie’s Christmas Attic Bakery Items Lunch Served 11:30-1:30 Scones & Coffee 10-11:30 Something for Everyone!! Cash or Checks Only

185 N. Oak Harbor Street Oak Harbor

uncommon threads unique locally handcrafted wearables, home decor and more

NOVEMBER

2 & 3 • 2018

NORDIC HALL 63 Jacobs Road approx. 1 mile S. of Hwy 525 & Main St.

Coupeville WA 98236

WEAVING BASKETRY BRAIDING DYEING FELTING JEWELRY KNITTING SPINNING and more

St Hubert Holiday Bazaar & Bake Sale Saturday, October 27th 9:30am~3pm Crafts, Books Baked Goods Lunch

Women of St. Hubert Church 804 Third St Langley

Holiday Bazaar 250 SW 3RD AVE • OAK HARBOR • 360.675.4837

Family Guide by Amy Hannold Women–“Live Your Dream”: If you are a woman providing the primary financial support for yourself and your dependents (children, spouse, partner, siblings and/ or parents), have financial need, and are enrolled in or have been accepted to a vocational/skills training program or an undergraduate degree program, we encourage you to apply for the Soroptimist’s “Live Your Dream Award” to help offset tuition costs, pay student loans, or find reliable childcare so you can worry less about how to pay your bills and focus on reaching your dreams. The deadline to apply is Nov. 15, 2018. Liveyourdream.org A Family’s Tale of Sisterhood: Be captivated as you reminisce about the challenges and cherished moments of family life. The Whidbey Playhouse presents The Octette Bridge Club, Oct. 26 through Nov. 11. Eight Irish-American and very Roman Catholic sisters meet every other Friday to play bridge, gossip and relate with one another on varying levels of honesty, resulting in both laughter and tears. Listen in on their conversations, which you may remember overhearing from your own mothers and aunts in years gone by. It’s a fantastic show and you don’t want to miss it! WhidbeyPlayhouse.com Celebrate Coupeville’s Big Screen Magic: Celebrate the 20th Anniversary of the filming of Practical Magic, right here in Coupeville, with a community viewing of the movie Friday, Oct. 26, at 7 p.m., at the Masonic Hall (804 N. Main). Popcorn and snacks will be available for purchase, your suggested donation of $5 per person for admission benefits the Coupeville Historic Waterfront Association. Coupevillehistoricwaterfront.com Haunted Petting Zoo: Don your costume and come meet the cute animals of the Kool Kritters 4-H Club decorated to scare: vampire rabbits, demonic cats, guinea pig witches, and more. This free petting zoo will be hosted by Sherman’s Pioneer Farm in Coupeville Saturday, Oct. 27, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Enjoy crafts, Halloween-themed activities and learn about joining a local 4-H club. Youth ages five to 19 are encouraged to explore the variety of clubs available in Island County, ranging from rabbits, to robotics, leadership, arts and crafts, dogs, chickens, bee keeping and more. Extension.wsu.edu/island Monster Mash Party: Whidbey Children’s Theater’s 5th annual Monster Mash fundraising event will be Saturday, Oct. 27, in the Pole Building, on the fairgrounds, in Langley, from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. A spooky good time awaits with nachos and hot dogs, sweet treats, raffle, music, coloring contest, SWHS Drama Club’s Haunted House, a Tent of Mysterious Mystical Musings, dancing and other fun throughout the evening. Don’t miss the costume parade and the 5th annual Lip Sync Battle Royale! Come see who wins the Golden Hairbrush. Admission is $10 Adults, $5 Children, $40 Families of five or more. Wctmagic.org Creepy Concert & Carnival: This family event is at South Whidbey High School Monday, Oct. 29, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. for the carnival, the concert begins at 7:30 p.m. The carnival features ghoulish games, prizes, cake walk, face painting, tricks and treats (ideal for K-8th graders). Stay for a spook-tacular concert featuring hits and ghostly jams performed by the middle school and high school bands. Guests are invited to wear their

Halloween costumes. Suggested donations for the event are 50-cents per game, $5 concert admission. The Creepy Concert & Carnival helps raise funds for the South Whidbey Middle School band program. Candy to the Troops, Dollars to You: Playhouse Dental of Oak Harbor and Anacortes is offering its Candy Buy Back program. Bring in your unopened candy Nov. 1 or 2, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., and they will pay you $1 per pound! The candy will be shipped to our troops through Operation Gratitude. Playhousedentalkids.com Be Encouraged & Creative: Positively Limitless, a free middle school youth group hosted by Positively Linked, will meet Saturday evening, Nov. 10, at In-Motion Dance Studio, 390 NE Midway Blvd, in Oak Harbor. Connect to a community that will inspire you to build self-confidence, discover inner strength, and explore your creativity. Registration is required, email info@positivelylinked.org or visit Positivelylinked.org Veterans Day: Honor our veterans by attending Oak Harbor’s Veterans Day Program, Saturday, Nov. 10, 11 a.m., at Oak Harbor High School. Monday, Nov. 12 at 1 p.m., Oak Harbor’s Veterans Day Parade takes place, rain or shine, on the Walk of Honor (from Southeast Regatta Drive to Midway Boulevard), on Pioneer Way. Sunday, Nov. 11 is a Washington State Parks Free Parks Day, when no Discover Pass is required to enjoy our local parks. Turducken Trot: This family-friendly 5k fun run/walk Nov. 17 supports the South Whidbey Parks and Aquatics Foundation, and its efforts towards a future South Whidbey community swimming pool. The registration fees are $30 for adults, $20 for students and an immediate family maximum of $80. Participants registered by Nov. 8 will be guaranteed a commemorative T-shirt. SWParks.org Holiday Shopping for a Great Cause: The Ladies Auxiliary to the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 7392 in Oak Harbor invites you to its Annual Auction Saturday, Nov. 17, beginning at 5:30 p.m. It’s a fun evening to begin your holiday shopping. Featuring live, silent and dessert auctions, the event includes an appetizer potluck. Tickets are $10 per person or $18 for couples. 360-675-4048 Enjoy Your Holidays – and the Preparation: Organized Christmas, at OrganizedHome.com will guide you through the tasks, taking frazzle out of the festivities. Using its tools and checklists, design a holiday you will enjoy, week by week, from now until New Year’s Day. Utilize the free planning printables, gift ideas, and year-round inspiration for a variety of everyday activities. Holiday House: Island County Readiness to Learn will be seeking donations to stock its shelves. Consider buying an extra gift for a family in need. Most needed every year are stocking stuffers and gifts suitable for teens and tweens. To volunteer or for more information, go to Readinesstolearn.org Find local holiday activities and family-fun events at WhidbeyIsland.MacaroniKid.com and answer the question “Mom, what can we do today?”

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Whidbey Weekly

NEWS

A Haunting in Coupeville p. 12 OCTOBER 25 - OCTOBER 31, 2018

LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

www.whidbeyweekly.com

Follow the Halloween Trail

By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly

Halloween on Whidbey Island is full of festive fun and there are more than enough tricks and treats to go around. We invite you to check out all the spooky spectacles our island has to offer and choose the trail that best suits you and your family. One sure fire hit this weekend is the Midway Monster Mash in Oak Harbor, to be held from 4 to 7 p.m. Saturday and brought to you by Midway Blvd. and Traders Village merchants. Now in its sixth year, the Mash is something many families have made part of their Halloween fun. “It’s a great, fun, community event where parents can dress up with their children and go out and have some free Halloween fun,” said Teresa Besaw, one of the longtime Monster Mash organizers. “Being the Saturday before Halloween,

people don’t have to rush around like on Halloween, when it’s on a week day or work and school day.”

“This year we have jam packed fun,” said Denise Bozeman of All About Kids Daycare. “The Oak Harbor School District Haunted bus is back, Richard Voit will have his Hot Wheels Camaros, there will be face painting, FREE Halloweenies and monster juice (while supplies last), midway-style games and so much more. Several businesses located at Traders Village will be open for trick or treating and demonstrations, as well as a trunk or treat.” There will be a DJ for entertainment playing favorite Halloween hits, live demonstrations by Woodward’s Tae Kwon Do and a flash mob by In Motion Dance Studio. Also new this year is a costume contest, according to Bozeman. “We made this change because we have seen such great costumes the last few years that we could not resist recognizing the creative efforts that went into them,” she said. “Our judges will be looking for the most creative costumes in these categories: Best Group or Family, Best Adult, Best Teen, and kid categories, by age.” Prizes this year include a bowling party for up to six people, a full month of classes from In Motion Dance Studio as well as a dance birthday party for 10, and tickets from Whidbey Playhouse.

Kathy Reed/File Photo Flash mobs are possible at the sixth annual Midway Monster Mash, like the “Thriller” flash mob performance last year by In Motion Dance Studio.

There will also be appearances by several special characters and the Oak Harbor Police and fire departments will also be represented.

Kathy Reed/File Photo Hundreds are expected to turn out for the sixth annual Midway Monster Mash, to be held from 4 to 7 p.m. Saturday at Traders Village in Oak Harbor. The free event will feature free Halloweenies, monster juice, games, tricks, treats, a costume contest and buckets of fun.

get a big kick out of that. Also, Police Explorers will be here,” said Besaw. The Monster Mash started six years ago with a zombie crawl that ended at Traders Village. The event has evolved into a single-venue party that draws hundreds of families. “We haven’t needed the zombie crawl to have a great time here at the Midway Traders Village,” Besaw said. “[The Midway Monster Mash] is free, it’s fun, it doesn’t take you too long to do the activities and get some treats, so you still have plenty of time to attend other Halloween events in the area.”

“We’ll have a police car and fire truck and I think the kids will

See HALLOWEEN continued on page 10

Whidbey Island Orchestra goes Italia! By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly As they say, the show must go on, even if that means the conductor must trade in her baton for her bow. Such is the case with Whidbey Island Orchestra, which will present two performances entitled Italia! for Whidbey audiences at 7 p.m. Friday and 3 p.m. Sunday at Trinity Lutheran Church in Freeland. Admission is free, although donations are welcome. A reception will immediately follow.

beauty of the Italian musical spirit, composed in 1944 during the war years, when Italy was at its lowest ebb,” described Cynthia Morrow, conductor of Whidbey Island Orchestra, who will now be the featured soloist. “The only recordings we have of this piece are by Franco Gulli, a wonderful Italian violinist. It hasn’t been performed much, if at all, in the U.S. or abroad, and this will be a West Coast premiere of the work.”

The concerts will feature works by Respighi, Verdi and an “Italian Folk Festival” medley. It will also mark the West Coast premiere of Alberto Curci’s violin concerto, “Concerto Romantico.”

Violinist Sherry Kloss was scheduled to perform the piece with WIO, but she was forced to cancel her appearance for health reasons. Morrow, a talented violinist in her own right, has stepped in to play the piece and guest conductor, Gabriela Garza Canales, will lead the orchestra.

“It’s a three movement love letter to the

“Last week our soloist, Sherry Kloss, called

me to say that she was facing a serious medical issue that would prevent her from performing in our upcoming concerts. She was, in fact, canceling all of her violin performances for the immediate future, and we were suddenly left with no soloist,” Morrow said. “After desperately searching for someone willing to learn a violin concerto in two weeks that no one knew or had played before, it came down to me playing it or giving up what the orchestra had worked so hard to master. Besides, it’s gorgeous!” Morrow said she immediately reached out to Canales, who had contacted her about conducting opportunities last month. “She is a remarkable Mexican percussionist doing her doctoral work in conducting at University of Washington under Ludovic

Photo Courtesy of Gabriela Garza Canales Gabriela Garza Canales will be the guest conductor at Whidbey Island Orchestra’s upcoming Italia! concerts, to be held Friday at 7 p.m. and Sunday at 3 p.m. at Trinity Lutheran Church in Freeland

Morlot,” said Morrow. “I reached out to her to conduct the concerto, and she agreed to quickly learn it and do this for us.

See ITALIA continued on page 16

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Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


HALLOWEEN HAPPENINGS: And speaking of other events, here are a few to consider as you wind your way along Whidbey Weekly’s Halloween Trail: THURSDAY, OCT. 25 Sherman Pioneer Farm Haunted Barn 3-5 p.m. Terry & Ebey Rd., Coupeville $5 per person FRIDAY, OCT. 26 Sherman Pioneer Farm Haunted Barn 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. $5 per person Pumpkin Patch & Trolley Ride 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. $5 per person Terry & Ebey Rd., Coupeville Halloween Howl 3:30-6:30 p.m. Free twilight tour to Deception Pass State Park. RSVP to 360-678-9536 or Travel@ IslandTransit.org Harvest Fest 5-8 p.m. Family Bible Church, Oak Harbor Zombie Glow 5K 5:30-6:30 p.m. NAS Whidbey Island, Oak Harbor Base access required

25

Flashlight Corn Maze Dark to 10 p.m. K&R Farm Stand, Hwy 20, Oak Harbor $5 per person

26

Haunted Fort 6:30-10 p.m. Fort Casey State Park, Coupeville $8 per person/$30 per family up to six people. A Discover Pass is required. “Practical Magic” Movie Night 7 p.m. Masonic Hall, 804 N. Main, Coupeville $5 suggested donation Frightville XVIII Haunted House 7 p.m. to midnight Roller Barn, NE Barron Dr., Oak Harbor $13 per person SATURDAY, OCT. 27 Halloween Pancake Breakfast 9-11 a.m. Island Senior Resources, Langley Suggested Donation: $7 For more information, call 360-321-1600 or 360-678-3373 Sherman Pioneer Farm Haunted Barn 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. $5 per person Pumpkin Patch & Trolley Ride 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. $5 per person Terry & Ebey Rd., Coupeville 4-H Haunted Petting Zoo 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Sherman Pioneer Farm, Coupeville 5th Annual ComicFest 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. The Book Rack, 551 NE Midway Blvd, Ste 3, Oak Harbor

FRE E

HAL L WH OW ILE S EEN UPP IES LIES LAS T!

MASH

October 27 • 4-7pm

AT THE MIDWAY TRADERS VILLAGE 390 NE MIDWAY BLVD • OAK HARBOR

Free Popcorn from Blue Fox, Monster Juice from Oldish Stuff & Uniquley Put, Free Halloweenies from Humphrey Sign Co., Music provided by Scott Dudley, Haunted School Bus by Oak Harbor School District, Photo Booth with Whidbey Island Camera Club, and a Spooky Book Nook with Whidbey Playhouse Costume Contest Prizes from: Blue Fox, Whidbey Playhouse, Oak Bowl and In-Motion Dance Studio Activities & Treats with: All About Kids Preschool, Bouncin’, Ashley’s Design, Sea Cadets, Farmer’s Insurance/Richard Voit, In-Motion Dance Studio, Joy Rutherford, M.A., Life Without Limits, Oak Harbor Elks, Oak Harbor Police Dept, Fire Department, Scottie’s Plumbing, Sunrise Services, Whidbey Lions Club, Whidbey Weekly, Woodward’s Tae Kwon Do & More! Swag Bags to first 100 participants to arrive in costume with treats from: Edward Jones/Jeff Pleet, Allstate Insurance/Matt Iverson, Bouncin’, CITRUSOLUTION, Cornerstone Lending,In-Motion Dance Studio, Land Title, Navy Wives, Mr Yuk & SaviBank

Coupeville’s Great Pumpkin Race 1-5 p.m. Alexander, between Coveland and Front Streets, Coupeville Free

SWHS Drama Club’s Haunted House 4-7 p.m. Island County Fairgrounds, Langley South Whidbey Monster Mash 4-7 p.m. Island County Fairgrounds Pole Building $10 for adults, $5 for children and $40 for families of five-plus. Costume parade: 4 p.m. Lip Sync Battle: 6:15 p.m.

Trunk or Treat 2-4 p.m. St. Hubert’s Catholic Church, Langley Case Farm Pumpkin Lights 6-9 p.m., weather permitting 98 Case Road, Oak Harbor Free, donations accepted

Halloween Torchlight Parade 5 p.m. Downtown Coupeville Free

MONDAY, OCT. 29 Sherman Pioneer Farm Haunted Barn 3-5 p.m. Terry & Ebey Rd., Coupeville $5 per person

Flashlight Corn Maze Dark to 10 p.m. K&R Farm Stand, Hwy 20, Oak Harbor $5 per person

Get Mummified 4-5 p.m., Ages 5-9 Langley Library, 104 Second St.

Halloween Bash Bowling Party 6-9 p.m. Oak Bowl, Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor

Frightville Kiddie Matinee Noon to 4 p.m. Roller Barn, NE Barron Dr., Oak Harbor $4 per person

Frightville XVIII Haunted House 7 p.m. to midnight Roller Barn, NE Barron Dr., Oak Harbor $13 per person

Trunk or Treat Harvest Festival Noon to 4 p.m. Convergence Zone, NAS Whidbey Island, Oak Harbor Free, Base access required

Black Cat Ball 7 p.m. to midnight Bayview Hall, Langley $20 admission benefits Paint the Hall fund

South Whidbey Schools Creepy Concert & Carnival 6 p.m. South Whidbey High School Langley

Case Farm Pumpkin Lights 6-9 p.m., weather permitting 98 Case Road, Oak Harbor Free, donations accepted TUESDAY, OCT. 30 Sherman Pioneer Farm Haunted Barn 3-5 p.m. Terry & Ebey Rd., Coupeville $5 per person Case Farm Pumpkin Lights 6-9 p.m., weather permitting 98 Case Road, Oak Harbor Free, donations accepted WEDNESDAY, OCT. 31 Chamber of Secrets 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. Chamber of Commerce, 32360 SR 20, Oak Harbor Trunk or Treat 2:30-5 p.m. United Methodist Church, Langley Spooktacular Langley 2:30-5 p.m. Downtown Langley Free

0 3

31

Halloween Spook-tacular 2:30-4:30 p.m. Homeplace, 171 SW 6thAve., Oak Harbor Goose Grocer Halloween Party 3-6 p.m. Goose Grocer, 14485 State Highway 525 Sherman Pioneer Farm Haunted Barn 3-5 p.m. Terry & Ebey Rd., Coupeville $5 per person Trick or Treat 4-8 p.m. Welcome Home Memory Care, 235 SW 6th Ave., Oak Harbor No Tricks, Safe Treats 5-7 p.m. Downtown Oak Harbor Free 27th Annual Harvest Carnival 5-8 p.m. Island Church, Langley Stop, Sip & Go 5-7 p.m. United Methodist Church, Oak Harbor Trunk or Treat 6-7:30 p.m. First Reformed Church, Oak Harbor Trunk or Treat 6-8 p.m. Oak Harbor Nazarene Church Kingdom Fest 6-8 p.m. Calvary Chapel, Oak Harbor Frightville XVIII Haunted House 7 p.m. to midnight Roller Barn, NE Barron Dr., Oak Harbor $13 per person

28

oak harbor school district

Haunted School Bus

6TH ANNUAL

MONSTER

Midway Monster Mash 4-7 p.m. 390 NE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor Free

Fall Bazaar Trunk or Treat 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. Olympic View Elementary, Oak Harbor

27

SUNDAY, OCT. 28 Sherman Pioneer Farm Haunted Barn 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. $5 per person Pumpkin Patch & Trolley Ride 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. $5 per person Terry & Ebey Rd., Coupeville

Fleet Auxiliary Trunk or Treat 2-4 p.m. Fleet Reserve Branch 97, 311 SE 8th Ave., Oak Harbor

Haunted Fort 6:30-10 p.m. Fort Casey State Park, Coupeville $8 per person/$30 per family up to six people. Discover Pass required.

FREE Community Halloween Fun on Midway Blvd in Oak Harbor!

MIDWAY

3rd Annual Fall Festival 1-3 p.m. Clinton Community Hall

29

HALLOWEEN continued from page 9

Looking for a safe Trick or Treat spot? We have you covered! Drinks and treats are while supplies last!

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 9AM-6PM 32630 SR 20 | Oak Harbor | 360-675-3755 | OakHarborChamber.com

Spooktacular Langley Come Trick or Treat in Downtown Langley Wednesday, October 31 Halloween Day 2:30-5pm

Langley Main Street www.visitlangley.com

The town and merchants are all dressed up with treats for kids and friendly dogs. Just look for the crow poster on participating shops.

October 27

4-7pm

• Costume Contest with Prizes! • Pet Costume Contest • Haunted Bus • Photo Booth • Treats

At the midway Trader’s village 390 NE Midway Blvd, oak harbor

DJ Leo

PRESENTS

A Spooktacular night of fun and music! FRIDAY, OCTOBER 26TH 5-8PM

STOP BY IF YOU DARE! Now Accepting s! rd Credit & Debit Ca

HAPPY HALLOWEED!

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Sponsored by Oak Harbor Main Street Association & Walmart OakHarborMainStreet.com

October 31 5:00 - 7:00pm Historic Downtown Oak Harbor


HALLOWEEN HAPPENINGS: And speaking of other events, here are a few to consider as you wind your way along Whidbey Weekly’s Halloween Trail: THURSDAY, OCT. 25 Sherman Pioneer Farm Haunted Barn 3-5 p.m. Terry & Ebey Rd., Coupeville $5 per person FRIDAY, OCT. 26 Sherman Pioneer Farm Haunted Barn 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. $5 per person Pumpkin Patch & Trolley Ride 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. $5 per person Terry & Ebey Rd., Coupeville Halloween Howl 3:30-6:30 p.m. Free twilight tour to Deception Pass State Park. RSVP to 360-678-9536 or Travel@ IslandTransit.org Harvest Fest 5-8 p.m. Family Bible Church, Oak Harbor Zombie Glow 5K 5:30-6:30 p.m. NAS Whidbey Island, Oak Harbor Base access required

25

Flashlight Corn Maze Dark to 10 p.m. K&R Farm Stand, Hwy 20, Oak Harbor $5 per person

26

Haunted Fort 6:30-10 p.m. Fort Casey State Park, Coupeville $8 per person/$30 per family up to six people. A Discover Pass is required. “Practical Magic” Movie Night 7 p.m. Masonic Hall, 804 N. Main, Coupeville $5 suggested donation Frightville XVIII Haunted House 7 p.m. to midnight Roller Barn, NE Barron Dr., Oak Harbor $13 per person SATURDAY, OCT. 27 Halloween Pancake Breakfast 9-11 a.m. Island Senior Resources, Langley Suggested Donation: $7 For more information, call 360-321-1600 or 360-678-3373 Sherman Pioneer Farm Haunted Barn 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. $5 per person Pumpkin Patch & Trolley Ride 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. $5 per person Terry & Ebey Rd., Coupeville 4-H Haunted Petting Zoo 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Sherman Pioneer Farm, Coupeville 5th Annual ComicFest 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. The Book Rack, 551 NE Midway Blvd, Ste 3, Oak Harbor

FRE E

HAL L WH OW ILE S EEN UPP IES LIES LAS T!

MASH

October 27 • 4-7pm

AT THE MIDWAY TRADERS VILLAGE 390 NE MIDWAY BLVD • OAK HARBOR

Free Popcorn from Blue Fox, Monster Juice from Oldish Stuff & Uniquley Put, Free Halloweenies from Humphrey Sign Co., Music provided by Scott Dudley, Haunted School Bus by Oak Harbor School District, Photo Booth with Whidbey Island Camera Club, and a Spooky Book Nook with Whidbey Playhouse Costume Contest Prizes from: Blue Fox, Whidbey Playhouse, Oak Bowl and In-Motion Dance Studio Activities & Treats with: All About Kids Preschool, Bouncin’, Ashley’s Design, Sea Cadets, Farmer’s Insurance/Richard Voit, In-Motion Dance Studio, Joy Rutherford, M.A., Life Without Limits, Oak Harbor Elks, Oak Harbor Police Dept, Fire Department, Scottie’s Plumbing, Sunrise Services, Whidbey Lions Club, Whidbey Weekly, Woodward’s Tae Kwon Do & More! Swag Bags to first 100 participants to arrive in costume with treats from: Edward Jones/Jeff Pleet, Allstate Insurance/Matt Iverson, Bouncin’, CITRUSOLUTION, Cornerstone Lending,In-Motion Dance Studio, Land Title, Navy Wives, Mr Yuk & SaviBank

Coupeville’s Great Pumpkin Race 1-5 p.m. Alexander, between Coveland and Front Streets, Coupeville Free

SWHS Drama Club’s Haunted House 4-7 p.m. Island County Fairgrounds, Langley South Whidbey Monster Mash 4-7 p.m. Island County Fairgrounds Pole Building $10 for adults, $5 for children and $40 for families of five-plus. Costume parade: 4 p.m. Lip Sync Battle: 6:15 p.m.

Trunk or Treat 2-4 p.m. St. Hubert’s Catholic Church, Langley Case Farm Pumpkin Lights 6-9 p.m., weather permitting 98 Case Road, Oak Harbor Free, donations accepted

Halloween Torchlight Parade 5 p.m. Downtown Coupeville Free

MONDAY, OCT. 29 Sherman Pioneer Farm Haunted Barn 3-5 p.m. Terry & Ebey Rd., Coupeville $5 per person

Flashlight Corn Maze Dark to 10 p.m. K&R Farm Stand, Hwy 20, Oak Harbor $5 per person

Get Mummified 4-5 p.m., Ages 5-9 Langley Library, 104 Second St.

Halloween Bash Bowling Party 6-9 p.m. Oak Bowl, Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor

Frightville Kiddie Matinee Noon to 4 p.m. Roller Barn, NE Barron Dr., Oak Harbor $4 per person

Frightville XVIII Haunted House 7 p.m. to midnight Roller Barn, NE Barron Dr., Oak Harbor $13 per person

Trunk or Treat Harvest Festival Noon to 4 p.m. Convergence Zone, NAS Whidbey Island, Oak Harbor Free, Base access required

Black Cat Ball 7 p.m. to midnight Bayview Hall, Langley $20 admission benefits Paint the Hall fund

South Whidbey Schools Creepy Concert & Carnival 6 p.m. South Whidbey High School Langley

Case Farm Pumpkin Lights 6-9 p.m., weather permitting 98 Case Road, Oak Harbor Free, donations accepted TUESDAY, OCT. 30 Sherman Pioneer Farm Haunted Barn 3-5 p.m. Terry & Ebey Rd., Coupeville $5 per person Case Farm Pumpkin Lights 6-9 p.m., weather permitting 98 Case Road, Oak Harbor Free, donations accepted WEDNESDAY, OCT. 31 Chamber of Secrets 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. Chamber of Commerce, 32360 SR 20, Oak Harbor Trunk or Treat 2:30-5 p.m. United Methodist Church, Langley Spooktacular Langley 2:30-5 p.m. Downtown Langley Free

0 3

31

Halloween Spook-tacular 2:30-4:30 p.m. Homeplace, 171 SW 6thAve., Oak Harbor Goose Grocer Halloween Party 3-6 p.m. Goose Grocer, 14485 State Highway 525 Sherman Pioneer Farm Haunted Barn 3-5 p.m. Terry & Ebey Rd., Coupeville $5 per person Trick or Treat 4-8 p.m. Welcome Home Memory Care, 235 SW 6th Ave., Oak Harbor No Tricks, Safe Treats 5-7 p.m. Downtown Oak Harbor Free 27th Annual Harvest Carnival 5-8 p.m. Island Church, Langley Stop, Sip & Go 5-7 p.m. United Methodist Church, Oak Harbor Trunk or Treat 6-7:30 p.m. First Reformed Church, Oak Harbor Trunk or Treat 6-8 p.m. Oak Harbor Nazarene Church Kingdom Fest 6-8 p.m. Calvary Chapel, Oak Harbor Frightville XVIII Haunted House 7 p.m. to midnight Roller Barn, NE Barron Dr., Oak Harbor $13 per person

28

oak harbor school district

Haunted School Bus

6TH ANNUAL

MONSTER

Midway Monster Mash 4-7 p.m. 390 NE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor Free

Fall Bazaar Trunk or Treat 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. Olympic View Elementary, Oak Harbor

27

SUNDAY, OCT. 28 Sherman Pioneer Farm Haunted Barn 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. $5 per person Pumpkin Patch & Trolley Ride 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. $5 per person Terry & Ebey Rd., Coupeville

Fleet Auxiliary Trunk or Treat 2-4 p.m. Fleet Reserve Branch 97, 311 SE 8th Ave., Oak Harbor

Haunted Fort 6:30-10 p.m. Fort Casey State Park, Coupeville $8 per person/$30 per family up to six people. Discover Pass required.

FREE Community Halloween Fun on Midway Blvd in Oak Harbor!

MIDWAY

3rd Annual Fall Festival 1-3 p.m. Clinton Community Hall

29

HALLOWEEN continued from page 9

Looking for a safe Trick or Treat spot? We have you covered! Drinks and treats are while supplies last!

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 9AM-6PM 32630 SR 20 | Oak Harbor | 360-675-3755 | OakHarborChamber.com

Spooktacular Langley Come Trick or Treat in Downtown Langley Wednesday, October 31 Halloween Day 2:30-5pm

Langley Main Street www.visitlangley.com

The town and merchants are all dressed up with treats for kids and friendly dogs. Just look for the crow poster on participating shops.

October 27

4-7pm

• Costume Contest with Prizes! • Pet Costume Contest • Haunted Bus • Photo Booth • Treats

At the midway Trader’s village 390 NE Midway Blvd, oak harbor

DJ Leo

PRESENTS

A Spooktacular night of fun and music! FRIDAY, OCTOBER 26TH 5-8PM

STOP BY IF YOU DARE! Now Accepting s! rd Credit & Debit Ca

HAPPY HALLOWEED!

33858 SR 20 • Suite 102 • Oak Harbor • 360-682-2420 • www.kaleafa.com This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.

Sponsored by Oak Harbor Main Street Association & Walmart OakHarborMainStreet.com

October 31 5:00 - 7:00pm Historic Downtown Oak Harbor


12

OCTOBER 25 - OCTOBER 31, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Spirits of Halloween haunt Coupeville house By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly

It is one of Coupeville’s beautiful, historic homes in which you will find, on any given day, a happy family, the family dog and all the warmth and love you would expect to go along with it. It is a lovely home, frequented by family friends and visitors - both invited and uninvited, seen and unseen, living and, well, not so much, according to residents Kelly and John. “I’ve seen shadows, orbs, the lights flicker, I’ve heard clawing, things we know we’ve put down in one place we find moved somewhere completely different,” described Kelly, who has lived in the home since July. “The dog wouldn’t even go upstairs.” “My mom is 93, she said she watched a guy on the ceiling when she stayed one night,” said John, as he sat in the same, quaint guest

www.whidbeyweekly.com

Whidbey Weekly

room upstairs. “This is only the second time I’ve been in this room; it just feels creepy. I know there’s something evil in this house.”

Kelly and John are completely serious as they talk about their unseen visitors and they seem to take it in stride. John said he even awoke one night to see a man standing at the foot of the bed in their downstairs bedroom. So when their landlord asked them if they’d be willing to host a “spiritual cleansing” of the house as a Halloween fundraiser for the Coupeville Chamber of Commerce, they agreed. Last Saturday evening, about 20 invited guests – Whidbey Weekly included - gathered to hear these “ghost” stories and to help any spirits who didn’t belong there move on. It was not a séance; there was no hand-holding around a crystal ball to try to communicate with the dead. There were

HAPPY HALLOWEEN!

people of all different opinions – from skeptics to believers – who gathered to hear what local experts had discovered as they explored the 120-year-old home. On hand were Kathy Baxter, a sensitive, and John and Dylan Hummel, owners of Island Time Paranormal. They described their separate experiences, Baxter sharing her perceptions of the spirits of an older, very angry man and his young daughter. “There was lots of anger, directed at different people,” she said. “His wife died in childbirth, his daughter was born with Downs Syndrome. He was a very judgmental man. He was a pastor, and when his congregation didn’t support him and help him with his daughter because they were afraid, she was never socialized. He was pissed off at everybody – his wife, the people in his congregation, his daughter.”

LOCALLY OPERATED “I am in awe of the duality of this investigation and what we’ve discovered,” said John Hummel. “In our recordings, you can definitely hear a young female voice saying ‘Yes,’ and a gruff man’s voice saying ‘Don’t talk.’ That correlates perfectly with a father/ daughter scenario. We definitely heard two distinct voices and every time we recorded them, the man sounded angry.” But those are not the only spirits Baxter said she sensed in the house. “There are three other energies here,” she said. “But they’re not in the same dimension as the older man. A dimension is just a frequency and there are still a few visitors here.” Baxter said the best way to explain the different dimensions is to picture a line with different frequencies, like a radio dial. We tune into one frequency at a time, but we know there are thousands of other frequencies available, all at the same time. It is when we are able to tune into multiple frequencies at once that we can have ‘paranormal’ experiences. Some people, like Baxter herself, are more sensitive to and capable of tuning in those different frequencies. “There are infinite dimensional frequencies,” she said. “Spirits sometimes get stuck as they pass on, they’re not ready for this to be over.” Hummel has been doing paranormal investigations for about five years. He said he started this adventure as a skeptic. His son, Dylan, was interested in shows like ‘Ghost Hunters,’ so he thought this could be a fun father-son activity. But as they started visiting different locations around the area, he began to change his mind.

Trick or Treat at the Captain Whidbey Inn October 27, 28 & 31! Follow us on Facebook for details on upcoming events! Call Today - Book your banquet events & holiday parties with us! 2072 Captain Whidbey Inn Road Coupeville • 360-678-4097 events@captainwhidbey.com

“I was walking through an empty building by myself and I heard, as clear as day, someone say ‘Hey!’ right next to me, and there’s no one there…it scared the hell out of me,” he laughed. “I’ve walked through places and felt like somebody was watching me, but it

See HAUNTED continued on page 14

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Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

OCTOBER 25 - OCTOBER 31, 2018

13

LOCALLY OPERATED

that even those with differing opinions have a conciliatory approach to your viewpoint. Goodwill debates on the 28th are a fruitful way of getting to the truth.

CHICKEN LITTLE & THE ASTROLOGER By Wesley Hallock

ARIES (March 21-April 19) One of your favorite words this week is sure to be ACTION. Quick to think, quick to act. That well describes your present approach to most everything. (If you’re slow about anything, it will be to change your mind once it’s made up.) Strangely, your quick ways in matters large and small does have a balancer this week. Watch on the 28th. Your quick ways on that day have the effect of slowing those around you. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Your easy going ways this week could place you a beat or two behind the music. If you find yourself out of step with the rhythm of life, you may expect the appearance of a kindly reminder to please pick up the pace. Take offense if you will, but whatever form the hurry-up takes, it’s for your own good. If you miss your bus, there’s always another, it is true. But a rare opportunity on the 28th may come only once. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) Possible time-wasters this week include people quick to fault the world, and slow to do anything about it. Pity parties can be short or long, depending on your response. Whether the issue is that messy garage or something bigger, if you have ideas for solutions, propose them. You will quickly learn who is willing to get their hands dirty, and who is merely talking. On the 28th, fault-finders come in threes. CANCER (June 22-July 22) You may have the effect this week of making weepy people feel they have found the perfect shoulder to cry on. Prepare to hear stories of what could have been-should have been. The one thing the troubled you meet will have in common is that they’re all living in the past. The highest service you can perform is to gently bring them back into present time. A jovial approach on the 28th works wonders. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Take nothing at face value this week. Much more exists than what is visible to the casual observer, and it may fall to you to be the rare individual who recognizes what others cannot. Get people talking, and you may be surprised at how many see the situation as you do. Where minds come into agreement, hang onto your hat. Final outcomes aren’t fixed on the 28th, but the good possibilities outweigh the bad. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You won’t have to say a lot to get your point across this week. A few well-chosen words, frank, succinct and to the point, are all that’s needed to convey your message. Where the other side of the story comes into play (as inevitably it will on the 28th), you will find

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) It always comes down to dollars and cents this week, or so it may seem at key moments. Not that you are stuck in such a rut. But there’s no escape from life’s practicalities when the topic comes up in every conversation, be it spouse, business partner or similar confidant that sees fit to bring it up. Make the appropriate concessions, agree to what you must, if you expect to find peace on the 28th. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Of course your intentions are good, and certainly you want the best for everyone this week. It’s going to astonish you, then, when not all sign on with your views of how it should be. Whatever “it” is, if you feel strongly about it, you may be sure that someone is going to object. It’s just that kind of week. A test of your resolve and strength of conviction is underway. Open-minded debate earns a passing grade on the 28th. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Plodding forward out of sheer determination, in lieu of your usual optimism, has surely been your fate for far too long. Expect no quick turnabouts this week, but do anticipate that the elusive meaning and value you seek may suddenly become obvious. It’s been there in front of you all along, but developing eyes with which to see takes time. You are farther along in that process than you may think on the 28th. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Friends and casual acquaintances play an important role in the success of your week. Goals you could not have met without them are now within your reach. In some cases, it’s been a long and winding road that you have traveled together, so some celebration may be in order. Remember to give credit where credit is due. (There is no “I” in team!) The 28th is not a day to let your work ethic grow slack. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb 18) There will never be a better time for a reality check on certain revolutionary ideas you hold. Anticipate first that you’re going to be branded a hopeless optimist. Then look for any hint of the impractical and weed it out. When you’ve done that, you’re ready to share your scheme or ambition with the one who holds power of veto over your pet project. The 28th isn’t the best day for selling its merits, but it won’t hurt to try. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Your thinking this week is influenced by a deep need for security, much more than you may realize. Notice that in weighing every idea or proposal, if it makes you feel safer, if it addresses your fears of failure or abandonment, then and only then are you comfortable enough to embrace it. Suspicions are not easily put aside. Shrug them off and they’ll surely arise later, so don’t even try. Take the time to dig deeper on the 28th.

CLUES ACROSS

42. Food company

13. A wife (law)

1. Type of cleaner (abbr.)

48. Trips to see wildlife

17. Printing speed measurement

4. Going out

50. Elderly

19. Wrong

10. __ Jima, WWII battlefield

51. Famed chapel

20. Exams

11. Closed

52. Something to grab

12. Air Force

53. City in Oklahoma

14. Moved swiftly

54. Muckraking journalist Tarbell

15. Will not (obsolete) 16. Type of tank 18. Raise 23. Gives a new moniker 24. Adversary 26. Anno Domini

56. Corroded

32. New Zealand conifer

59. Most liberated

33. College teachers

60. Google certification (abbr.)

35. A way of grating 38. Novice 41. Having limits

1. High moral behavior

28. Bunch of something

29. Prints money 31. Accumulate

CLUES DOWN

27. Lillian __, actress

25. Replaces

55. Thallium 58. A Brooklyn NBAer

22. Represent

21. Outlying suburb of London

43. Shining with jewels or sequins 44. Existing at birth but not hereditary

30. This (Spanish)

2. Expects

31. A guitarist uses one

3. Fanciful notions 4. Spanish be

45. __ Caesar, comedian

34. Small stem bearing leaves

5. All the people of approximately the same age

46. A young male horse under the age of four

36. Soviet Socialist Republic

6. Berated 7. Trailblazing comedienne

37. Actress Rooney 39. Dark brown or black

8. Fabric edge

47. Russian industrial city 49. Wash off 56. Radio frequency

40. Matter

9. South Dakota

41. Atomic number 87 (abbr.)

12. Amazon ID number

57. Delirium tremens Answers on page 19

© 2018, Wesley Hallock, All Rights Reserved

YOUR GUESS IS AS GOOD AS OURS WEATHER FORECAST Chicken Little looks at what is and fears the sky is falling. Wesley Hallock as a professional astrologer looks at what is and sees what could be. Read Wesley’s monthly forecast, with links to Facebook and Twitter, at www. chickenlittleandtheastrologer.com. To read past columns of Chicken Little and the Astrologer in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

Thurs, Oct. 25

Fri, Oct. 26

Sat, Oct. 27

Sun, Oct. 28

Mon, Oct. 29

Tues, Oct. 30

North Isle

North Isle

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H-60°/L-49°

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Rain Possible

Showers Possible

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South Isle

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H-57°/L-49°

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H-56°/L-44°

Rain Possible

Showers Possible

Rain and Drizzle Possible

Rain

Showers Possible

Rain and Drizzle Possible

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Featuring Local Craft Beer, Wine & Ciders 103 S. Main • Coupeville • 360.682.5747 www.penncovebrewing.com

1191 SE Dock St, #2 • Oak Harbor • *Starting October 19 360-675-6500 • chrisbakeryonwhidbey.weebly.com

The holidays are quickly approaching, see us for: Cakes, Pies, Cookies, Rolls, Bread & More!

Stop by for Monster Bread & Halloween Cupcakes & Cookies!

MONSTER BREAD IS BACK!*

Those interested in seeing the Hummel’s videos of their investigation can find the YouTube link on Island Time Paranormal’s Facebook page.

“It was really interesting and fun,” said Eccles. “I think everyone enjoyed it. It was enlightening, actually.”

No matter where one’s beliefs fall on the spectrum between total skepticism and total belief, the event was a fun, interesting way to spend an evening during this spooky Haunting of Coupeville season.

There is no way for observers to know if the cleansing worked. Kelly and John will have to be the judge of that. Baxter’s theory is that spirits feel safe in the house, it’s an easy place to pass as they make their transition from our dimension to the next.

“We’re going to free the spirits, we’re coming to help with their passage, we are releasing them,” Baxter told a group in the bedroom as she fanned the burning sage with a feather, spreading it throughout the room. “We’re letting it carry all the old thought forms out. And as we release them, we’ve created a vacuum, so we have to let something back in, so focus on love. Gather your thoughts and send it out…think love.”

Most people are familiar with that skin-prickling feeling you get on your arms or back or scalp when you hear a story or a description of something that makes you uneasy. Whidbey Weekly went upstairs with Kelly and John to see the room in question before the formal cleansing started. I admit feeling the skin on my entire body prickle and crawl the whole time I was in the room, even on my legs, which is very unusual for me. It didn’t stop. Granted, it could have simply been the subject matter, which was fascinatingly creepy, but I’ve never had the feeling last so long.

“There was just something about it, I didn’t like this room,” admitted Lynda Eccles, who had been in the house on a previous occasion, before Kelly and John lived there.

The point of the evening was to cleanse the spirits from the house. Baxter gave everyone sticks of burning sage – like incense, and encouraged everyone to walk throughout the house, letting the smoke and fragrance permeate every corner. Special attention was paid to the bedroom upstairs that seemed to be a focal point of activity in the house.

“Now, when you are seeing figures, or you are capturing voices that are responding to you, that’s intelligence, a spirit,” he continued.

“If you think about it, it’s all about frequencies and energy,” he said. “When stuff is coming through, like hearing footsteps, for example, it’s usually fragments. It’s residual energy that has been stored in a building over the years – how many people walked on those floors, how many steps have there been? So when someone enters a building that’s been empty for a long time, it’s fresh energy – it’s like throwing a battery into the center of the pool and it’s causing ripples.

Hummel said he can classify experiences he and Dylan investigate into two different categories: residual and intelligent.

wasn’t a negative feeling. I’ve seen human shadows, I’ve heard a woman singing and it’s always there on the periphery, just out of reach, you just can’t quite wrap your mind around it.”

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly Kathy Baxter leads people through a spiritual cleansing of a historic Coupeville home Saturday evening. The home’s residents believe the house is haunted. The event was a fundraiser for the Coupeville Chamber of Commerce.

HAUNTED continued from page 12

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www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/ PMH0072592/

In a large saucepan, bring chicken broth to boil over medium heat. Add mushrooms, vinegar, soy sauce, sriracha and white pepper. Simmer for 5 minutes. Combine the cornstarch and water in a small bowl to form a loose paste. Add the cornstarch mixture to the soup and stir. Simmer for another 5 minutes. Soup will begin to thicken. Pour the beaten egg into the soup while stirring gently. It should feather and be cooked very quickly in the broth. Add the tofu and green onions, stir for a minute, remove from heat and serve!

Hot and Sour Soup ½ cup mushrooms, sliced (shitake is best, I’ve heard) ¼ cup rice wine vinegar ¼ cup low sodium soy sauce 1 tablespoon sriracha 3 tablespoons cornstarch 3 tablespoons cold water 1 teaspoon ground white pepper 6 cups chicken broth 2 eggs, beaten 6 oz. firm tofu, sliced into strips 3 green onions, sliced

Yes, sour is good. It might not always taste amazing, but it absolutely CAN taste positively marvelous! When working in unison with other flavors, sour can enhance your mealtime experience like nothing else. Dear Readers, Oct. 25 is National Sour Day and if you’re a super sour fan, a lover of lip-puckering flavors, then you’ll have to celebrate this day in due style! You can either be a sourpuss or eat something sour (to get a sourpuss) and enjoy the point of the pucker! I’m including a recipe for hot and sour soup I found online at https://amyinthekitchen.com/hot-and-sour-soup/ and have used a couple of times already. And with the weather being crisp and cool, a hot soup on a chilly day is a delightful thing, so sour up your season and if you try the recipe, let me know how you like it! Please send any and all comments, questions and definitely recipes you’d like to share to letsdish.whidbeyweekly@gmail.com and we’ll do just that and Dish!

Order Early for Thanksgiving! Now accepting orders for 12-14 pound Hickory Smoked Turkeys $65

Yogurt isn’t the only food with a tang. Other common foods such as pickles (of all sorts – carrots, cauliflower, beets, etc.) and chutneys, have their own tang to them. Think of kimchi! Not only is this pickled dish a treat by itself, used as a topping for meat and veggies, or even on a sandwich to give it that extra little burst of flavor, is a prime example of how sour is delectable. Kimchi is actually lauded for its supposed ability to help athletes’ performance and is touted for the lactobacilli (beneficial bacteria) within. Even dressings and sauces are making the move away from rich and creamy towards clear and sour. It’s opened up the public mind as a collective, I think, to embrace different, more intense flavors and opt for them in a break away from the sugary products we

Kefir is an example of this, or any yogurt in fact. It’s the probiotics (good bacteria) found within these foods that lend it its signature tanginess. This means ‘sour-ish’ food has a definite health benefit for us in that it provides a stable gut environment and helps to prevent the growth of potentially harmful bacteria in our digestive tract. I’d say it’s reason in and of itself, to consume yogurt or kefir from time to time. If you don’t find the plain ol’ stuff tasty by itself, try adding a little honey or blueberries to it – both of which have their own health advantages! It’s an excellent snack or breakfast on-the-go, too.

I’m generalizing here of course, and I’m pretty sure there are people who thoroughly enjoy the experience of eating a range of different sour foods. I’ve found, however, general trends see a partiality towards foods that aren’t sour. But I don’t think sour necessarily means those foods or dishes are plain and simply pucker-worthy. These can incorporate those food items which have a bit of a tang.

we know them to be. I happen to find a slice of lemon or lime in water or sparkling water exceptionally refreshing and yet, by itself, I give it a miss. A squeeze of lemon juice over ovenbaked fish takes the meal to different levels of delicious and yet again, by itself isn’t quite as appetizing.

Dining Guide

Lemons, limes, grapefruits, not-quite-ripe raspberries, oranges or strawberries are all examples of sour foods of the fruity kind. Added into dishes with other ingredients, they’re rather palatable and even quite scrumptious, but by themselves they can be the face-scrunching, drool-inducing, mouth-puckering favorites

Our senses of taste and smell are synonymous with emotions and both senses are linked to the involuntary nervous system, which is why when we experience an unpleasant smell, or taste, it can result in nausea or even vomiting! And while there are several different tastes – salty, sweet, bitter, savory (or umami) and sour, we are focusing on the very last one. The sour sensation we find in sour foods is the result of the splitting off of hydrogen ions by an acid which is dissolved in a water solution.

What makes food sour? I think in order to answer this we need to know a little about how taste works. What we call ‘taste’ is a merger of sensations which, when compiled, allow us to discern the ‘taste’ of a food. It is the smell, the temperature and the texture that, when combined, produce the taste. It is thought that only after we perceive what the aroma of a food is, can we develop an idea of what its taste is. You might already have experienced this concept in action when you have a cold or a really stuffy nose. The taste of food is often dulled in that instance. The inability to smell the food properly impairs our aptitude at tasting it.

There are many different kinds of foods in the world, all with varying textures, consistencies, flares and of course, flavors. Desserts are usually sweet, main courses are typically savory, but which course allows for an entire mealtime experience of sour? Is this even appealing to anyone? The taste of sour foods evokes a visceral response. Your cheeks and jaw begin to creak, the muscles tighten at the prospect of an introduction of sourness to the tongue and yet, wouldn’t you know it, foods that are sour and bitter have a fair few benefits for our health.

IT’S OKAY TO BE A SOURPUSS ON NATIONAL SOUR DAY!

with Kae Harris

have on the market, even if many of us still sway towards the sweet. Maybe it’s a general trend to move away from things laden with sugar, which can promote unhealthy eating habits, that has shed light on the benefits of sour food. I spoke not long ago about what apple cider vinegar can do for us and this just highlights another tangy food stuff and its health benefits – even if the recipe was for a sweet pie. Never mind that, though – it demonstrates versatility and how sour can enhance other foods and flavors.

Whidbey Weekly

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Film Shorts Courtesy of Cascadia Weekly

By Carey Ross First Man: On the heels of the ethereally lovely “La La Land,” which came on the heels of swinging and savage “Whiplash,” comes director Damian Chazelle’s latest effort, a gritty, gripping account of NASA’s moon mission, as seen through the eyes of Ryan Gosling’s Neil Armstrong. Chazelle, what will you do next? ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 18 min.) Goosebumps 2: Haunted Halloween: Very little is known about the second installment of the film series based on R.L. Stine’s wildly popular books, but a ventriloquist dummy appears to figure strongly into the plot, so this is obviously an unholy nightmare disguised as a kid flick. ★★ (PG • 1 hr. 40 min.) Halloween: In a sequel that wisely pretends all of the other sequels don’t exist, Jamie Lee Curtis reprises her breakout role as Laurie Strode–except it’s 40 years later and Laurie is no one’s victim now. ★★★★ (R • 1 hr. 49 min.) Hunter Killer: Here’s how you can tell if a movie is going to be bad: If it stars Gerard Butler, it will be bad. This movie stars Gerard Butler. ★ (R • 2 hrs. 1 min.) Johnny English Strikes Again: If you like Rowan Atkinson, you might like this movie despite its many faults. On the other hand, if you like Rowan Atkinson, this movie will probably just make you long for Mr. Bean. ★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 28 min.) Mid90s: Jonah Hill, surprisingly versatile, writes and directs his first film, mining his

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The Old Man and the Gun: It seems only fitting that for his (supposedly) final role before retirement, Robert Redford would make a film that hearkens back to some of his best roles as a charismatic rogue in the likes of “Butch Cassidy” and “The Sting.” It’s his cinematic sweet spot, and no one does lawless and charming quite like him. ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 33 min.)

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SMALLFOOT (PG) A STAR IS BORN (R)

The Sisters Brothers: His previous films (“Rust and Bone, A Prophet”) had elements of Westerns, so it makes a certain amount of sense that when director Jacques Audiard sets out to make a Western, he incorporates elements of comedy, drama, horror and romance–as well as a dream cast that includes John C. Reilly, Joaquin Phoenix, and Jake Gyllenhaal. ★★★★★ ( R • 2 hrs. 1 min.) For Anacortes theater showings, please see www.fandango.com. For Blue Fox and Oak Harbor Cinemas showings see ads on this page.

Receive a $5 game card for every $20 spent in the snack bar (single transaction) Box Office & Snack Bar Opens At 4pm • 1st Movie Begins At Dusk 11 & Over $6.50; Kids 5-10 $1.00; 4 & Under Free GO KARTS ARE OPEN FRIDAY 4PM, SATURDAY 11AM , SUNDAY 12:30PM *Cash prices

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own teenage experiences to tell the story of Stevie, a 13-year-old growing up in 1990s Los Angeles who finds a quirky community at the local skate shop, with insight and authenticity. ★★★★ (R • 1 hr. 24 min.) Smallfoot: In a world populated by yetis, people are the thing to be feared in this movie that is only original if you haven’t seen the far superior Monsters Inc. But it’s good enough for kids, and not every animated movie can be a Pixar film. ★★★ (PG • 1 hr. 49 min.)

OCTOBER 25 - OCTOBER 31, 2018

WICAonline.org 360.221.8268

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BITS ‘n’ PIECES

Island 911

Seriously, we do not make this stuff up! SUNDAY, OCT. 14 11:22 am, S Beeksma Dr. Advising Honda minivan came into location, started filming reporting party and being belligerent. 5:33 pm, SR 20 Caller states someone left heroin on the counter at location. MONDAY, OCT. 15 12:19 am, SE Midway Blvd. Reporting party states there is someone on reporting party’s roof. Reporting party states went out and told subject to get off the roof. THURSDAY, OCT. 18 9:01 am, NE Midway Blvd. Abandoned truck in parking lot, parked in a very strange position, has been at location since yesterday. 11:34 am, NE Midway Blvd. White, older female approached reporting party while she was in her car; said she recognized her and began taking pictures of her. 12:04 pm, SR 20 Deer hit by a car, appeared deliberate, by a Scion XV, black in color. Left northbound on SR 20. Reporting party feels the suspect sped up and hit the deer on purpose. FRIDAY, OCT. 19 9:49 am, SR 20 Reporting party advising subject in store earlier this morning ran out of store after trying to steal a soda and left behind a backpack.

10:14 am, SR 20 Advising female in Honda Odyssey was in parking lot taking pictures of all the vehicles. 10:58 am, NW Quarterdeck Loop Party requesting call in reference to someone hacking her email, threatening to release information about reporting party if she does not pay ransom. 2:11 pm, NW Atalanta Way Caller advising have issues with subjects not looking before they come out into the road. 6:26 pm, SR 20 Reporting party advising female was at location earlier harassing guests; heard female is now at 7-11 tape recording. Requesting female be trespassed from location. SUNDAY, OCT. 21 12:31 am, SW Erie St. Male outside of location announced he is drunk, kicked a pumpkin at kids. 1:10 am, SE 8th Ave. Caller states there is a female subject on the porch ringing door bell and won’t go away. Reporting party does not know female. 8:37 am, SE Bayshore Dr. Advising female at park gazebo dancing on the tables; reporting party watching from across the street, female is dancing very provocatively. 5:01 pm, SE Pioneer Way Male subjects next to location in a green van are screaming at passersby and asking lewd questions. Report provided by OHPD & Island County Sheriff’s Dept.

Canales said she wanted to work with WIO after reading the group’s mission statement. “When I read the sentence ‘We perform for the love of music and for the opportunity to spread the joy of music,’ I thought to myself, ‘I have to contact them,’” she said. “I share these ideals and I truly enjoy working with groups and with people that love music so much that they want to share with others the joy that it brings to them.” Canales said she decided she wanted to be a conductor many years ago, when she realized how powerful and impactful music can be.

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Asked about the purpose of programming for the region’s theater and music lovers, Duncan said: “Our audiences are smart, well read, well traveled and don’t’ want to be just entertained. While it’s important to try and stay just ahead of the audience enough to be challenging, fresh and modern, we also have to keep our pulse on what conversations are resonating with our public. What stories are important to tell right now, right here?” Deana Duncan began at WICA as a volunteer in 1999 and came on staff in 2000. She was instrumental in the launch of the WICA Theatre Series and has directed eight and produced all 92 of the plays produced by WICA in the last 18 years. Deana holds a Masters in Nonprofit Leadership from Seattle University, a BFA in Theatre Arts and Communications from the University of Nevada, Reno, and attended the American Academy of Dramatic Arts and The Stella Adler Conservatory. She studied directing with Tony award winner Bartlett Sher during his tenure as Artistic Director at Intiman Theatre in Seattle. WICA is world renowned for holding the annual DjangoFest, a week long tribute to jazz pioneer Django Reinhart. “We use Django as a stepping off point, and each year the music goes in so many different, and charming directions,” Duncan said. “We plan to continue this idea, and keep making jazz roots relevant to our most modern aficionados.” DjangoFest for 2018 just concluded recently. WICA is also host to a full theatrical season, new ballet, comedy events, classical and world music concerts, and the nationally known political lecture series hosted by Robert Merry, this year featuring luminaries like CNN’s Gloria Borger, and Clinton Press Secretary Mike McClurry. “WICA is more than plays and concerts; it’s a complete cultural center for everyone in the area,” said Duncan. “Our community demands more every year, and we plan to continually expand our offerings, to keep everyone on the leading edge of the arts, humanities, and the most exciting creative and cultural achievements.” Whidbey Island Center for the Arts is a registered 501(c)3 nonprofit organization serving the community of South Whidbey Island and beyond. WICA’s mission is to inspire, nourish, and enhance the artistic, social, and economic well-being of the community. [Submitted by Fritha Strand, Marketing Manager, WICA]

Seeking Applicants for Island County Planning Commission

ITALIA continued from page 9 “Rather than spend the performance with my arms waving around in the air before performing an upper body marathon, I decided to ask her to conduct two other works as well,” she continued. “We feel very fortunate to have her with us as we approach the first concert of our 2018-2019 season.”

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so preparing this has become a priority for me,” she said. “I don’t want to disappoint my orchestra or our audience, and I would like everyone to fall in love with Alberto Curci’s beautiful writing. He was a famous violinst, teacher, and philanthropist in Italy, the founder of the International Curci Violin Competition, which is still going strong, although Curci himself, sadly, is not. I hope that, wherever he is, he’s listening and smiling.” While conductors can spend months preparing a piece, Canales said she was happy to step in. “It is always a challenge to step in at the last minute because it usually takes some time for the orchestra and conductor to get accustomed to each other,” she said. “But in situations like this, you just have to make things work out quickly. That’s the job.”

The Island County Board of Commissioners is seeking applicants from Commissioner District 2 (Oak Harbor) to serve on the Island County Planning Commission. Members must reside in the district appointed to represent. The Board of County Commissioners appoints Planning Commission members for four-year terms, which may be renewed by mutual agreement. The Planning Commission consists of nine members, three from each County Commissioner District, to assure county-wide representation. The Board of County Commissioners seeks to ensure that the Planning Commission is a balanced committee representing many different viewpoints with regard to land use. The Planning Commission makes recommendations to the Board in matters concerning growth and development as authorized in the Planning Enabling Act (RCW 36.70).

Even though Morrow was familiar with the music, there has been room for little else but practice the past two weeks.

“Within the pieces of the program, they will be able to hear romanticism, joy, melancholy, excitement, mystery and so much more,” she said. “They will witness an amazing soloist and a wonderful orchestra that has been preparing for so many weeks to present this concert to them. I am confident that it will be a great experience for everyone involved.”

The Planning Commission meets the second and fourth Monday of each month in the Island County Commissioners Hearing Room in Coupeville at 2:00pm in the Courthouse Annex Hearing Room, Coupeville. Depending on the agenda, some meetings are held in the evenings and/or on Camano. Meetings run two to six hours or more depending on the complexity of the agenda. Preparation and research is necessary. Service on the Planning Commission is unpaid; however, members may obtain reimbursement for travel expenses to and from meetings.

“Playing a concerto of this length and difficulty requires many hours of violin practice,

You can find more information at whidbeyorchestras.org.

Interested individuals should send a letter of interest including a statement of qualifica-

“To me, it is all about giving something,” she said. “When people take two hours of their day to come play their instrument in a rehearsal, or to come listen to a live concert, I want to make sure they have the best possible experience.”

The melodies featured in this concert are memorable and Canales encourages everyone to attend.

tions and a resume to: Island County Board of Commissioners, Attn: Pam Dill, Re: Planning Commission Vacancies, Post Office Box 5000, Coupeville, WA 98239, no later than 4:30pm Nov. 19, 2018. For additional information please phone 360-679-7353 or e-mail pamd@ co.island.wa.us [Submitted by Pam Dill]

Local Business News Sherwood’s Business Luncheon Join Sherwood at its Business Luncheon for an engaging look at how to build a stronger, more inclusive workforce. It will be held Tuesday, Oct. 30 from 12:00pm to 1:00pm at the Oak Harbor Yacht Club, 1301 SE Catalina Dr., Oak Harbor. Nationally, only about 20-percent of people with disabilities are employed and in Washington State nearly 27,000 individuals with disabilities are unemployed. As businesses are looking to hire in an environment of low unemployment, learning how to be a more inclusive workforce will help fill those needs. Sherwood is one of three providers in Island County who support high school students and adults with disabilities who are interested in seeking employment. A job leads to increased economic independence, community integration and greater self-worth. Please attend Sherwood’s Business Luncheon to learn how supported employment can help meet your hiring needs and make a difference in the lives of people with disabilities. This event is sponsored by The Nysether Family Foundation. Registration is required. Visit www.sherwoodcs.org/events.

Apply Now to Share the Secrets of Your Business Success with Others Sno-Isle Libraries is looking for presenters for its business-class series, Business Pros Classes in the series are taught by people who have business expertise and want to share it with budding entrepreneurs and small business owners. The 2018 Business Pros series runs through mid-November and Sno-Isle Libraries is issuing the annual call for proposals for workshops, classes and presentations from local business experts to be included in the 2019 series. Successful candidates will present workshops, classes and presentations to help future entrepreneurs and current business owners develop new skills to assist them in starting and growing a business. Proposals for the series should cover a step of starting or running a business and include learning outcomes that can be measured in a post-event survey. Proposals of particular interest include: Running an online business; valuing/selling a business; agricultural businesses; accounting processes, taxes and other financial information for small businesses; designing, creating, and maintaining a business website; networking for business owners; operating a restaurant or mobile food business. Proposal parameters include: Must be submitted using the online form; sessions should range from 1-3 hours (best-attended sessions are under 2 hours); presentations must have learning outcomes; presentations may include contact information for the presenter; submitting a print-quality photo for publicity is encouraged. Sno-Isle Libraries will market classes to the public and presenters are encouraged to promote to their networks. Sno-Isle Libraries will not provide presenters with a list of registered attendees due to privacy policies. A contract with Sno-Isle Libraries is required to ensure engagement and payment. Business Pros is aligned with Sno-Isle Libraries strategic priority to strengthen the local economy in Snohomish and Island counties. For more information, contact Emily Felt, Lead Librarian for Business Services at 360-6517017 or EFelt@sno-isle.org.

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Life Tributes LARRY HAVEN BLAKE

ing sense of humor, which he shared with friends and strangers, along with the ever present plate of original Oreo cookies!

Dec. 4, 1933 – Sept. 23, 2018 Larry Haven Blake was born Dec. 4, 1933 in Muscatine, Iowa to parents Andrew and Beulah (Nichols) Blake. Following his schooling, Larry began working for International Harvester in Moline, Ill. July 14, 1953, he joined the Navy. Larry served during the Korean Conflict on the USS Walker and the USS Small and was honorably discharged July 10, 1957 as a Gunners Mate Third Class. Following his military service, Larry returned to his job at International Harvester, where he worked until retirement. Larry eventually moved to Washington State. Having a heart for veterans, Larry began volunteering at the original Veterans Memorial Museum in Centralia and later at the museum’s new location in Chehalis. As a dedicated volunteer, he worked hundreds of hours as a cabinetmaker. The story of the museum and some of Larry’s work can be seen in the book “The Miracle Museum,” by Lee T. Grimes. After moving to Oak Harbor, Larry discovered the PBY-Naval Air Museum, housed in an old gas station. Once again he began volunteering, doing everything from dusting to docenting. He also served on the museum board. When the museum moved to Simard Hall on the Seaplane Base and then to its current downtown location, Larry followed. During those years he spent many hours at the museum and also at local campgrounds, inviting tourists to visit the museum.

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JAMES “JAY” THOMAS RIGGLES James “Jay” Thomas Riggles, 82, passed away peacefully Oct. 16, 2018 at the Fidalgo Skilled Nursing Facility in Anacortes, Wash. He was born Feb. 15, 1936 to Jessie J. Riggle and Willie (Reynolds) Riggle. Upon graduation from high school in 1953 at Elmore City, Okla., he moved to Russell, Kan., where he worked on the dairy farm for Eddie Fritzler. Sept. 15, 1955 he joined the U.S. Navy. In 1962, he was transferred to Naval Air Station Whidbey Island at Oak Harbor, where he served the remainder of his 31-year-Navy career. During this time, he made 12 carrier cruises. Following his Navy career, he worked at Boeing in Everett until his retirement in 1999. He enjoyed camping and riding his motorcycle.

Jay is survived by his wife, Georgina “Gina” (Miller), sister Sandy Metha Ilson, brothers Floyd, Sam and Gerlad, sister-in-law Susan Miller and numerous nieces and nephews.

He was preceded in death by his father and mother, his brother, Alford Riggle, sisters Dorothy Johnson and Loretha Battles.

Per his request, there will be no funeral services. A burial service will be held at a later date at the Russell, Kan. Cemetery.

Life Tributes can now be found online at www.whidbeyweekly.com Puzzle 1 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.49)

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Larry loved people and he loved animals. Many will remember Larry letting his beard grow and dressing up as Santa during the Christmas season, passing out candy to amazed families. Larry had a great affection for dogs, especially black labs. He always shed a tear when he spoke about the beloved black labs that had been part of his life. Larry had a teas-

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Donations in Larry’s name may be made to WAIF or to the PBY-Naval Air Museum.

Jay was a member of the Fleet Reserve, American Legion and a life member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars.

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Larry was a longtime member of the VFW, a charter member of the Veterans Memorial Museum, a member of the Island County Historical Society and a member of the PBY-Naval Air Museum.

Larry loved God and would often show people his large angel collection. He liked to listen to country music, with his favorite song being Alabama’s “Angels Among Us.” Larry cherished the numerous teddy bears he had on display, all handmade by his mother. He also collected and displayed books, car models and military memorabilia.

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Larry passed away Sunday, Sept. 23, 2018 at the age of 84, with friends by his side. He was buried Friday, Oct. 5 at the Rock Island National Cemetery in Ill., where he rests among fellow veterans.

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Foster Homes Needed!

Experienced Barbers wanted!

Family Tails Dog Rescue needs foster homes! We can't save dogs from high kill shelters without homes for them to stay at while they wait to find their forever home. 1 week to 3 months, a fun and rewarding way to be involved with rescue and also have a dog without the full time commitment. We pay for everything, you just provide the love and the home. Please call 360-969-2014 for more info or for an application.

AUTO/PARTS FOR SALE 2015 Chrysler 300 C, 4-door sedan, 3.6 L V6 RWD. Transferable Extended Warranty. 43,000 miles. Black Interior and Exterior, Sunroof, Heated Leather Seats. Asking $18,200. (360) 679-4003 (0)

ANNOUNCEMENTS Pregnant? Need baby clothes? We have them and the price is right–FREE. Pregnancy Care Clinic, open most Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10am to 4pm. Call 360-221-2909 or stop by 6th and Cascade in Langley. Be the difference in a child’s life and become a foster parent today! Service Alternatives is looking for caring, loving, and supportive families to support foster children. 425923-0451 or mostermick@ servalt-cfs.com The Whidbey Island community is encouraged to try out the paddling sport of dragon boating with the Stayin’ Alive team. Our team’s mission is to promote the physical, social, and emotional benefits of dragon boating. It has been shown to be especially beneficial to cancer survivors. Practice with us for up to 3 times for free. Life-jackets and paddles provided. Saturdays at the Oak Harbor Marina, 8:45am. Contact njlish@ gmail.com. More info at our Facebook Page: https://www. facebook.com/NorthPugetSoundDragonBoatClub?ref=hl If you or someone you know has been a victim of Homicide, Burglary, Robbery, Assault, Identity Theft, Fraud, Human Trafficking, Home Invasion and other crimes not listed. Victim Support Services has Advocates ready to help. Please call the 24-hr Crisis Line 888-3889221. Free Service. Visit our web site at http://victimsupportservices.org

RIDE SHARE/VAN POOL

at 526 Bayshore Drive. Each week, we have volunteer opportunities available to help care for our community garden, share organic gardening tips, and learn Permaculture principles. All ages and skill levels welcome. Schedule can change due to adverse weather conditions. If you have any questions, please contact us at: imagineapermacultureworld.gmail.com Mother Mentors needs volunteers! Oak Harbor Families with young children need your help! Volunteer just a couple of hours a week to make a difference in someone’s life! To volunteer or get more info, email wamothermentors@ gmail.com or call 360-3211484. Looking for Board Members to join the dynamic Board of Island Senior Resources and serve the needs of Island County Seniors. Of particular interest are representatives from North Whidbey. For more information please contact: reception@islandseniorservices.org

JOB MARKET Drivers wanted for Whidbey SeaTac Shuttle. CDL/P2 Preferred, Training available for those without. Full Time, Part Time and weekend openings available. Details at www. seatacshuttle.com or call 360679-4003 (2)

HOME FURNISHINGS Walnut occasional table, with beveled glass top, $40 or best offer; Stained glass terrarium, with matching cover, plus wood stand. 26-1/2” tall x 101/2” diameter of cover x 14” diameter of base. $125 or best offer; Twin-size, sturdy metal bed frame, with wood roller feet. $15 obo. We can send How’d youdifficulty do? rating 0.49) Puzzle 1 (Medium, 3

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Vanpool: Daily vanpool from Whidbey Island to Mukilteo to north Seattle seeks full/PT riders. Bob (h) 360-730-1294 or (c) 206-526-4150 (0)

The Side Door Barbershop is seeking experienced barbers for booth rental opportunities in a new location. For more information, call Sue Johnson at 360-672-8622

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photos. Call or text 360-3200525. Quilted wall hangings, purchased at the Houston International Quilting Conference. In excellent condition, ready to hang on your wall! Quail (20” x 11”), $15 or best offer. Duck (22” diameter), $15 or best offer. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525. Fireplace tool sets: brush, shovel, and poker, in a sturdy stand. One set is 30” tall, the other set is 21” tall, $25 ea. obo; Sturdy, brown leather log tote by Eddie Bauer, never used. $20 obo. We can send photos. Call or text 360-3200525. “Happy Holidays” painted sign, 21-1/2” x 16-1/2”, $15 obo. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525.

LAWN AND GARDEN 25 aluminum silver deck post caps, $3 each; 200 feet new 8” heavy waterline, $4 a foot, obo. Can be used for waterline or drain line. 360-321-1624 Natural Barnyard Topsoil: Good for gardens, flower beds, etc. Unscreened, 10 yard loads, $225 delivered. South Whidbey 360-321-1624

MISCELLANEOUS Cooking pumpkins for sale. Organic. Simply Whidbey soil and sunshine for nutrition. $5 each. All are about 5-7 lbs. Delicious. Julie, 360-969-9266 (1) Wind chimes: prices range from $10–$50 or best offer No Cheating!

depending on size. We can send photos. Call or text 360320-0525 Halogen work light, for indoor projects. The height of the light can be adjusted. $30 or best offer. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525

RECREATION Scotty Cameron Futura RH 5W Putter. This putter is in “as new” condition. RH 35”, with stock grip, steel shaft, and head cover. $345 or best offer. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525. 12 volt boat winch, $40 obo; Small anchor. Weighs only about 3 pounds, but has a design that will keep your small boat on the beach where you left it. $10 obo. We can send photos. Call or text 360320-0525. Camping items: 2 single air mattresses, “as new” condition, $20 each or best offer; Brookstone waterproof floating lantern, for camping, patio, poolside, or emergencies, new, $25 or best offer; Old (but clean) Thermos 1-gallon jug, $5; Vintage Coleman stove, with protective denim cover, $25 or best offer; Versatile backpack, the two parts can be used separately, or (for more serious backpacking) together, $45 obo. We have photos. Call or text 360-3200525. Sports items: Bag Boy golf cart, $15 obo; Golf umbrella, $5; Men’s wet suits, size L, $10 per item; Neoprene gloves

The Side Door Barbershop and hats, size L, $5 each; Water skis: Terry Competition slalom ski, with carrying bag, $30 obo; O’Brien Competition slalom ski, Kevlar/Boron, $30 obo; Wiley wood water skis, $25 obo. We have photos. Call or text 360-320-0525.

ANIMALS/SUPPLIES Wanted: Horse to ride. Gentle for beginner. Share cost or lease. Road safe. 360-2791565 (1) Excellent Grass Hay, good for horses, $7 per bale, 20 bale minimum. 360-321-1624 If you or someone you know needs help in feeding pet(s), WAIF Pet Food Banks may be able to help. Pet Food Banks are located at WAIF thrift stores in Oak Harbor (50 NE Midway Blvd) and Freeland (1660 Roberta Ave) and are generously stocked by donations from the community. If you need assistance, please stop by.

WANTED Art, Antiques & Collectibles. Cash paid for quality items. Call or text 360-661-7298 (1)

DRUMMER: Need experienced, solid rock drummer with great meter. Practice weekly in Oak Harbor in fully equipped rehearsal/recording studio. Mostly rock, blues and acoustic originals plus some covers. Plan to play concerts/ festivals and work on CD. Rich at rswitzer55@netzero.net or 360-675-5470 before 9 pm. Was your Dad or Gramps in Japan or Germany? I collect old 35 mm cameras and lenses. Oak Harbor, call (970) 823-0002

FREE Miscellaneous materials in the yard. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525

PERSONALS Mexico: seeking all information/help about Jalisco Mexican state, Lake Chapala area, town of Ajijic, Ex-pat community. Seeking one-level, two bedroom, two bath house to rent or purchase in the future. No real estate agents, please. Call JM 360-730-3244 (1)

CLASSIFIED INFORMATION US Postal Mail

Whidbey Weekly Classified Department PO Box 1098 Oak Harbor, WA 98277

E-Mail............classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com Telephone..................................(360)682-2341 Fax.............................................(360)682-2344 PLEASE CALL WHEN YOUR ITEMS HAVE SOLD.

Please try to limit your classified to 30 words or less, (amounts and phone numbers are counted as words) we will help edit if necessary. We charge $10/week for Vehicles, Boats, Motorcycles, RVs, Real Estate Rental/Sales, Business Classifieds and any items selling $1,000 and above. We do charge $25 to include a photo. The FREE classified space is not for business use. No classified is accepted without phone number. We reserve the right to not publish classifieds that are in bad taste or of questionable content. All free classifieds will be published twice consecutively. If you would like your ad to be published more often, you must resubmit it. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date.

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Business Spotlight 4:30-7pm • October 31 with

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150 SE Pioneer Way • Oak Harbor • 360-679-3533

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SEEKING ADVENTURE? WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED

Join the Cutting Edge Team at the Side Door Barbershop By Kathy Reed Sue Johnson, owner of the Side Door Barbershop in Oak Harbor, is looking for a few good barbers to join her in a new adventure! The Side Door Barbershop will be opening in a new location in downtown Oak Harbor soon (stay tuned for details) and has booth rental spaces available for experienced, professional, positive, friendly and hardworking individuals who are a cut above when it comes to barbering. Johnson, who has 45 years of experience in hairdressing and barbering, loves what she does and it shows. She said she has always loved cutting hair. She loves her customers and works hard to establish a clean, comfortable atmosphere, where people can come and enjoy their experience. Just think how much more enjoyable it is to get your hair cut by someone who wants to do their best to please you and make you feel right at home during the process. That’s what Johnson has done with the Side Door Barbershop.

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Back in medieval times, a full-service barber would actually conduct surgery and dental procedures on their customers! You can rest assured Johnson and her team of barbers will simply stick to the best, full-service barbering you can hope to find. Whether you need a military-style cut for work, something professional, basic or more cutting edge, the team at the Side Door Barbershop will be happy to give you the cut and style you want. Johnson is excited about her upcoming move and being able to offer a full range of barbering services to her customers. She is looking for people who will care about their customers’ satisfaction as much as she does, people who are friendly and enjoy working with others, who will treat their customers with the utmost care and respect while creating and sharing a positive experience with their customers and co-workers alike. Perhaps you are a new barber. The Side Door Barbershop may be just the thing for you! Think about joining a team of experienced fellow barbers who can help you hone your skills, sharing what they have learned from their years in the profession. Those interested in getting in on the ground floor of this burgeoning opportunity should definitely get in touch with Johnson by calling 360-672-8622. This could be your chance to help build something truly special.

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The Side Door Barbershop Experienced Barbers wanted! The Side Door Barbershop is seeking experienced barbers for booth rental opportunities in a new location. For more information, call Sue Johnson at 360-672-8622

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