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October 11 through October 17, 2018

VANYAandSONIAand and MASHA SPIKE October 12-27 by Christopher Durang directed by Edward Jordon Whidbey Island Center for the Arts 565 Camano Ave. Langley, WA 360.221.8268 // WICAonline.org More Local Events inside

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Homesteading on Whidbey By Helina Bailey THE NEIGHBORHOOD BUNNY LADY By now you all know the chicken ladies are out there in full force. What about the bunny ladies? Did you know Whidbey is home to them too? You might even have one in your neighborhood. I certainly do, and she goes by the name of Amy Kinkaid. Her property is right down the road from me, nestled into the back corner of a neighborhood on the north end of the island. If you are driving through the winding blocks of her quiet neighborhood, she is the hidden surprise at the end of a long driveway. Tall trees and her personal mini forest seclude her seven acre farm from the rest of the nearby homes. Her registered farm is a little gem, home to bunnies, chickens, quails, two pups, and a beautiful family. Amy, her husband, Andrew, and their 2-year-old son, Cole, run the farm. Amy knows all things bunnies, while her husband is quite the handy man. He runs around fixing things, making things, and finding ways to keep the farm running smoothly. He is humble about his innovative creations, but having raised bunnies and chickens myself, I feel he deserves a round of applause for his time-saving work. Most impressive of these functional innovations is the watering system he has set up for the bunnies.

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A fifty-gallon RV water tank has been repurposed to serve as the water tank for an automatic, low pressure watering system. With the use of quick-release connecters and a pump, Amy simply plugs the hose into the spigot then turns the knob to fill the tank. Watching Amy demonstrate how she provides water for dozens of bunnies in a few seconds was amazing. I thought back to my own experience of filling my rabbit water bottles multiple times a day, every day, for every single cage. My system was time consuming, annoying, and elementary in comparison. While this set up and many others are impressive, Amy’s knowledge and experience is equally so. She is a 4-H gal, educated about her pedigrees and she knows her bunnies. Her first introduction to raising the furry creatures started long ago. As a child, her family raised them on a large scale, having 300 to 400 at a time. Now she is passing on this legacy to her own son.

tions, so the parents, the grandparents, and the great-grandparents. Keep in mind these fluff balls reproduce like, well, rabbits. This means a breeder can create a pedigree in a relatively short time frame. Speaking of rabbit reproduction, what does she do with all those babies? In one season, my two does and one buck gave me eighteen kits. Seeing all her does had me wondering how many kits Amy gets at a time and what she does with them all. First, she has to separate the kits around eight weeks in order to wean them, preventing any males from impregnating their moms and reducing stress on the moms. After they have been weaned, they are available for purchase in breeding pairs or individually. Some of them are sold as pets while others go on to breed more meat rabbits. Of the kits not sold, Amy raises them to sell later or butcher for meat. Andrew, being a Jack-of-all-trades, works with some of the pelts from the meat rabbits. He has found age makes a huge difference when trying to tan the pelts. A few weeks can be the difference between a beautiful pelt and furless one. Andrew has discovered the fur of younger rabbits falls off when trying to process the hide, as opposed to older rabbits. An older rabbit, however, can be tough when it comes to cooking it. If you have never tried rabbit, it is a very lean white meat, similar to chicken. Amy uses it in place of chicken or pork in many recipes. My extended family has used it in Mexican dishes such as tamales and pozole. Because of this, I have been making spicy pozole with my meat rabbits. I also don’t know other ways to cook rabbit, but I will be experimenting with new recipes after talking to Amy. When I confessed my lack of experience in rabbit cuisine, Amy let me in on a little secret about the part of the rabbit I found really tough and nearly inedible - the strip of meat around the belly. She told me it makes the best jerky. I will now be saving all those little strips of meat for the dehydrator and whipping up a batch of savory jerky this winter. If you enjoyed reading about my local bunny lady, stay tuned for my next article. I very well may be showcasing a homesteading lady near you!

She doesn’t have hundreds of them, but one day she might. For now, she has her show bunnies, her soft and fluffy Mini-Rex pet bunnies, and her meat rabbits. The large and beautiful Cinnamons are pedigree. They participate in rabbit shows, always striving to win the Grand Champion title. Because they are show rabbits, Amy goes through great pains to maintain their nails and coats, ensuring they are always show ready. She explained to me “pedigree” refers to ancestry and lineage, rather than just being “pure bred.” To achieve this status, there must be records going back three genera-

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ON TRACK with Jim Freeman

Watching the two deer outside in the pouring rain looking for the apples gifted me by the cat shelter in Freeland, I thought I might offer them an additional treat today, in the form of iceberg lettuce. Apparently, these

deer are like me. Where’s the dressing? Play ball Excuse me if this reads as if I am not paying attention.

While typing on this borrowed laptop, I am watching Seahawks football on my new flat screen TV while listening to the Dodgers and Braves play baseball with the cheering fan sounds being released from somewhere inside my computer speakers. As I age, I am trying to re-acquaint myself with multitasking, a skill last seen in my youth. As a young college kid at a southern Baptist school in Missouri, I was able to cook 36 hamburgers at once while squirting mustard and ketchup on the 72 bun halves while looking out the order window at southern Baptist co-eds readying for my multi-tasked burgers, fries, and a soft drink. Not only that, but, while cooking, I often had to check the math addition of the items on each order because the high school kids we hired to take orders were unable to carry their one’s, let alone their two’s, three’s and fours. Think pre-computer and post-abacus. Task rockers Women have always been able to multitask. Ask any mother, grandmother, or operator of a day care center.

Throw in a flat screen TV airing a football game, a computer web site broadcasting a baseball game, and a borrowed lap-top, and what do you have?

Many of us remember Uecker from his multitude of appearances with Johnny Carson, as sportswriter George Owens on the sitcom Mr. Belvedere (1985-1990), his Miller Lite ads sitting in the last row of the stadium, and of his cameo appearance in the April 8, 1986 episode of Who’s The Boss? The Unnatural, superbly directed by Jim Drake, and also featuring Billy Martin and Steve Sax. If you do not know those names, you already left the ballpark. Uecker’s baseball stories and one-liners, all archived online by wonderful fans, are another great example of why I often embrace the world wide web. Feast on these Ueckerisms: The biggest thrill a ballplayer can have is when your son takes after you. That happened when my Bobby was in his championship Little League game. He really showed me something. Struck out three times. Made an error that lost the game. Parents were throwing things at our car and swearing at us as we drove off. Gosh, I was proud. I remember one time I’m batting against the Dodgers in Milwaukee. They lead, 2 - 1, it’s the bottom of the ninth, bases loaded, two out and the pitcher has a full count on me. I look over to the Dodger dugout and they’re all in street clothes.

If I know I am going to Wal-Mart any day of the week, my mind is spinning with lists of things not to buy.

I had a great shoe contract and glove contract with a company who paid me a lot of money never to be seen using their stuff.

Who needs to prepare to shop? I prepare not to shop.

I knew when my career was over. In 1965 my baseball card came out with no picture.

I have lists of non-purchase items.

Up and coming Thursday, Oct. 11, 5 p.m. at the Clinton library, Maribeth Crandell, author of “Flip Flop on the Appalachian Trail” shares highlights from her fabulous adventures.

Wednesday, Oct. 17, 10 a.m. at the Freeland library, Lisa Norman will guide you step-by-step in creating your own blog. Sunday, Oct. 21, starting at 1:30 p.m. at Bayview Hall, celebrate community icon Deb Sherod’s FUNdraiser for her recent health setbacks. Join family and friends for a hare-raising good time, with a variety of talented musicians and entertainers, games and family fun. Bring a picnic lunch and a beverage to add to this afternoon of inspiration.

Few kids sat near me at lunch because of Mom’s pickle sandwiches, but I never took it personally. This way I never had to share my Fritos. Mom only gave me six. My brother and sister got the other twelve.

Chortles from Greenbank The little woman packed my bags. As I walked out the front door, she screamed, “I wish you a slow and painful death, you jerk!”

God must have known women would be multitasking, both in and out of the cave, while the man of the cave was off getting supper.

I replied, “Oh, so now you want me to stay?”

So, why not create man to focus on that one very important job until several thousand years later when man was smart enough to invent microwaves and frozen pizza to introduce multitasking.

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With 84 years of laughing under his belt, “Mr. Baseball” has been the Brew Crew’s broadcaster since 1971.

When I played baseball I got death threats all the time–from my mother.

We would walk around the room to drop our colorful greetings to each and every kid, even if we would not sit next to them at lunch.

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Bob Uecker Last week’s National League baseball playoff between the Milwaukee Brewers (the former Seattle Pilots) and Colorado Rockies reminded me how absolutely wonderful it is to hear a radio broadcast by Milwaukee’s announcer Bob Uecker.

If I know someone is coming over at 2 p.m., my entire morning is shot getting ready.

Remember back when elementary school teachers forced us to drop Valentine cards in those big envelopes Scotch taped to the side of our desks?

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Congratulations.

The highlight of my baseball career came in Philadelphia’s Connie Mack Stadium when I saw a fan fall out of the upper deck. When he got up and walked away, the crowd booed.

I remember one 4th grade when I got a lot of likes, even though they were more like forced likes.

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The end of this paragraph.

Buddha is reported to have said “the expectation of interruption is.” In other words, if you expect to be interrupted, you are already there.

Kinda like caller ID. One can look down at the ringing phone, see the caller info, and then not pick up the phone when it is your sister calling to say she has more likes on her recent Facebook post than you do.

OCTOBER 11 - OCTOBER 17, 2018

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Whidbey Weekly LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

390 NE MIDWAY BLVD | PO BOX 1098 | OAK HARBOR, WASHINGTON 98277 Publisher & Editor.......................................................... Eric Marshall Marketing Representatives................Penny Hill, Roosevelt Rumble Graphic Design............................................................. Teresa Besaw Production Manager......................................................TJ Pierzchala Circulation Manager.................................................... Noah Marshall

Contributing Writers Jim Freeman Wesley Hallock Kae Harris Tracy Loescher Kathy Reed Carey Ross

Volume 10, Issue 41 | © MMXVIII Whidbey Weekly PUBLISHED and distributed every week. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The Whidbey Weekly cannot be held responsible for the quality of goods or services supplied by advertisers in this publication. Articles, unless otherwise stated, are by contribution and therefore the Whidbey Weekly is not in a position to validate any comments, recommendations or suggestions made in these articles. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. DEADLINES: The Whidbey Weekly is a submission based editorial with contributing writers. Please feel free to submit any information (please limit to 200 words) that you would like to share with the Whidbey Weekly. You may submit by email to editor@whidbeyweekly.com, by fax to (360)682-2344 or by postal mail to PO Box 1098, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date. For more information, please visit www.whidbeyweekly.com.

Dog Parade & Costume Contest Saturday, October 20 10am-2pm • Free Entry!

Mutt Strut registration begins at 11am

Bayview Cash Store • 5603 Bayview Road • Langley Rain or Shine! Event moves next door to Bayview Hall if necessary

PRIZES FOR: best dog costume best celebrity dog best trick best owner/dog costume combo surprise categories!

Also Featuring (10 am – 12 noon) Dog wellness, agility and assistance demonstrations Halloween games for kids and kids at heart Doughnut decorating fun!

I bought my sweet wife a hamster skin coat last week. When we went to the fair last night in Puyallup, it took me almost three hours to get her off the Ferris wheel. To read past columns of On Track in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

More information: www.goosefoot.org • 360-321-4145

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Bits & Pieces Editor,

Letters to the Editor Editor, Community Spirit and Volunteerism are Alive and Well! Last week our community came together to rescue a Homoja (aka Quonset) Hut from potential demolition. Businesses pitched in money and services. Community leaders stepped up. Volunteers cleared brush, hauled trash, moved fences and much more. All to ensure the preservation of a World War II icon. While research on the hut has been in progress for some time, the planning and execution of the move was accomplished in near record time, according to Jim Woessner, who has extensive experience moving buildings. This happened first and foremost because Chris Anderson of Century 21 Trophy saw the value of donating the hut. Then businesses, including Whidbey Island/Heritage Bank, CPI Plumbing of Mount Vernon, Sears Home Store, Jet City Rentals, Reed’s Construction, Custom Logging, and others who I have probably missed, pitched in to help with money, services, equipment or labor. Numerous individuals have donated money to the cause. Dr. Wayne Tilson offered space on his land to park the hut. Nickel Bros. Inc., the professional building movers, were imaginative and adaptable in developing and executing the move plan. Oak Harbor city councilman, Jim Woessner, attended kindergarten in a converted Homoja Hut. He jumped in with his extensive experience moving buildings to play a key role in making the move happen. Former city councilwoman and State Representative Sue Karahalios provided valuable ideas, advice and encouragement. PBY-Naval Air Museum volunteers devoted over 200 hours to clearing dense blackberry bushes that nearly covered the hut and to removing years of trash and debris that had accumulated inside. They removed some trees and cleared barbed wire and electrical fences along the move route. Since the effort to save the hut went public in early August, it has been remarkable how many people have stepped forward with their experiences living in Homoja Huts or going to school in converted huts. We are looking forward to talking to more people in the community who went to school, taught or lived in Homoja Huts. The hut can become a historical exhibit that helps connect the life stories of hundreds, if not thousands, of people in our community. It can be a rich time capsule for present and future generations to examine. Next, we must continue raising funds, about $12,000, to cover the cost of moving and securing the hut. Then the serious preservation work will begin. We invite everyone in the community who would like to help or contribute information, especially those whose paths went through a Homoja Hut, to contact us at 360-240-9500 or P.O. Box 941, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Donations may be made to this address or through our Facebook page or website at www.pbymf.org. Again, thanks to all who helped Save the Hut! Wil Shellenberger President, PBY-Naval Air Museum Oak Harbor, Wash.

Not to shock you, but, the oil companies are lying. 1631 is not a tax. It is a fee placed on oil companies and utilities that burn fossil fuels. It will be their decision to to pass those costs on to the consumer. The money collected must go to addressing the problem. It will be applied three ways: 1) 70-percent for seeding local solutions to reduce carbon pollution and create 40,000 living wage jobs. 2) 25-percent to protecting Washington’s resources: forests, freshwater and our infrastructure, made vulnerable by increasing storm intensity, sea level rise, droughts, flooding, etc. 3) 5-percent to support vulnerable communities: low income, those living in the most dangerous places, even the fossil fuel workers who will be displaced and need retraining or chose early retirement. An independent study demonstrates that if fees are passed on, gasoline might increase 10-14 cents, at most. An average person’s monthly bills would rise $10. The Seattle Times recognizes 1631’s importance: “This makes Washington a beacon in the dark age of Trump, with a climate-change-denying federal government… If it succeeds, I-1631 could inspire other states. Failure leaves us with a status quo that is unsustainable.” Oil companies have already spent $20 million to delude the public and protect their profits. 1631 puts people before profits. We invite scrutiny. Ballotpedia.com has done a thorough, balanced analysis of 1631. On Whidbey, local leaders are engaged in seeking endorsements from towns and businesses, including WhidbeyHealth Medical Center. The many threats to public health which Carbon Chaos poses are real. These threats to our physical and emotional well-being are being played out right now across the globe. The American Public Health Association recognizes this. Georges Benjamin, executive director has said, “If anyone doesn’t think this is a severe problem, they are fooling themselves.” Truly, “There is no more time for ‘No,’” said a woman testifying in favor of Mercer Island’s endorsement of I-1631. We are going to win this. Please vote Yes! on 1631! Gary Piazzon Coupeville, WA

Editor, Ballots will be in the mail soon for most of us. For those who are deployed, ballots already have been sent. I hope everyone reading this will vote to re-elect Rick Hannold as Island County’s District 3 Commissioner. Here’s why: His Seattle-based opposition is throwing more than $85,000 into the race. Don’t let outside groups and outside money hijack our election! Their candidate is Seattle ‘transplant’ Janet St. Clair, whose political committee filed its paperwork when she had lived here for less than 24 months. Do they think we’re stupid? ‘Seattle St. Clair’ was policy chair for Seattle’s 36th District Democrats. Do you think Seattle Democrats support our Navy? Naval Air Station Whidbey? Give me a break! Retired Navy Chief Petty Officer Rick Hannold is our District 3 Commissioner. Here in Island County for 32 years and counting. He has done a great job and he deserves re-election. He understands the challenges our Navy community and our families face. He will not betray the Navy and our Navy community. So, when you get all those super-slick brochures from Seattle in the next few weeks, don’t forget where they’re coming from. I write this in memory of my uncle, Richard James Dorgan, killed in action in France, November, 1944. If he were still alive he would not betray our Navy and neither should any of us. Sue Robinson Camano Island, Wash.

Rick Hannold falsely takes personal credit for Barnum Point land acquisitions, saving Island Transit, and protecting the environment. In truth, he opposes further public open space acquisitions, hamstrings the popular Conservation Futures Fund, approved Clean Water Act violations, and supports draining wetlands and unchecked clear-cuts. Most egregious is Hannold’s false claim that he led the ban on finfish net pens in Island County. Nothing could be further from the truth. The heavy lifting for this monumental accomplishment took place during my tenure as county commissioner, well before Mr. Hannold took office. His contribution is his signature on the final document once the arduous state agency process was complete. What he can take credit for are the back room amendments he approved allowing our public beaches to be taken over by commercial shellfish operations, and for diminishing marine protections. State law requires the “highest and best use” of public resources, but it also requires “no net loss of ecosystem services.” Over 330 public comments were submitted during the Shoreline Master Plan update. No one supported finfish net pens. While these comments were invaluable, the linchpin was the voluminous peer reviewed science submitted by Steve Erickson of Whidbey Environment Action Network, demonstrating that the state was not using “best available science” in its interpretation of net loss. He showed that finfish net pens are an environmental and wild fish disaster due to viruses, sea lice, escapement, antibiotics, dyed food, and sea floor dead zones. We need county commissioners who protect the interests of the whole, offer creative and effective solutions, are not vindictive, and who do not take credit for other peoples’ good work. We need Janet St. Clair.

Angie Homola Island County Commissioner 2009-2012

Newest State Ferry Begins Carrying Customers Suquamish, the last of four new ferries, debuts on Mukilteo/Clinton run Washington State Ferries began to carry passengers aboard the newest state ferry, Suquamish, with the 12:30pm sailing from Clinton last Thursday. The Suquamish is the fourth, and last funded, Olympic Class ferry. The new ferry’s name means “people of the clear salt water” in Southern Coast Salish Lushootseed language. While Suquamish is the last currently funded new ferry, Washington State Ferries is developing a long range plan to address future vessel needs. The plan will be delivered to the legislature in January. “The plan recommends building new vessels to replace the oldest ferries in the fleet,” said WSF head Amy Scarton. “Just to maintain current service levels, 13 of our oldest ferries will need to be replaced by 2040, and we’re recommending building 16 new vessels in total to continue to provide reliable service.” The ferry will operate on the Mukilteo/Clinton route during the busy summer season and will also serve as a maintenance relief vessel, filling in when other vessels are unavailable on other routes. Suquamish facts: ·144 vehicle and 1,500 passenger capacity. ·$122 million to construct, in addition to equipment provided by Washington State Ferries. ·Constructed by ship builder Vigor in Seattle.

Editor,

·Cleanest vessel in the fleet. Meets the Environmental Protection Agency’s Tier 4 emission standards.

We expect elected officials to be truthful and to exercise a strong work ethic guided by integrity and honesty. Taking credit for the work of others is deceitful.

Washington State Ferries, a division of the Washington State Department of Transportation, is the largest ferry system in the U.S. and safely and efficiently carries 25 million people

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED a year through some of the most majestic scenery in the world. For breaking news and the latest information, follow WSF on Twitter (twitter.com/wsferries). [Submitted by Broch Bender, WSDOT]

Avian Evolution: How Birds Got to be Birds Whidbey Audubon Society begins a new year of programs by going back in time, to when dinosaurs roamed the earth and nature began to experiment with a new approach to flight, resulting in birds. Thursday, Oct. 11, nature author and student of paleontology, Constance Sidles, tells about exciting new fossils of extraordinary detail being found in northeast China, dating back to the time when dinosaurs began to evolve into birds. The free program is in the Coupeville Recreation Hall at 901 NW Alexander Street. Doors open at 7:00pm for socializing and a short business meeting. The program begins at 7:30pm and the public is welcome. Constance Sidles is a master birder, member of Seattle Audubon’s Conservation Committee, chair of Audubon’s Publications Committee and author of five books about birds and nature. She got her degree in Egyptology from the University of Chicago and still reads the occasional hieroglyphic, but has spent her professional career in publishing. She is founder and president of Constancy Press LLC, a small publishing house specializing in nature books. [Submitted by Susan Prescott, Whidbey Audubon Publicity Chair]

Herstory: Stories From the Lives of Old Lesbians What was it like to be a lesbian in a time when being “out” presented real risks of violence, arrest, confinement in a mental institution, or loss of a job and standing in the community? How did lesbians define themselves when there were no websites, TV shows, magazines, or books that represented their lives in a realistic way, or advocated for them? The Old Lesbian Oral Herstory Project has been collecting stories to document this untold legacy, with more than 600 individual interviews. Some of these stories are harrowing, some sad, some hilariously funny, but all are packed with emotion. Sunday, Oct. 28, from 3:00 to 5:00pm at Whidbey Island Center for the Arts in Langley, the women’s stories will be presented through readings from the original interviews, supplemented with a DVD that documents additional stories and helps explain how the stories were collected. Major General Trish Rose, USAF (Ret.), the first openly lesbian officer to achieve two-star rank, will introduce the presentation, and readings will feature Whidbey Island residents Judy Lynn, Rose Hughes, Mully Mullally, Dr. Jo Moccia, and Marsha Morgan. All are welcome. A donation of $10-$20 will be requested to help cover costs and support the Old Lesbian Oral Herstory Project. Sponsored by PSARA (Puget Sound Advocates for Retirement Action) Education Fund. Co-sponsored by Whidbey Giving Circle, Whidbey Institute, Hedgebrook, Puget Sound Old Lesbians Organizing for Change, Washington State Labor Council, Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Whidbey Island. For more information, contact Robby Stern, PSARA Education Fund President, psaraedfund@psara.org, 206-391-6998. PSARA Education Fund, 321 16th Avenue S, Seattle WA 98144. [Submitted by Robby Stern, PSARA]

Skagit Valley College Offers Workshops to Help Students Complete Financial Aid Paperwork Skagit Valley College (SVC) is pleased to announce its participation again this year in the “College Goal Washington” event on Saturday, Oct. 13 from 9:00am to noon at SVC’s Mount Vernon and Whidbey Island campuses. College Goal Washington helps students and families complete the FAFSA or WASFA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid/Washing-

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www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OWNED ton Application for State Financial Aid), which are the applications needed to apply for financial assistance for post-secondary education. Students from SVC, as well as high school students and their families, are welcome to attend. The event is being held in October as FAFSA/WASFA applications are available now. Attendees will receive assistance in filling out FAFSA/WASFA forms from trained volunteers. In addition, financial aid experts will be onsite to answer questions about how to pay for college, how to access financial aid, and to work individually with students on a case-bycase basis. Students who are ineligible to file the FAFSA may be eligible to file the Washington Application for State Financial Aid (WASFA) and access the State Need Grant, helping them pay for college. Trained volunteers and interpreters will be available to work with students and families to fill out the WASFA. For more information about the event, contact Rose Hill, Outreach Navigator, 360-416-7795 or rose.hill@skagit.edu [Submitted by Arden Ainley, Chief Public Information Officer SVC]

Photographer Captures a Majestic Setting on South Whidbey

Julie Boyd’s scenic South Whidbey image was picked as the Land Trust’s 2019 calendar cover photo

Photographers call it the golden hour – the hour before sunset or after sunrise when the sun is low in the sky and the soft natural light often leads to warmer, more magical images. Julie Boyd recognized the sort of effect these conditions were having on a south Whidbey Island landscape when she looked across Useless Bay on a cold late afternoon last January. She raised her camera and took pictures of Sunlight Beach with Double Bluff and the snow-capped Olympic Mountains in the background. “The color tones were rich and the setting breathtaking,” Boyd recalled. “It is always my goal to capture the moment and try and create an emotional response of being at the location.” The beautiful image was one of more than 300 photos submitted by 75 photographers who participated in the Whidbey Camano Land Trust’s fifth annual outdoor photo contest. Boyd’s shot was chosen for the cover of the Land Trust’s 2019 Calendar. Boyd, who lives on South Whidbey with her husband, has been involved with photography for two decades. She’s studied the craft more seriously during the past three years, learning from some internationally acclaimed photographers. She recently went on a two-week photo tour in Scotland. “I shoot photography all the time,” Boyd said. “I think in colors, shapes, and textures. Everywhere I look, I see beauty and lighting on subjects. Photography brings me to a place of peace in a busy life.” The photo contest is intended to engage photographers to help celebrate the beauty and nature of our scenic islands and to raise awareness of the Land Trust’s mission. Twenty-five images were selected for the Land Trust’s 2019 calendar, ranging from Bruiser the elk to a scenic lavender field. Each photographer whose work is selected receives a complimentary calendar. Calendars are being sold at participating retail outlets in Island County. That list may be viewed on the Land Trust’s website (www.wclt. org). The Whidbey Camano Land Trust is a nonprofit nature conservation organization that actively involves the community in protecting, restoring, and appreciating the important natu-

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ral habitats and resource lands that support the diversity of life on our islands and in the waters of Puget Sound. For more information, visit www.wclt.org, email info@wclt.org, or call 360-222-3310. [Submitted by Ron Newberry, Communications Manager, WCLT]

Whidbey Weavers offer Uncommon Threads for Holiday Shopping Imagine a rainbow of color, texture and creativity. This is the Whidbey Weavers Guild 15th Annual Uncommon Threads Sale, to be held the first weekend in November.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month WhidbeyHealth now has world-class 3D mammography with its brand new Mammomat Revelation. With this new mammography platform, the very earliest detection of breast cancer is achievable, leaving breast cancer no place to hide. Call today!

The Whidbey Weavers Guild is a community of fiber artists with roots back to the mid 1960s, when a couple of local artists offered weaving demonstrations at the Coupeville Arts and Crafts Festival. By 1969, a small group of weavers was meeting monthly at a member’s home. As more weavers joined the group, they developed programs, and by 1987 the Guild had grown to 30 members. Today, the Whidbey Weavers Guild has over 160 members ranging from beginner to production weavers and fiber artists - some of whom are nationally recognized artists and teachers - as well as members who raise sheep, alpaca, goats, llamas and dogs for fiber production. Membership extends beyond Whidbey throughout Puget Sound, several other states and Canada. Monthly programs bring in local and national fiber artists for presentations and workshops. Scholarships and study groups support member fiber arts education. Members are active in the community with displays and demonstrations in schools, shops, libraries, festivals and at the Island County Fair. Each April the Guild hosts a two-day group Spin-In with teaching sessions and vendors for a large audience drawn from neighboring states and Canada. November 2 and 3, the 15th Annual Uncommon Threads Sale is a great opportunity to do early holiday shopping and purchase locally hand-crafted products made by Guild members. You will find a wide range of woven, knitted, crocheted, felted and spun hand-crafted clothing and home accessories. Fiber arts of all kinds are represented, offering hand-spun yarn, dyed spinning fibers, rugs, braided or felted jewelry, baskets, clothing and table linens. A wide range of pricing ensures something special for every budget.

3D mammography screening is available at: WhidbeyHealth Medical Center 101 N. Main St., Coupeville No provider order is needed for a screening mammogram. Call 360.678.7607 to schedule. www.whidbeyhealth.org

MCINTYRE HALL PRESENTS

And don’t forget to purchase raffle tickets to win some wonderful fiber arts. The Uncommon Threads Sale will be held Friday, Nov. 2, from 10:00am to 7:00pm and Saturday, Nov. 3, from 10:00am to 3:00pm at the The Nordic Hall, 63 Jacobs Road, Coupeville. This a new location from previous years. You can learn more about the Whidbey Weavers Guild at www.whidbeyweaversguild.org [Submitted by Lynn Sheffield, Olympic Mist Farm Alpacas]

Soroptimist International of South Whidbey Seeking Award Applicants The Soroptimist International of South Whidbey Island are seeking applicants for their “Live Your Dream Education and Training Award.” This $1500 award will be granted to a woman, head of household, who is working to better her life through additional education and skills training. The selected recipient has the potential to receive up to $16,000 in additional national Soroptimist awards. These funds are to offset tuition costs, to payoff student loans, and/or additional expenses such as reliable childcare. This award is to assist the recipient in focusing on reaching her dreams. Apply online at https://bit.ly/LYDA-award  Application Deadline: Nov. 1, 2018 Contact: Nancy Thompson/Live Your Dream Chair at nancy@dancingfishvineyards.com [Submitted by Marlane Harrington, Soroptimist International of South Whidbey]

LOCARNO MEXICAN FOLK I CUBAN SON I LATIN SOUL

Friday, October 19 7:30pm An eclectic fusion of Latin American styles. LOCARNO is the Latin project of Tom Landa, JUNO Award winning musician and Paperboys founder. “Locarno’s approach is so genuine and so welcome for audiences who enjoy great song writing, a respect for tradition, a searching musical curiosity, and virtuoso performance skills. Their compelling blend of Mexican, Cuban, and North American popular music delivered with exuerant energy is a winning combination.” ~ Michael Juk - CBC

360.416.7727 mcintyrehall.org

On the Mount Vernon Campus of Skagit Valley College

2 5 0 1 E Co l l e g e Way, M o u nt Ve r n o n

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What’s Going On All entries are listed chronologically, unless there are multiple entries for the same venue or are connected to a specific organization (such as Sno-Isle Libraries) in which case all entries for that venue or organization are listed collectively in chronological order under one heading.

Lions Club Blood Drive Thursday, October 11, 11:00am-5:00pm Coupeville United Methodist Church, 608 N Main St. Sponsored by the Coupeville Lions Club. One pint of blood can save three lives and we have helped save hundreds of lives in our community hospitals throughout Western Washington. To donate, just drop in or you may schedule an appointment at DonorSched@ psbc.org. For more information, call Paddy Roberts at 360-632-5204 or 360-678-4105.

Haunted Fort Friday, October 26, 6:30pm-10:00pm Saturday, October 27, 6:30pm-10:00pm Fort Casey State Park, Coupeville Explore the scary labyrinth of the fort in this special haunted event. For smaller kids there is trick or treat lane, a bounce house, ghost stories, and games. Tickets are $8 per person or $30 for a family up to six people. A Discover Pass is required. Proceeds go to restoration of the Admiralty Head Lighthouse at Ft. Casey State Park.

Italia! Concert Friday, October 26, 7:00pm Sunday, October 28, 3:00pm Trinity Lutheran Church, Freeland

Representatives from Seattle’s Private Reserve will be on site with product displays and information. Island Herb is located at 5565 Vanbarr Pl, Unit F. For more information, call 360-3310140 or visit whidbeyislandherb.com

Join the Whidbey Island Orchestra for a special concert filled with the romantic sounds of cherished Italian composers, Verdi, Respighi, Curci and more. Featuring nationally acclaimed violin soloist Sherry Kloss performing the West Coast Premiere of Alberto Curci’s Concerto Romantico. Dr. Cynthia Morrow, Conductor. Admission is free (although donations are accepted and greatly appreciated) followed by a reception with orchestra & refreshments. For more information, cnewman@whidbey.com

Comedy Night

Halloween Pancake Breakfast

Friday, October 12, 8:00pm-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville

Saturday, October 27, 9:00am-11:00am Island Senior Resources, Langley Suggested Donation: $7

Island Herb Vendor Day Friday, October 12, 3:00pm-6:00pm Island Herb, Freeland

No cover. For more information, call 360-6825747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

Island Herb Vendor Day Friday, October 19, 2:00pm-5:00pm Island Herb, Freeland Representatives from Clandestine Gardens will be on site with product displays and information. Island Herb is located at 5565 Vanbarr Pl, Unit F. For more information, call (360) 331-0140 or visit whidbeyislandherb.com

Locarno Friday, October 19, 7:30pm McIntyre Hall, Mount Vernon Locarno is the Latin project of JUNO Award winning musician, Tom Landa. Like him, the music is equal parts Mexican and Canadian. Tom was born and raised in Mexico City, and moved to Canada in his teens. In the mid 1990s he formed the folk roots band, The Paperboys, who have been touring world-wide for over 20 years. For tickets and more information, call 360-416-7727 or visit www. mcintyrehall.org

13th Annual Mutt Strut Saturday, October 20, 10:00am-2:00pm Bayview Cash Store, 5603 Bayview Road, Langley Prizes for: best dog costume, best celebrity dog, best trick, best owner/dog costume combo. Also featuring dog wellness, agility and assistance demonstrations, halloween games and donut decorating fun. Sponsored by Goosefoot. More information at www. goosefoot.org

South Whidbey Ryther Mardi Unit Dinner and Auction Saturday, October 20, 5:00pm Holmes Harbor Rod and Gun Club, Langley $35 per person Contact Sara Wilcox for tickets or information at saraw@whidbey.com or 360-331-7103.

Halloween Howl Friday, October 26, 3:30pm-6:30pm Board the bus for a free twilight tour to Deception Pass State Park with Native American storyteller Lou Labombard, Sno-Isle librarian Jessica Aws and others sharing tales in a shelter by the fire. Dress in costume and bring a flashlight. Those under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. To RSVP call 360-678-9536 or email: Travel@IslandTransit.org

Enjoy pancakes, scrambled eggs, sausage links, fresh fruit, juice, milk, coffee or tea. Gluten free links and pancakes available too. Try your luck to win 1 of 3 raffle baskets, tickets $2 each. For more information, call 360-321-1600 or 360-678-3373. Island Senior Resources is located at 14594 SR 525.

Upcoming Sno-Isle Library Events See schedule below Cost: Free Lit for Fun Book Group Thursday, October 11, 9:00am-11:00am Freeland Library Join us for a discussion of Louise Penny’s “Still Life,” which introduces us to Inspector Gamache, who commands his forces with integrity and quiet courage in this traditional mystery. For adults. Flip Flop on the Appalachian Trail A Journey with Maribeth Crandell Thursday, October 11, 5:00pm-6:00pm Clinton Community Hall, 6411 S. Central Ave. Maribeth Crandell, author of “Flip Flop on the Appalachian Trail” had wanted to hike the trail since she was a kid. She waited almost four decades to do it. Hear the story of her journey. Hike along with her for over 2,000 miles through snow storms, heat waves, wildlife encounters, and the scariest animal of all, her fellow man. Future of the Korean Peninsula Thursday, October 11, 6:30pm-8:00pm Oak Harbor Library Dr. Stephen (Steve) Schwalbe, professor at Columbia College and American Public University, presents this free community lecture on the future of the Korean Peninsula. Dr. Schwalbe served as a Defense Attaché in South Korea for two years as well as an intelligence officer in the Combined Forces Command headquartered in Seoul, Korea, for one year. Friday Fun with SAM (Science, Art, and Music) Fridays, October 12, 19, 26, 10:00am Freeland Library Join us on the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Fridays of each month as we explore stories through the lens of science, art, and music. For toddlers and preschoolers.

Journey to a Fabled Earth: The Path of Freelance Fantasy Illustration Saturday, October 13, 2:00pm-3:30pm Coupeville Library

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED For more information, contact Ann at (425) 263-2704, email healingwhidbey.com, or visit the International Association of Healing Rooms at healingrooms.com.

Concordia Lutheran Church Sunday service, 9:30am Bible Study & Sunday School, 10:45am 590 N. Oak Harbor Street For more information, visit www.concordia oakharbor.org or call (360) 675-2548.

Teaching Through God’s Word Sundays, 9:00am & 11:00am Calvary Chapel, 3821 French Road, Clinton

What is it like to be a freelance illustrator? Join illustrator and author Emily Fiegenschuh for a presentation about her path to becoming a working artist in the fantasy genre. All ages welcome!

For more information, visit ccwhidbey.com.

A Conversation with Mandy Manning, National Teacher of the Year Monday, October 15, 7:00pm-8:30pm South Whidbey High School

All are welcome. Values-based children’s religious exploration classes and childcare will be provided. Visit www.uucwi.org for more information. The Unitarian Universalist Congregation building is located at 20103 Highway 525, two miles north of Freeland.

Come be inspired by this teacher from the Joel E. Ferris High School in Spokane. National Teacher of the Year, Mandy Manning, helps refugee and immigrant students process trauma, celebrate their culture and learn about their new community. 3rd Tuesday Book Group Tuesday, October 16, 9:30am-11:00am Freeland Library Join us for a great book discussion of Tayari Jones’ “American Marriage.” FUNdamentals of Collage Wednesdays, October 17, 24, 2:00pm-4:00pm Freeland Library Get your feet wet in this fun and fast-paced collage workshop. This two-session class is taught by Wendy Lee Lynds. Please register and plan to attend both sessions. Funded by Friends of the Freeland Library. South Whidbey at Home Book Group Thursday, October 18, 3:00pm Freeland Library Join us for a great book discussion of Dave Eggers’ “The Circle.” You don’t need to be a member of South Whidbey at Home to attend - everyone is welcome! Demystifying Hospice: Inside the Stories of Patients and Caregivers Thursday, October 18, 3:00pm-4:00pm Oak Harbor Library Author Karen J. Clayton will talk about her writing journey and share stories and ideas from her new book, “Demystifying Hospice,” published by Rowman and Littlefield. Book sales and signing follow presentation.

Religious Services South Whidbey Community Church

Unitarian Universalist Sunday Service Sundays, 10:00am Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland

Unity of Whidbey Sundays, 10:00am 5671 Crawford Road, Langley If you’re one of the “spiritual but not religious” people who questions your childhood faith or is looking for something more, Unity of Whidbey may feel like a homecoming. Visit our website: unityofwhidbey.org

Whidbey Quakers Sundays, 4:00pm-5:00pm Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland Whidbey Islands Friends Meeting (also known as Quakers) meet in silent worship and community, with occasional spoken messages, every Sunday at the Unitarian Universalist building. For more information, contact Tom Ewell at tewell@whidbey.com or go to www. whidbeyquakers.org.

First Church of Christ, Scientist Worship, 10:00am Sunday School to age 20, 10:00am Wednesday Testimony Meeting, 2:30pm Christian Science Reading Room Tuesday & Friday, 11:00am-3:00pm Wednesday 3:30pm-5:30pm The church and Reading Room are located at 721 SW 20th Court at Scenic Heights Street, Oak Harbor. Call 360-675-0621 or visit christianscience.com Services and Sunday School are also held at 10:30am on South Whidbey at 15910 Highway 525, just north of Bayview and across from Useless Bay Road; testimony meetings are held the first Wednesday of each month at 7:30pm.

Galleries & Art Shows

Sundays, 9:00am-9:45am Adult Bible Study 10:00am-11:00am Worship Deer Lagoon Grange, 5142 Bayview Rd, Langley

Featured Artist: Susan Bradley

October 14, Message: “The Last Words of David”

There will be light snacks and beverages. Other Artworks Gallery artists will be on hand to greet visitors during the reception. Bradley works in colored pencils and pen-and-ink in the pointillism style. Susan says, “I am a person who loves the beauty of the outdoors, and animals.” She certainly brings attention to that beauty through her art.

Pastor Darrell Wenzek. Worship is followed by a potluck lunch and great fellowship. For more information, call 360-221-1220.

Prayer Group Every Tuesday, 4:00pm-5:30pm St. Hubert Catholic Church, Langley Charismatic Prayer and Praise group. Everyone welcome. For more information, call Bill at 360-222-4080 or email Sobico@comcast.net.

Filipino Christian Fellowship Sundays, 2:00pm Meets at Church on the Rock, 1780 SE 4th Ave., Oak Harbor. www.ohcfellowship.com

Healing Rooms Every Thursday, 6:30pm-8:30pm 5200 Honeymoon Bay Road, Freeland The Healing Rooms are open to anyone desiring personal prayer for physical, emotional, or spiritual needs. There is a team of Christians from several local churches that are dedicated to praying for healing the sick in our community. All ministry is private, confidential, and free. Teams are available to pray for individuals who drop by on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Reception: Saturday, October 13, 2:00pm-5:00pm Artworks Gallery, Greenbank Farm

“The Art of Creating” Opening Reception: Saturday, October 13, 2:00pm-5:00pm Exhibit will continue through October 31 Raven Rocks Gallery, Greenbank The gallery will be featuring artists demonstrating their personal creative efforts on a daily basis. Wool spinning, pen and ink drawing, rock writing, art card assemblage, tapestry weaving, wool felting and carding, free form watercolor and much more.

Cascade Journey: New Watercolor Exhibit Exhibit continues through October UUCWI Art Gallery, 20103 State Route 525, Freeland An exhibition of watercolor paintings inspired by a special road trip will be showcased in the WHAT'S GOING ON

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Veterans Day parade p. 10 OCTOBER 11 - OCTOBER 17, 2018

Zachary Schneider Photo Courtesy of Whidbey Island Center for the Arts A rich cast of characters and a script that is sure to garner laughs makes the latest production by Whidbey Island Center for the Arts a must-see. “Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike” opens Friday at the Langley theater. Pictured from left are James Hinkley as Vanya, Nicole Parnell as Nina and Suzi Dixon as Sonia.

Laugh along with “Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike” By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly

mix.”

Whidbey Island Center for the Arts’ latest production is sure to tickle a few funny bones as it presents the Tony Award-winning comedy by Christopher Durang, “Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike,” opening Friday in Langley and running through Oct. 27.

As funny as it sounds, pulling off a comedy is hard work – sometimes even harder than a dramatic piece.

Directed by Edward Jordan (an actor, producer, screenwriter, author and playwright whose musical comedy “Bollywood and Vine” kicks off a pre-Broadway tour next summer), the play shares the story of middle-aged siblings Vanya and Sonia, who like to bicker and complain about their lives at their family’s Pennsylvania farmhouse, paid for by their movie-star sister, Masha. “On one madcap weekend, Masha breezes in with her beefcakey boy toy, Spike, to bitch about her own empty life,” described Jordan. “But Masha is no gentle breeze. She’s a force of nature who creates hilarious mayhem everywhere she goes so everyone better duck for cover - especially when she announces that she’s selling the farmhouse out from under Vanya and Sonia. “Add a wise-cracking housekeeper who fancies herself a psychic and a young, aspiring actress who may have designs on Masha’s boy toy, and you have Christopher Durang’s irresistible remix of Anton Chekhov’s ‘Uncle Vanya’ and ‘The Seagull’ with special appearances by Snow White, Grumpy, Prince Charming and Dame Maggie Smith,” he continued. “Their psychic housekeeper tries portents and omens and voodoo to stave off what she foresees as imminent disaster should Masha follow through on her plans to sell the house Vanya and Sonia are living in,” said Teresa McElhinny, who plays said housekeeper, Cassandra. “Exuberant aspiring actress Nina, attracted to Spike, adds more mayhem to the

“Making theater of any sort is hard, but comedy presents some unique challenges,” said Jordan. “We all know people who seem to have no sense of humor at all. In a comedy, how do you explain ‘funny’ to someone? You either get the joke or you don’t.” “I think it is harder to do a comedy, because even under the obvious comedy that has to deliver, there’s also a lot of deeper comedy that can be mined,” said Kyle Collins, who plays Spike. “It’s also what makes comedies so much fun.”

Zachary Schneider Photo Courtesy of Whidbey Island Center for the Arts Will Vanya and Sonia be tossed out of their family home by their movie-star sister, Masha? That is the question at the center of the story and the laughs in the comedy “Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike,” opening Friday at Whidbey Island Center for the Arts in Langley. Pictured from left are Suzi Dixon as Sonia, James Hinkley as Vanya and Nancy Nolan as Masha.

“Comedic timing is a skill one has to hone,” said McElhinny. “Deliver a funny line too soon or too late, and it loses its punch. Also, there are so many different brands of humor slapstick, dry wit, satire - and not everyone laughs at the same stuff.”

ground drop into our world,” Duncan continued. “His ability to work with the playwright’s blueprint and build the world of the play as he works with actors and designers is a joy to watch. In the end, he was right; he has changed my mind on this play, it’s heartbreakingly funny and poignant.”

Just as location is key in real estate, it’s the material that matters in theater. If the script doesn’t work, it’s harder for the director and the actors to connect to the material, and therefore the audience.

Cast members agree, saying there is a ring of truth about the characters that audiences will appreciate.

In fact, WICA Artistic Director, Deana Duncan, had a completely different script in mind when she approached Jordan about directing. “I had read a new spoof of a Chekov that I liked and I pitched it to Edward, who kindly told me he thought that the Christopher Durang script “Vanya, Sonia, and Masha, and Spike” was a better choice,” she said, adding that she had full confidence in Jordan’s abilities. “I wasn’t sure I agreed, but I knew HE was a good enough reason to say yes. “It’s rare to have someone of Edward’s training and back-

“I love how the story flows so seamlessly from the absurd to the tragic and back again without missing a beat, sort of the way most people’s lives do.” said James Hinkley, who plays Vanya. “[Audiences] are likely to see something of themselves in one or more of these characters.” “It’s a comedy, yet it also deals with some very real and relevant issues,” said Collins. “Yes, yes!” agreed Suzi Dixon, who plays Sonia. “Very annoying family issues are so true and so funny.”

See WICA continued on page 10

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Life Tributes

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phy. When the sun was shining, Wayne and Carley would drive all over the countryside, always stopping to take beautiful pictures. Their life was always an adventure. A Celebration of Life will be held Sunday, Oct. 21, 2018, 4 p.m. at First Reformed Church, Pastor Matt Waite officiating, with Military Honors performed under the auspices of the McChord Air Force Base Honor Guard. Graveside service will be Monday, Oct. 22, 2018, 10 a.m. at Grand View Cemetery, Anacortes. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations are suggested to First Reformed Church, 250 SW 3rd Ave., Oak Harbor, WA 98277 or Wounded Warrior Project, PO Box 758517, Topeka, KS 66675-8517. Family and friends are encouraged to share memories and condolences at www.whidbeymemorial.com.

Life Tributes can now be found online at www.whidbeyweekly.com

Lorraine (Lori) Weatherby Lorraine Weatherby, age 89, of Oak Harbor, Was. passed away Oct. 5, 2018. In her early years she married a soldier who was stationed at Fort Casey. She worked as a switchboard operator for many years. Later she and her husband moved to Fairport, N.Y. where they owned a café together. Lorraine married William (Bill) Weatherby in 1961. She and Bill loved to travel after they retired and made several trips to Florida, Arizona, and Missouri. She loved cross stitch and all types of needle work. Lorraine was preceded in death by her brother, Harry VanNieuwenhuise Jr., and sister, Joanne Murcray. She is survived by her brother, John (Juanita) VanNieuwenhuise, sister, Janice Traylor, three step-children, and numerous nieces and nephews. A graveside service for Lori will be held at Maple Leaf Cemetery Friday, Oct. 12 at 1 p.m.

DOUGLAS EARL HARRISON, JR. It is with great sorrow I announce the death of my beloved son, Douglas Earl Harrison, Jr., who died Sept. 29, 2018. He was 31 years old. He is survived by his parents, Lisa Harrison of Oak Harbor and Doug Harrison, Sr. of Everett; his three children, Graham Logan Harrison, Curtis Matthew Harrison and Logan Christopher Harrison; grandparents Bob and Linda Berka of Oak Harbor; numerous other relatives. He was a charismatic young man, with an infectious smile, charming and persuasive swagger that just drew you in, a friend to just about everyone he met, a source of strength for many he knew and an unyielding force to be reckoned with when provoked. He enjoyed a full social schedule, loved deeply, played hard, and was an adventurous soul, always watchful for life’s special treasures that brought him joy. I know that he would want us to celebrate his life. Please join us at the Church of Jesus Christ of LatterDay Saints, 201 NE O’Leary Street, Oak Harbor, Saturday, Oct. 13, 11 a.m. Family and friends are encouraged to share memories and condolences at www.whidbeymemorial.com.

EVALYN LUCILLE NORMAN Evalyn Lucille Norman, native daughter of Oak Harbor, passed away Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018, at Careage of Whidbey in Coupeville. Evalyn was born Nov. 10, 1936 to Mynard and Dena Jansma. Evalyn attended Oak Harbor Christian School and Oak Harbor High School, graduating in 1955. She married Ronald Mark Norman in June, 1969. She had been a member of Church on the Rock in Oak Harbor. Evalyn is survived by her sons: Michael K. Norman of Round Rock, Texas and Christopher E. Norman (Anita) of Clear Lake, Wash.; her daughter, Sabrina McClimans, of Bellevue; granddaughter, Kaitlyn McClimans, and grandson, Matthew McClimans, step-granddaughter, Ale Toussint, of Clear Lake; her brother, Harvey Jansma (Gladys), of Camano Island, Wash.; as well as nephews Brian Jansma of Germany, Randy Jansma of Camano Island and David Jenkins of Mountlake Terrace. She was preceded in death by her husband, Ronald, her parents Myna and Dena Jansma and sisters Mary Ellen Jansma and Joan Jenkins. At her request, no public services will be held. Interment will take place at Tahoma National Cemetery, where she will be buried next to her husband, Ronald. Family and friends are encouraged to share memories and condolences at www.whidbeymemorial.com.

Wayne Howard Knapp, Lt. Col (USAF, Ret.) Wayne Howard Knapp, Lt. Col. (USAF, Ret.), 90, 33-year resident of Oak Harbor, passed away peacefully, surrounded by family Friday, Oct. 5, 2018, at Regency on Whidbey Assisted Living. Lt. Col. Knapp was born Sept. 5, 1928 in Mount Vernon, Wash. to Robert E.L. Knapp and Irene (Davis) Knapp. He attended Mount Vernon schools, graduating from Mount Vernon High School. He attended the University of Utah, where he met his future wife, Carley. They were married Dec. 31, 1950 in Salt Lake City. He enlisted in the United States Air Force, retiring after 24 years with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. His duty stations included: Sacramento, Calif.; Laredo and San Antonio, Texas; Phoenix, Ariz.; England; Georgia; Vietnam; Clark Air Force Base in the Philippine Islands; Randolph Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas and finally Chanute Air Force Base in Rantoul, Ill., where he retired. Wayne and Carley moved to Oak Harbor in 1985. Of all his accomplishments, he was most proud of serving his country. While in Phoenix, Wayne accepted the Lord as his savior and lived his life as a servant of the Lord through his music ministry and sharing his faith with the world. He raised his family to love and serve the Lord. Faith was central to his family’s life. Wayne’s devotion to his family was palpable. Love, acceptance, and forgiveness were always present. He is survived by his wife, Carley, and his children: Laura Knapp (Coleman), Wayne Knapp Jr., and Ellen Knapp (Antonelli). Grandchildren: Chad Coleman, Becky Coleman (Roehl), Cathy Knapp, Jennifer Knapp, Tim Oliver, Becky Oliver, Beth Oliver (Eubanks), and 18 great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his granddaughter, Jill Coleman, and grandson, Todd Oliver. Wayne blessed his family’s life and his community with his music, art, and photography–he composed piano music, playing at home and in church, and ministered to Vietnamese by taking a portable piano into villages and playing for various villagers; he also directed and sang in church choirs, and while serving in England, he directed the American choir, taking his choir all over England; his art can be found all over the world. He and his, wife, Carley built a cottage-industry business selling cards and prints of his photogra-

Island 911

Seriously, we do not make this stuff up! SATURDAY, SEPT. 29 5:52 am, SR 20 Female on sidewalk heading southbound, but there are objects in roadway. 9:43 am, Oak Harbor Rd. Advising white house on Oak Harbor Rd. has red writing in window saying “Help Me.” 3:57 pm, SR 20 Reporting white male, tall, blonde, scraggly hair sitting outside Haggen with no shirt, pants almost off, flipping people off and yelling swear words. 11:52 pm, SE 4th Ave. Caller can’t sleep, ears ringing, nose burning. 11:55 pm, SW 8th Ave. Advising finger slammed in door. SUNDAY, SEPT. 30 1:26 am, SR 20 Vehicle needs jump start, caller unable to reach anyone who can assist her. 11:48 am, SR 20 Caller reporting female taking pictures of license plates; female asked if caller was driving new car and enjoying it; caller states he doesn’t know her. WEDNESDAY, OCT. 3 11:12 am, SW Fort Nugent Ave. Reporting black male walking down road carrying gas can and yelling at no one. 5:32 pm, SE Barrington Dr. Advising male subject inside store won’t leave, sitting in book section, has been in store past hour, walking around like a zombie. 5:50 pm, SR 20 Reporting white male, mid 30s, walking behind location carrying very long knife. 6:35 pm, SR 20 Caller advising vehicle behind location, gray Honda van, subject covered up in the front seat, vehicle is running. 11:05 pm, SR 20 Advising shoplifter ate a bunch of stuff in bathroom, is now refusing to cooperate. THURSDAY, OCT. 4 9:48 am, SR 20 Reporting party advising backpack left at entrance to location yesterday, has now checked inside and it has needles with liquid in them. 10:44 am, NE Midway Blvd. Caller advising customer damaged drive through drawer. Customer is already gone, needs police report for insurance.

3:22 pm, SR 20 Reporting party in police department lobby; states saw male subject walking wearing military camo but didn’t look military; had one pant leg rolled up and ball cap bill flipped up. 3:40 pm, SW 10th Ave. Reporting party advising crow is stuck in her fence. 5:23 pm, SW 1st Ave. Requesting check of location, victim of gunshot wound in emergency room, was shot in the toe. 7:42 pm, SR 20 Caller states male is getting naked in front of location; male is outside screaming. FRIDAY, OCT. 5 10:15 am, SW Capital Dr. Caller advising coyotes have been coming onto caller’s property trying to eat neighbors’ cats and attack caller’s dogs. 11:59 am, SE Bayshore Dr. Party states transient male handed reporting party a wedding ring in parking lot of complex a week ago; party in police department lobby to turn it in. SATURDAY, OCT. 6 8:04 am, SR 20 Female driving Odyssey van is regularly at location; currently sitting in vehicle at location, yelling at customers. Has a large, metallic-type visor cover over her. 2:06 pm, SW 8th Ave. Reporting party states 2-year-old keeps running in and out of traffic on SW 8th Ave., playing with younger brothers, but are not watching toddler. Reporting party told parents who were inside location, but did not seem to care. 2:26 pm, SE 4th Ave. Caller states daughter reported truck at location with woman hanging out window is stating “Call 9-1-1 they are taking my kids.” 5:02 pm, NE Midway Blvd. Requesting subject be trespassed; male has been caught hiding in store overnight before. 5:42 pm, NE Izett St. Caller requesting contact in lobby referencing husband driving off while she was on hood of vehicle. 10:19 pm, SR 20 Stating there is condensation on cracks in roadway between Big 5 and Applebees; is concerned this could be a warning of upcoming tsunami. Report provided by OHPD & Island County Sheriff’s Dept.

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UUCWI gallery. Accomplished local artist Nola Allen and her husband celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary by retracing a favorite drive across the northern Cascades. With deft use of color and a masterfully relaxed style, Nola captures and memorializes their journey and the stunning natural beauty of the region. The gallery is located in the building’s entrance foyer.

Meetings & Organizations Republican Women of North Whidbey Thursday, October 11, 11:30am Oak Harbor Elks Club, 155 NE Ernst St. Our speaker this month will be Sheilah Crider, Island County Auditor. She will speak about what happens to your ballot once you mail it and also about cyber security at the elections office. It’s a timely subject and one that is on our minds and our neighbors’ minds. This month’s challenge is to bring a friend. Come learn about what goes on behind the scenes! Cost is $10 for lunch. For more information, contact Rita Drum at ritadrum777@gmail.com or phone 631-707-5980.

American Association of University Women (AAUW)

one of the oldest homes in our region - namely the Granville Haller house in Coupeville. Accused of disloyal conduct and sentiments after the Battle of Fredericksburg, Haller was dismissed from the Army in July, 1863. He and his wife moved to Coupeville on Whidbey Island (Washington Territory in 1866) where he built a home on Front Street and started a business that extended credit to pioneer families. In 1879, Haller’s case of dismissal was re-examined by Congress. Following a six-day long court of inquiry in Washington, D.C., he was exonerated and his commission reinstated with a promotion to colonel. The public is invited to this event, call 360-240-9500 for directions and more information. For a list of continuous Meetings and Organizations, visit www.whidbeyweekly.com

Classes, Seminars and Workshops Tuesday, October 16, 12:30pm Island Senior Resources, Langley Catch a ride with Island Transit to find out about new guided tours, Saturday service, vans for non-profits, apps for your phone, and Paratransit services. Optional lunch by donation is at 11:45am. The Bayview Senior Center is located at 14594 SR 525.

Walk Through the Grades

Meeting begins with social time, program begins at 10:00am. The speaker will be Jason Armstrong, Deception Pass State Park head ranger, who interacts with park visitors and volunteers as well as overseeing preservation and repair of park structures and environment. Prospective members welcome. Please contact Elree Harris at elree64@gmail.com for further information.

Come in and experience Waldorf education through real-time discussion and observation with students and teachers. You will visit three classrooms over the course of the morning. Discover how WIWS educates students for academic excellence toward a lifelong love of learning; thus developing citizens of the world with the head to think independently, the heart to serve others and the courage to take action for the common good. RSVP with Karina at enrollment@wiws.org. Drop-ins are welcome. Adults only please, babes in arms.

Monday October 15, 6:30pm-8:30pm Hayes Hall, Room 137, SVC, Oak Harbor Anyone interested in astronomy is invited to attend. There will be short presentations on current topics in astronomy and a good time is guaranteed for all. For more information about ICAS or club events, contact Bob Scott at ICAS_President@outlook.com or visit www. icas-wa.org.

Whidbey Island Camera Club Tuesday, October 16, 6:00pm-8:00pm Oak Hall, Room 306, SVC, Oak Harbor The theme for October is “Wood objects.” You may submit up to three photographs for discussion during the meeting to absolutescience@hotmail.com. Whidbey Island Camera Club, a community club, is open to the public. If you have questions, please email tina31543@comcast.net

Community Swing Band Rehearsal Wednesday, October 17, 7:00pm South Whidbey Community Center, Langley Are you a trumpet or trombone player who loves playing Big Band music? An extensive library of Basie, Ellington, Anthony, Miller, Kenton, Brown, and Q. Jones; Charts arranged by Niehaus, Nestico, Jones, Wolpe, and J. Williams. If you are interested, call Dale Zeigler at 425-269-9029. The South Whidbey Community Center is located at 723 Camano Ave.

South Whidbey Garden Club Friday, October 19, 9:00am-12:00pm St. Peter’s Church, Clinton Travels of a Young Gardener by Riz Reyes seeking the best plants for the Pacific Northwest. Public is welcome.

PBY-Naval Air Museum Wednesday, October 24, 11:30am CPO Club, 1080 Ault Field Rd, Oak Harbor The featured speaker at the no-host luncheon will be Lynn Hyde who heads up “Historic Whidbey,” (a 501c3) and is aspiring to restore

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LOCALLY OPERATED

HALLOWEEN HAPPENINGS 2018

Lunch n Learn: All Aboard!

Saturday, October 13, 9:30am Coupeville United Methodist Church, 608 N. Main St.

Island County Astronomical Society (ICAS)

OCTOBER 11 - OCTOBER 17, 2018

HAPPY HALLOWEEN!

Wednesday, October 17, 8:30am-10:00am Whidbey Island Waldorf School, Clinton

Trick or Treat at the Captain Whidbey Inn October 27, 28 & 31! Follow us on Facebook for details on upcoming events! Call Today - Book your banquet events & holiday parties with us! 2072 Captain Whidbey Inn Road Coupeville • 360-678-4097 events@captainwhidbey.com

AARP Driver Safety Class Wednesday, October 17, 8:30am-4:30pm Oak Harbor Senior Center Cost $15 AARP members; $20 for non-members This class can save you money, but more importantly, you learn safety strategies and basic vehicle maintenance. Preregister by calling 360-632-1752.

Croptoberfest Friday, October 19, 9:30am-5:30pm and/or Saturday, October 20, 9:30am-5:30pm Oak Harbor $28/day or $50 for both

MIDWAY MONSTER MASH F

HOTREE WH ILE S DO GS UPP LIES LAS T!

Join me for two whole fun-filled days to preserve your special memories through your photos. Registration includes gifts, challenges, prizes, drawings, ideas, inspiration, lunch and best of all fun and fellowship! Come both days and leave your things over night. Space is limited so register early. Contact Nancy Cunningham, Creative Memories Independent Advisor at 808-779-8280 or picsonapage@ gmail.com for a registration form or more information.

NRA Personal Protection Outside The Home Class

WHAT'S GOING ON

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FREE Community Halloween Fun at the Midway Trader’s Village 390 NE Midway Blvd, Oak Harbor

Swag Bags to first 100 participants to arrive in costume, Costume Contest, Music, Food, Crafts & Games! We’d love Swag to put in the bags and more participants! Email midwaymonstermash@hotmail.com for more information

FRIGHTENINGLY LOW PRICES HALLOWEEN COSTUMES & DECORATIONS AT PRICES SO LOW, IT’S SCARY!

Saturday, October 20, 9:00am-5:00pm Sunday, October 21, 9:00am-5:00pm NWSA Range, 886 Gun Club Road, Oak Harbor Cost: $50, includes a book This class builds on skills already gained in other shooting classes and shooting styles, which the student must be able to show documentation or competency. The class also gives a thorough legal brief on the provisions of law pertaining to the ownership and use of a firearm. Defensive shooting skills are emphasized in this class. This class includes shooting on the NWSA Pistol Range. For questions or to register go to nrainstructors.org and search 98277 to bring up the class. More information can be found at www.northwhidbeysportsmen.org.

October 27 • 4pm-7pm

The Store with the Big Heart All proceeds donated to community programs

600 SE Barrington Drive • Oak Harbor • (360)675-1133 Hours: Mon-Sat 9am-5:30pm • Dontation Hours: Mon-Sat 9am-4pm

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Oak Harbor Veterans Day Parade

Monday, Nov. 12 • 1 p.m. Participation applications due by Nov. 1 Email promotion@oakharbormainstreet.com

Kathy Reed/File Photo The Oak Harbor Veterans Day Parade will once again march through the heart of the historic downtown on Pioneer Way. The parade will be held at 1 p.m. Monday, Nov. 12. Anyone interested in showing support to veterans is encouraged to participate or to watch.

Join in the Oak Harbor Veterans Day Parade By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly Organizers of this year’s Veterans Day Parade in downtown Oak Harbor are hoping for a bigger, better event, one befitting the scope of the service and sacrifice given by so many men and women in our nation’s armed forces. The Oak Harbor Main Street Association will hold its Veterans Day Parade at 1 p.m. Monday, Nov. 12, the federally observed holiday. It is not a parade aimed at promot-

ing upcoming events, but a show of support for all veterans. Any individual, group or organization is welcome to participate. “I encourage anyone who wants to honor veterans to participate,” said Matthew Williams, executive director of OHMSA. “If you want to simply come out and carry a banner or a placard to honor vets, anyone can do that. “With over half our population represented

by the military, either active duty, reserves or retired, Oak Harbor needs to praise that, show our gratitude for that,” Williams continued. “With what our veterans do for us, we want to make sure they know they are appreciated and that they are honored in an appropriate way.”

Williams said the biggest challenge in planning this event is obviously the weather. The parade will go on whether the sun is shining, the rain is falling or the wind is blowing. And if you can’t walk in the parade, he encourages everyone to come out and show their support by watching.

Williams said they have already lined up one major sponsor, Walmart, and they are looking to add more. And people are registering to take part, such as the Oak Harbor High School NJROTC, motorcycle groups from veterans organizations, the Oak Harbor High School marching band, girl scout troops and more. Those interested in joining the event should apply by Nov. 1. Email promotion@ oakharbormainstreet.com for more information on how to take part.

“If you can’t march in the parade or if you don’t have an organization to participate with, you can still participate by coming out for all those who are marching,” said Williams, noting it really is a celebration of our community.

The Veterans Day Parade is an event Williams said he wanted to be involved with as soon as he began working for OHMSA, so he is happy for the opportunity to bring the parade back to Pioneer Way, through the heart of the historic downtown. “I want to see this become one of the most recognized Veterans Day events in the area,” he said. “I know we have a lot of competition around the state, but we have a geographical advantage by being on an island. I want Oak Harbor to be known as the place to go for a Veterans Day Parade.

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly Rain or shine, the 2018 Veterans Day Parade will take place at 1 p.m. Monday, Nov. 12. The parade, being organized by the Oak Harbor Main Street Association, will travel the wrong way down Pioneer Way, which will be closed to accommodate the event.

“Without the sacrifices made by veterans for generations before us, we couldn’t even come together to celebrate what has been done for us,” he continued. “So it’s only right we take a couple of hours to show our appreciation and gratitude. We owe it to them to do that.”

“I’m really looking forward to bringing the celebration downtown,” he said. “It’s a unique setting where we can gather together, close down the street and celebrate like a family in a close environment. It’s a unique opportunity to get together and I hope to see a lot of community support, that folks just come out and say thanks.” The George Morris Post of the American Legion will provide a luncheon for participants following the parade. There is also a community Veterans Day Program scheduled for 11 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 10 at Oak Harbor High School’s performing arts center. The annual program, sponsored by the Oak Harbor Council of the Navy League, will feature the theme “Stories of Our Veterans,” 100 Years Since Armistice Signing. Colors will be presented by OHHS NJROTC and the OHHS Wind Ensemble will provide music. Everyone is welcome to attend. More information is available at OakHarborNavyLeague.org or at OakHarborChamber.com.

WICA continued from page 7 Therein lies the appeal of good theater, no matter where it happens. For some, it is a chance to escape from reality for a time, to have a good laugh or even a good cry, depending on the story line. Or perhaps some see it as an opportunity to broaden their horizons or expand their world view, no matter on which side of the stage they find themselves. It is a role WICA relishes.

shared by the entire community. And to open that experience up to the community as actor, backstage, and tech, as well as audience, makes it an even deeper shared experience. I bemoan the fact, as Vanya does during his tirade in the last scene, ‘there are so few shared memories’ and ‘our lives are ... disconnected.’ Community theater is one means of connection.”

“Community theatre is important, because it creates opportunity for anyone and everyone to participate,” said Duncan. “WICA does not pre-cast and we have the infrastructure in place to help train in all areas including: acting, directing, stage management, set, costume, light, and sound design. We exist to create a home for theatre arts not only for this community but for its visitors.”

“I make no distinction among the various theater venues. ALL theater is important,” said Jordan. “If you want to study world history, read plays. They’ll reveal the true zeitgeist of the times.”

“Since most of us never get to Broadway, community theater helps to make theater part of our national consciousness,” Hinkley said. “This production has such a broad range of diverse persons from our community. The experience of the interplay between them on stage is so interesting!” “Theater puts life up onto the stage, immersing the audience into the experience,” McElhinny said. “It can be a memory

Performances of “Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike” are at 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and at 2 p.m. Sundays starting Friday and running through Oct. 27. The Piano Bar opens one hour before each performance. Tickets are $22 for adults, $18 for senior citizens and military, $15 for youth and for matinee performances. They are available at the WICA box office or online at https://tickets.wicaonline.org. “This play has something everyone will laugh at, even though the entire audience may not be laughing at the same spot simultaneously, but somewhere, somehow, all funny bones will be tickled,” said McElhinny. 

Zachary Schneider Photo Courtesy of Whidbey Island Center for the Arts James Hinkley plays Vanya in the Christopher Durang play “Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike,” which opens Friday at Whidbey Island Center for the Arts in Langley.

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Film Shorts By Carey Ross The Predator: If we must have a retooling of the Predator franchise, I suppose the man responsible for some of the most over-thetop movies of the 1980s, Shane Black, is the right man to have at the helm. If you’re trying to parse the previous sentence, I believe the term you’re looking for is “damning with faint praise.” ★ (R • 1 hr. 41 min.)

Crazy Rich Asians: The first movie with an all-Asian cast since “Memoirs of a Geisha,” this adaptation of the blockbuster bestseller translates to the big screen with the kind of ease only money can buy. Critically acclaimed and a success at the box office, here’s hoping Hollywood is starting to realize that representation rules. ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 1 min.)

Shine: Somehow, a movie featuring a nearly all-Latino cast, with a plot that exists at the nexus of gentrification and salsa dancing, that addresses complex themes, got a distribution deal that puts it into mainstream theaters and suddenly I believe in miracles. ★★★ (R • 1 hr. 36 min.)

Fahrenheit 11/9: Michael Moore is back and he’s in fine fighting form in this documentary that examines how we got here and how we, as private citizens and stakeholders in our democracy, can battle back from the brink. ★★★★ (R • 2 hrs. 6 min.) First Man: On the heels of the ethereally lovely “La La Land,” which came on the heels of swinging and savage “Whiplash,” comes director Damian Chazelle’s latest effort, a gritty, gripping account of NASA’s moon mission, as seen through the eyes of Ryan Gosling’s Neil Armstrong. Chazelle, what will you do next? ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 18 min.) Goosebumps 2: Haunted Halloween: Very little is known about the second installment of the film series based on R.L. Stine’s wildly popular books, but a ventriloquist dummy appears to figure strongly into the plot, so this is obviously an unholy nightmare disguised as a kid flick. ★★★ (PG • 1 hr. 40 min.) Hell Fest: The plot conceit of this horror flick is simple: A masked killer stalks victims at an elaborately staged Halloween carnival. It probably won’t be that great, but then again, I don’t think it’s supposed to be. Let the bleeding begin. ★★ (R • 1 hr. 29 min.) The House with a Clock in its Walls: Eli Roth, one of the fathers of the cinematic blight that is torture porn, is the director of this kids comedy starring Jack Black and Cate Blanchett and I am not at all sure how to feel about this. ★★★ (PG • 1 hr. 44 min.)

For Anacortes theater showings, please see www.fandango.com. For Blue Fox and Oak Harbor Cinemas showings see ads on this page.

The Nun: A character from a movie sequel somehow gets its own spinoff–and that should tell you everything you need to know about the state of mainstream Hollywood at the moment. If you want to be freaked out all over again by the creepy nun from “The Conjuring 2,” you now get your chance. Puzzle 1 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.36) ★ (R • 1 hr. 36 min.)

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Friday, October 12 thru Sunday, October 14

GOOSEBUMPS 2: HAUNTED HALLOWEEN (PG) VENOM (PG-13) THIS WEEKS SPECIALS: MEATBALL SUBS $3.50, CORN DOGS $2.50 Box Office & Snack Bar Opens At 4pm • 1st Movie Begins At Dusk 11 & Over $6.50; Kids 5-10 $1.00; 4 & Under Free GO KARTS ARE OPEN FRIDAY 4PM, SATURDAY 11AM , SUNDAY 12:30PM

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This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. Keep out of reach of children. Marijuana products may be purchased or possessed only by persons 21 years or older.

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Movie Hotline 360-279-2226 Book A Party or Special Showing 360-279-0526 1321 SW Barlow St • Oak Harbor

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On a scale from 1 to 10...3.6 Every row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every column of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9

COMING SOON: A STAR IS BORN, A SIMPLE FAVOR, NIGHT SCHOOL, 11/9 THE GRINCH

OPEN EARLY & CLOSED LATE!

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VENOM PG-13 GOOSEBUMPS 2: A HAUNTED HALLOWEEN PG FIRST MAN PG-13

LAST MARKET this season Visit us on the Green Saturday 10am to 2pm

Smallfoot: In a world populated by yetis, people are the thing to be feared in this movie that is only original if you haven’t seen the far superior Monsters Inc. But it’s good enough for kids, and not every animated movie can be a Pixar film. ★★★ (PG • 1 hr. 49 min.)

Venom: A rare Marvel miss I will still probably see on account of how Tom Hardy’s presence can make up for a variety of cinematic ills. ★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 53 min.)

FARAWAY ENTERTAINMENT YOUR LOCAL MOVIE THEATER

GROWING SINCE 1979

A Simple Favor: This thriller starring Blake Lively (love her) and Anna Kendrick (love her too) has all the look of a big-budget Lifetime movie–and that is not an insult. Gather up some girlfriends, smuggle in some White Claw and make a night at the movies of it. ★★★★ (R • 1 hr. 56 min.)

A Star is Born: The fourth version of this toxic-but-somehow-romantic love story sees Bradley Cooper (who also directed) and Lady Gaga play the musical couple in question– and the Oscar buzz is already building, although I remain loyal to the super-cheesy 1976 version. Barbra Streisand and Kris Kristofferson forever. ★★★★★ (R • 2 hrs. 15 min.)

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COUPEVILLE FARMERS MARKET

Courtesy of Cascadia Weekly

Bad Times at the El Royale: This movie ticks a lot of boxes for me: written and directed by “Cabin in the Woods’” Drew Goddard. A great ensemble cast including Jeff Bridges, Jon Hamm, Chris Hemsworth, and Nick Offerman. A kitschy roadside motel. A decidedly Tarantino-esque vibe. Perfect popcorn fare. ★★★★ (R • 2 hrs. 20 min.)

OCTOBER 11 - OCTOBER 17, 2018

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Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/sudoku on Fri Sep 28 18:23:55 2018 GMT. Enjoy!

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OCTOBER 11 - OCTOBER 17, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Let’s Dish! with Kae Harris

FOOD MYTHS AND LEGENDS Is food not a timeless entity in and of itself? Of course, vital to existence, it is more than just physical sustenance for the body. It’s also a vessel for storytelling, found throughout the ages in myths and legends alike. So integral is food to our existence, we talk about it whenever we get the chance. We write about it (here, for example), we sing about it, we make endless reference to it, turn it into art and experience. But my favorite thing of all we do with food is we tell stories with it, or over it, and bond with people in the process. The food of myths and legends is unique to the area of the world where a particular kind of food comes from. Norse mythology, for example, is rife with the drinking of mead and beer in the halls of Valhalla, which is apt because the Norse were pretty good ale-makers. In fact, it was an ale brewer who would host a feast each year in the winter. The floor of the hall was made of gold that shone so bright, there was no need for any other light source. The beer this ale brewer (named Aegir, I think) made, was no ordinary mead. No. It was produced in a large cauldron, gifted to him by the Norse god Thor and was served in cups (which of course, were magical) which refilled as soon as they were emptied into the stomaches of the feast attendees! In reality, it was most common for Vikings to serve their mead in cattle horns and because of the shape, it was unable to be put down while there was still liquid in it, so the passing around and the draining of the mead from the horn was a swift and gallant move itself, lending to this idea of a ‘constantly-filled’ cup. Now, this isn’t to say every day Vikings didn’t drink out of regular cups – they did, but in myths and stories it always seems so much more fun to picture horns of mead making the rounds, being ‘clinked’ as a ‘cheers’ to the loud and thunderous cries of mirthful Viking folk. There isn’t very much mention in Norse mythology of what kind of food was eaten. I suspect, on a liquid mead diet imbibed from magical refilling cups, there wasn’t much room left for actual food.

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Did we, mere mortals, take our inspiration for our food from the gods? Because the gods from mythology seem to sustain themselves on the strangest of things, in particular (and as far as Greek mythology goes) the elusive ‘Elixir of Life.’ What is this? Is it a potion? Is it a small vial of liquid? A large helping of stodgy food? I would rather it was the latter, but to be honest I think it conjures up images of a shimmering drink that keeps all the Greek mythological deities looking luminous and as wonderful as their descriptions in stories. In those stories, it is said nectar and ambrosia were the food and drink of immortals after the birth of Zeus. Before then, they were said to sustain themselves on the vapors of their slain enemies. Kind of unappetizing to me, but okay, whatever works for some. What was so special about ambrosia to appoint it a place in the belly of the Greek gods? It was believed to have been sourced from the horn of a magical goat named Amalthea, who was the adoptive or foster mother of Zeus. While ambrosia from the horns of the foster mother goat was fodder for the baby Zeus, they were also capable of producing any kind of food for any kind of being. Imagine having a goat like that! It would eliminate the need for grocery stores entirely. And the nectar mentioned in Greek mythology was expedited from the sky, by an eagle with shining wings who brought it directly to baby Zeus. Throughout the ages and in many other cultures across the world, there is made mention in myths of the Elixir of Life, the food of the gods. It is even a topic brought up in different religions. So fervent was the quest for this Elixir that during medieval times, alchemists set about trying to find the philosopher’s stone, as they believed it was necessary to concoct the elixir which would render a person immortal. It was also thought to turn lead into gold. Whether the ‘Peaches of Immortality’ as in Chinese mythology, ‘ambrosia and nectar’ for the Greek gods and goddesses, Haoma in Zoroastrianism, they all talk of a certain food or drink that is a privilege reserved only for immortals. Where did these stories come from?

LOCALLY OPERATED

They obviously originated somewhere. Maybe the observations of populations by those who told stories to appeal to the masses? Maybe there is indeed truth to it all. Will we ever know for sure? Either way, the ambrosia many of us know today doesn’t come from the horn of a magical goat. It’s more like a salad. And not a green, leafy salad, either! All this confusion language can create! Ambrosia salad is a rich and decadent dessert and in that way, maybe it was a play on the mythological version, in that it was decadent and magnificent enough for the gods themselves to eat. In a mixture of mandarin oranges, coconut, mini marshmallows, pineapple, maraschino cherries and even toasted pecans, you have brought together all the sweetness of the natural world. You then mix it with sour and whipped cream and chill to perfection before serving. I included a recipe for ambrosia salad a while back and it really is a crowd pleaser at any potluck. It beats having to sustain yourself on the vapors of your enemies. Yes, I know it’s fall and the season mandates we serve all things with pumpkin spice, but I’m thinking of the Halloween parties that might be coming up and how we can turn the mythical nectar of the gods into a crowd-pleasing favorite today. How about a recipe I came across a while ago called ‘Peach Nectar Punch?’ While the ‘Peaches of Immortality’ might be reserved for the divine only, a peach punch can be recreated to make anyone happy! Dear readers, I hope your upcoming celebrations or get-togethers will be fun and fruitful - literally! October 11 is National Myths and Legends day, so I’m including a recipe for a sparkling peach punch, aka nectar of the gods, I found and tweaked slightly to suit the taste buds of my loved ones. It’s non-alcoholic so it can create quite a stir at a kids party! If you try it, let me know how you like it! Please send any and all comments, questions and definitely recipes to letsdish.whidbeyweekly@gmail.com and we’ll do exactly that and Dish! Mythical Peach Punch 1 bottle chilled apple-peach or cranberry-peach juice 1 liter 7 up 2 cans peach juice, chilled (11.5 oz) each 2 packages frozen peaches (10 oz each) 1 package fresh raspberries (optional) 1 cup diced strawberries (optional) Mix all the ingredients together in a large bowl and chill until ready to serve. You can even keep the punch bowl cold by placing it in a larger bowl of ice while out for everyone to enjoy! www.ancient-origins.net/myths-legends/ immortality-elixir-life-and-food-gods-001201 To read past columns of Let’s Dish in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www. whidbeyweekly.com.

Dining Guide

WHAT’S GOING ON

continued from page

Back Pain & Sciatica Workshop Saturday, October 20, 11:00am Rue & Primavera, Oak Harbor This is a free informational workshop. Rue & Primavera is located at 785 Bayshore Dr, Ste 102. For more information or to register, call 360-279-8323.

Lunch n Learn: Death Café Tuesday, October 23, 12:30pm Island Senior Resources, Langley Let’s talk about death at Whidbey Island’s first Death Café. At a Death Café people drink tea, eat cake, and discuss death. The aim is to increase awareness of death and help us make the most of our lives. Optional lunch by donation is at 11:45am. The Bayview Senior Center is located at 14594 SR 525.

Emergency Readiness for Businesses Thursday, October 25, 10:00am-2:00pm Oak Harbor Fire Department, 855 E Whidbey Ave. Learn how to prepare for a variety of emergencies for your business. Free lunch while supplies last. For more information, call the Oak Harbor Chamber of Commerce at 360-675-3755.

WhidbeyHealth Hospice Care Training Session Tuesdays, Oct. 30, Nov. 6 & 13, 9:00am-4:00pm WhidbeyHealth Hospice Care, Coupeville This three-day orientation will cover a variety of topics introduced by Hospice Care staff members. For individuals with a calm disposition, who are willing to listen with compassion and who are comfortable with issues of death and dying. No special skills are required. Time commitments are flexible for each individual. You can bring your interests and passion for service in varied ways of your choosing. Volunteers need to be 18 years or older, pass a background check and screening process, and participate in the three-day training. Contact Donna Selig at seligd@whidbeyhealth.org or call to register at 360-914-5635.

Lunch n Learn: Whidbey Island Center for the Arts Tuesday October 30, 12:30pm Island Senior Resources, Langley Come hear what’s new, how things work there, and have your questions answered about how they get from an idea to a fullblown production. Learn about volunteer opportunities, too! Optional lunch by donation is at 11:45am. The Bayview Senior Center is located at 14594 SR 525.

Let Us Take Care Of Dinner! Too Tired To Cook? Get Your Dinner To Go! Call Ahead And We’ll Have It Ready For You! 360-679-3500 We Cater! 601 NE Midway Blvd • Oak Harbor Follow us on Facebook & Twitter

JOIN THE FUN! Join us for NFL and College Football Games! $3 Tacos Every Tuesday! Live Music Fridays & Saturdays Comedy Night Friday, October 12, 8-10PM Featuring Local Craft Beer, Wine & Ciders Beer & Fear Halloween Party 103 S. Main • Coupeville • 360.682.5747 Live Music with Mussel Flats www.penncovebrewing.com Saturday, Oct. 27, 6-10PM

HAPPY HOUR MONDAY-FRIDAY 3-6PM

KEEP YOUR DOUGH LOCAL

We have fresh breads, pastries, pies, muffins, cookies, cakes & desserts!

Breakfast & Lunch on the Water - Daily Fresh Baked Treats Homemade Soups & Sandwiches 360.678.5431 • 4 Front Street • Coupeville

9

1191 SE Dock St, #2 • Oak Harbor 360-675-6500 • chrisbakeryonwhidbey.weebly.com

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www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

OCTOBER 11 - OCTOBER 17, 2018

13

LOCALLY OPERATED

both feet. Holding back gains you nothing, and robs you of the hidden benefits of spontaneity. What are those? You will be in better position to answer on the 12th.

CHICKEN LITTLE & THE ASTROLOGER By Wesley Hallock

ARIES (March 21-April 19) You’ll be amazed this week at how difficult it is for others to see that which is patently obvious to you. If you have hopes of enlisting the doubters and the wafflers in your cause, expect to take control of the situation quickly and firmly. These fence sitters shouldn’t be too hard to motivate, but your leadership is a must to inspire them to action. Even the hardened skeptics are as putty in your hands on the 12th. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Reminders of days gone by have probably been many and frequent, lately. It’s not that you necessarily enjoy living in the past, as some may allege. If you stop to think about it, much of the unfinished business now catching up to you is not something anyone would voluntarily choose. But now that it’s on your plate, you must deal with it. Doing so on the 12th opens the way to communications of the delightful sort. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) Delightful diversions and fanciful pursuits are only the starting point this week. What starts out as spur of the moment fun could easily morph into something greater. While the ultimate direction of your recreation is impossible to guess, unexpected romantic angles cannot be ruled out. In hindsight, you may realize that the 12th was rife with obvious clues. How many of those can you now spot in advance? CANCER (June 22-July 22) Someone in your circle is reluctant to spoil your fun this week. Their good intentions mean the person in question will likely try to keep the lid on something that is bothering them. But false cheer never works for long around you, does it? Sensitive soul that you are, you’ll sense their distress and sniff out the problem in no time. If there is any way you can be of help, your instincts will inform you on the 12th. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) All may not be perfect in your world, but the imperfections are not what matter most this week. You will find ways to be happy, no matter what, and as you do, the uncontrollable negatives in your day will fade away to the background. Use your natural warmth to good advantage and you will seem in command, even when you’re not. A friendly competition on the 12th might also be an ardent flirtation. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Your most-cherished habits are likely to go out the window this week. Despite your best efforts to maintain order and practicality in your life, you may find yourself standing without map or compass on the brink of adventure. If leap you must, then leap with

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Safety and security are probably on your mind this week. Security means money in the minds of most, so chances are good you are thinking in terms of dollars. In that case, a possible splurge by the spendthrift in your life (is that you?) may become a source of anxiety. Clinging too tightly to what you have only increases that anxiety. Give your mind a rest on the 12th by counting your blessings, instead. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) The universe doesn’t really revolve around you, however much you may feel at times this week that it does. You have a lot going for you, yes, but loud crowing over your accomplishments is sure to arouse hidden resentment in certain quarters. Tone it down a bit if you hope to keep everyone on your side. Your chance to play the modest hero on the 12th comes when you least expect it. Be alert or miss it. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) A fleeting moment that arouses your sympathies for someone less fortunate is a prime possibility this week. The chance to act on your feelings will be brief. The spiritual impact if you do act is forever. Two lives are changed in that moment, yours and the person you help. Those rules remain in effect whether you act individually or as part of a larger organization. The 12th opens doors at many levels. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Thinking outside the box solves issues quicker than standard solutions this week. Spontaneity is your friend here. At the same time, the force of established law and tradition is not to be abandoned. Rather, the door is open for you to devise new or unusual applications for that which is already well-established. Simply put, there are many uses for a paperclip. The 12th may present you with one more. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb 18) Career-oriented activities are favored this week, as well as any activity that puts you in the public eye. Your promotions at every level take root and prosper. Whether you work behind the scenes or directly as a front person, the story is the same. Your reach is considerable at present, and used wisely, it puts your aspirations within your grasp. Working your sphere of influence is profitable on the 12th. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) A welcome and refreshing sense of broad-mindedness is coming your way. You may already be experiencing the many ways an open mind can brighten your world. Perhaps travel is holding new appeal. Even if it does not, you can at least anticipate the thrill of embarking on an intellectual journey through some form of education. Your world is transforming, and the change is really within you. The effects on the 12th are powerful.

CLUES ACROSS

1. Rhythmic patterns 7. Ethical theory 13. Nightclub 14. Upsets 16. Type of railroad 17. Home of The Beatles 19. Political organization 20. Disgraced cyclist Armstrong 22. Seven 23. Enlarges hole 25. Some are big 26. August __, German socialist 28. Unappetizing food 29. Cast out 30. Adult male 31. After uno 33. Midway between northeast and east 34. Kenyan settlement 36. Oxygen deprived 38. British writer 40. Synchronizes solar and lunar time 41. Vehemently expressed 43. Hurt 44. Relative biological effectiveness (abbr.) 45. Gradually weaken 47. Cool! 48. Touch softly 51. Israeli city

53. Indicating silence 55. Protein-rich liquids 56. Tropical Asian plants 58. A very small circular shape 59. Type of wrap 60. Potato state 61. Spinning toy 64. Type of degree 65. Ornamental molding 67. Closes again 69. Verses 70. Rise up

CLUES DOWN 1. Spanish seaport 2. Equal to one quintillion (abbr.) 3. Powders 4. One of the “Great” ones 5. Increase motor speed 6. “E.T.” director 7. Caught sight of 8. Congressional investigative body 9. Aroma 10. Runs without moving 11. Southeast 12. About remembering 13. Slang for famous person 15. Potential criminal 18. Body part

21. All over the place 24. Conqueror 26. Actress Ling 27. Mauna __, Hawaiian volcano 30. Distributes 32. Golfing legend Sam 35. Laos musical instrument 37. Open payment initiative 38. Having no fixed course 39. Type of dog 42. Digital audiotape 43. Hit lightly 46. San Diego ballplayers 47. Stop working 49. Suitable for growing crops 50. Musical groups 52. Soft 54. Lowest point of a ridge 55. Beloved late TNT broadcaster 57. Thin strip to align parts 59. Cardinal number 62. Frozen water 63. One who is incredibly special 66. Rhodium 68. Top lawyer in the land Answers on page 15

© 2018, Wesley Hallock, All Rights Reserved

YOUR GUESS IS AS GOOD AS OURS WEATHER FORECAST Chicken Little looks at what is and fears the sky is falling. Wesley Hallock as a professional astrologer looks at what is and sees what could be. Read Wesley’s monthly forecast, with links to Facebook and Twitter, at www. chickenlittleandtheastrologer.com. To read past columns of Chicken Little and the Astrologer in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

Thurs, Oct. 11

Fri, Oct. 12

Sat, Oct. 13

Sun, Oct. 14

Mon, Oct. 15

Tues, Oct. 16

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

H-56°/L-42°

H-58°/L-43°

H-59°/L-44°

H-60°/L-44°

H-59°/L-50°

H-61°/L-47°

H-59°/L-47°

Sunny

Mostly Sunny

Mixed Clouds and Sun

Cloudy and Rainy

Rain and Drizzle Possible

AM Rain

Wed, Oct. 17

Cloudy

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

H-57°/L-42°

H-59°/L-43°

H-60°/L-45°

H-63°/L-45°

H-66°/L-49°

H-63°/L-49°

H-64°/L-48°

Sunny

Plenty of Sun

Mixed Clouds and Sun

Possible Showers

Rain and Drizzle Possible

Cloudy

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Foster Homes Needed!

Experienced Barbers wanted!

Family Tails Dog Rescue needs foster homes! We can't save dogs from high kill shelters without homes for them to stay at while they wait to find their forever home. 1 week to 3 months, a fun and rewarding way to be involved with rescue and also have a dog without the full time commitment. We pay for everything, you just provide the love and the home. Please call 360-969-2014 for more info or for an application.

AUTO/PARTS FOR SALE 1983 GMC half ton pickup with old 455 cylinder engine. Includes tow hitch, ball and steel tool box. Great work truck. Call 360-440-0377 leave message (0)

ANNOUNCEMENTS Pregnant? Need baby clothes? We have them and the price is right–FREE. Pregnancy Care Clinic, open most Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10am to 4pm. Call 360-221-2909 or stop by 6th and Cascade in Langley. Be the difference in a child’s life and become a foster parent today! Service Alternatives is looking for caring, loving, and supportive families to support foster children. 425923-0451 or mostermick@ servalt-cfs.com The Whidbey Island community is encouraged to try out the paddling sport of dragon boating with the Stayin’ Alive team. Our team’s mission is to promote the physical, social, and emotional benefits of dragon boating. It has been shown to be especially beneficial to cancer survivors. Practice with us for up to 3 times for free. Life-jackets and paddles provided. Saturdays at the Oak Harbor Marina, 8:45am. Contact njlish@ gmail.com. More info at our Facebook Page: https://www. facebook.com/NorthPugetSoundDragonBoatClub?ref=hl

RIDE SHARE/VAN POOL Vanpool: Daily vanpool from Whidbey Island to Mukilteo to north Seattle seeks full/PT riders. Bob (h) 360-730-1294 or (c) 206-526-4150 (2)

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Imagine Oak Harbor’s 1st Food Forest, Saturdays 11am-3pm, at 526 Bayshore Drive. Each week, we have volunteer opportunities available to help care for our community garden, share organic gardening tips, and learn Permaculture principles. All ages and skill levels welcome. Schedule can change due to adverse weather conditions. If you have any questions, please contact us at: imagineapermacultureworld.gmail.com

The Side Door Barbershop is seeking experienced barbers for booth rental opportunities in a new location. For more information, call Sue Johnson at 360-672-8622

Mother Mentors needs volunteers! Oak Harbor Families with young children need your help! Volunteer just a couple of hours a week to make a difference in someone’s life! To volunteer or get more info, email wamothermentors@ gmail.com or call 360-3211484. Looking for Board Members to join the dynamic Board of Island Senior Resources and serve the needs of Island County Seniors. Of particular interest are representatives from North Whidbey. For more information please contact: reception@islandseniorservices.org

hang on your wall! Quail (20” x 11”), $15 or best offer. Duck (22” diameter), $15 or best offer. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525. Fireplace tool sets: brush, shovel, and poker, in a sturdy stand. One set is 30” tall, the other set is 21” tall, $25 ea. obo; Sturdy, brown leather log tote by Eddie Bauer, never used. $20 obo. We can send photos. Call or text 360-3200525. “Happy Holidays” painted sign, 21-1/2” x 16-1/2”, $15 obo. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525.

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

25 aluminum silver deck post caps, $3 each; 200 feet new 8” heavy waterline, $4 a foot, obo. Can be used for waterline or drain line. 360-321-1624 Natural Barnyard Topsoil: Good for gardens, flower beds, etc. Unscreened, 10 yard loads, $225 delivered. South Whidbey 360-321-1624

Yamaha Clavinova electric keyboard. Call 360-440-0377 leave message (0)

HOUSEWARES 75-mile range digital TV antenna, $30 firm. Call 360440-0377 leave message (0)

HOME FURNISHINGS

LAWN AND GARDEN

MISCELLANEOUS Two small, indoor fountains: the soothing sounds of flowing Clean burning firewood, free water can bring stress relief of creosote; P10 series, 1000and relaxation to your environ- lb capacity, foldable crane ment. The smaller one is $15 cherry picker. Call 360-440obo, the slightly larger one is 0377 leave message (0) $20 obo. We can send photos. Wind sculptures by Lyman Call or text 360-320-0525. Whittaker. We have two left, Walnut occasional table, with $175 and $250; Wind chimes: beveled glass top, $40 or best We have five sets, depending offer; Stained glass terrarium, on size. Price range: $10–$50 with matching cover, plus or best offer. We can send wood stand. 26-1/2” tall x 10- photos. Call or text 360-3201/2” diameter of cover x 14” 0525 diameter of base. $125 or best offer; Twin-size, sturdy metal No Cheating! bed frame, with wood roller feet. $15 obo. We can send photos. Call or text 360-3200525. Quilted wall hangings, purchased at the Houston International Quilting Conference. In excellent condition, ready to How’d you do? Puzzle 1 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.36) 6

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Halogen work light, for indoor projects. The height of the light can be adjusted. $30 or best offer. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525 Looking for Xmas, Bday, Father’s Day, or just Gifts in general? These are LOCAL made crafts, I have about 50-60 of these available. They are $16.00/ea, plus shipping if you want them mailed. CASH preferred. Dimensions are: 5-6”W X 17”L. Contact me at ljohn60@gmail.com.

RECREATION Scotty Cameron Futura RH 5W Putter. This putter is in “as new” condition. RH 35”, with stock grip, steel shaft, and head cover. $345 or best offer. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525. 12 volt boat winch, $40 obo; Small anchor. Weighs only about 3 pounds, but has a design that will keep your small boat on the beach where you left it. $10 obo. We can send photos. Call or text 360320-0525. Camping items: 2 single air mattresses, “as new” condition, $20 each or best offer; Intex queen size coilbeam downy airbed, nearly new (used for one week for guests), easy to deflate and store when not being used, $25, or best offer; Brookstone waterproof floating lantern, for camping, patio, poolside, or emergencies, new, $25 or best offer; Old (but clean) Thermos 1-gallon jug, $5;

The Side Door Barbershop Vintage Coleman stove, with protective denim cover, $25 or best offer; Versatile backpack, the two parts can be used separately, or (for more serious backpacking) together, $45 obo. We have photos. Call or text 360-320-0525. Sports items: Bag Boy golf cart, $15 obo; Golf umbrella, $5; Men’s wet suits, size L, $10 per item; Neoprene gloves and hats, size L, $5 each; Water skis: Terry Competition slalom ski, with carrying bag, $30 obo; O’Brien Competition slalom ski, Kevlar/Boron, $30 obo; Wiley wood water skis, $25 obo. We have photos. Call or text 360-320-0525.

ANIMALS/SUPPLIES Excellent Grass Hay, good for horses, $7 per bale, 20 bale minimum. 360-321-1624 If you or someone you know needs help in feeding pet(s), WAIF Pet Food Banks may be able to help. Pet Food Banks are located at WAIF thrift stores in Oak Harbor (50 NE Midway Blvd) and Freeland (1660 Roberta Ave) and are generously stocked by dona-

tions from the community. If you need assistance, please stop by.

WANTED DRUMMER: Need experienced, solid rock drummer with great meter. Practice weekly in Oak Harbor in fully equipped rehearsal/recording studio. Mostly rock, blues and acoustic originals plus some covers. Plan to play concerts/ festivals and work on CD. Rich at rswitzer55@netzero.net or 360-675-5470 before 9 pm. Art, Antiques & Collectibles. Cash paid for quality items. Call or text 360-661-7298 (1) Was your Dad or Gramps in Japan or Germany? I collect old 35 mm cameras and lenses. Oak Harbor, call (970) 823-0002

FREE Dresser, 6 drawers high, narrow. Purchased in Cripple Creek, Colorado. Text Julie 360-969-266 (1) Miscellaneous materials in the yard. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525

CLASSIFIED INFORMATION US Postal Mail

Whidbey Weekly Classified Department PO Box 1098 Oak Harbor, WA 98277

E-Mail............classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com Telephone..................................(360)682-2341 Fax.............................................(360)682-2344 PLEASE CALL WHEN YOUR ITEMS HAVE SOLD.

Please try to limit your classified to 30 words or less, (amounts and phone numbers are counted as words) we will help edit if necessary. We charge $10/week for Vehicles, Boats, Motorcycles, RVs, Real Estate Rental/Sales, Business Classifieds and any items selling $1,000 and above. We do charge $25 to include a photo. The FREE classified space is not for business use. No classified is accepted without phone number. We reserve the right to not publish classifieds that are in bad taste or of questionable content. All free classifieds will be published twice consecutively. If you would like your ad to be published more often, you must resubmit it. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date.

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Business Spotlight Gutter Cleaning Safely from the Ground.

Starting at $99.00*

The Cornerstone of Quality Service – Whidbey Memorial

*For up to 100’ of gutters

Safety is #1 for us and here’s why it should be #1 with you too! 90,000 Hospitalized injuries happen every year from people who fall off ladders! Professionals are NOT immune! Why risk someone falling on your property? You can be held liable. WE offer a Gutter Cleaning Service that is affordable and safe.

360-675-3005

By Kae Harris

We get to know you first, then your goals. Gene Kelly Barner Financial Advisor

144 NE Ernst Street, Suite C Oak Harbor, WA 98277 (360) 675-8239

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

In an industry where compassion and caring are the cornerstones of quality, where a good heart defines what service to others is truly about, no other place does it better than Whidbey Memorial. The staff of this funeral home embody the care and empathy required to help grieving loved ones in their time of loss.

As a licensed advanced planning specialist, Paul is able to discuss and record people’s end-of-life wishes far ahead of when the services are needed. Peace of mind is priceless and Whidbey Memorial offers just that. People can rest assured their end-of-life details will be adhered to and honored and the burden of planning in a time of such sadness is lifted off the shoulders of loved ones. It is likewise noteworthy that Whidbey Memorial’s compassion reaches far and wide, stretching from the San Juan Islands to Clinton and encompasses Whatcom, Skagit and Island counties.

Working with the greatest respect and conducting themselves at all times with grace, professionalism, compassion and know-how unmatched, Whidbey Memorial ensures your best interests are safe in their capable hands. When honoring a loved one, the quality put in by Whidbey Memorial to every aspect of service is most definitely unsurpassed.

thrivecommunityfitness.com 32650 Highway 20 Building D, Oak Harbor, WA

HARADA PHYSICAL THERAPY Your Hometown Therapists

As Whidbey Island’s most experienced funeral director, owner Paul Kuzina knows exactly what it takes to give of himself to those who are bearing the weight of grief on their shoulders. His experience and expertise are far reaching and cover many end-of-life avenues. From embalming, cremation and ceremonies to rituals, death certificates, headstones and more, Paul’s capable hands ensure each and every aspect of caring for decedents and their families is done efficiently and with the utmost respect for all concerned.

As far and wide as their empathy reaches, it’s easy to see why Whidbey Memorial staff are the backbone of this funeral home and the foundation on which selfless service to others is built. They ensure the loved ones are at the forefront of all end-of-life processes, demonstrating just how valuable each Whidbey Memorial’s staff member’s skills are. Whether Social Security paperwork, veterans paperwork or death certificates, Whidbey Memorial does it all, relieving a substantial amount of stress from the already weary loved ones. Paul and Heidi’s expertise has seen the establishment grow in the communities of Whidbey Island into the pillar of support for the grieving, and Edie Silvey’s and Elizabeth Lee’s unceasing efforts further root the very core principles of Whidbey Memorial into the hearts of those who pass through their doors by ‘putting heart into quality service.’

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One Weekend - Two BIG Events!

Ace Helpful Hardware Tour

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19, 1-4PM Learn from the experts! Live demos & insider tips! Top Brands • Discounts • Giveaways

Ace Neighborhood Fix-It Fest

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 11AM-2PM Learn about fire safety, DIY projects and home safety tips! Free Samples • Demos • Giveaways

For more information about their indispensable services, call Whidbey Memorial, 360-675-5777, visit their website at www.whidbeymemorial.com or stop in at 746 NE Midway Blvd, Oak Harbor.

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

150 SE Pioneer Way • Oak Harbor • 360-679-3533

Putting heart into quality service Whidbey Island’s most experienced funeral director serving all of Island County and surrounding areas with caring that goes the extra mile. At Jersey Mike’s, we offer a sub above – one that’s measured in more than inches or seconds ‘til served. We carefully consider every aspect of what we do – every slice, every sandwich, every store – we provide our customers with sustenance and substance too.

31595 SR 20, Suite A5 Oak Harbor • 360-682-5245 Daily 10am - 9pm

Memorial

Funeral Home

12 Months FREE Financing

746 NE Midway Boulevard • Oak Harbor

Mon - Sat 9am-6pm Sunday 11am-5pm

(360) 675-5777

info@whidbeymemorial.com www.whidbeymemorial.com

“A Family Tradition Since 1912”

Paul and Heidi Kuzina, Owners

2015 Broadway, Everett, WA 98201 • 425-259-3876 • EricksonFurniture.com

Delivery to Whidbey Island Available

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Whidbey Weekly, October 11, 2018  

Whidbey Island Center for the Arts Whidbey Weekly News Let's Dish Island 911 Bits & Pieces What's Going On Film Shorts

Whidbey Weekly, October 11, 2018  

Whidbey Island Center for the Arts Whidbey Weekly News Let's Dish Island 911 Bits & Pieces What's Going On Film Shorts

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