Whidbey Weekly, September 27, 2018

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September 27 through October 3, 2018

A 10-day celebration of local products, services, and experiences!

* Cider Festival

* Harvest Faire

* Ebey’s Reserve Farm Tour

* Farm-To-Fork Dinners

* Passport Tour of Maxwelton Valley

For a complete details about events, classes, shopping & tasting opportunities, check our website calendar at:

www.whidbeyislandgrown.com/events Like us on

Facebook@whidbeyislandgrown and

Instagram@whidbeygrown for the latest updates.

More Local Events inside

September 2018

CIDERfestival

29 Saturday

Pacific Rim Institute

10 Tastings

11 am - 4 pm

& logo glass

whidbeyislandciderfestival.com • 360.678.5586

brownpapertickets.com/ event/3018694

180 Parker Rd • Coupeville WA 98239 FREE Music • Children’s Activities • Food • Cider Store • MORE!

$25 - Advanced $30 - At Door


Fall Bazaars & Events

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SEPTEMBER 27 - OCTOBER 3, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

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FREE

Saturday, September 29 • 10am-4pm Skagit River Park 1100 S. Skagit Street, Burlington

And Help Good Cheer!

Saturday, October 6 12-5PM

Bring a can of food for Good Cheer. All Materials & insruction provided for you to build, stuff and customize your own scarecrow! $10 per scarecrow. BBQ lunch provided by donation. BBQ til the food runs out!

Info: 360-221-4677

Island County Fairgrounds in Langley

Family Guide by Amy Hannold Creative Expression & Community Connection: “Create Space Langley” invites people of all ages to express themselves through a variety of artistic mediums including knitting, music, paper arts, collage, painting, paper mâché, poetry, crochet, sewing and more. A project of note includes the creation of knitted shawls which are donated to comfort moms at the Ronald McDonald House. Most activities are offered on a freewill donation basis. Popular with families is the “Open Studio” on early-release Wednesdays. Classes and events seek to inspire everyone to create something meaningful, no matter their skill level or experience. Create Space Langley’s calendar can be found at Createspacelangley.org. What’s for Dinner?: Returning to school and extra-curricular activities can make meal planning a challenge. You can make appetizing, healthy and convenient meals for your family, with a little advance preparation. Find doable recipes for individual freezer meals and a free guide to create “10 Meals in an Hour” at Livingwellspendingless.com/ category/recipes/10-meals-in-an-hour.

Greenbank Farm’s 2018

Faire

Advertise your Fall Bazaars & Events with Whidbey Weekly! Special Discounted Prices for a Limited Time Only! 1/8-Page ............... Only $75 • Vertical: 2.319”W x 7.125”H • Horizontal: 4.838” W x 3.438“H

Sunday, September 30 12-5PM

ADD FULL COLOR FOR ONLY $25

This section will publish every Thursday starting September 13, • Vertical: 2.319”W x 3.438”H • Horizontal: 4.838”W x 1.594”H through October 25, 2018. Deadline is the Thursday prior 1/32-Page ............. Only $25 • Horizontal only: 2.319”W x 1.594”H to each publication. 1/16-Page ............. Only $40

To learn more about advertising in Whidbey Weekly contact: Eric Marshall 360-682-2341 • publisher@whidbeyweekly.com

PHONE: (360)682-2341

Celebrating the best of Whidbey’s farming heritage and community with free activities for the whole family at Greenbank Farm. Enjoy fabulous food, live music, fresh produce, arts and crafts. Details at //portoc.org/ or call 360-222-3558

FAX: (360)682-2344

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Whidbey Weekly LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

390 NE MIDWAY BLVD | PO BOX 1098 | OAK HARBOR, WASHINGTON 98277 Publisher & Editor.......................................................... Eric Marshall Marketing Representatives................Penny Hill, Roosevelt Rumble Graphic Design............................................................. Teresa Besaw Production Manager......................................................TJ Pierzchala Circulation Manager.................................................... Noah Marshall

Contributing Writers Jim Freeman Wesley Hallock Kae Harris Tracy Loescher Kathy Reed Carey Ross

Volume 10, Issue 39 | © MMXVIII Whidbey Weekly PUBLISHED and distributed every week. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The Whidbey Weekly cannot be held responsible for the quality of goods or services supplied by advertisers in this publication. Articles, unless otherwise stated, are by contribution and therefore the Whidbey Weekly is not in a position to validate any comments, recommendations or suggestions made in these articles. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. DEADLINES: The Whidbey Weekly is a submission based editorial with contributing writers. Please feel free to submit any information (please limit to 200 words) that you would like to share with the Whidbey Weekly. You may submit by email to editor@whidbeyweekly.com, by fax to (360)682-2344 or by postal mail to PO Box 1098, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date. For more information, please visit www.whidbeyweekly.com.

SEPTEMBER EVENTS: Burlington Harvest Festival and Pumpkin Pitch: Saturday, Sept. 29, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at Skagit River Park in Burlington. Watch the pumpkin pitch competition, enjoy food vendors, live music, free “KidZone” activities, zucchini car races, pony rides, and a “Touch-a-Truck” area. Free admission and parking. (BurlingtonWA.gov/Recreation) Farms of Ebey’s Reserve: Take a free, self-guided tour of nine farms within Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve Saturday, Sept. 29, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The tour is part of a 10-day “Whidbey Island Grown” celebration. (Whidbeyislandgrown. com) Greenbank Farm Harvest Faire: Celebrate autumn and Whidbey’s farming heritage with fabulous food, produce, flowers, live music, crafts, vintage cars, wine-beer garden and free activities for the entire family, all at historic Greenbank Farm. Sunday, Sept. 30, noon to 5 p.m. (Portofcoupeville.org) OCTOBER EVENTS: Skagit Valley Festival of Family Farms: Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 6 and 7. A weekend full of fun including corn and hay mazes, free samples, animal exhibits, pumpkin patches, hayrides, educational displays, and locally grown food. Free parking and admission. This is a self-guided tour of participating farms, maps at Festivaloffamilyfarms. com. Build a Scarecrow and Help Good Cheer Too: All of the materials and instruction to build, stuff and customize your scarecrow will be provided for $10 and two cans of food, Oct. 6, noon to 5 p.m. at the Island County Fairgrounds. BBQ delights, for you, by donation. (Whidbeyislandfair.com) Visit the Fire Station: North Whidbey Fire and Rescue invites the public to their annual open house Monday, Oct. 8, 4 to 7 p.m. at the Heller Road station. Meet your local emergency response personnel, enjoy a free hot dog, meet Sparky the Fire Dog and Smokey the Bear. Transition Resource Fair: Island County Parent to Parent hosts this event which brings together 20-plus resource providers and information from Island County and

regionally, to assist families of middle school age students through adults, who experience disabilities. Admission is free and includes dinner, Tuesday, Oct. 9, 4 to 7 p.m., at Coupeville High School. (360-675-4093) Home Depot Safety Fair: Meet your local safety and first-responder agencies at this event, Saturday, Oct. 27, 9 a.m. to noon. Learn about fire safety, emergency preparedness, home safety and more! HALLOWEEN EVENTS: The Haunting of Coupeville: Coupeville hosts a variety of Halloween and harvest fun throughout October, including “Weary Bones Rest Stop Graveyard,” “Catching Casper” Run/Walk, “Trunk-or-Treat,” and the Halloween Torchlight Parade. Sherman Farm’s “Hay Bale Maze and Haunted Barn“ are family-friendly during the day, but after dark – they’re only for the bravest of souls! (Hauntingofcoupeville.com) Frightville: Presented by the Oak Harbor Boys & Girls Club, Oct, 19-20, 26-27 and 31 at the Oak Harbor Roller Barn. Haunting hours are 7 p.m. to midnight. Tickets are $13 per person, at the door. A “LightsOn-No Scare” Matinee is Saturday, Oct. 27, noon to 4 p.m., tickets are $4 per person. (Facebook.com/Frightville) VFW Hosts Halloween Party for Kids: Kids of all ages are welcome to a free Halloween party featuring pumpkin painting, a costume contest, and more Saturday, Oct. 20, 1 to 3 p.m., VFW Post 7392, Oak Harbor. Haunted Fort Casey & Switchboard: Bring the family for trick-or-treating, a bounce house, ghost stories, and games. Ages 10 and older are invited to tour the haunted fort and switchboard. Dinner and snacks for purchase, will be available from food vendors. The haunting fun and Halloween activities run Oct. 26 and 27, 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. Tickets are $8 per person, $30 per family (up to 6 people). Proceeds benefit the restoration of the Admiralty Head Lighthouse. A Washington State Park’s Discover Pass required to access the park Midway Monster Mash: This free, family-friendly Halloween Party is Saturday, Oct. 27, 4 to 7 p.m. at the Traders Village Log Cabin building on Midway Blvd., in Oak Harbor. There’ll be music, food, crafts and games! (Facebook.com/Midwaymonstermash) Halloween ComicFest: Costumed comic characters, and comics fans, are invited to stop by The Book Rack in Oak Harbor Oct. 27, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., for free comics, costume contest and other treats. (Facebook. com/thebookrackoakharbor) The Great Pumpkin Race: Build your pumpkin or squash race car and then head to Coupeville Sunday, Oct. 28, at 1 p.m., to compete in a hilarious and dramatic display of American ingenuity. You could win the coveted Pumpkin Race Championship Trophy! Prizes are also awarded for Best Decoration, Most Innovative Design, and Best Crash. Spectators, to cheer on the entries, are also welcome. Visit Hauntingofcoupeville. com for rules and information. Fall is full of fun on Whidbey! Fill your calendar with our calendar of local events, at WhidbeyIsland.MacaroniKid.com.

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ON TRACK with Jim Freeman

In honor of the return of school playground sounds to our neighborhoods, the National Association of Playgrounds, aka NAP, has issued the following approved playground jokes for distribution to our children in need of humor at recess.

• In search of fresh vegetable puns; Lettuce know • He who laughs last didn’t get it • Big shout out to my fingers; I can always count on them • Remember: If the world didn’t suck, we’d all fall off • Irony—the opposite of wrinkly • If you suck at playing the trumpet, that’s probably why • When you’re down by the sea, and an eel bites your knee, that’s a moray

Recess on Did you hear about the dairy farmer who talked to his cows because they’ll give more milk that way? Farmer Wayne says it goes in one ear and out the udder.

Military musing A U.S. Marine Colonel was about to start the morning briefing to his staff. While waiting for the coffee machine to finish its brewing, the Colonel decided to pose a question to all assembled.

What did the teddy-bear say when it was offered dessert? No thanks, I’m stuffed.

He explained that his wife had been a bit frisky the night before and he failed to get his usual amount of sound sleep. He posed the question of just how much of sex was “work” and how much of it was “pleasure?” A Major chimed in with 75-25% in favor of work.

What do you call lending money to a bison? A buff-a-loan! Why did the ape get a job? It was tired of monkeying around. What do you do when two snails are fighting? Leave ‘em to slug it out! Which monkeys grow on vines? Grey Apes. Aren’t you glad you have already graduated? Imagine playing tag at our age. Who needs hide and seek? I do that every day looking for my truck keys, my wallet, or my left ear hearing aid. Band Aid For more info about Deb Sherod’s fun fundraiser next month, check out http://bit.ly/momsherod. You’ll get a big smile reading the remarks from her friends, family and supporters. Here is one of my faves from Francie. Hi Deb! I applaud you to go the only way for you! I used Chinese meds. I Googled Chinese formulas at the time, many years ago. And found them for my fibromyalgia. When I got to the sight [sic], they said that in Chinese medicine, if the doctor does not heal their patients, they do not keep their job as a doc! Also that it would take 3 to 6 months to cure me. It only took 3 months! I was CURED! Only the best for you and your Chinese Healer! All the light, Love and Laughter to you and your family and friends!! Francie More info about Deb’s October 21 fundraiser will follow next week. Indian Hills humor Sometime ago, although it could have been yesterday, I received an e-mail with pictures of an Indian Hills, Colorado Community Center sign that showcases humorous sayings along the highway. While I have seen many e-mails with sign humor offered by some folks in Wallingford in north Seattle, the following word play really lit up my desire to find out more about Indian Hills, Colorado and what they do at their community center other than laugh. See if you agree. • Well, to be Frank, I’d have to change my name. • Forget world peace. Visualize using your turn signal. • Life is short. If you can’t laugh at yourself, call me, I will. • QU!T STeAL!NG r LETTER$ • What I If Told You, You Read That Line Wrong • Ban pre-shredded cheese; Make America grate again • Electricians have to strip to make ends meet • For Chemists, alcohol is not a problem, it’s a solution • My mood ring is missing and I don’t know how I feel about that • I scream; You scream; The Police come; It’s awkward • I’m friends with 25 letters of the alphabet; I don’t know Y • Cow stumbles into pot field! The steaks have never been higher • Crushing pop cans is soda pressing

A Captain said it was 50-50%. A Lieutenant responded with 25-75% in favor of pleasure, depending upon his state of inebriation at the time.

SEPTEMBER 27 - OCTOBER 3, 2018

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PROPTOBERFEST Oktoberfest Flyers Style

3-10pm, Saturday, September 29, 2018

There being no consensus, the Colonel turned to the PFC who was in charge of making the coffee. What was HIS opinion? Without any hesitation, the young PFC responded, “Sir, it has to be 100% pleasure.” The Colonel was surprised and, as you might guess, asked why. “Well, sir, if there was any work involved, the officers would have me doing it for them.” The room fell silent. God bless the enlisted man. Thanks also to Greenbank Wayne for providing the above chortle, albeit a bit adult for page three readers. Greenbank Pantry and Deli A healthy and hearty shout out to Emily Terao and Alex Pulichino, the proprietors and cooks extraordinaire of the new Greenbank Pantry & Deli. My most recent visit was a nutritional delight of the fresh food kind. For a moment, I thought I was back in my fave deli in Arlington, Virginia. While I enjoyed an Italian sub, my chow pal Mr. Flaaten had an Italian sandwich. Both came with meat and cheese piled high enough that we were quiet for some time, much to the appreciation of the kind strangers at the end of our table. The Greenbank Civic Center is almost complete. When the Greenbank Store re-opens, sometime in the fall, we’ll be there to cover the excitement for those of you who seldom zip from your zip-code.

Brats! Schnitzel! & More! Live Music: Pickled Herring Band 3-5pm & 6:30-9pm

Web chortles Thanks to the Phreeland Fantom, who just celebrated his 70th, for sharing these purloined pearls of cuteness from the mind of little Harold. A new teacher was trying to make use of her psychology courses. She started her class by saying, “Everyone who thinks they’re stupid, stand up!” After a few seconds, Little Harold stood up. The teacher said, “Do you think you’re stupid, Harold?” “No, ma’am, but I hate to see you standing there all by yourself!” Harold watched, fascinated, as his mother smoothed cold cream on her face. “Why do you do that, Mommy?” he asked. “To make myself beautiful,” said his mother, who then began removing the cream with a tissue. “What’s the matter, Mommy”, asked Harold, “Giving up?” Little Harold attended a horse auction with his father. He watched as his father moved from horse to horse, running his hands up and down the horse’s legs and rump, and chest. After a few minutes, Harold asked, “Dad, why are you doing that?” His father replied, “Because when I’m buying horses, I have to make sure they are healthy and in good shape before I buy.” Harold, looking worried, said, “Dad, I think the UPS guy wants to buy Mom.”

Reservations Highly Recommended Call for Details 360-675-5858 32295 SR 20 • Oak Harbor www.eatatflyers.com

To read past columns of On Track in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www. whidbeyweekly.com.

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SEPTEMBER 27 - OCTOBER 3, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

Bits & Pieces Letters to the Editor Editor, RE: Harvest Relays It is with a mix of sadness and profound gratitude that the Coupeville Farmers Market shares news of the end of the annual Harvest Relays. We are sad to learn of the decision to end this event that has financially supported Gifts from the Heart Food Bank, a crucial service to residents of central Whidbey. We remain proud of and grateful to the central Whidbey community for all the love, support, and funds provided through this fund raising effort over the last 10 years. We send appreciation and sincere wishes for success to Gifts from the Heart Food Bank in their future fund raising efforts. CFM Board of Directors: Dorothy Mueller, Jessica Fisher, Elizabeth-Phoenix Agin, Byron Burns, Nancy Skullerud, Michael Case-Smith Market Manager Peg Tennant For more information: Gifts From the Heart, 360-678-8312, info@giftsfromtheheartfoodbank.com Coupeville Farmers Market, 360-540-3821, coupevillemarket@aol.com

Editor, Vote NO on latest Pool Park & Rec levy For the second time in one year, we’re being asked to fund a pool we already voted not to fund. And this time we’re being asked to pay even more. Some Oak Harbor residents live on a tight or fixed income. Levying yet another tax on them creates an even heavier financial burden than they’re already coping with, given the many levies/taxes that have been tacked onto property taxes in the last few years. “Just $60 more per year” isn’t a good enough argument. That $60 could be used to buy groceries or pay utility bills instead of funding a pool the majority of voters don’t want. A more equitable solution would be to have those who want to use a pool fund it, not force everyone to pay for it. Enough is enough! Taxpayers voted no last year. Vote NO again this year! Respectfully, Laura L. Phillips Oak Harbor, WA

Editor, Dams or Salmon and Orca?–That is the choice. The short term solution is a fishing ban on Chinook (King) salmon, but the long term solution is breaching, or better, removing the four Lower Snake River dams. The equation is simple. LSR Dams = no salmon = starving Orca. Why? 5,500 miles of climate-resistant, premier salmon spawning streams are blocked by these obsolete, purposeless, costly-to-maintain dams. Puget Sound’s resident Orca eat exclusively Chinook (King) salmon. The Chinook that use the Snake River system feed our Orca in the winter. Biologists agree the dams must come down immediately or extinction is inevitable. These are not Elwha or Hoover dams. The electricity they produce has already been replaced by renewables. They exist only to make Lewiston, Idaho a seaport, so private grain growers can use barges which taxpayers subsidize at $25,000/barge. There are other

fiscally and energetically feasible ways to move that grain while restoring the necessary habitat for millions of salmon. Governor Inslee can’t order the dams to be removed directly, but a massive upwelling of public sentiment can encourage him to have a conversation with Lt. General Todd Semonite, head of the US Army Corps of Engineers, who must issue a “Record of Decision” to direct the Walla Walla District, Corps of Engineers, to select Alternative #4 of their 2002 Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to breach the dams. Orca can’t afford more studies and political machinations. We will study them into extinction. To restore this vital watershed Call Governor Jay Inslee 360-902-4111, the Army Corps of Engineers 503-808-3800 and Bonneville Power Authority 503-230-5102 today.

C.N. Shipley Oak Harbor, WA

Gary Piazzon Whidbey Environmental Action Network

Celebrate Autumn’s Arrival at Greenbank Farm’s Harvest Faire

Editor, I am responding to the letter by Bonnie Tchuileng which ran in the Sept. 6-Sept. 12 issue of Whidbey Weekly. That Bonnie can’t stand Donald Trump is, of course, her privilege, but one would hope such hate has some foundation in fact and reason, not pure, un-informed emotion. Despite her belief to the contrary, Donald Trump is the President of these United States, duly elected in accordance with rules set forth in the Constitution of the United States. I would invite Bonnie to obtain, and read, Article 2, Section 1 of that Constitution, together with Amendment 12, ratified June 15, 1804. Ms. Tchuileng claims Donald Trump is a dictator and cites Webster’s Dictionary as her authority. What she fails to do is cite the entire Webster definition, only the third of three common usages. For her edification I would like to set forth Webster’s complete citation: dictator: 1a: a person granted absolute emergency power especially, history: one appointed by the senate of ancient Rome b: one holding complete autocratic control: a person with unlimited governmental power c: one ruling in an absolute and often oppressive way Bonnie, again without citation of fact, states Donald Trump hates democracy and again invokes Webster by way of defining democracy and unequivocally saying Trump believes in rule by himself, the dictator. We must remember that we do not live in a democracy, and though our system contains some democratic principles, our system of government is a Constitutional Republic. In our system, the President is balanced by the Supreme Court (which has on several occasions ruled against the President) and the Congress (which on several occasions ruled against the President). Were Donald Trump a dictator, neither of those two institutions would have any effect on his actions, which is clearly not the case. According to planetrulers.com, there are 49 dictatorships in the world and amazing as it might seem, the United States is not listed among them. Ms. Tchuileng, again without citation, claims Donald Trump claims “all Mexicans entering the United States are rapists and drug dealers.” I would invite her to cite the date and place wherein Donald Trump has ever made such a public statement. I would agree that Jesus did say “… love your neighbor…”, and using that very same admonition, we must love our Russian neighbors. I too believe we should have compassion for those who are poverty stricken, but to say that Mexico’s well-known corruption is partially a result of poverty is 180 degrees out of phase. Mexico’s poverty is the result of corruption, not the cause. As recorded by ranker.com’s list of 50 poorest countries in the world, Mexico is not among them, however, in 2016, Mexico ranked 123rd (out of 170) in the world in perceived corruption.

The writer finally got it right in a portion of her final paragraph – you get to vote him out in 2020. Of course, she totally misrepresents the capability, and ability, of her choice for president but that is another matter. By the way, I didn’t vote for Trump, but he is the President and I will support him. I didn’t vote for Obama, but he was the President and I supported him. I believe that is what a Constitutional Republic requires of its citizens. Every four years we get to express our opinion; in between we are obligated to make the system work. To do otherwise is to laugh in the face of the most superbly developed Constitution ever invented by man and contributes zero to the well-being of the nation.

Celebrate the best of Whidbey’s farming heritage and community at Greenbank Farm’s inaugural Harvest Faire, featuring festivities for the whole family, Sunday, Sept. 30 from noon to 5:00pm. The event is part of Whidbey Island Grown Week, Sept. 28 - Oct. 7. Families will find something for everyone, including fresh produce, flowers, arts, crafts and live music. Plus, enjoy fabulous food, vintage cars, wine-tasting, a celebrity pie-eating challenge, activities and more on the pastoral grounds of 1904 Greenbank Farm– one of the last remaining heritage farms on the island. So welcome the arrival of autumn on one of Whidbey’s oldest farms for an unforgettable experience. Brought to you by the merchants of Greenbank Farm and the Port of Coupeville in partnership with Whidbey Island Grown. More event details at www.facebook.com/ portofcoupeville/ vendor information at 360-222-3558 or email adminassistant@ portofcoupeville.org. [Submitted by Kellie Tormey, Port of Coupeville]

South Whidbey Backroads is Back Bayview Hall and the Island County Historical Society are teaming up again for another “South Whidbey Backroads,” Sunday, Sept. 30, 2:00pm at Bayview Hall, 5642 Bayview Road, Langley. This free local history program is focused on how the roads of South Whidbey got their names. This installment will feature Heggenes and Anderson Roads. All Heggenes and Anderson family members and friends are invited to come and share some family and local history, and all are invited to attend and swap stories and learn more about this very special place in a relaxed, informal program. Bring your favorite potluck snack to share with your new and old friends and neighbors in historic Bayview Hall. For more information, please call Rick at the Island County Museum, 360-678-3310. [Submitted by Rick Castellano, Executive Director, Island County Museum]

September is National Coupon Month Whidbey Coupon Club invites all who are interested in saving money to its “Clip n’ Chats.” The club offers coupons for clipping and money-saving conversation. The Whidbey Coupon Club has been featured nationally on Bankrate.com. Locally, it serves families throughout Whidbey Island, by helping them “Eat Better, For Less.” On South Whidbey, there is a team of volunteers who help to save tens of thousands of dollars on behalf of the Good Cheer Food Bank. Thanks to coupon insert donations and the team’s efforts, they’re able to more affordably stock the shelves full of a variety of quality, healthy food options. The North Whidbey Coupon Club meets at Christian Reformed Church, 1411 Wieldraayer Road in Oak Harbor, every Friday from 10:00am to 11:30am. To attend is free, however a $1

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED donation per meeting is suggested which supports “Coupon Care Packages” to overseas military families. Meetings are “Kid-Friendly” and are not held on holiday weekends. The South Whidbey Coupon Club meets at Good Cheer Thrift Store, 114 Anthes Avenue, Langley, every Wednesday from noon to 4:00pm (look for meeting updates on the “Whidbey Coupon Club” Facebook page.) The South Whidbey Coupon Club also welcomes those who would like to help clip coupons which will be used for Good Cheer’s shopping. Whidbey Coupon Club Needs Your Help Whidbey Coupon Club needs donations of coupon inserts. Please bring them to the Oak Harbor Senior Center, Oak Harbor Windermere Real Estate, Coupeville Windermere Real Estate, Whidbey Party Store, Good Cheer Food Bank, Good Cheer Thrift Store in Langley, or the “Good Cheer Two” store at Ken’s Korner. The club is looking for the “Smart Source,” “Retail Me Not” and “Proctor & Gamble” inserts from weekend papers. The Whidbey Coupon Club also sends expired coupons to military families overseas (coupons are valid up to 6 months after the printed expiration date). For more information, find Whidbey Coupon Club on Facebook or email nwcouponclub@ comcast.net. [Submitted by Amy Hannold]

Skagit Valley College To Host The Annual SVC Powwow Skagit Valley College (SVC) will host the annual SVC Powwow Oct. 5-7 at SVC’s Mount Vernon Campus. The three-day event will include drummers and dancers in full regalia and will draw performers from across the U.S. and Canada. Admission is free. SVC has a long history of collaboration with its Native American neighbors, including hosting powwows on campus in previous years. This is a family-friendly, free event, and all are welcome. Come join the dancing, drums, kids’ corner organized by SVC’s Early Childhood Education program, and food. The event will include vendors selling Native arts and crafts in the Dave DuVall Pavilion. Grand Entry will take place Friday, 7:00pm; Saturday, 1:00pm and 7:00pm; and Sunday, 1:00pm. All Veterans are welcome to take part in the Grand Entry each day. The Powwow will include time to honor veterans from all walks of life and recognize their service. Saturday is the longest and busiest day. There will be dance specials and a giveaway happening throughout the day. The day will include grass dancers, fancy dancers, traditional dancers, and jingle dancers. There will be intertribal dances that are open to all. In addition, there will be a category called “tiny tots” for children birth to 6 years of age. Every participating child will receive a gift. The SVC Powwow is about nurturing our diverse community, building relationships that honor the beauty in our differences, and celebrating all that brings us together for common purpose. [Submitted by Arden Ainley, Chief Public Information Officer, SVC]

Mutt Strut Dog Parade & Costume Contest Adding New Activities for Pets and People Whidbey Island’s 13th annual Mutt Strut dog parade and costume contest takes place Saturday, Oct. 20 from 10:00am to 2:00pm. The Mutt Strut tradition continues on strong. Dress up your favorite canine for the annual Mutt Strut Dog Parade and Costume Contest, sponsored by Goosefoot. Mutt Strut registration begins at 11:00am; the parade is at noon with costume judging to follow. Prizes awarded for: best dog costume; best owner and dog costume combo; best trick; best celebrity dog; and surprise categories. For this spooky 13th celebration, Goosefoot is proud to offer more activities than ever! All are free and open to friends–human and doggy– of all ages. Activities are available 10:00am to noon, and will include dog wellness demonstrations, agility and parkour courses, nose works sniffing training, information on animal

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www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OWNED care, emergency preparedness, wellness programs, and more. There will also be spider races, monster ball toss, witches hats ring toss, doughnut decorating, and candy corn guesses for kids and kids at heart. All activities are free. Food and beverage available from nearby restaurants or the Bayview Farmers Market. The event takes place rain or shine; things will move into Bayview Hall if the weather makes it necessary. Bayview Farm & Garden’s annual Apple Day, which used to happen in conjunction with the Mutt Strut, will take place on Saturday, Oct. 6 due to earlier apple harvests. Please call 360-321-4246 for further information or visit www.goosefoot.org. [Submitted by Sami Postma, Goosefoot]

South Whidbey Ryther Mardi Unit Dinner and Auction The South Whidbey Ryther Mardi Unit is planning another great dinner and auction for Saturday, Oct.r 20 at Holmes Harbor Rod and Gun Club in Langley. Ryther offers and develops safe places and opportunities for children, youth and families to heal and grow. The menu this year is: Bacon wrapped stuffed pork loin topped with a black cherry bourbon barbecue sauce. Served with rosemary mashed potatoes and seasonal veggies. Or, seared ling cod topped with a beurre blanc. Served with rice pilaf and seasonal veggies. Both served with a caesar salad. This year’s theme is “Star Light, Star Bright, Let Ryther Shine Tonight“ and you can win a prize by having the best decorated star attire. Just to mention a few procurement items for the auction: Holland America Cruise for two for seven days, wine baskets, Mariners tickets, Swinomish Casino Lodge stay, lots of gift cards and many more items you will want to bid on. Doors open at 5:00pm and dinner begins at 6:00pm. The cost of this fun event is $35 per person. Please contact Sara Wilcox for information and tickets at saraw@whidbey.com or 425-985-1185 [Submitted by Sara Wilcox]

Whidbey Weekly

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Local Business News Whidbey Telecom Is Now A DISH Authorized Retailer

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Whidbey Telecom is excited to announce it has added DISH to its portfolio of product offerings. George Henny, Co-CEO of Whidbey Telecom stated, “The way people are getting their video entertainment is changing fast. People are shifting to streaming video options for entertainment, at home and on the go. People trust us to provide great service, so it is our responsibility to find the best options for our customers and community. We also needed to look for the best, most cost-effective solution for customers who want to stick with regular TV, especially when the major networks are relentlessly forcing massive price increases on us that end up getting passed along to our customers. We are excited that DISH can help us offer both SLING streaming and regular DISH TV options to our communities.” Chris McKnight, CMO of Whidbey Telecom added, “With DISH, customers choose from a variety of TV packages to fit their needs. The equipment is the most technologically advanced in the industry, but it’s still easy to use. DISH was recently ranked number one in customer service by J.D. Power, which shows they listen to their customers. Their wholehome experience puts DISH’s value, technology and service way ahead of the competition.” About Whidbey Telecom Since 1908, Whidbey Telecom has been a locally owned and operated communications service provider serving South Whidbey Island, Hat Island and Point Roberts, Wash. Always connecting the community and a technology pioneer, Whidbey Telecom’s The Big Gig® brought the fastest fiber optic network to South Whidbey Island in 2016. For additional information, please contact marketing@whidbeytel.com or visit www.whidbey.com.

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Dog Parade & Costume Contest Saturday, October 20 10am-2pm • Free Entry!

Mutt Strut registration begins at 11am

Bayview Cash Store • 5603 Bayview Road • Langley Rain or Shine! Event moves next door to Bayview Hall if necessary

PRIZES FOR: best dog costume best celebrity dog best trick best owner/dog costume combo surprise categories!

Also Featuring (10 am – 12 noon) Dog wellness, agility and assistance demonstrations Halloween games for kids and kids at heart Doughnut decorating fun!

More information: www.goosefoot.org • 360-321-4145

Mount Vernon • Anacortes • Camano Island • Whidbey Island 360-424-0115 • www.gnwtitle.com • #fixer • #closer Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.

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SEPTEMBER 27 - OCTOBER 3, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

What’s Going On All entries are listed chronologically, unless there are multiple entries for the same venue or are connected to a specific organization (such as Sno-Isle Libraries) in which case all entries for that venue or organization are listed collectively in chronological order under one heading.

Island Herb Vendor Day Friday, September 28, 3:00pm-6:00pm Island Herb, Freeland Representatives from Ethos will be on site with product displays and information. Island Herb is located at 5565 Vanbarr Pl, Unit F. For more information, call (360) 331-0140 or visit whidbeyislandherb.com

“The Reluctant Radical” Friday, September 28, 6:30pm UUCWI, 20103 SR 525, Freeland The film explores the path that led Mr. Ward to taking direct action despite the personal risks. He was one of five “Valve Turners” who in October 2016 turned off the entire flow of Canadian tar sands oil into the United States. Ken acted here in Washington. The final VT trial of Emily Johnston and Annette Klapstein will begin Oct. 9 in Minnesota. Admission free. Donations will fund legal costs for the Valve Turners and other climate activists. Co-sponsored by Whidbey Environmental Action Network.

Comedy Show Friday, September 28, 8:00pm-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville No cover. For more information, call 360-6825747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

Tour the Farms of Ebey’s Reserve Saturday, September 29, 10:00am-4:00pm A free self-guided tour featuring locally grown food and products all within Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve. Part of Whidbey Island Grown Week. For more details visit https://whidbeyislandgrown.com

Fall Vendor Event Saturday, September 29, 10:00am-4:00pm Oak Harbor Elks Lodge, 155 NE Ernst St. Start your holiday shopping with vendors from the Whidbey Island Small Business Association. For more information, visit www.whidbey islandsba.com

Pumpkin Pitch & Harvest Festival Saturday, September 29, 10:00am-4:00pm Skagit River Park, Burlington View the amazing Pumpkin Pitching machines up close from 10-11:15am. The Opening Ceremony, followed by the accuracy and distance competition, begins at 11:30am. The festival includes a free KidsZone with zucchini car races, pie eating contests, pumpkin painting, activity booths, pony rides, and inflatables. Food vendors on site. Enjoy live music after 2:00pm. Free wagon rides to and from the free parking lot. No admission, parking or activity fees. For more information, call 360-755-9649 or visit burlingtonwa.gov/pumpkinpitch

or at www.penncovebrewing.com. For more information, email info@penncovebrewing. com

stuff and customize your own scarecrow. BBQ lunch provided by donation until the food runs out. For more information, call 360-221-4677.

Live Music: Mussel Flats

Candidate Forum

Saturday, September 29, 7:00pm-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville

Monday, October 8, 10:30am-11:30am Regency on Whidbey, Oak Harbor

Mussel Flats is a classic rock/blues band living and playing music on Whidbey Island. No cover. For more information, call 360-6825747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

This forum will introduce candidates running for County Commissioner, District 3, Rick Hannold and Janet St. Clair. Regency is located at 1040 SW Kimball Drive. For more information, call 360-279-2224 or email tmendiola@ regency-pacific.com

Harvest Faire Sunday, September 30, 12:00pm-5:00pm Greenbank Farm, 765 Wonn Road The event will showcase home-grown produce, flowers, arts and crafts from local farmers and vendors. Plus, enjoy food trucks, antique cars, wine, live music, storytelling and more, all on the pastoral grounds of 1904 Greenbank Farm–one of the last remaining heritage farms on the island. More event details at www.portoc.org. Vendor information at 360-222-3558 or email adminassistant@ portofcoupeville.org.

Candidate Forum Monday, October l, 10:30am-11:30am Regency on Whidbey, Oak Harbor This forum will introduce candidates running for legislative District 10 State Representative Position 1 and 2. Scott McMullen and Norma Smith - Dave Paul and Dave Hayes. Regency is located at 1040 SW Kimball Drive. For more information, call 360-279-2224 or email tmendiola@regency-pacific.com

Candidate Forum Tuesday, October 2, 7:00pm-9:00pm Trinity Lutheran Church, Freeland Candidates will answer questions and discuss topics presented by the League of Women Voters of Whidbey Island. Free and open to the public. Meet Island County Sheriff candidates, Island County Commissioner District 3, State Representative positions 1 and 2, and U.S. Representative candidates.

Candidate Forum Tuesday, October 4, 7:00pm-9:00pm Oak Harbor Elks Lodge, 155 Ernst St. Candidates will answer questions and discuss topics presented by the League of Women Voters of Whidbey Island. Free and open to the public. Meet Island County Sheriff candidates, Island County Commissioner District 3, State Representative positions 1 and 2, and U.S. Representative candidates.

Instant Wine Cellar Friday, October 5, 7:00pm Oak Harbor Elks Lodge, 155 NE Ernst St. An evening to benefit United Way of Island County. Admission is $30 per person. Raffle for the big prize-an instant wine cellar or 99 bottles of beer. Purchase tickets at uwisland@ wavecable.com

Star Party Friday, October 5, 7:30pm Fort Nugent Park, Oak Harbor

Featuring music, children’s activities, food, Cider Store and more. Part of Whidbey Island Grown Week. For more information of the days activities visit http://whidbeyislandcider festival.com

Explore the night sky and view distant galaxies, planets and nebulas at this free public Star Party hosted by the Island County Astronomical Society (ICAS). No telescope is needed and people of all ages are welcome to attend. Be sure and dress warmly and note that the event will be canceled if the weather is cloudy. For more information, contact Bob Scott at ICAS_President@outlook.com or visit www.icas-wa.org.

3rd Annual Bennett Boyles Memorial Golf Tournament

Build a Scarecrow & Help Good Cheer

Whidbey Island Cider Festival Saturday, September 29, 11:00am-4:00pm Pacific Rim Institute, Coupeville

Saturday, September 29, 1:00pm Shotgun Start Whidbey Golf Club, Oak Harbor Proceeds will be used to help local cancer patients and their families. Register at Penn Cove Taproom, 103 S Main St, Coupeville,

Saturday, October 6, 12:00pm-5:00pm Island County Fairgrounds, Langley $10 per scarecrow Bring a can of food for Good Cheer. All materials and instruction provided for you to build,

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED How to Approach a Dog You Don’t Know Saturday, September 29, 10:00am Freeland Library Learn how to approach a dog you do not know and some pointers about when NOT to approach a dog. Presented by Jan Skewes and her therapy dog. Used Book Sale Saturday, October 6, 10:00am-2:00pm Freeland Library Large selection of great books for all ages at bargain prices. Proceeds support Friends of the Freeland Library. Music with Caspar Babypants Saturday, October 6, 2:30pm Clinton Community Hall Enjoy live music for your kids from the one and only Caspar Babypants. Kindie-rock with integrity, inventive lyrics, and just pure fun for the whole family.

Lions Club Blood Drive

Religious Services

Thursday, October 11, 11:00am-5:00pm Coupeville United Methodist Church, 608 N Main St

South Whidbey Community Church

Sponsored by the Coupeville Lions Club. One pint of blood can save 3 lives and we have helped save hundreds of lives in our community hospitals throughout Western Washington. To donate, just drop in or you may schedule an appointment at DonorSched@ psbc.org. For more information, call Paddy Roberts at 360-632-5204 or 360-678-4105.

Open Skate Fridays Every Friday, 6:00pm-8:00pm Roller Barn, 98 NE Barron Dr, Oak Harbor Proceeds support Boys & Girls Club. $5 per skater and $3 for general admission. Last Friday of the month, skate with the Whidbey Island Roller Girls! Sorry, checks not accepted, credit card fees apply. For more information, call (360) 240-9273.

Upcoming Sno-Isle Library Events See schedule below Cost: Free Lit for Fun Book Group Thursday, September 27, 9:00am-11:00am Freeland Library Join us for a discussion of Jessica Shattuck’s “The Women in the Castle,” a powerful and propulsive story of three widows whose lives and fates become intertwined after World War II. Preschool Storytime Thursday, September 27, 10:30am Freeland Library Let imaginations run wild with fun books, sing-alongs and creative activities that prepare young minds for the adventures of reading. Suggested for ages 3-5. Caregiver required. Friday Fun with SAM (Science, Art, Music) Friday, September 28, 10:00am Freeland Library Join us on the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Fridays each month as we explore stories through the lens of science, art, and music. Caregiver required. History On Wheels! Friday, September 28, 1:00pm-2:00pm Coupeville Elementary School Multipurpose Room Join internationally-acclaimed Victorian history expert Gabriel Chrisman and his wife, Sarah (author of the Tales of Chetzemoka cycling club series), in exploring the world of 19th century bicycles! For children ages 5 and up and their caregivers. Coding with Ozobots Friday, September 28, 2:00pm-3:30pm Coupeville Library Ozobots are tiny programmable robots. Using colored markers and paper, program Ozobots to make their way through mazes! For tweens. Please register. Farmers Market Book Sales Saturday, September 29, 10:00am-2:00pm Coupeville Farmers Market Shop locally at the Friends of the Coupeville Library book nook. Books for all ages! All proceeds benefit the Coupeville Library.

Sundays, 9:00am-9:45am Adult Bible Study 10:00am-11:00am Worship Deer Lagoon Grange, 5142 Bayview Rd, Langley Pastor Darrell Wenzek. Worship is followed by a potluck lunch and great fellowship. For more information, call 360-221-1220.

Prayer Group Every Tuesday, 4:00pm-5:30pm St. Hubert Catholic Church, Langley Charismatic Prayer and Praise group. Everyone welcome. For more information, call Bill at (360) 222-4080 or email Sobico@comcast.net.

Filipino Christian Fellowship Sundays, 2:00pm Meets at Church on the Rock, 1780 SE 4th Ave., Oak Harbor. www.ohcfellowship.com

Healing Rooms Every Thursday, 6:30pm-8:30pm 5200 Honeymoon Bay Road, Freeland The Healing Rooms are open to anyone desiring personal prayer for physical, emotional, or spiritual needs. There is a team of Christians from several local churches that are dedicated to praying for healing the sick in our community. All ministry is private, confidential, and free. Teams are available to pray for individuals who drop by on a first-come, first-serve basis. For more information, contact Ann at 425-263-2704, email healingwhidbey.com, or visit the International Association of Healing Rooms at healingrooms.com.

Concordia Lutheran Church Sunday service, 9:30am Bible Study & Sunday School, 10:45am 590 N. Oak Harbor Street For more information, visit www.concordia oakharbor.org or call (360) 675-2548.

Teaching Through God’s Word Sundays, 9:00am & 11:00am Calvary Chapel, 3821 French Road, Clinton For more information, visit ccwhidbey.com.

Unitarian Universalist Sunday Service Sundays, 10:00am Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland All are welcome. Values-based children’s religious exploration classes and childcare will be provided. Visit www.uucwi.org for more information. The Unitarian Universalist Congregation building is located at 20103 Highway 525, two miles north of Freeland.

Unity of Whidbey Sundays, 10:00am 5671 Crawford Road, Langley If you’re one of the “spiritual but not religious” people who questions your childhood faith or is looking for something more, Unity of Whidbey may feel like a homecoming. Visit our website: unityofwhidbey.org WHAT'S GOING ON

continued on page

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Whidbey Weekly

NEWS

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Whidbey Follies Return p. 10 SEPTEMBER 27 - OCTOBER 3, 2018

Growing connections at the root of WIG Week By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly

Hold onto your hats, the second annual Whidbey Island Grown Week is upon us! The 10-day celebration of all things grown and produced on Whidbey promises even more events and experiences starting Friday and running through Sunday, Oct. 7. Harvest parties, farm tours, cooking demonstrations and farm-to-table events abound. “I’m looking forward to the diversity of events this year,” said WIG steering committee chair John Burks, of Kettle’s Edge Farm. “We’ve got some great offerings, including individual businesses offering specials to those who mention WIG Week, some great farm-to-table events, Slow Food Whidbey is offering a sausage-making class – just some really fantastic events.”

Two big additions this year are self-guided mini farm tours, reminiscent of the annual farm tour conducted across the island in the past.

“I think a couple of neat things are the tours of farms,” Burks said. “We’ve got the tour of the farms of Ebey’s Reserve on Saturday, which includes eight farms plus the Pacific Rim Institute, which will be holding its second annual Cider Festival. The following weekend (Oct. 6 and 7) is the Progressive Cycling Tour of Maxwelton Valley. “One of the things we hoped when the former Farm Tour ended was that local farms would pick up the activity,” Burks continued. “This is an effort to do that and as time progresses, we hope more farms will become engaged.” “I said I’d do it immediately,” said Liz Sherman of Sherman’s Pioneer Farm in Coupeville about the idea of the Saturday farm tour. “We’re here anyway and it’s a great thing that brings the community together. People are always concerned there’s nothing to do on Whidbey. Well, there’s lots to do, it’s just different. Going on a farm is really cool.” Sherman’s Pioneer Farm, which is open daily through October, is one of eight farms open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. Other farms include Eckholm Farm, Lavender Wind Farm, Bell’s Farm, Willowood Farm, Prairie Bottom Farm, Rosehip Farm and Garden and Kettle’s Edge Farm. Pacific Rim institute is also included in the tour. (Maps and more information are available Saturday at the Coupeville Farmers Market or online at www.whidbeyislandgrown.com.)

Photo by Jack Penland Locally grown garlic hangs to dry at Willowood Farm, just one of hundreds of Whidbey Island Grown products available.

Photo by Sherrye Wyatt Making connections and promoting products grown and produced on Whidbey Island is what Whidbey Island Grown is all about and the second annual WIG Week, starting Friday and running through Sunday, Oct. 7, celebrates that. Gathered at Bayview Farmers Market from left are WIG members Stephen Williams of Foxtail Farm, Gloria Mickunas, of Whidbey Party Girls, Susan Prescott of South Whidbey Tilth and Loren Imes of Quail’s Run Farm.

trolley rides, our pumpkin patch and lots and lots of organically-grown vegetables, mostly squash,” said Sherman. “In addition, there will be food tasting – we’ll show you all the different things you can make with Sugar Hubbard squash, like smoothies, parfaits and mac n’ cheese. I might make some mini shepherd pies, with squash on top instead of mashed potatoes.” Sherman said there will be plenty of people on hand in case folks want to tour the farm’s processing plant as well. Greenbank Farm has also joined in WIG Week activities and will be holding its first ever Harvest Faire from noon to 5 p.m. Sunday.

The tour is a great opportunity to discuss conservation and growing practices with farmers as well as livestock management and much more. Of course, this time of year all the farms will have produce available.

“We’ll have vendors from all over Whidbey – over 20 so far – including artists, food vendors, home grown produce, flowers and arts and crafts,” said Kellie Tormey with the Port of Coupeville/Greenbank Farm. “Each merchant will be demonstrating something that pertains to their business, Master Gardeners will have activities like making a fairy garden and we’ve invited antique and vintage cars and trucks to be there, so there will be a people’s choice award for that. Plus, there will be live music from Steve DeHaven throughout the day.”

“We’re going to have our regular fare, plus we’re going to have our haunted barn – which is pretty family-friendly –

See WIG continued on page 10

Balda’s Brier proposal stirs concerns By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly A proposed manufactured housing community near the intersection of Miller and Balda Roads at the site of an old chicken farm south of Oak Harbor has ruffled some feathers among its potential new neighbors. The developer sees the project, called Balda’s Brier, as a potential solution to Whidbey Island’s affordable housing crisis. Some neighbors see it as the “introduction of urban blight into a rural community,” as one public comment put it. Members of the existing neighborhood, who answered questions as a group and did not want to be identified individually, said they have four primary concerns about the project. “A, personal safety. The present road designs at existing intersections, with additional traffic, will create a greater potential for vehicular collisions,” the group told Whidbey Weekly via email. “B, consideration should be given that two other large developments are proposed within a mile of this development. C, compromising of the current aquifer – the property proposed for this development has a history of contamination from poultry manure that has the potential of contaminating our present aquifer, drinking water and surrounding properties. D, increased storm water runoff.” The proposal by Harborsmith Properties calls for 30 manufactured homes to be built on

the 20-acre parcel, which is currently owned by William and Kathleen Massey of Oak Harbor. The community would be accessed off Miller Road and would include a 50-foot landscaped buffer, open space and community trails, resident and guest parking, plus bulk storage, and a retention pond. “All the news coverage on affordable housing shortages piqued my interest in trying to find a way to partially alleviate the issue,” said Colin Smith of Harborsmith Properties, who is purchasing the land. “After review of the code, I found this style of development provides a niche opportunity to provide a more affordable option to Whidbey Island’s senior, military, and workforce population. I hope to create a desirable community while simultaneously preserving the rural character of the area through ample open space and landscape buffering.” According to Smith, as of late last week the land use permit review process was on hold with Island County, pending analysis from a project hydrogeologist, so no final decision has been made on the permit. “Island County staff has requested information from the applicant to complete our review,” said Jonathan Lange, a senior planner with Island County. “Once our review is complete, a State Environmental Protection Agency Determination will be made, which has a 14-day appeal period. Once the appeal period is complete, a public hearing can be scheduled.”

No dates have yet been set for a public hearing. The community group said it wants to be sure the county and the state are following proper procedures. “Community neighbors want to be assured that Island County and the State of Washington follow existing guidelines to ensure our environment and quality of lifestyle are not compromised,” they wrote. “In addition, the SEPA form previously submitted on this proposed development should be reviewed for inaccuracies as well as a more in-depth traffic study [conducted] during summer months as opposed to December.” Smith said he is meeting all the requirements, especially where concerns have been raised. “In regards to concerns noted about contamination of existing aquifer, Island County has Critical Aquifer Recharge Review as part of its anti-degradation policy,” he said. “Based on county hydrogeologist review of proposed LOSS (septic), it is required that additional private analysis is undertaken to determine the proposal’s effect on groundwater prior to a decision being made. Washington Department of Health also has environmental review of proposed LOSS as part of its process prior to approving for engineering.” As far as stormwater runoff, there are pre-existing issues with road washout on nearby Scenic Heights Road, said Smith, who claims the project has been designed with that in mind.

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly A proposal to build a manufactured home community on land that was once a chicken farm has several area neighbors concerned. Balda’s Brier would consist of 30 homes on the 20-acre parcel of land.

“The proposed development layout avoids the eastern portion of the existing parcel to avoid contributing runoff to that area,” said Smith. “Stormwater facilities were sized using a conservative approach, in addition to utilizing an emergency overflow mechanism with adequate vegetative buffer to ensure the project won’t contribute runoff above the pre-developed rate.” Smith also said there is no proposed or required mitigation related to the property’s past poultry operation, but that is part of the review process by the state DOH and Island County. Area residents remain unconvinced. “Community neighbors suggest the proposed project be put on hold until the proper infrastructure is in place, i.e. roads, water and sewer,” they said. Should the permit for the project be approved, Smith anticipates construction of Balda’s Brier would begin in the spring or summer of 2019.

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SEPTEMBER 27 - OCTOBER 3, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Island 911

Seriously, we do not make this stuff up! MONDAY, SEPT. 17 6:13 am, NE Ernst St. Caller advising wife just walked out of house. 6:43 am, SW Stremler Dr. Reporting party advising Subaru Forrester is parked in wrong direction on sidewalk. 8:01 am, SR 20 Male caller whispering, states he needs officers to contact him discreetly for information; refused to provide further. 5:26 pm, SR 20 Advising motorcycle passed cars on red light at Swantown on sidewalk. TUESDAY, SEPT. 18 6:56 am, SW Stremler Dr. White Subaru Forrester missing front license plate is parked on sidewalk facing wrong direction. 7:47 am, SR 20 Female in a brown Honda Odyssey screaming out her window “rapist” and swear words, video taping people in parking lot. 7:58 am, SR 20 Honda Odyssey is driving on SR 20 hanging out window taking pictures of people and yelling; now pulled over across from Safeway toward Walgreens.

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2:09 pm, SE Bayshore Dr. Advising female blocked caller in with her gray minivan so he could not leave and yelled that he “T-boned” her, then took his picture. Demanded caller’s insurance. When he said no, she left. 4:33 pm, SE Regatta Dr. Male subject in bathroom yelling, pounding and acting out. 4:56 pm, SR 20 Reporting party advising they were just photographed by woman just now; woman just left, vehicle a Honda minivan. 5:09 pm, SR 20 Advising woman came into location and took photos and video of people inside store. When approached she screamed that she did not need to talk to them. 5:48 pm, SE City Beach St. Caller advising man walked up behind her in bleachers, kept staring at caller. Moved closer and stood behind her, moved away after speaking to caller. WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 19 2:28 am, NE Goldie St. Reporting party advising male subject pulled fire alarm and attempted to fight another customer, then threw keys and wallet into bush and left.

9:20 am, NE Ernst St. Reporting party states she isn’t sure what happened but believes husband is dead.

THURSDAY, SEPT. 20 11 am, SW Erie St. About an hour ago, a white female in her 40s taking pictures of license plates.

12:46 pm, SE Barrington Dr. Caller advising when she arrived at work, a woman in white van pulled up and took a picture of her.

11:33 am, SE Barrington Dr. Reporting party went to location to get change of clothes, says male subjects were rude to her.

1:42 pm, SE Barrington Dr. Reporting party advising female transient is living in driveway between Island Thrift and Habitat. Subject continues to not wear shirt and go to bathroom in area.

1:10 pm, NE O’Leary St. Caller advising being contacted by subject’s estranged husband; states he is returning to Oak Harbor and bringing hell with him.

1:54 pm, SE Pioneer Way Advising female in Honda Odyssey is driving up and down Pioneer Way taking pictures of vehicle.

3:55 pm, SR 20 Reporting female in parking lot taking pictures and being belligerent; getting into vehicle now, brown van.

2:09 pm, SE Midway Blvd. Reporting party advising woman he reported before just came back and again took pictures. Honda Odyssey heading up Pioneer Way.

7:22 pm, NE Midway Blvd. Reporting party states vehicle parked at McDonald’s with numerous license plates inside vehicle. Report provided by OHPD & Island County Sheriff’s Dept.

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Life Tributes Marguerite G. “Peggie” Suess Marguerite “Peggie” Suess passed away peacefully with her family by her side Saturday, Sept. 22, 2018, just one month after celebrating her 100th birthday. Peggie was born in Oshkosh, Wis., the second oldest in a family of eight children. She graduated from Oshkosh High School in 1936, then attended Oshkosh State Teachers’ College for one year and worked at the family owned business–The Bowen Street Tavern, famous for its fish and chips and chop suey, all prepared by her father, Leo and mother, Martha (Pofahl) Lueck. Later she was employed as head of the Stenographic Department at the Oshkosh Vocational School, supervising seven employees. She and husband, John Suess, were married in Oshkosh Aug. 4, 1942. John entered the Army Aug.12, 1942 and was discharged in January, 1946. Peggie and John left Oshkosh and moved to the Seattle area where she worked as a secretary at James Madison Junior High. John and Peggie’s brother, Bud Lueck, bought a fishing boat and planned to fish in Alaska. When that venture did not work out the boat was sold, but not before it had pulled into a safe harbor–Oak Harbor–during a storm. Peggie and John loved the small community and moved to Oak Harbor Feb. 14, 1947. March 17, 1947, Peggie was hired to work in the Civilian Personnel Office at NAS Whidbey Island, starting as a Clerk Typist–GS-2. She retired from her illustrious career June 29, 1975 after 32 years of service. She attained the title of Principal Classifier/ Personnel Specialist and, at the time of her retirement was the highest graded female employee on the base. Peggie had a notebook full of awards and commendations for her work in Civilian Personnel and was selected as “Employee of the Year” by NAS Whidbey in 1966, 1967 and 1971. Peggie not only excelled at her job but she participated in many community activities. She was a charter/life member of the Oak Harbor Emblem Club #450 and served as their president in 1996-97 and 2000-2001. She was also a member of the Oak Harbor Senior Center and served as Vice Chairman and Chairman of the Senior Coordinating Committee from 1992-94. She was a former member and

past president of the Oak Harbor Business Women’s Association and the Oak Harbor Toastmistress Club, held an honorary lifetime membership in the Federal Managers’ Association, and founded and operated, along with sister Denise, the Whidbey Vagabond Senior Travel and Social Club until it was dissolved due to the opening of the Oak Harbor Senior Center. In her younger days she loved to bowl, served as president of the North Whidbey Women’s Bowling Association and participated in three leagues. She was nominated for Oak Harbor Woman of the Year twice. Peggie has been a member of St Augustine Catholic Church since her arrival in Oak Harbor in 1947, taught religious education classes, served on the first Parish Council, and was president from 1980-82. She was a regular greeter at the 5 p.m. mass. In 2010, she moved from her Oak Harbor home of 48 years to Summer Hill where she was selected Resident of the Month in January 2011. To keep her mind sharp, Peggie played bingo at Summer Hill, was an avid reader, and could be found with daughter, Martha, at the casino most Mondays playing the nickel poker slot machines. All who knew Peggie characterized her as a classy lady full of integrity, strong in her faith, and thankful for all her blessings. She used her many talents to make this community a better place. Peggie (and John) were blessed with two surviving daughters, Martha (Gary) Wallin and Julie (Ralph III) Houser. Also surviving are four grandchildren, Rachel, Ralph IV, Jason and Matthew, and five great-grandchildren Sam, Alex, Adelaide, Linnea, and Ralph V. Two sisters, Ruth McMahon of San Antonio, Texas and Denise Bradshaw of Apache Junction, Ariz., as well as many nieces and nephews, also survive. She was preceded in death by her husband John in 1979, son-in-law Gary Wallin in 2017, her parents, and siblings Valeria, Donald, Bernard, Carol and Leo. A funeral mass will be celebrated Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018, 10 a.m. at St Augustine Catholic Church, Oak Harbor with Rev Paul Pluth, JCL as celebrant. Mass will be followed by a reception in the parish hall. Peggie will be laid to rest at Pioneer Cemetery, next to her beloved husband, John, and many of her family members. The family suggests memorials to St. Augustine Catholic Church or the Oak Harbor Emblem Club #450, PO Box 666, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Arrangements were entrusted to Wallin Funeral Home.

Life Tributes can now be found online at www.whidbeyweekly.com

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Make a Difference By Bruce Gordon

Farm Planner, Whidbey Island Conservation District

A PRIMER ON FARM PLANNING: “HAVE A NEXT, SO YOU’RE NOT ALWAYS AT THE END OF YOUR LINE” I’d like to begin this column with some quotes as pertinent to successful farm conservation planning as to any other planning. “Few people have any next, they live from hand-to-mouth without a plan, and are always at the end of their line.” Ralph Waldo Emerson; “If you don’t know where you are going, you’ll end up someplace else.” Yogi Berra; “A good plan today is better than a perfect plan tomorrow.” George S. Patton. The purpose of farm conservation planning is to help you get where you want to go with your farm. Even if you don’t identify your property as a farm, there are many benefits conservation planning can provide for the management of your rural acreage. Farm conservation planning is figuring out where you want to go, identifying the problems keeping you from getting there, coming up with alternatives to overcome these problems, and deciding which alternatives you are going to implement and how and when you will implement them. We at Whidbey Island Conservation District (WICD) follow the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) planning process. It is a dynamic, adaptive process that has been refined and improved over years of use. NRCS supports the process with a vast array of supporting resources, many of which are available in online technical guides by the county. You can learn more about these technical guides by visiting www.nrcs.usda. gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/national/technical/ fotg/. The planning process has three phases, each broken down into steps. The graphic below illustrates these phases and steps. Let’s take a look at these steps to learn more about the farm planning process and how you might incorporate these ideas into the management of your property’s natural resources when working with a conservation planner.

Farm Planning Phase I: Collection and Analysis Step 1 – Identify problems and opportunities: The need for a conservation plan often starts with identification of resource problems and concerns about your property, with or without ideas of how to resolve them. Step 2 – Determine objectives: I like to broaden this to “goals and objectives.” Goals are statements about desired future conditions; they are broad, long-term, and often not particularly measurable. For your farm or rural acreage, they may pertain to quality of life, forms of production, and landscape conditions. Objectives are steps to take to achieve goals. They are specific, short or medium term, and are measurable. These are the goals and objectives of the decision maker, the land owner, or operator. Along the lines of the Yogi Berra quote, goals and objectives are expressions of where we want to go.

Step 3 – Inventory resources: This is taking stock of and documenting existing natural resource conditions on your property, together with the economic and social issues related to them. Step 4 – Analyze resource data: In this step, the resource information gathered in step 3 is evaluated, primarily using tools and criteria from the NRCS technical guide, in order to more clearly understand your property’s natural resource conditions and better identify resource concerns and potential opportunities for you as a landowner. Farm Planning Phase II: Decision Support Step 5 – Formulate alternatives: In this step, planners like myself can work with you to put forth alternatives (known as “practices”) to achieve your goals and objectives, address your property’s resource concerns, and take advantage of opportunities available to you to improve resource conditions. Step 6 – Evaluate alternatives: We work with you to assess the alternatives presented in step 5 to better determine whether they will advance the goals and objectives and effectively address the identified resource concerns and opportunities. Economic, social, and ecological concerns are evaluated, with attention to compliance with laws and ordinances.

SEPTEMBER 27 - OCTOBER 3, 2018

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Step 7 – Make decisions: The decision maker (you as the land owner or operator) selects your preferred alternatives, schedules practice implementation, and works with a farm planner to develop appropriate and effective specifications for implementation of the selected practices. Farm Planning Phase III: Application and Evaluation Step 8 – Implement the plan: The land owner or operator then implements the selected practices, sometimes with detailed information and design assistance from WICD. In some cases, WICD is able to secure funds to pay some of the costs for expensive practices that provide public benefits, such as water quality improvement. In such cases WICD enters into a contract with the landowner in order to clearly establish the expectations and responsibilities of both parties. Step 9 – Evaluate the plan: Few farm plans are 100 percent effective in achieving the goals and objectives for which they were developed. Glitches, unforeseen circumstances, and incompletely understood relationships often result in less than perfect outcomes. This step is to evaluate the outcomes in light of the plan and its implementation, in order to identify adjustments and improvements to make continued and future efforts more effective. Getting back to the George Patton quote, a good plan today will generally help you get where you’re trying to go more effectively than a “perfect” plan sometime in the future, and carefully carrying out step 9 will make that future plan closer to perfection. Whidbey Island Conservation District would be happy to provide you with information and direct planning assistance, within the constraints of our available resources, to help you develop and implement a farm conservation plan to better meet your goals and objectives and address natural resource concerns on and around your farm. To learn more about our farm planning services and other program offerings, visit www.whidbeycd.org or give us a call at (888) 678-4922.

A 10-day celebration of all things Whidbey! www.whidbeyislandgrown.com

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10 SEPTEMBER 27 - OCTOBER 3, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

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Whidbey Follies return after 25 years By Kacie Jo Voeller Whidbey Weekly

For the first time in a quarter-century, the stage is set this weekend for two shows of Whidbey Island comedy served up Saturday Night Live-style. The Whidbey Follies will take place at Coupeville High School Performing Arts Center Saturday at 7 p.m. and Sunday at 3 p.m. Tickets are available at the door for $15 and doors will open 30 minutes prior to each show. David and Pat Howell, the show’s writers, director and assistant director, respectively, said people have been asking about the return of the Follies since they have been back on Whidbey Island. This is the year they decided to go ahead and start the show again. From skits involving a presidential visit to Whidbey Island to a town hall where everything from the parking in Coupeville to water pollution is brought up, the Follies take on both national and local news in a comical and musical way, David said. “We get ideas — we look at the newspapers and see what the issues are, what can we deal with, what we can talk about,” he said. “Once you get an idea, it is really easy to develop it and then the music just sort of comes and fits.” Additional pieces of the show will include performances by Wild Man Cooley before the opening act and after intermission, plus numbers done by the ensemble group, Saratoga Sirens, Howell said. Returning to the show to tackle a new issue, the Haller House, will be the Sisters of Perpetual Preservation. In fact, the show’s proceeds will be donated to the Haller House campaign and the Island County Museum. “We are restoring the Haller House, so we do a skit which involves the Sisters of Perpetual Preservation — four nuns,” David said. “They first made their appearance back in 1989, different people, but the nuns were there to tackle issues like the Catholic church wanting to redo the siding on the church. The church wanted to put up vinyl siding and of course, there

is nothing historic about vinyl siding. It was a big issue in town. They are coming back to deal with the restoration and the preservation of the Haller House.”

The show has a history of being used to raise funds for a number of causes. Originally, the show was used to fund the efforts of Concerts on the Cove, a community concert organization started by the Howells. “We were thinking, ‘What could we do to raise money?’” David said. “We went through the usual bake sales and then we thought, well, what is Concerts on the Cove all about? It is about performances. So, we said, ‘Let’s put on a show. Let’s put on a performance.’ It’s what we do.” “It is a ‘fun-raiser’ as well as a fundraiser,” Pat Howell said. The new show has brought new challenges with it, according to David. “This one has been difficult because it is like starting all over from scratch,” he said. “We did not know many people or who the performers were and where the resources were, so it has been a learning curve, a steep learning curve.” The Howells said their favorite aspect of putting on the Whidbey Follies was the process of writing it and then getting to see it materialize on a stage. “We are excited to see it get on the stage finally,” David said. “The whole process is fun and it all comes to fruition when it is finally up there on stage and we get to see the audience’s response. That is why we do it. It is why anybody does anything on stage.” Howell has a background in performance and prior to his time creating the Follies, he was an opera performer. With his experience, creating the Whidbey Follies came naturally, he said. “I have spent my whole life on or around a stage,” said David. Kay Foss, who took part in the earlier Follies, said she will play the role of questioning the president in this show. In the last one in which she participated, she played an angel.

Kacie Jo Voeller/Whidbey Weekly David Howel plays Hassam Fazir in a “Camel Lot” skit at this weekend’s Whidbey Follies, to be held Saturday at 7 p.m. and Sunday at 3 p.m. at Coupevile High School’s Performing Arts Center.

“I like the combination of singing and a little bit of acting, because that is all I wanted, just a little bit (of acting). Singing is one of the things I really like to do.” Foss has known the Howells for a number of years and agreed to take part in the show again on one of her visits to The Salty Mug, a coffee shop run by the Howells. “I said I would do it early on,” Foss said. “The best parts of the show are that I like to sing and I like the way it comes together. Pat and David are great at creating the Follies and knowing how far to go.” Foss said the Whidbey Follies and the issues the show takes on in a comical manner can help tackling those challenges seem a bit less daunting. “In a time of stress, and at any time, it is good to poke fun at things,” she said. “It is good to find the laughter in things and laughing about something can make it easier.” For more information, call the Howells at 360-320-8847.

WIG continued from page 7 Fans of Whidbey Pies may enjoy a very special – and potentially messy – competition at 1 p.m. Sunday. “Whidbey Pies is sponsoring a celebrity pie-eating contest featuring Island County Commissioner Jill Johnson, Darci Chowen from Amazon and Port of South Whidbey Commissioner Curt Gordon, so we’ll have representatives from the north end of the island to the south,” Tormey said. It seemed a natural fit for the Port of Coupeville and Greenbank Farm to join with Whidbey Island Grown in promoting all Whidbey has to offer, according to Tormey. “With merchant support, we saw this as an opportunity to partner with Whidbey Island Grown,” she said. “It’s a great fit to showcase the best of Whidbey Island and so it’s a perfect collaboration.” “Greenbank Farm becoming part of Whidbey Island Grown was really important for us as an organization and we’re glad they have joined,” said Burks. “Looking down the road, I see a lot of opportunities to use the location as a venue for future activities and events. It’s a fabulous location that’s central to the island and it’s just a great space.”

Pierzchala earns Eagle Scout

Photos by Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly Andrew Michael Pierzchala of Oak Harbor has joined an elite group – officially achieving the rank of Eagle Scout at a Court of Honor Sunday evening at the American Legion. Pierzchala, who graduated in June from Oak Harbor High School, has been a member of the Boy Scouts of America since 2006. Implemented in 1911, Eagle Scout is the highest rank in Boy Scouting and represents a milestone of achievement. Scouts must meet several requirements and complete their final project before they turn 18 in order to qualify. At Sunday’s ceremony, several Eagle Scouts joined Pierzchala as he took the oath, reaffirming theirs along with him. He joins a group that includes the likes of Neil Armstrong, Gerald Ford, James Lovell, Gary Locke, Mike Rowe and Steven Spielberg, to name just a few. Pierzchala is attending Skagit Valley College and plans to pursue a career in business.

Forming partnerships and collaborations which showcase all the island has to offer is at the heart of Whidbey Island Grown. The organization has nearly doubled in membership since last year and Burks is confident the 501 (c)6 will continue to grow. WIG has a broad scope of membership, allowing all different kinds of businesses and organizations with products and services unique to Whidbey Island to join, from farms and community-supported agriculture to lodging, dining and catering, locally produced products and more. Slow Food Whidbey Island is a founding member. “The reason for our involvement is the majority of the categories into which WIG members fall have to do with the production, preparation and serving of locally grown food, which is a fundamental part of the Slow Food mission,” said Merv Floyd, president of Slow Food Whidbey and a WIG steering committee member. “WIG is essentially a community effort for related businesses to band together for mutual benefit,” he said. “We therefore feel it is important to support this effort which is aimed at improving the visibility of these local businesses and their products to customers both here on the island and on the mainland. Promoting the brand name (WIG) and hopefully making Whidbey a center for agri-tourism will bring more revenue to the island.” Business-to-business connections are helped along by WIG events during the year. “One of the main things we do is our networking events with our membership, where they can share ideas about their business and find opportunities for synergies,” Burks said. “That’s what we’re about – to help local businesses find opportunities for collaboration and networking that at the end of the day highlight the best of Whidbey Island in both products and local services.” For being only the second annual event, many of the WIG Week activities have already established a following, such as the Slow Food class on the art of sausage-making. There is currently a waiting list to take part. (slowfoodwhidbey.org) “This is typical for most of our events, which validates our belief that such classes are needed and desired by the community,” said Floyd. There are plenty of other events going on throughout the week and everyone is encouraged to check out the complete schedule at whidbeyislandgrown.com. “WIG is doing a super job of promoting local and organically grown products,” said Sherman. “If you live on Whidbey, there’s nothing you can’t get here. Beef, lamb, pork, veggies – if you search it out, you can find it. This time of year, there are tons of apples, plums - everything you need is right here.”

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Film Shorts

SEPTEMBER 27 - OCTOBER 3, 2018 LOCALLY OPERATED

WHY GO OVER THE BRIDGE FOR YOUR CUSTOM FRAMING & ART SUPPLIES?

Courtesy of Cascadia Weekly

Crazy Rich Asians: The first movie with an all-Asian cast since “Memoirs of a Geisha,” this adaptation of the blockbuster bestseller translates to the big screen with the kind of ease only money can buy. Critically acclaimed and a success at the box office, here’s hoping Hollywood is starting to realize that representation rules. ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 1 min.) Fahrenheit 11/9: Michael Moore is back and he’s in fine fighting form in this documentary that examines how we got here and how we, as private citizens and stakeholders in our democracy, can battle back from the brink. ★★★★ (R • 2 hrs. 6 min.) Hell Fest: The plot conceit of this horror flick is simple: A masked killer stalks victims at an elaborately staged Halloween carnival. It probably won’t be that great, but then again, I don’t think it’s supposed to be. Let the bleeding begin. ★★ (R • 1 hr. 29 min.) The House with a Clock in its Walls: Eli Roth, one of the fathers of the cinematic blight that is torture porn, is the director of this kids’ comedy starring Jack Black and Cate Blanchett and I am not at all sure how to feel about this. ★★★ (PG • 1 hr. 44 min.) Life Itself: A multigenerational family saga written and directed by Dan Fogelman, the man responsible for the multigenerational family saga “This Is Us.” Although his ideas don’t fare as well on the big screen as they have on the small one, you’re still going to want to bring a dozen hankies to the theater with you. ★ (R • 1 hr. 57 min.) Night School: A group of high school dropouts tries to earn their GEDs in what I’m sure is a fine vehicle for Kevin Hart to show off his comedic chops, but let’s be real: We’re all here for Tiffany Haddish. ★★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 51 min.) The Nun: A character from a movie sequel somehow gets its own spinoff–and that should tell you everything you need to know about the state of mainstream Hollywood at the moment. If you want to be freaked out all over again by the creepy nun from “The Conjuring 2,” you now get your chance. ★ (R • 1 hr. 36 min.) Peppermint: Jennifer Garner returns to her action-adventure roots as a woman who sees her entire family murdered and then turns her body into a lethal weapon in order to exact

revenge. Do Jen a favor and just rewatch “Alias” instead. ★ (R) The Predator: If we must have a retooling of the Predator franchise, I suppose the man responsible for some of the most over-thetop movies of the 1980s, Shane Black, is the right man to have at the helm. If you’re trying to parse the previous sentence, I believe the term you’re looking for is “damning with faint praise.” ★ (R • 1 hr. 41 min.) A Simple Favor: This thriller starring Blake Lively (love her) and Anna Kendrick (love her too) has all the look of a big-budget Lifetime movie–and that is not an insult. Gather up some girlfriends, smuggle in some White Claw and make a night at the movies of it. ★★★★ (R • 1 hr. 56 min.)

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Smallfoot: In a world populated by yetis, people are the thing to be feared in this movie which is only original if you haven’t seen the far superior “Monsters, Inc.” But it’s good enough for kids, and not every animated movie can be a Pixar film. ★★★ (PG • 1 hr. 49 min.) White Boy Rick: This based-on-a-true story account of a teenage FBI informant-turneddrug-dealer that stars Matthew McConaughey seems like it should hit all of the cinematic sweet spots. If you’re starting to wonder whether the McConaissance was more myth than man, so am I. ★★ (R • 1 hr. 51 min.)

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12

SEPTEMBER 27 - OCTOBER 3, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Let’s Dish! with Kae Harris

What’s in a Sausage? There are many different foods we discuss here, many different ingredients; the herbs, spices and methods of cooking, all part and parcel of foodtalk. As with just about everything in history, so much can be left to guesswork. Perhaps aspects of the food world are indeed misunderstood, and think of all the recipes and techniques which have been lost to the ages! This is where we fill in the blanks, I think, take stock of current inventory and work backwards – a bit like retracing our steps – in order to get a glimpse as to where a certain food item or dish originated. That’s half the fun, though, right? If we’re lucky enough, we get little crumbs of evidence telling us all about the history of a dish. Sometimes it’s preserved in hand-me-down tales from generation to generation and other times it’s inked somewhere for us to draw inspiration from and make new and exciting meals. Preserved throughout history, in exactly this way, is sausage. I’m not just talking about the stuff we tend to eat at breakfast with our scrambled eggs, although that, too, is part of it all. I’m talking about the many different forms it can take and all the ways we find to put it into our meals. Sausage is a mixture of ground meat, fat and salt. Nowadays we can find it stuffed into casings, sometimes with added fillers and preservatives, other times not. It can also be found in bulk form, sans the casing, and this is kind of what many of us might know best as a breakfast item. Now, when it comes to sausage, the ways in which it’s prepared and made are endless, though the process of allowing us to be endlessly creative with this foodstuff means the item itself is divided into different categories. There’s fresh sausage, which is made from fresh meat that has not been cured nor smoked in any way and must be cooked prior to consumption, while cooked sausage, on the other hand, is just that – a cooked form of the food made from uncured meats that are also not smoked. Then you have your cooked, smoked sausage, which is made from smoked meats that have been cured before cooking; you can think of this category as one which includes hotdogs. Uncooked sausage

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is cured and smoked and will later be cooked before being consumed. Next, we have dry sausage, a.k.a. summer sausage. Its moniker is derived from the fact refrigeration is unnecessary, even in the warmer months, and it’s made from cured sausage that has been air-dried under strict conditions which monitors its time, temperature and the humidity (nowadays at any rate). Salami and chorizo are classic examples of this type of sausage. Let’s just say this is my favorite category, because as someone who grew up eating salami sandwiches, I can attest to each step of the process being equally important, (even if I wasn’t really thinking about the process of salami sausage-making when I was scarfing some down). Last but not least, we have specialty meats, which encompasses a wide range of meat products either cured or uncured, which are then normally baked, formed into loaves and sliced into slivers which are often found in salads and sandwiches. It seems a rather tedious process, I imagine, to make sausage, and the categories themselves are hell-bent on the details that strictly divide your end product into its designated group, which is all dependent on how it was prepared. Even though details separate the many different kinds of sausage from one another, one thing seems to remain constant all over the world and that’s the simple fact people thoroughly enjoy sausage – including the kinds not derived from animal products. I wonder if we love it so much because of the amusing shape it often takes, in addition to, of course, the multitudinous ways it’s spiced and cooked? This makes me wonder then, why would anyone first have conceived of the idea of a sausage? Probably out of necessity and to ensure every last little morsel of something was used in its entirety. How best though, to ensure each little bit you scraped up from the meat wasn’t truly wasted if you didn’t or couldn’t eat it all in one go? By salting it or smoking it. It’s thought the rise of sausages was all thanks to humans’ increasing ability to coordinate their hunting strategies in order to bring down larger game, resulting in more meat. This would eventually necessitate a way to preserve meat not readily used so it wouldn’t spoil and go to waste. Some

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4,000 years ago, it’s believed ancient Mesopotamians were experimenting with stuffing meat into intestinal casings and salting it. From there the history of the sausage seems to have merely been preserved and continued by using whatever each culture had available. The word itself comes from Latin ‘Salsus,’ which means ‘salted,’ as well as the Northern French word ‘saussiche.’ Regardless of what the word is or where and from whence it came, the sausage is a ubiquitous part of most cultures in one way or another. In South Africa we throw ‘boerewors’ onto the grill at barbecues, because it really isn’t a barbecue (or what we call, a ‘braai’) without it. What boerewors is to South Africa, Bratwurst might be to Germany and Andouille to France - such is the ubiquity of the food - and just like its ability to permeate so many facets of life across the world, are the ways in which we prepare it. From stews and soups to breakfast, sandwiches and more, the sausage always seems to find its niche. Do you, fellow foodies, have a favorite kind of sausage dish? I happen to love good old fashioned ‘bangers and mash,’ so I’ll include a recipe for it. It was a staple in my home and with good reason! If you try this dish, let me know how you like it! Please send any and all comments, questions and definitely recipes you would like to share to letsdish.whidbeyweekly@gmail.com and we’ll do just that and Dish!

Bangers and Mash 4-6 pork sausage links (you could use smoked sausage too) 1 ½ to 2 pounds red potatoes, peeled and cubed ¼ cup butter 4 tablespoons milk Salt and pepper to taste 2 tablespoons butter 1 ½ large yellow onions, chopped 6 cups beef broth 2 cups red wine (Can be substituted with 2 more cups of broth)

Dining Guide

continued from page

Whidbey Quakers Sundays, 4:00pm-5:00pm Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland Whidbey Islands Friends Meeting (also known as Quakers) meet in silent worship and community, with occasional spoken messages, every Sunday at the Unitarian Universalist building. For more information, contact Tom Ewell at tewell@whidbey.com or go to www. whidbeyquakers.org.

First Church of Christ, Scientist Worship, 10:00am Sunday School to age 20, 10:00am Wednesday Testimony Meeting, 2:30pm Christian Science Reading Room Tuesday & Friday, 11:00am-3:00pm Wednesday 3:30pm-5:30pm The church and Reading Room are located at 721 SW 20th Court at Scenic Heights Street, Oak Harbor. Call (360) 675-0621 or visit christianscience.com Services and Sunday School are also held at 10:30am on South Whidbey at 15910 Highway 525, just north of Bayview and across from Useless Bay Road; testimony meetings are held the first Wednesday of each month at 7:30pm.

Tame Your Sugar Habit Saturday, September 29, 10:30am-12:00pm Bayview School, 5611 Bayview Rd, Langley In this free workshop you will learn three keys to overcome sugar cravings. Seating is limited. Please RSVP at drjanehealthcoach@gmail.com or 360-331-1726.

Free Life Skill Workshops: Estate Planning Tuesday, October 2, 1:00pm-3:00pm Concordia Lutheran Church, Oak Harbor Presented by Concordia Community Academy. For more information or to register, visit concordiaoakharbor.org or call 360-679-1697.

DUI/Underage Drinking Prevention Panel Thursday, October 4, 6:45pm Oak Harbor Library Meeting Room No pre-registration required, no late admittance allowed. Open to all and required by local driving schools for driver’s education students and parents. More information, call 360-672-8219 or visit www.idipic.org.

Let Us Take Care Of Dinner! Too Tired To Cook? Get Your Dinner To Go! Call Ahead And We’ll Have It Ready For You! 360-679-3500 We Cater! 601 NE Midway Blvd • Oak Harbor Follow us on Facebook & Twitter

CATCH THE GAME! Join us for NFL and College Football Games! $3 Tacos Every Tuesday! Live Music Fridays & Saturdays Last chance to register for the 3rd Annual Bennett Featuring Local Craft Beer, Wine & Ciders Boyles Memorial Golf 103 S. Main • Coupeville • 360.682.5747 Tournament! Visit www.penncovebrewing.com www.penncovebrewing.com

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Breakfast & Lunch on the Water - Daily Fresh Baked Treats Homemade Soups & Sandwiches 360.678.5431 • 4 Front Street • Coupeville

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Classes, Seminars and Workshops

Cook the sausage links in a skillet with a smidge of oil until browned on all sides and cooked through. Remove from heat and set aside, covering with foil to keep some heat in. In a medium to large saucepan, place the cubed potatoes and cover with water. Boil until tender and drain. Mix in ¼ cup of butter, milk, salt and pepper and mash until smooth. Next, melt 2 tablespoons butter in a skillet over medium/high heat and fry the chopped onions until they just begin to brown. Pour in the beef broth and wine and boil the mixture down to half its volume and slightly thicker. (I prefer a thicker gravy, so mixing 2 tablespoons of flour with a little water to form a thin paste and adding this to the stock thickens it up wonderfully). Dish up your mash with a cooked banger (sausage) and pour some onion gravy over the top, serve and enjoy! To read past columns of Let’s Dish in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www. whidbeyweekly.com.

WHAT’S GOING ON

At the Pacific Rim Institute, 180 Parker Rd, Coupeville

1191 SE Dock St, #2 • Oak Harbor 360-675-6500 • chrisbakeryonwhidbey.weebly.com

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www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

SEPTEMBER 27 - OCTOBER 3, 2018

13

LOCALLY OPERATED

worth it. Nothing says you can’t loosen up later, when circumstances warrant. The 30th is a day to value steady progress, however slow, over speed.

CHICKEN LITTLE & THE ASTROLOGER By Wesley Hallock

ARIES (March 21-April 19) Is the grass on the other side of the fence really greener? The burning desire to know could seize you at any time this week, and it’s unlikely you will accept anyone’s word as your answer. Wanderlust being a hard thing to resist, it’s easy to see that your path will trend toward the unknown, with many interesting side journeys. This could express as a mere online shopping spree, or something bigger. The 30th tells the tale. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) The rich details of some small but significant aspect of your world are likely to loom up before you in full and vivid color at some time this week. When they do, expect an irresistible urge to seize some of that richness in both hands with intent to make it your own. It’s not greed, just an appreciation of what makes the world a wonderful place. The pursuit of happiness on the 30th will definitely have its tangible aspects. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) What you want that can’t be acquired outright this week might appear reachable by sleight of hand. The important question to consider when entertaining a proposition is whether it is ethical. Make sure that clever maneuvers don’t cross the line into shady dealings. This theme of manipulating to get what you want can take many forms. “Scratch my back and I’ll scratch yours” has many applications on the 30th. CANCER (June 22-July 22) The important question of how to grow your personal security is bound to arise during the week. A possible pitfall is the temptation to risk what you have in an effort to acquire more. Risking what you can’t afford to lose on a roll of the dice is never the way to go. Any act that doesn’t immediately increase your peace of mind is not the way to go. The odds are with you on the 30th, but nothing is guaranteed. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Forward progress of the measured and slow kind serves you better this week than anything founded on quick and shallow schemes. It’s a lasting legacy of the kind you can pass on that should most concern you now. Everything is aligned to help you toward that end. Your job or profession benefits greatly from paced and methodical advances at this time, as does your standard of living on the 30th. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Pragmatic and down-to-earth approaches are favored in all your dealings this week. This may get you labeled as over-cautious in the minds of certain freewheeling friends, but the inner peace that results from your adopting pedantic ways at present is well

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) A greater than usual measure of independence is a desirable thing for you this week. The reason may reveal itself in a friendship that proves itself to be less steady than you thought. The cost of sustaining an unworkable relationship could extract more from you than it is worth. Making change-ups where needed on the 30th may be less taxing emotionally than enduring the status quo. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Someone whose mind is as firmly made up as your own comes into harmony with your objectives this week. When this happens, you’ve found the perfect ally to join you in acting out your plan. The alliance, if you choose to make it one, could prove shortlived, so be prepared to act on it without delay when it appears. Don’t overlook the value of input from friends and work associates on the 30th. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Surrounding yourself with reliable people is the surest way to bolster your public image this week. Responsible and energetic associates who can hold you on task when your attention might otherwise be inclined to wander are especially desirable. Expect the appearance of such a person on the 30th. You may not particularly welcome their message or approach, but you will benefit from it, nonetheless. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Efficiency and hard work align with ambition and determination in a way that may surprise you this week. The ease that results from such an alignment belies the effort that you know lies behind it. Simply put, you get out of the situation what you have put into it. If that also means there is time to partake of the finer things in life on the 30th, do indulge yourself. You know what they say about all work and no play. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb 18) Discipline and the willingness to work hard are your hidden strengths this week. These, plus full and complete trust in your finely-honed sense of danger that tells you when something is not right, are your vehicles to success. You may find yourself at odds with a certain well-meaning but less astute and ambitious friend who would steer you in an easier but less profitable direction on the 30th. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) The input of a well-grounded and practical partner already known to you is central to what could be a productive week for you. Add the help of one stable and conservative friend and you’re set to go. Working well with others is the obvious key to your success at many levels, but especially financially. Your impulsive side is going to feel ignored, but the 30th brings compensations. Treat them as well-earned rewards.

CLUES ACROSS

1. Where to shop 6. A descendant of Shem 12. NBA big man “Boogie” 16. Integrated circuit 17. Voice 18. Larry and Curly’s buddy 19. Beloved English princess 20. Used to emphasize 21. Sun worshippers want one 22. Atomic # 44 (abbr.) 23. Lincoln’s state 24. Selects 26. Organs present in invertebrates 28. Self-immolation by fire 30. Trauma center 31. Automobile 32. Mustachioed actor Elliott 34. Something to do at auctions 35. British School 37. San Diego ballplayers 39. Drumming pattern 40. One-time Portuguese currency 41. Honor 43. Beaches have it 44. Folk singer DiFranco 45. Electronic data processing

47. Where wrestlers ply their trade 48. The Peach State 50. Boat post 52. Omitted from printed matter 54. Witnesses 56. Indicates position 57. Atomic # 18 (abbr.) 59. Obliged to repay 60. Lead prosecutor 61. Sun God 62. The Ocean State 63. Seek opportunity without scruples 66. Keeps you cool 67. Achievements 70. A beloved street 71. Analyze minutely

CLUES DOWN

1. Cooks need one 2. A mystic syllable 3. Male parents 4. Greek goddess of discord 5. U.S.-based church (abbr.) 6. Movies have lots of them 7. Greek goddess of the dawn 8. Influential naturalist 9. Ancient town 10. Atlanta-based rapper 11. Animosities 12. Pop singer

13. Speak 14. One who lives in northern Burma 15. Not liquids 25. A framework 26. Peter’s last name 27. Plants have it 29. To shorten a book 31. French philosopher 33. Murdered in his bathtub 36. Greek letter 38. A hiding place 39. Crazed supporters 41. Winged nut 42. Doctor of Education 43. Unhappy 46. Popular celeb magazine 47. __ and greets 49. Poke holes in 51. Beloved Mexican dish 53. Monetary unit of Angola 54. More wise 55. Pouches 58. Hindu’s ideal man 60. Type of gazelle 64. Revolutions per minute 65. Energy unit 68. Cerium 69. Canadian peninsula Answers on page 15

© 2018, Wesley Hallock, All Rights Reserved

YOUR GUESS IS AS GOOD AS OURS WEATHER FORECAST Chicken Little looks at what is and fears the sky is falling. Wesley Hallock as a professional astrologer looks at what is and sees what could be. Read Wesley’s monthly forecast, with links to Facebook and Twitter, at www. chickenlittleandtheastrologer.com. To read past columns of Chicken Little and the Astrologer in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

Thurs, Sept. 27

Fri, Sept. 28

Sat, Sept. 29

Sun, Sept. 30

Mon, October 1

Tues, October 2

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

H-66°/L-51°

H-70°/L-51°

H-66°/L-55°

H-64°/L-52°

H-65°/L-47°

H-61°/L-47°

H-62°/L-47°

Mostly Sunny

Mostly Sunny

Sunny and Beautiful

Mixed Clouds and Sun

Mixed Clouds and Sun

Mostly Cloudy

Wed, October 3

Cloudy

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

H-68°/L-54°

H-71°/L-53°

H-69°/L-54°

H-64°/L-53°

H-65°/L-51°

H-62°/L-49°

H-64°/L-49°

Mostly Sunny

Partly Sunny

Mostly Cloudy

Mixed Clouds and Sun

Mixed Clouds and Sun

Mostly Cloudy

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.

Cloudy


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Foster Homes Needed! Family Tails Dog Rescue needs foster homes! We can't save dogs from high kill shelters without homes for them to stay at while they wait to find their forever home. 1 week to 3 months, a fun and rewarding way to be involved with rescue and also have a dog without the full time commitment. We pay for everything, you just provide the love and the home. Please call 360-969-2014 for more info or for an application.

AUTO/PARTS FOR SALE 2001 Chevy Malibu 4-door, runs great, perfect island car. $1,000. Call 360-720-1374 (1)

GARAGE/ESTATE SALES BIG GARAGE SALE: Saturday, Sept. 29, 8am-4pm and Sunday, Sept. 30, 9am-noon, 1963 Zylstra Rd., Oak Harbor. Furniture, musical equip. (amps, mixers, speakers, organ etc.), books, tools, clothing and lots more! GARAGE SALE: Friday and Saturday, Oct. 5-6, 8 am to 2 pm, 1931 NE 11th Ave., Oak Harbor. We’ve cleaned out the garage and now we have to get rid of all the stuff! Furniture; upright freezer; lots of new lotion bottles, cosmetic jars, packaging materials and items from previous botanicals business; ribbon and craft materials; waterproof canvas; rubber stamps; holiday items; household goods and much more, including a vintage, 1961 travel trailer. No early sales (with the exception of the travel trailer – call 360929-1452 for information and photos.)

RIDE SHARE/VAN POOL Vanpool: Daily vanpool from Whidbey Island to Mukilteo to north Seattle seeks full/PT riders. Bob (h) 360-730-1294 or (c) 206-526-4150 (4)

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Imagine Oak Harbor’s 1st Food Forest, Saturdays 11am-3pm, at 526 Bayshore Drive. Each week, we have volunteer opportunities available to help care for our community garden, share organic gardening tips, and learn Permaculture principles. All ages and skill levels welcome. Schedule can change due to adverse weather conditions. If you have any questions, please contact us at: imagineapermacultureworld.gmail.com Mother Mentors needs volunteers! Oak Harbor Families with young children need your help! Volunteer just a couple of hours a week to make a difference in someone’s life! To volunteer or get more info, email wamothermentors@

gmail.com or call 360-3211484. Looking for Board Members to join the dynamic Board of Island Senior Resources and serve the needs of Island County Seniors. Of particular interest are representatives from North Whidbey. For more information please contact: reception@islandseniorservices.org

JOB MARKET WAIF is hiring for both retail and animal care positions. Visit www.waifanimals.org/ jobs for more info (1) PT Evening Janitorial – Freeland/Clinton: Hiring IMMEDIATELY for part-time evening janitor, Monday-Saturday, 9 hours total per week, (one hour per shift M-F, three hours on Sat) in Freeland, half hour per visit 2x per week in Clinton. Start time flexible (after 6pm/earlier on Saturday). Compensation: $12 per hour, part-time. Easy $400+ extra income per month! Must have valid DL, cell phone, pass background/drug screening and E-Verify (USCIS). Please provide name and phone number. Resumes welcome. E-mail: susan.valenzuela@ybswa. net (1)

bed frame, with wood roller feet. $15 obo. We can send photos. Call or text 360-3200525. Quilted wall hangings, purchased at the Houston International Quilting Conference. In excellent condition, ready to hang on your wall! Quail (20” x 11”), $15 or best offer. Duck (22” diameter), $15 or best offer. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525. Fireplace tool sets: brush, shovel, and poker, in a sturdy stand. One set is 30” tall, the other set is 21” tall, $25 ea. obo; Sturdy, brown leather log tote by Eddie Bauer, never used. $20 obo. We can send photos. Call or text 360-3200525. “Happy Holidays” painted sign, 21-1/2” x 16-1/2”, $15 obo. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525.

LAWN AND GARDEN 25 aluminum silver deck post caps, $3 each; 200 feet new 8” heavy waterline, $4 a foot, obo. Can be used for waterline or drain line. 360-321-1624 Natural Barnyard Topsoil: Good for gardens, flower beds, etc. Unscreened, 10 yard loads, $225 delivered. South Whidbey 360-321-1624

MISCELLANEOUS

HOME FURNISHINGS

Chicken eggs: Tasty and Two small, indoor fountains: the soothing sounds of flowing healthy from happy chickens. $4/dozen. Julie, 360-969water can bring stress relief and relaxation to your environ- 9266 (1) Wind sculptures by Lyman ment. The smaller one is $15 Whittaker. We have two left, obo, the slightly larger one is $20 obo. We can send photos. $175 and $250; Wind chimes: Call or text 360-320-0525. No Cheating! Walnut occasional table, with beveled glass top, $40 or best offer; Stained glass terrarium, with matching cover, plus wood stand. 26-1/2” tall x 101/2” diameter of cover x 14” diameter of base. $125 or best offer; Twin-size, sturdy metal How’d you do? Puzzle 1 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.41) 5

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On a scale from 1 to 10...4.1 Every row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every column of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9.

Puzzle 1 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.41)

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We have five sets, depending on size. Price range: $10–$50 or best offer. We can send photos. Call or text 360-3200525 Halogen work light, for indoor projects. The height of the light can be adjusted. $30 or best offer. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525 12 volt boat winch, $40 obo; Small anchor. Weighs only about 3 pounds, but has a design that will keep your small boat on the beach where you left it. $10 obo. We can send photos. Call or text 360320-0525. Camping items: 2 single air mattresses, “as new” condition, $20 each or best offer; Intex queen size coilbeam downy airbed, nearly new (used for one week for guests), easy to deflate and store when not being used, $25, or best offer; Brookstone waterproof floating lantern, for camping, patio, poolside, or emergencies, new, $25 or best offer; Old (but clean) Thermos 1-gallon jug, $5; Vintage Coleman stove, with protective denim cover, $25 or best offer; Versatile backpack, the two parts can be used separately, or (for more serious backpacking) together, $45 obo. We have photos. Call or text 360-320-0525. Sports items: Bag Boy golf cart, $15 obo; Golf umbrella, $5; Men’s wet suits, size L, $10 per item; Neoprene gloves and hats, size L, $5 each;

Answers below

7

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Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/sudoku on Sat Sep 1 18:34:12 2018 GMT. Enjoy!

Water skis: Terry Competition slalom ski, with carrying bag, $30 obo; O’Brien Competition slalom ski, Kevlar/Boron, $30 obo; Wiley wood water skis, $25 obo. We have photos. Call or text 360-320-0525.

Was your Dad or Gramps in Japan or Germany? I collect old 35 mm cameras and lenses. Oak Harbor, call (970) 823-0002

ANIMALS/SUPPLIES

FREE

Excellent Grass Hay, good for horses, $7 per bale, 20 bale minimum. 360-321-1624 If you or someone you know needs help in feeding pet(s), WAIF Pet Food Banks may be able to help. Pet Food Banks are located at WAIF thrift stores in Oak Harbor (50 NE Midway Blvd) and Freeland (1660 Roberta Ave) and are generously stocked by donations from the community. If you need assistance, please stop by.

WANTED

Miscellaneous materials in the yard. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525

PERSONALS Mexico: seeking all information/help about Jalisco Mexican state, Lake Chapala area, town of Ajijic, Ex-pat community. Seeking one-level, two bedroom, two bath house to rent or purchase in the future. No real estate agents, please. Call JM 360-730-3244 (1)

CLASSIFIED INFORMATION US Postal Mail

Whidbey Weekly Classified Department PO Box 1098 Oak Harbor, WA 98277

E-Mail............classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com Telephone..................................(360)682-2341 Fax.............................................(360)682-2344 PLEASE CALL WHEN YOUR ITEMS HAVE SOLD.

Please try to limit your classified to 30 words or less, (amounts and phone numbers are counted as words) we will help edit if necessary. We charge $10/week for Vehicles, Boats, Motorcycles, RVs, Real Estate Rental/Sales, Business Classifieds and any items selling $1,000 and above. We do charge $25 to include a photo. The FREE classified space is not for business use. No classified is accepted without phone number. We reserve the right to not publish classifieds that are in bad taste or of questionable content. All free classifieds will be published twice consecutively. If you would like your ad to be published more often, you must resubmit it. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date.

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Business Spotlight Caring Goes The Extra Mile

HARADA PHYSICAL THERAPY Your Hometown Therapists

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Gutters that are Good to Go! When you need your gutters geared up for the fall weather ahead, what do you do? You call Crystal Clean Windows & More LLC! While their excellence in window cleaning cannot be denied, their expertise ensures your home or place of business is not only aesthetically pleasing, but provides functionality and safety at the same time. With service as great as this, you can’t go wrong when working with Crystal Clean.

Mon - Sat 9am-6pm Sunday 11am-5pm “A Family Tradition Since 1912” 2015 Broadway, Everett, WA 98201 • 425-259-3876 • EricksonFurniture.com

Delivery to Whidbey Island Available

Insurance: The biggest risk is not having any. Gene Kelly Barner Financial Advisor

144 NE Ernst Street, Suite C Oak Harbor, WA 98277 (360) 675-8239

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210 SE Pioneer Way #2 101 S Main Street www.HaradaPT.com 360-679-8600 360-678-2770

746 NE Midway Blvd • Oak Harbor

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Autumn brings in some of Mother Nature’s best decorations. The crisp clean air, beautiful fall leaves and the wind that often whips them into our gutters and drains are almost here. Clogged drains aren’t just a pain and hassle to clean, they can, if left in the long run, lead to damage with costly repairs. Don’t let it get that far! Owner Jason Leman is a pro when it comes to clearing out clogs! In fact, he’s recently added a new system to his cleaning protocols and this one is second to none with what it can achieve! The SkyVac is a series of products specifically designed and developed for cleaning gutters at both residential homes as well as commercial and industrial spaces. High ceilings and long-reach spaces are no match for this system, as it consists of long, carbon fiber vacuum poles attached to the vacuum and comes complete with a video camera and carbon fiber telescopic pole just to ensure each and every nook and cranny is free and clear of clogs.

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Not only does the SkyVac system bring a whole new level of clean to your gutters, it safeguards all those who would be attempting to clean them out manually. By reducing the need for ladder usage, SkyVac drastically decreases the risk of falls and injuries. Furthermore, the system reduces the amount of labor required for the job, which in turn is a savings for the property owner! It truly is a win-win and after all the cleaning and clearing away of twigs, leaves and other fall debris, Jason offers gutter whitening too, so your property will function at its best, and will look good, too! If your gutters are good to go, maybe you want to get a little gleam in your windows. There really is no better company for the job than Crystal Clean. Whether indoors or outdoors, your windows can shine with all their might, because not only does Crystal Clean exercise green practices by utilizing eco-friendly products, they also employ the RODI (reverse osmosis deionization) system to guarantee you a spot-free finish each and every time! For more information about the invaluable services Crystal Clean Windows & More LLC provides, just call 360-675-3005, or visit their website at www.crystalcleanwindowswhidbey.com and get your gutters ‘good-to-go’ and your windows glimmering!

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At Jersey Mike’s, we offer a sub above – one that’s measured in more than inches or seconds ‘til served. We carefully consider every aspect of what we do – every slice, every sandwich, every store – we provide our customers with sustenance and substance too.

31595 SR 20, Suite A5 Oak Harbor • 360-682-5245 Daily 10am - 9pm