Whidbey Weekly, September 20, 2018

Page 1

September 20 through September 26, 2018

More Local Events inside


Military Muster NAS Whidbey Island, Washington

September 20-26, 2018

U.S. Navy Observes Hispanic Heritage Month subsequently awarded a Navy Cross, the country’s second highest military award.

The Navy observes National Hispanic Heritage Month, Sept. 15–Oct. 15, highlighting the histories and accomplishments of Americans from Spanish-speaking areas.

The tradition of observing Hispanic heritage began in 1968, when President Lyndon B. Johnson designated a week in mid-September as National Hispanic Heritage Week. Twenty years later in 1988, President Ronald Reagan extended that week to a month-long observance.

This year’s theme is “Hispanics: One Endless Voice to Enhance our Traditions.” As of June 2018, approximately 59,000 active and Reserve Sailors of Hispanic heritage serve in the U.S. Navy contributing to the strength of the nation’s force. Hispanic Americans’ military service dates back to the Civil War. One well-known example is Jorge Farragut, who was born on the Spanish island of Minorca and joined the South Carolina Navy in 1779. Remembered as one of the first Hispanic Revolutionary War heroes, he was instrumental in securing a Union victory in New Orleans April 28, 1862. When Adm. Farragut died in 1870, President Ulysses S. Grant led 10,000 Soldiers and Sailors through the streets of New York during his funeral procession. Several members of the Hispanic community — military and civilian — have significant contributions toward protecting the nation and embodying Department of Defense values. Sixty people of Hispanic heritage have been awarded the Medal of Honor, two were presented to members of the

The heritage month’s dates refer to Independence Day anniversaries of Latin American countries – Sept. 15 is the anniversary of independence for Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. Mexico declared its independence Sept. 16, and Chile Sept. 18. Navy, 13 to members of the U.S. Marine Corps and 46 to members of the U.S. Army. USS Rafael Peralta (DDG 115) was named in honor of Navy Cross recipient Marine Corps Sgt. Rafael Peralta, who was killed in Fallujah, Iraq, in 2004. An Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer, Rafael Peralta was commissioned in a ceremony at Naval Air Station North Island in July last year. Peralta, who was born in Mexico City, Mexico, immigrated to the United States with his family. He joined the Marine Corps in 2000, after receiving his Green Card. Peralta was

The Navy is strengthened by the diversity of its force as it underlines that patriots of Hispanic American Heritage continue to build legacies of freedom and diversity as they fight for the security of the country and the peace of the world. Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute (DEOMI) provides printable posters, presentation, guidance for organizing observance and education facts on their website, under the section “Special Observances.” For more information about the history of Hispanic Americans and their numerous contributions to the Navy, visit Naval History and Heritage Command’s website.

NAS Whidbey SAR Conducts Three Rescues and One Medevac A Search and Rescue (SAR) team from Naval Air Station (NAS) Whidbey Island conducted three rescues and a medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) between Sunday, Sept. 9 and Saturday, Sept. 15, 2018. Early in the morning Sunday, Sept. 9, SAR rescued three, uninjured male climbers stuck on a 9,300-foot-high ledge of Mount Stuart, approximately 30 miles southwest of Leavenworth, Wash. The climbers were unprepared for the plummeting nighttime temperatures and were beginning to succumb to hypothermia. Once the climbers were hoisted on board the helicopter they were taken to Boeing Field, where they landed just before 3:30 a.m. A SAR team then flew to Lopez Island mid-morning Monday and picked up a 70-year-old male patient suffering from a possible stroke. He was flown to higher care at Harborview Medical Center. Saturday morning, Sept. 15, a SAR team was called in to rescue two male hikers just southwest of Stephen Peak in the Olympic National Forest. The hikers had triggered

emergency beacons late the night before because they were lost and cold at approximately 5,100 feet in bad weather. The SAR team found the hikers on a steep trail a little after 9:30 a.m. and hoisted them on board the helicopter. Since they were not injured, they were taken to William Fairchild Airport in Port Angeles where they were met by Olympic National Park Rangers. At about 1:30 p.m. the same day, the SAR team was called to rescue a hunter near Spirit Lake at Mt. St. Helens. The hunter had fallen 60 feet and was suffering from head, neck and back injuries, and a fractured femur. The hunter was found at the bottom of a 60-foot rock face. The SAR team hoisted the patient on board and transported him to Legacy Emanuel Hospital in Portland, Ore., arriving about approximately 3:30 p.m. NAS Whidbey Island SAR has conducted 50 total missions throughout Washington State this year, including 37 rescues, eight searches and five medical evacuations. The Navy SAR unit operates three MH-60S helicopters from NAS Whidbey Island as

search and rescue/medical evacuation (SAR/ MEDEVAC) platforms for the EA-18G aircraft as well as other squadrons and personnel assigned to the installation. Pursuant to the National SAR Plan of the United States, the unit may also be used for civil SAR/MEDEVAC needs to the fullest extent practicable on a non-interference basis with primary military duties according to applicable national

directives, plans, guidelines and agreements; specifically, the unit may launch in response to tasking by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center (based on a Washington State Memorandum of Understanding) for inland missions, and/or tasking by the United States Coast Guard for all other aeronautical and maritime regions, when other assets are unavailable.

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When the director gave me the details of another scene, he said, “Sit stiff in the wheelchair, stare out the window, and lean forward about a ¼ of an inch.” Holy privy. That was three things to remember at the same time. After a couple of takes, we took. Stunt fish On to the next challenge, opening a red-ribbon-wrapped box filled with a plastic jar of goldfish flakes. Not only had I not opened a small cardboard box since Christmas before last, I had never seen a jar of goldfish flakes. Mom never let us have pet fish. She said it was too sad when they died, usually three days after purchase. Dad had other ideas. He loved dead fish, even if they were caught with Velveeta infused Wonder Bread dough balls. Channeling Yes, today was a big one. My well-directed non-reacting-while-reacting pushed my non-Stanislavski training to the limits. My training has been more Stan than Mr. Slavski. After asking Siri on a friend’s cell phone, “From what TV and movie stars do I draw to appear realistically non-reactive?” Siri responded, “Somewhere between Jack Benny and Benny Hill.” On with the video shoot. Going right into Siri’s non-character, I swiveled my head right to left and back again, like a freshman Senator in Congress, only without the blinking. It was a challenge at first, but after three failed attempts at a smooth swivel, and a break to feed my goldfish, Spunky and Funky, I calmed down enough to swivel a bit slower. The director, seemingly pleased, gave me another half sandwich. I have learned a lot in this experience. Not that I have a need to learn any more at my age, but every once in awhile I am stunned by my own curiosity. Like prop placement. Prop time Probably one of the reasons movies cost so much to make is because of all the props Hollywood needs to buy to make reality look fake. In the 1999 Snow Falling on Cedars, the red strawberries portrayed in the field at Ebey’s Prairie are actually plastic. The real green strawberries did not get call backs. Thank goodness plastic ties were included in the plastic strawberry bag to facilitate the strawberries’ connection to reality. Coupeville historian Dale Sherman can verify, along with the Beatles, those strawberry fields do last forever, particularly the plastic ones. The most likely reason I was cast in this non-speaking role is my caboose is a neat location, available, and free. Either that or because I was the only person auditioned for a non-speaking part who offered a Sharpie to sign the cast of the casting director. As a result, my 90-year-old caboose has never been so clean. How fake is that?

Forever the cheerleader, Deb is fighting the fight. Deb’s kids, Sasha and Shane, have set up a Go Fund Me page to help with Mom Deb’s medical expenses and loss of income from May and September surgeries. More specific info can be obtained at www. gofundme.com. Search for Deb Sherod, medical. Hopefully, Deb’s family and friends will see us Whidbey Weekly readers and more at Bayview Hall, Sunday, Oct. 21. The bands begin playing after church is out, about 1 p.m. Details regarding Deb’s upcoming “Thank You Carnival” will be shared here, there, and everywhere, but surely on Drew’s List, and oh what a list his is. Celluloid splendor Thanks to the voluminous catalog of the SnoIsle Regional Library System, we patrons of the arts can bring Hollywood to our haciendas without having to wear topcoat and tails. Pajamas, robes, and DVDs work well together. Last week, several of the movies I ordered on the easily navigable www.sno-isle.org site came in, much to my delight. Oftentimes, I will order a movie or CD or book on a Saturday night. Amazingly, my treats are on the Freeland Library shelf by Tuesday or Wednesday. This weekend’s treat was Gold Diggers of 1937, starring Dick Powell, Joan Blondell, Victor Moore, Glenda Farrell and more Busby Berkeley beauties than a cataract-free pair of eyes should see after midnight. According to my sister, the best listener in the family, and often the only one available, our Mom loved Dick Powell.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Whidbey Weekly LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

390 NE MIDWAY BLVD | PO BOX 1098 | OAK HARBOR, WASHINGTON 98277 Publisher & Editor.......................................................... Eric Marshall Marketing Representatives................Penny Hill, Roosevelt Rumble Graphic Design............................................................. Teresa Besaw Production Manager......................................................TJ Pierzchala Circulation Manager.................................................... Noah Marshall

Contributing Writers Jim Freeman Wesley Hallock Kae Harris Tracy Loescher Kathy Reed Carey Ross

Volume 10, Issue 38 | © MMXVIII Whidbey Weekly PUBLISHED and distributed every week. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The Whidbey Weekly cannot be held responsible for the quality of goods or services supplied by advertisers in this publication. Articles, unless otherwise stated, are by contribution and therefore the Whidbey Weekly is not in a position to validate any comments, recommendations or suggestions made in these articles. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. DEADLINES: The Whidbey Weekly is a submission based editorial with contributing writers. Please feel free to submit any information (please limit to 200 words) that you would like to share with the Whidbey Weekly. You may submit by email to editor@whidbeyweekly.com, by fax to (360)682-2344 or by postal mail to PO Box 1098, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date. For more information, please visit www.whidbeyweekly.com.

DJA NGO Fest NW

2018

No wonder we went to see Susan Slept Here on my birthday. I thought Mom was like me, wanting to see Debbie Reynolds. My sister said Mom thought Dad looked like Dick Powell. So, I got the 8x10 black and white picture of our 30-something Dad down from the caboose wall and held it up to a paused Dick Powell, his singing lips closed to reveal to this forensic Freeman that Dad and Dick had similar mouths, similar chins, white button down collared shirts, Royal Windsor knots, slick suits, and confident eyes. Dad even sang as good as Dick. Maybe even gooder. While Dad did not tap dance as well as Powell, Dad could sure sell motor oil. His skills surely kept me in Brylcreem during the formative years of my hygiene enhancement. I am so glad our sister listened to those stories from Mom. With both her and Mom in the living room, I was busy upstairs using our vacant bathroom, putting petroleum by-products on my hair, trying to look like Ricky Nelson. That effort did not work. I ended up looking more like Nelson Eddy, only no one like Jeanette MacDonald was calling. Gotta run. The guy who bought my unused prop goldfish flakes on e-Bay just showed. Might be enough cash flow for an 8-ounce cup of drip. To read past columns of On Track in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www. whidbeyweekly.com.

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Keeping my mouth closed and my eyes open was as tough as leaving Chuck E. Cheese sober.

Last spring, Deb’s bright lights got dimmed and dim sum with major medical issues.

WHIDBEY ISLAND’S #1 CANNABIS SHOP

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Talk about acting.

Sale Prices All Day!

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In one scene, I am to react by not reacting.

Hare hop Deb Sherod, one of Whidbey’s longest burning bright lights, is known to many as The Master Gardener with The Master Clippers @ Deb’s Hare Today in Clinton.

Friday, September 21 • 3:00-6:00pm Featuring House of Cultivar

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I never told him that when the director said, “Quiet on the set,” I thought he was saying, “Quiet on the sit.”

Our final scenes will be shot this Saturday at the Clinton Community Hall between 1 and 3 p.m. during Richard Evans’ final Sno-Isle presentation highlighting portions of his autobiography, Fazkils. If you want to be an extra in the out-takes, we’ll see you there. Like Sue Bird, Richard will autograph your back if you don’t talk behind his.

LOCALLY OPERATED

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The cameraman, a local non-Union sympathizer, said it is the first time he had ever seen me sit still.

The producers are seeking a family rating, a G, or maybe a G whiz, since the goldfish are naked.

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Today was a big day. Not only was it my first time working as an actor in a non-speaking role, I was paid extra for not talking. Some film buffs call this being cast offtype.

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INTERNATIONAL DAY OF PEACE ~ VENDOR EVENT

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with Jim Freeman

I’ll let you know when this short film is finished if approved by the motion picture ratings bureau.

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ON TRACK

SEPTEMBER 20 - SEPTEMBER 26, 2018

SEPT

3 2 19 djangofestnw.com // WICAonline.org 360.221.8268 // 800.638.7631 Whidbey Island Center for the Arts 565 Camano Ave, Langley, WA

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SEPTEMBER 20 - SEPTEMBER 26, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

Bits & Pieces ing can buy a bowl of chili, cornbread and water or soda for $5. A taster’s spoon and voting privilege is available for $1. Additional soda or water is $1.

Water is available for horses/mules, but owners are asked to bring their mount’s own bucket. No dogs, stallions or bicycles are allowed. Those interested in Friday night camping can contact Dianne at 360-221-0115.

Potential Traffic Impacts at Langley Blvd Starting Sept. 19, the Navy has contracted to have contaminated soil removed and replaced at the top of Langley Blvd following removal of an old fuel tank two years ago. While the removal project is not expected to have a direct impact on the roundabout project currently under construction at the Heller, Clover Valley, and Ault Field roads intersection, it may contribute to additional traffic delays. Work on the soil removal and replacement is not scheduled during peak transit hours to and from the installation, and is anticipated to last for three days. For more information about the project, please call 360-257-4025. [Submitted by Thomas Mills, NAS Whidbey Island]

Whidbey Audubon Society Bird in the Hand Festival Whidbey Audubon Society Bird in the Hand Festival is an opportunity to observe birds up close and personal, with prepared examples on display to be held and examined. This free, family-friendly celebration of birds is Saturday from 10:00am to 1:00pm at Bayview Farm and Garden, 2780 Marshview Ave., Langley. Attendees will enjoy the spectacular colors and feather patterns of backyard birds like Rufous Hummingbird, Spotted Towhee, and Northern Flicker. Few people know how really beautiful birds are when viewed closely, and little hands are welcome to touch the birds. Study the Belted Kingfisher footpads that help excavate its burrow, feel the surprisingly light weight of a Great Blue Heron wing, and look in a microscope to see the structure of an owl feather. The Whidbey Audubon chapter has federal and state permits to keep and display birds that have met an accidental demise, provided it is for educational purposes. A small group of volunteers have been trained by a taxidermist, and have spent many hours preparing the specimens. Birds freshly killed from window strikes, cats, vehicle hits, and other causes are collected for this purpose. The collection of over 500 specimens may be unique to this Audubon chapter. Other Festival experiences will include falconers with live hawks and an owl, children’s activities, an Osprey talk, and the “Answer Man” table for your most daunting questions. For more information, visit www.WhidbeyAudubon.org [Submitted by Cheryl Bradkin]

Saddle up for Russell Maugans Memorial Ride and Chili Cook-Off Island County Back Country Horsemen of Washington will hold its Russell Maugans Memorial Equine Ride, treasure hunt, raffle, silent auction and chili cook-off Saturday, to help raise money to support Whidbey Island trails. The event will take place at the Chadwick/ Bolton residence, 4534 Putney Woods Lane in Langley. The first ride out will be at 9:00am, the last will leave at 10:30am. In addition to rides, participants can enjoy a treasure hunt, raffle and silent auction. All items for the raffle and auction are donated and the auction will take place at 1:00pm sharp, according to organizers. Cost for the ride and five raffle tickets is $10, or $20 will buy the ride and 20 raffle tickets. Cost to enter the chili cook-off is $10 and winners of the Judge’s and People’s Choice awards will receive cash prizes. Those attend-

All proceeds from this event will be used by Island County Back Country Horsemen of Washington for development and maintenance of Whidbey Island trails. To learn more, please go to islandcountybchw.webs.com. [Submitted by Joy Rutherford]

Join Washington State Ferries for a ‘Ferry’ Big Party Enjoy a free day of family fun at the state’s Eagle Harbor Maintenance Facility on Bainbridge Island Washington State Ferries will celebrate the newest state ferry, Suquamish, with a community celebration at WSF’s Eagle Harbor Maintenance Facility on Bainbridge Island Saturday. The public is invited to take part in vessel tours, a speaking ceremony, kids’ activities, free food and live music on board the new ferry from 10:00am to 4:00pm. Suquamish Community Celebration attendees will explore the newest Olympic-class ferry and get a glimpse of the wheelhouse while enjoying complimentary food from galley food vendor Centerplate and music from the Bainbridge Island High School Band. Before boarding the new vessel, attendees will also get a rare chance to pass through WSF’s Eagle Harbor Maintenance Facility, where all state ferries go for maintenance and preservation work. At 1:00pm, guests will be invited to gather on the vessel car deck for a brief ceremony. The Suquamish is the fourth, and last funded, Olympic-class ferry, christened in January 2018 and accepted to the state fleet from ship builder Vigor July 26. The new ferry’s name means “people of the clear salt water” in Southern Coast Salish Lushootseed language, taken from the name of the indigenous people whose traditional winter village is located on the beach in front of the Old Man House on Agate Passage in Kitsap County. Throughout the day, members of the Suquamish Tribe will celebrate the ferry that carries the tribe’s name, including remarks by Chairman Leonard Forsman and a presentation by Suquamish Song and Dance. “I look forward to celebrating this important milestone with our customers, our ferry-served communities, the people who built this new ferry, and our dedicated WSF employees,” said Transportation Secretary Roger Millar. “This new ferry brings us one step closer to stabilizing our ferry fleet and ensuring reliability for our 24.5 million annual ferry customers.” With room for 144 cars and 1,500 passengers, Suquamish, like its sister vessels Chimacum, Tokitae and Samish, offers flexible seating configurations, wider stairways and vehicle lanes, and two elevators, making these Olympic Class ferries the most accessible vessels in the fleet. Suquamish meets the Environmental Protection Agency’s Tier 4 emission standards, making it the cleanest vessel in the fleet. The total construction cost was $122 million in addition to equipment provided by WSF. It will operate on the Mukilteo/Clinton route in the summer and will serve as a maintenance relief vessel in the winter, filling in when other vessels are out of service. Event goers should wear sturdy, comfortable shoes as there may be uneven surfaces onsite. The event location is about a 10-minute walk from both the Bainbridge Island Ferry Terminal and downtown Winslow. Thanks to Kitsap Transit, attendees can catch a shuttle from the ferry terminal to get to the event. There is ample parking at and near the ferry terminal and in the downtown area. ADA parking and a pick-up/drop-off area will be available at WSF’s

Eagle Harbor Maintenance Facility. Attendees are encouraged to take public transportation to the event. This event is made possible by the generous support of sponsors including Vigor, Maxum Petroleum, Bronswerk, Bagby Elevators, Valley Power Systems, Rolls Royce and Supergraphics. Washington State Ferries, a division of the Washington State Department of Transportation, is the largest ferry system in the U.S. and safely and efficiently carries 25 million people a year through some of the most majestic scenery in the world. For breaking news and the latest information, follow WSF on Twitter (twitter.com/wsferries). [Submitted by Justin Fujioka, WSDOT]

Partnerships Bringing Candidate Forums to Communities As part of the commitment to build civic engagement, Sno-Isle Libraries is partnering with the League of Women Voters and local groups on candidate forums in advance of the November 6 general election. The scheduled candidate forums for Whidbey Island are: Monday, Sept. 24, 6:30pm-8:30pm, Clinton Community Hall Candidates for Legislative District 10, Positions 1 and 2, Island County Sheriff and Island County Commissioner District 3. Tuesday, Oct. 2, 7:00pm-9:00pm, Trinity Lutheran Church, Freeland Candidates for Legislative District 10, Positions 1 and 2, Island County Sheriff, Island County Commissioner District 3 and 2nd Congressional District. Thursday, Oct. 4, 7:00pm-9:00pm, Oak Harbor Elks Club Candidates for Legislative District 10, Positions 1 and 2, Island County Sheriff, Island County Commissioner District 3 and 2nd Congressional District. The deadline to register to vote in the November election is Oct. 29. Registration can be done online and every Sno-Isle Libraries community library has voter-registration material. The deadline for current voters to update an address is Oct. 8. Ballots for the November 6 general election will be mailed on Oct. 19 in Island County. [Submitted by Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, Sno-Isle Libraries]

Learn How to Tone it Down at Civility First Events A group of Whidbey Island residents decided they were tired of hearing the political rhetoric. Not the differing views, but the strident way those views are expressed. It was out of the increasing cacophony that Civility First was born. “We began a year and a half ago,” said Cathy Whitmire, a Civility First founder, director and spokesperson. “We came together out of a shared sense of concern that the social and political divides were widening.” One of the first projects for the group was a booth at the 2017 Island County Fair. “We had both red and blue balloons and Republicans and Democrats behind the same table,” Whitmire said. Once they overcame their confusion, people – more than 400 of them – shared stories. “Everyone had an uncle they were dreading to see at Thanksgiving or a neighbor or coworker they were now avoiding” Whitmire said. The group’s website says: “We are a group of citizens representing a wide range of political views. We have come together to repudiate the divisive language and hate speech permeating our society.”

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Women Business Owners: Don’t Forget About Your Retirement Plan

American Business Women’s Day is celebrated on Sept. 22. And there is indeed cause for celebration, because, in recent decades, the number of women business owners has risen sharply, to the point where nearly 40 percent of all businesses are now women-owned, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. If you are one of these owners, or thinking about becoming one, you’ll always have a lot to think about when running your business, but there’s also an area you can’t ignore – your retirement. Specifically, you need to consider establishing your own retirement plan. Most plans available to you are fairly easy to establish and maintain, and are not terribly costly to administer. Here are some popular options: Owner-only 401(k) – This plan, also known as an individual or solo 401(k), is available to self-employed individuals and business owners with no full-time employees other than themselves or a spouse. For 2018, you can put in up to 25 percent of your annual income as an “employer” contribution, and you can defer up to $18,500 (or $24,500 if you’re 50 or older). The sum of your employer contribution and your salary deferrals cannot exceed $55,000, or $61,000 if you’re 50 or older. You can make elective contributions on a pre- or post-tax (Roth) basis. Pre-tax contributions reduce your taxable income for the current year. Roth contributions don’t offer any immediate tax benefit, but any qualified withdrawals will be 100% tax-free. SEP IRA – If you have just a few employees or are self-employed with no employees, you may want to consider a SEP IRA. You’ll fund the plan with tax-deductible contributions, and you must cover all eligible employees. As an employer, you can contribute the lesser of 25% of your compensation (if you’re also an employee of your own business) or $55,000. Solo defined benefit plan – Pension plans, also known as defined benefit plans, are less common than in previous years, but you can still set one up for yourself if you’re self-employed or own your own business. This plan has high contribution limits, which are determined by an actuarial calculation, and your contributions are typically tax-deductible. SIMPLE IRA — A SIMPLE IRA, as its name suggests, is easy to set up and maintain, and it can be a good plan if your business has fewer than 10 employees. However, while a SIMPLE IRA may be advantageous for your employees, it’s less generous to you, as far as allowable contributions go, than an owner-only 401(k), a SEP IRA or a defined benefit plan. For 2018, your annual contributions are generally limited to $12,500, or $15,500 if you’re 50 or older by the end of the year. You can also make a matching contribution of up to 3% of your compensation. As an employer, your contributions are fully deductible as a business expense up to certain limits; as an employee, your pretax contributions reduce the amount of your taxable income for the same tax year. Before opening any of these plans, you’ll want to consult with your tax advisor on the tax issues and a financial professional on the investment aspects. But don’t wait too long. You will need to work hard to keep your business thriving – so choose a retirement plan that works just as hard for you. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Jeffery C. Pleet, CLU®, ChFC®

Financial Advisor 630 SE Midway Blvd. Oak Harbor, WA 98277 (360) 679-2558 jeffery.pleet@edwardjones.com

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

While some might assume the group leans left, Whitmire said, that isn’t always the case. “We have an equal number of people saying we are conservative leaning,” Whitmire said. “When we send people (to speak to local groups), we send in red/blue pairs. No longer

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SEPTEMBER 20 - SEPTEMBER 26, 2018

Fall Bazaars & Events

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are they ‘conservatives from Oak Harbor,’ they are Sandi and Jim and we are friends. Relationship takes away prejudice. The conversation space gets bigger.”

“We give out Civility First stickers to put on your computer that people can look at before they press the send button” on those strident political messages.

Whitmire said the goal isn’t to make political points, but to listen and understand. The group’s advisory board includes Trump supporters, longtime Republican elected officials as well as Quakers, liberals and Democratic Party supporters.

[Submitted by Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, Sno-Isle Libraries]

Verna Everitt to Assumes Role as WICA Executive Director

The communities of Langley and Coupeville, four churches, community groups and hundreds of local residents have signed the pledge. The Sno-Isle Libraries Board of Trustees joined Civility First in proclaiming October 2018 as Civility Month. Civility workshops will be conducted at: Coupeville Library, Sept. 29, 4:00pm-5:30pm Oak Harbor Library, Oct. 1, 6:00pm-7:30pm Camano Island Library, Oct. 2, 6:00pm-7:30pm Freeland Library, Oct. 4, 1:00pm-2:30pm Assembly of God Church, Oct. 6, Noon-3:00pm The Oct. 1 event at Oak Harbor is scheduled to feature State Rep. Norma Smith and Island County Commissioner Helen Price Johnson. Civility First, the Pacific NorthWest Art School and Sno-Isle Libraries are partnering on an art and photography contest to mark civility month. The entry deadline is Sept. 30 and entry forms are available at any library on Whidbey and Camano islands. An awards ceremony is scheduled for 2:00pm, Oct. 27, at the Coupeville Library. Whitmire said the civility workshops offer plenty of tips, along with one more thing:

FREE

Saturday, September 29 • 10am-4pm

“We sit in a place where some liberals and some conservatives are being very wary of us because we are holding a place that, unfortunately, is uncommon at this moment,” Whitmire said. Civility First has a Civility Pledge that starts with: “In order to create a community where we are each treated with civility and respect, each of us affirms that we will: …”

Cid

Skagit River Park 1100 S. Skagit Street, Burlington

Fall Sportsman Sale and Gun Show Verna Everitt, a Vashon Island native who spent 17 years in film production in Los Angeles before returning to Vashon in 2007 and pursuing a career in nonprofit management, is the new executive director at the Whidbey Island Center for the Arts. On Sept. 1, she replaced Stacie Burgua, who spent nearly 18 years as WICA ED and leaves behind a legacy of steady growth, financial health, and artistic excellence. Everitt relocated to South Whidbey over the summer to take on her new duties. “I couldn’t be more delighted to be facing this big new challenge of carrying on the leadership that Stacie has given WICA over so many years,” said Everitt. “I’m gratified that WICA represents such a strong foundation for ongoing success and distinction.” Everitt left Vashion at 18 to pursue a bachelor’s degree in political science at UCLA, then co-founded Mid-Metro Productions, which created films and commercials. She ran the company with her husband, Tim, from 1990 to 2007, when the couple relocated to Vashon and took up farming. Tim continued his film career in the realm of special effects, while BITS & PIECES

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Saturday, September 22 Open 10am Close when we are done In the Main Clubhouse Holmes Harbor Rod and Gun Brooks Hill Road, Langley Admission by donation Members and non-members all welcome guns • ammo • scopes hunting gear • knives fishing gear • tools camping equipment boating equipment who knows what will show up FFL on site for firearm transfers info / table reservations Mike 360-221-7574 Tables: $10 Member $20 Non-member

Mount Vernon • Anacortes • Camano Island • Whidbey Island 360-424-0115 • www.gnwtitle.com • #fixer • #closer Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.

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SEPTEMBER 20 - SEPTEMBER 26, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

What’s Going On All entries are listed chronologically, unless there are multiple entries for the same venue or are connected to a specific organization (such as Sno-Isle Libraries) in which case all entries for that venue or organization are listed collectively in chronological order under one heading.

fishing gear, boating equipment, and all manner of other sporting goods. An FFL will be on site to facilitate firearm transfers. Though HHRGC is a private club, the public is welcome to attend this event. Admission is by donation. The show will run until late afternoon. For more information, call 360-221-7574.

The Green Room Vendor Day

Oktoberfest

Friday, September 21, 3:00pm-6:00pm The Green Room, Oak Harbor Representatives from House of Cultivar will be on site with product displays and information. The Green Room is located at 1640 N Goldie Road. For more information, call 360-6825755 or visit www.thegreenroomwa.com

Island Herb Vendor Day Friday, September 21, 3:00pm-6:00pm Island Herb, Freeland Representatives from Avitas will be on site with product displays and information. Island Herb is located at 5565 Vanbarr Pl, Unit F. For more information, call (360) 331-0140 or visit whidbeyislandherb.com

Island Transit’s Birding By Bus Saturday, September 22 Take Island Transit to Whidbey Audubon’s Bird in Hand Event at Bayview. Later ride the bus to Crockett Lake for Birdwatching with an Audubon guide. To RSVP call 360-678-9536 or email Travel@IslandTransit.org

Russell Maugan Memorial Equine Ride, Treasure Hunt, Silent Auction and Chili Cook-Off Saturday, September 22, 9:30am 4534 Putney Woods Lane, Langley Whether you come to ride, enter the Chili Cook-Off, eat, participate in the raffle and auction, you’re bound to have a whole lot of fun while supporting the Putney Woods Trails. First Ride out at 9:30am - Last Ride out at 10:30am. $10/Riders + 5 raffle tickets or $20/ Ride + 20 raffle tickets. $10/Chili entry. Cash prizes for Judge’s and People’s Choice. Chili judging begins at 11:00am. Plenty of free parking. Proceeds benefit Whidbey Island Trails through maintenance & development by Island County Back Country Horsemen of Washington. For more information, call 360-221-0115 or email diannebolton@comcast.net

Children’s Day Saturday, September 22, 10:00am-2:00pm South Whidbey Community Park, Langley There will be bounce houses, 30+ exciting, interactive booths, and even a free lunch (while supplies last). All this will be provided to you at no cost, courtesy of local organizations and businesses that support children and their families. For more information, call 360-2215484 or visit www.swparks.org. Community Park is located at 5495 Maxwelton Road.

Jamboree by the Sea Saturday, September 22, 10:00am-4:00pm Catalina Park and the Marina, Oak Harbor Hosted by the Deception Pass Sail and Power Squadron, the Jamboree will stress family boating involving safety, education, and awareness on our waters. This free event will include demonstrations from N. Whidbey Fire and Rescue, Sheriff’s harbor division, U.S. Customs and Border, a virtual trainer, classes on boating safety for kids, ABC’s of boating signups, boat inspections, knot tying, rock painting, crabbing class, youth sailing and kayaking and much more.

Fall Sportsman’s Sale and Gun Show Saturday September 22, 10:00am Holmes Harbor Rod and Gun Club, Langley The show takes place in the main clubhouse and features more than two dozen tables of guns, ammo, optics, knives, reloading gear,

Saturday, September 22, 2:00pm-8:00pm Historic Downtown Pioneer Way, Oak Harbor Live music, beer garden, food, shopping, with free admission! Presented by the Oak Harbor Main Street Association.

Live Music: El Colonel & Mary De La Fuente Saturday, September 22, 7:00pm-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville For the past 20 years, Curran “El Colonel” Stromberg has been playing blues music of all shades at festivals, clubs, showcase theaters, and private events across Washington state. No cover. For more information, call 360-6825747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

Candidate Forum Monday, September 24, 6:30pm-8:30pm Clinton Community Hall, 6411 S Central Ave. The Forum will include candidates for: Island County Sheriff, Island County Commissioner, District 3, and State Rep. Legislative District 10 - Position 1 and 2. This event is co-sponsored by the Clinton Community Hall, the Clinton Chamber of Commerce, the Sno-Isle Clinton Library and the League of Women Voters of Whidbey Island. Doors will open by 6:00pm and an informal meet and greet will be held after the event. The event is free and open to the public and the media. Light snacks will be provided. Questions for the candidates should be submitted in advance at info@clinton communitycouncil.org

Comedy Show Friday, September 28, 8:00pm-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville No cover. For more information, call 360-6825747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

Upcoming Sno-Isle Library Events See schedule below Cost: Free South Whidbey at Home Book Group Thursday, September 20, 3:00pm Freeland Library Join us for a great book discussion of Leslie Jamison’s “The Recovering: Intoxication and its Aftermath.” You don’t need to be a member of South Whidbey at Home to attend - everyone is welcome! The Lost Intruder Thursday, September 20, 5:00pm Oak Harbor Library Former A-6 Intruder pilot Peter Hunt shares highlights of his quest to find the missing jet that the Navy salvage ships could not. Friday Fun with SAM (Science, Art, Music) Fridays, September 21, 28, 10:00am Freeland Library Join us on the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Fridays each month as we explore stories through the lens of science, art, and music. Caregiver required. Books2Movies: Doctor Strange Friday, September 21, 2:00pm-4:30pm Freeland Library This group will focus on books that were made into movies. Read/Listen to the book then join us for the movie and a lively talk. Enjoy coffee/ tea, candy and popcorn and meet with fellow book lovers. Brandon Henry will lead the discussion.

Made By Hand Fall Leaf Lanterns and Coasters Saturday, September 22, 10:00am-11:30am Freeland Library Create beautiful mason jar lanterns and leaf coasters with mod podge and fall leaves! We will have leaves available, but feel free to collect and bring your own. All materials will be provided. Registration is required. Farmers Market Book Sales Saturdays, September 22, 29, 10:00am-2:00pm Coupeville Farmers Market Shop locally at the Friends of the Coupeville Library book nook. Books for all ages! All proceeds benefit the Coupeville Library. Meet the Author - Dick Evans Saturday, September 22, 2:00pm-4:00pm Clinton Community Hall, 6411 S. Central Ave. Join us as we welcome author, director, and writer Dick Evans, to discuss his new memoir, “Fazkils.” Books will be available for signing and purchase. Clinton Community Council Candidate Forum Monday, September 24, 6:30pm-8:30pm Clinton Community Hall, 6411 S. Central Ave. The Clinton Community Council will hold a non-partisan candidate forum for the upcoming elections. The event is free and open to the public and the media. Light snacks will be provided.

Religious Services South Whidbey Community Church Sundays, 9:00am-9:45am Adult Bible Study 10:00am-11:00am Worship Deer Lagoon Grange, 5142 Bayview Rd, Langley September 23 Message: “David Has a Bad Day” II Samuel 11--12 Pastor Darrell Wenzek. Worship is followed by a potluck lunch and great fellowship. For more information, call 360-221-1220.

Filipino Christian Fellowship Sundays, 2:00pm Meets at Church on the Rock, 1780 SE 4th Ave., Oak Harbor. www.ohcfellowship.com

Healing Rooms Every Thursday, 6:30pm-8:30pm 5200 Honeymoon Bay Road, Freeland The Healing Rooms are open to anyone desiring personal prayer for physical, emotional, or spiritual needs. There is a team of Christians from several local churches that are dedicated to praying for healing the sick in our community. All ministry is private, confidential, and free. Teams are available to pray for individuals who drop by on a first-come, first-serve basis.

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED Whidbey Quakers Sundays, 4:00pm-5:00pm Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland Whidbey Islands Friends Meeting (also known as Quakers) meet in silent worship and community, with occasional spoken messages, every Sunday at the Unitarian Universalist building. For more information, contact Tom Ewell at tewell@whidbey.com or go to www. whidbeyquakers.org.

First Church of Christ, Scientist Worship, 10:00am Sunday School to age 20, 10:00am Wednesday Testimony Meeting, 2:30pm Christian Science Reading Room Tuesday & Friday, 11:00am-3:00pm Wednesday 3:30pm-5:30pm The church and Reading Room are located at 721 SW 20th Court at Scenic Heights Street, Oak Harbor. Call (360) 675-0621 or visit christianscience.com Services and Sunday School are also held at 10:30am on South Whidbey at 15910 Highway 525, just north of Bayview and across from Useless Bay Road; testimony meetings are held the first Wednesday of each month at 7:30pm.

Galleries & Art Shows Whidbey Allied Artists Art Show & Sale Friday, September 21, 10:00am-6:00pm Saturday, September 22, 10:00am-6:00pm Sunday, September 23, 10:00am-5:00pm Coupeville Rec Hall, 901 NW Alexander St The art show/sale will feature art demos woodworking, painting, photography, fabric art and jewelry. In memory of island artist Helen Ryder, WAA will present a display and sale of her work. Purchase an item at the show and enter to win the Artists’ Raffle Basket.

Meetings & Organizations Island County Master Gardener Foundation Thursday, September 20, 6:00pm Coupeville Rec Hall, 901 NW Alexander St. Kelsi Mottet, of the Whidbey Island Conservation District, will present ‘Painting the Landscape with Native Plants’ to our general meeting. Kelsi will teach us about the beauty and benefits of using native plants in landscapes and gardens. Local wildlife will thank you! Social time with snacks begins at 6:00pm, followed by announcements and a brief business meeting. Kelsi’s educational program will begin around 7:00pm. As always, Master Gardener Educational Programs are free and open to the public. Reasonable accommodations will be made for those with disabilities or special needs who contact Loren Imes at 360-639-5059 or loren.imes@wsu.edu. For more information, contact Martha Hollis at 360-639-5058.

South Whidbey Garden Club Friday, September 21, 9:00am-11:45am St. Peter’s Church, Clinton

For more information, contact Ann at 425-263-2704, email healingwhidbey.com, or visit the International Association of Healing Rooms at healingrooms.com.

September’s program: “Gardeners Know The Best Dirt!” Kicking off our new year, we will be meeting in discussion groups, sharing successes and failures in our gardens, favorite tools, watering systems and favorite spots to find blooming treasures, etc. Bring your ideas to share. Refreshments provided and the public is welcome.

Unitarian Universalist Sunday Service

Island County Amateur Radio Club

Sundays, 10:00am Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland All are welcome. Values-based children’s religious exploration classes and childcare will be provided. Visit www.uucwi.org for more information. The Unitarian Universalist Congregation building is located at 20103 Highway 525, two miles north of Freeland.

Unity of Whidbey Sundays, 10:00am 5671 Crawford Road, Langley If you’re one of the “spiritual but not religious” people who questions your childhood faith or is looking for something more, Unity of Whidbey may feel like a homecoming. Visit our website: unityofwhidbey.org

Saturday, September 22, 9:00am-12:00pm 1 NE Sixth Street, Coupeville The meeting, held in the county commissioner’s hearing room, is free and open to the public. For more information, see www. w7avm.org or contact ki7qlg@w7avm.org.

AAUW New Member Social Saturday, September 22, 3:00pm-5:00pm Private Home, 955 Condra Lane, Oak Harbor Join the American Association of University Women (AAUW) for drinks and snacks and hear about what they do to support women and girls on the island, at the state level and nationally. The purpose of AAUW is to advance WHAT'S GOING ON

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By Kacie Jo Voeller Whidbey Weekly Coming soon to Oak Harbor is an event that can be summed up in one word “fun,” according to the executive director of Oak Harbor’s Main Street Association, Matthew Williams.

Admission to the event itself is free, with food and beverages available for purchase from vendors. While the event is in its third year overall, it is sponsored for the first time this year by the Swinomish Casino and Lodge.

Philippe Bishop Photo Courtesy of Alpenfire Cider The 2018 Whidbey Island Cider Festival celebrates the state’s biggest crop – apples! The festival, which will feature family friendly activities as well as tastings of hard cider for adults from cideries across the region, will be held from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 29 at Pacific Rim Institute in Coupeville.

By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly Late September on Whidbey Island heralds crisp, cool mornings, changing leaves and the harvest. It’s the perfect season to celebrate one of our area’s most bountiful crops – the apple.

“We approached them (the Swinomish Casino and Lodge) and they were generous enough to believe in the event and give us a sponsorship,” Williams said.

The 2018 Whidbey Island Cider Festival, to be held from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 29 at Pacific Rim Institute in Coupeville, will celebrate our state’s top crop with a variety of family-friendly activities as well as offering adults over 21 the opportunity to taste some of the best hard ciders produced in the northwest.

Bands from Oak Harbor and the surrounding area will be highlighted at the event, and various types of music will be played, Williams said.

“There’s going to be family side and cider side of the festival,” said Ashley Ureste, PRI event coordinator. “The festival is free for families and there will be 10 cideries pouring their ciders. Each is brining two to four different types of cider, so there will be plenty to choose from.”

“We are going to have The Pickled Herring, which is a local band; they play a lot of Oktoberfest celebrations,” he said. “There is going to be High Voltage, which is a 90s rock cover band - it’s going to be a good time. The third band is going to be Just-in-Tyme. They are a local band who likes to rock out.”

There is a cost to enter the cider side. Tickets are $25 in advance (brownpapertickets.com) or $30 on the day of the event and will buy adult ticket-holders a commemorative glass and 10 tasting tokens.

Williams said one of the band members from Just-in-Tyme is also the owner of Wicked Teuton Brewing Company, which will be providing some of the beverages at the event, along with beer from Flyers Restaurant and Brewery.

“Macaroni Kid will be there, there will be face painting, apple pressing and apple identification; we’ll have a fire truck there and Grandpa Rufus and his wooden spinners will be there,” said Ureste. “Master Gardeners will also be there to answer any questions and Dan Vorhis from Muscle and Arm Farm in Freeland will also be there. He’ll be selling a variety of rare apple trees. If you want to start your own orchard, he’s the man to talk to.”

“Just-in-Tyme played last year and got a good response, so we are going to have them again,” Williams said. Williams, who started with the Oak Harbor Main Street Association last November, said events like these are important to help support local businesses and show what the town has to offer. “That is actually what initially got me to downtown when I moved to Oak Harbor

See OKTOBERFEST continued on page 14

SEPTEMBER 20 - SEPTEMBER 26, 2018

Cider takes center stage at Whidbey Island festival

Oak Harbor’s annual Oktoberfest to spotlight downtown

Oak Harbor’s Oktoberfest will take place Saturday from 2 to 8 p.m. in the historic downtown district along Pioneer Way. A beer garden with specialty beers provided by local brewers, food from area restaurants, family fun, and music from three bands will all be featured at the event. The downtown shops will also be open for attendees to peruse.

Catch “Daddy Long Legs” p. 10

“Folks can go in and put in a token to get a taste of any of the ciders that interest them,” Ureste said. “We’ll also have a cider store where people can purchase cider if they have to have it right then.” The family side will have plenty of free, fun activities for all ages.

“People can bring apples from their yard and ask us to identify them,” said Vorhis (muscleandarmfarm.com). “Of course, identifying an apple tree can take a little more than just looking at the fruit - you have to pay attention to bloom times, growth habit of the tree, things like that. But sometimes we get lucky and can identify an apple, or at least narrow the choices.”

at an amazing rate,” said Nancy Bishop of Alpenfire Cider in Port Townsend, a family-owned orchard and cidery making its second appearance at the Whidbey Island Cider Festival. “When the Northwest Cider Association began, I think there were five to seven cideries in the northwest. The last I heard, there are now around 300.” Bishop compares the process of making cider to that of making wine. It is typically a once-a-year harvest with a fermentation process that can last as little as four months and as long as 15 months before the cider is ready to bottle. This growing industry has found an enthusiastic and thirsty audience. “I think many people are drawn to cider out of curiosity for something new, something gluten free, something with lower alcohol, more session-able than wine,” said Bishop. “But they stay with cider because it is delicious, and with so many styles and approaches, there is always something new to try.” Alpenfire Cider (alpenfirecider.com) will be offering four different ciders for tasting: a rosé cider called Glow; a still cider called Olympic Discovery Trail; 3 Pommes, a blend of apples, pears and quince; and Rosy Pommeau, a rosé dessert cider that is barrel-aged for over a year. If you want to make a day of it or if you want some food to go along with the cider, there will be local vendors offering food for purchase, such as PRI Wood Fired Pizza, Oystercatcher, Coupe’s Last Stand and Chris’ Bakery. Live music will be provided by Brian Kenny. All proceeds from the event will benefit Pacific Rim Institute. “We are a nonprofit who saves native plants on Whidbey Island and Puget Sound. We are working 24/7 collecting seeds, planting them in our greenhouse and replanting the local prairie, savannah and forests. We are one of the locations where you can find the endangered

See CIDER continued on page 14

Vorhis said they will also have as many as 60 varieties of trees on mini dwarf stock people can purchase. “The mini-dwarf trees are a perfect size for a small yard, are quite productive, can be containerized and are the best size for insect barrier netting, to avoid the need for sprays,” he said. As noted, Washington State has long been touted for its apple production. Our climate suits the fruit trees. Whidbey Island is no exception. “Whidbey Island is an apple growing paradise,” said Vorhis. “We have a super-long growing season and very long days in the summer to ripen fruit and add sugars and flavor compounds. We have dry summers to avoid diseases while the fruit grows and ripens.”

Photo courtesy of High Voltage The 90s cover band High Voltage will be one of the groups performing at Oktoberfest Saturday in Oak Harbor.

The popularity of hard cider has grown significantly in the past decade or so. With apples being the state’s number one commodity and its third-largest export, it makes sense for the apple industry to branch out. More and more cideries are being established, all of them creating special blends and signature flavors. “Cider consumption has jumped tremendously since we opened our business in 2006, and with that, new producers are coming on board

Photo Courtesy of Sherrye Wyatt Get a taste of some of the best hard ciders from around the region at the 2018 Whidbey Island Cider Festival, which will be held Saturday, Sept. 29 at Pacific Rim Institute in Coupeville. Tasting tickets for those over 21 can be purchased for $25 in advance or for $30 at the door until sold out.

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SEPTEMBER 20 - SEPTEMBER 26, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

BITS ‘n’ PIECES

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5

Verna became community outreach director at the Vashon Center for the Arts. Concluding that she wished to concentrate her professional efforts in nonprofit management, she earned a master’s degree from Seattle University in “nonprofit arts leadership.” Following her academic detour, Everitt became executive director at the Vashon Community Care Foundation, a fundraising arm of a prominent assisted living center on the island. In that position, she provided oversight to fundraising and donor relations, community outreach, event planning, public relations and marketing, and social media outreach.

project and are required by Island County and the State of Washington.” As construction and logistics can vary, this part of the overall project is estimated to cost up to $30,000 and include over 160 tests. Categories for tests and special inspections include earthwork, asphalt, concrete, and structural wood/lateral framing. Another special test is building air barrier/blower door testing which uses infrared thermography for checking air leakage and analysis. [Sherrye Wyatt]

Deer in the Headlights? Consider the Bus!

Verna and Tim, who have been married for 30 years, have two children—Katherine, 26, and Sam, 18. In her spare time, Verna enjoys theater, movies, reading biographies, and cooking. She expresses enthusiasm about the move to South Whidbey, which she says is “reminiscent of Vashon, a very close-knit community.” She describes her new island as “breathtakingly beautiful.” WICA, established in 1996, is dedicated to the mission of nourishing and enhancing the artistic, social, and economic wellbeing of the South Whidbey community. It’s areas of artistic concentration are theater, music, literature, dance, and the visual arts. [Submitted by Fritha Strand, Marketing Manager, WICA]

Inspections Begin at New Bayview Station South Whidbey Fire/EMS Commissioners took the next step in building the new Bayview fire station, and recently secured the services of GeoTest Services to oversee the special inspections and testing for the construction project. A local firm, it has offices in Oak Harbor, Arlington and Bellingham. “Tests and inspections are critical and some involve significant coordination between the department, general contractor and subcontractors,” said Chief H.L. “Rusty” Palmer. “They are vital to the overall success of the

This time of year as our days grow shorter and the nights longer, we turn on our headlights for the morning commute. Some of us are coming home in the dark, too. Commuting in the dark days of fall and winter, residents of Whidbey have an added concern. Deer are most active during dawn and dusk. How many of us have been driving along and suddenly, out of nowhere, a deer leaps in front of us? Oh, deer! The DOT estimates motorists hit roughly 5,000 deer and elk on state highways each year and Whidbey Island is one of its top ten areas of concern. Ralph Downes, on Whidbey says, “The vast majority of car-deer accidents are not reported.” He estimates the total could actually be twice what the study indicates. Many island residents feed the deer, which results in a concentration of animals in those neighborhoods. Scott Harris, a wildlife biologist with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), said in a recent presentation that whenever a deer is hit by a motor-

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ist, “there’s always someone feeding nearby.” Widespread feeding along with reduced hunting and few predators results in an overpopulation of deer, which increases collisions with cars. “One of my biggest pet peeves is having to euthanize wild animals that someone has basically loved to death,” he said. If the feeding stops, Harris says the population will eventually return to normal. The WDFW offers some tips for avoiding deer and car collisions. Be especially watchful at dawn and dusk. If you see a deer crossing the road, slow down, there may be more. When you see the brake lights of a car ahead, slow down and be cautious as you pass that spot. Take note of deer crossing signs. They’re placed where frequent accidents have occurred in the past. Headlights may confuse deer, causing them to stop in the roadway. If you must drive in the dark, slow down so you have more time to react if you’re suddenly faced with a deer in the headlights. With our heavy population of deer, the common car-deer collisions on Whidbey, and the shorter days ahead, it just makes sense to take the bus. Studies show commuting by bus is at least twice as safe as traveling by car. Let the friendly, well-trained professionals do the driving for a relaxing commute. Island Transit starts its weekday services at 3:55am and the last bus parks at 8:40pm. There are 11 routes on Whidbey Island and it’s fare free. [Submitted by Maribeth Crandell, Island Transit Mobility Specialist]

Local Business News Cascade Insurance Agency Joins Leavitt Group Leavitt Group is pleased to announce Cascade Insurance Agency has affiliated and merged operations with Leavitt Group Northwest, effective Sept. 1, 2018. Leavitt Group is a network of insurance brokers whose collective strength allows members to provide national insurance products and risk management resources to their clients.

Shelli Trumbull will join Sue Blouin and Bonnie Wallin in Leavitt Group’s Oak Harbor office. With this merger, the combined agency will serve the insurance needs of Whidbey Island as well as the rest of Washington State and surrounding states. “Leavitt Group shares the same guiding principles of building strong relationships, respect, and trust that have been integral to Cascade Insurance Agency’s success,” said Trumbull. “I look forward to working with local, experienced insurance agents who care about their clients. The additional services available to a large agency provide access to many more benefits for our customers.” Shelli Trumbull has been serving the local community for over 25 years. She is a Certified Insurance Counselor and Accredited Customer Service Representative. She can help you with your personal and business insurance needs. Her experience, combined with the greater insurance market access and a wide range of value-added services and resources will be a benefit to new and existing clients. Trumbull is, “excited to work with a community centered insurance business dedicated to its customers.” Leavitt Group Northwest has offices in Oak Harbor, Auburn, Everett, and University Place. Clients receive employee benefits solutions, property and casualty insurance, risk management, health insurance, and other services. Clients also benefit from the consultative approach to risk management found within the culture of each office and the unique flexibility that comes with local, on-the-ground agency owners and employees. For more information about Leavitt Group, please visit www. leavitt.com.

8th Annual Skagit Valley Giant Pumpkin Festival It’s time to think big! Christianson’s Nursery is partnering with Pacific Northwest Giant Pumpkin Growers (PNWGPG) to host the 8th Annual BITS & PIECES

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Whidbey Audubon Society

Bird in the Hand Festival Saturday, September 22 10am-1pm Bayview Farm and Garden 2780 Marshview Ave, Langley, WA • Free and family friendly • Hold & examine bird specimens • Children’s activities • Live raptors • Feathers under a microscope WhidbeyAudubon.org 360-320-5480

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360-675-3854 • 250 SE Pioneer Way • Oak Harbor genesartframing.com 9:30-6 Monday-Friday • 10-5:30 Saturday • Closed Sunday Custom Framing • Pens & Pencils • Papers • Canvas Brushes • Portfolios • Clay • Easels • Palettes • How-To- Books Calligraphy • Drafting • Airbrush • Artists & Craft Paint Supply Totes • Readymade Frames • Children's Art Kits

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Island Angler By late September and through the rest of the autumn months, deciding where to fish is exciting because there are so many options. Water is beginning to cool back down in the local lakes and many of the fall insects and bugs are out, which in turn gets the resident fish actively feeding again. This can make for good lake fishing once again.

Rivers are starting to see greater numbers of hatchery and wild salmon returning and for the ones that will be open, catching salmon in these rivers can be both exciting and challenging. Stalking salmon from the banks of a river is a challenge by itself, but hook a big chrome bright coho in a river like the Nooksack or the Skagit, which typically have a lot of fallen and sunken logs, as hard as you are trying to reel them in, they are fighting just as hard to swim under a log or dart into the swift river current, hoping to snap or shear off your line. If the rivers are still lacking in fish, then turn to the salt.

A wonderful catch of Skagit River Coho and Cutthroat Trout

Late summer saltwater salmon fishing can be hot! Especially when there are multiple species headed for rivers. I recall fishing Hein Bank in the Straits in the fall of 2015; we were using downriggers and we had a hard time catching a king salmon because as the downrigger ball was headed down to 100 feet, a pink or coho salmon would bite our spoons before it could even get down near the bottom. What a great time! In three days we hooked and landed a total of 100 salmon! If I had not experienced it myself and someone told me the story, I would not believe it - 100 salmon in the same spot, come on! Unfortunately, the pink salmon only arrive on the even years, so fishing this good may have to wait until next summer. Nevertheless, coho, kings and sockeye can make things busy. Even without the numerous pinks, fishing can be very productive during this time of year. Regardless of where you choose to fish, right now is “prime time.” A float with a gob of salmon roe or sand shrimp is great natural-style bait for coho in the rivers. If artificial lures are the way you prefer to fish, I use a Cerise or Purple marabou feather jig (a number 3 or 4), silver and Chartreuse

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NORTH WHIDBEY Your HELP Community HOUSE Food Bank “Bluefox” spinner, and a medium-size purple Brad’s wiggle wart; these are my three go-to lures for river coho. If I’m targeting saltwater salmon, I like the cookies and cream, or white lightning 3 1/2-inch spoons to start fishing with, then I may switch to something with pink or green in it if I’m not getting any take-downs. Coho and Kings will also aggressively chase a Hoochie or the Ace-Hi fly if the spoons are not getting bit. One of the key reasons this time of year is so productive in the rivers and the saltwater is the rain. The lack of rain will keep migrating fish holding in the bays and near the mouth of the rivers. Once the rains start to be more than just a sprinkle, these patiently waiting fish will get the sweet scent of their home river waters and the race is on!

Zachary Loescher with a Skagit River Coho

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FRESH OR SALT

SEPTEMBER 20 - SEPTEMBER 26, 2018

One of the other great things about this time of year is the ability to catch a limit of saltwater salmon from the beaches and gravel shorelines. The reason is while the salmon are using the shores to help navigate their way to the rivers, they are close enough for us to reach them with a good casting rod and reel. The two most popular ways fishermen catch the migrating fish from shore is casting a “Buzz-bomb” style lure or using the tidal currents to drift a Herring under a float. Both of these methods are effective at catching close-to-shore salmon. If you are fishing the beaches and do not see any jumping or swirling fish, be patient and keep fishing. Most of your bites will be blind strikes; the fish are there, they just aren’t giving away their location. The fish are here and in the largest numbers we will see until next year, so get out and catch some while the odds are in our favor. If you find yourself having the incurable fishing bug and would like to get the most information in the shortest amount of time, look to local clubs like The Puget Sound Anglers and the Coastal Conservation Association. These clubs are filled with local, experienced fishermen and the clubs are involved and informed about the decisions affecting our fishing opportunities in Washington. Start thinking about putting gloves, beanies, shake-n-heat hand warmers and rain gear back into the boat and your backpacks - cooler weather is here. I have seen limits of coho being caught in Marine areas 7 and 9 along with good numbers of fish being taken from local rivers. Be careful and GOOD LUCK out there!

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Oak Harbor couple delights in “Daddy Long Legs” Kleppang, a big fan of the book, brought the idea of doing the musical at the Playhouse to Heather and Darren a while ago. She is thrilled with the casting and said the production lives up to her vision.

By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly You have just four more chances to see “Daddy Long Legs,” which is heading into its closing weekend at Whidbey Playhouse in Oak Harbor. To miss this production would be a pity.

“Darren and Heather have served the show so well,” she said. “Heather has become the Jerusha of the book.”

The musical, based on the Jean Webster novel of the same name, features the incredibly talented Heather Good McCoy and her equally talented husband, Darren McCoy, choral director at Oak Harbor High School. The production is a sheer delight. It is creatively staged by directors Doug Langrock and Cynthia Kleppang, beautifully acted and sung by the McCoys and skillfully accompanied by very competent and capable musicians. “Daddy Long Legs” tells the story of Jerusha (Heather Good McCoy), a young woman who has grown up in an orphanage and is about to “age out,” but for her unknown benefactor, Jervis (Darren McCoy), who has read one of her essays and decides to pay for her college education. All Jervis asks is that Jerusha write to him monthly, apprising him of her progress. Jerusha, however, cannot limit herself to just one letter a month, and writes quite frequently, sharing her opinions and thoughts on her life at college as well as her musings – and conclusions - about her anonymous benefactor. While set in the early 1900s, there is nothing old fashioned about the theme of this production. “That century gap isn’t really noticeable and I think this story is very relevant today,” said Kleppang. “Jerusha was just as rebellious then as young women can be today and I was actually surprised at how empowered she was for her time.” “She’s this amazing mix of Jo from “Little Women” and Anne from “Anne of Green Gables” and that makes for a really fun acting experience,” Heather said of her character. “She has this spunk and zest for life and an incredible imagination and is so full of hope and strength. As an actress, that’s a dream to play someone like that.” While Jerusha may be the one in college, both characters learn a lot. “The life lessons are my favorite parts and there are too many to list,” said Darren. “Jerusha, at 19, is discovering things it

“It’s incredible to see how Jerusha grows from a young orphan into a strong and confident woman and how Jervis feels old and isolated in his life and finds someone who makes him feel young and happy,” said Heather. “We’ve been working really hard as a small team and it’s been awesome.”

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly Heather Good McCoy stars as Jerusha in the musical “Daddy Long Legs,” playing through Sunday at the Whidbey Playhouse in Oak Harbor.

takes people a lifetime to learn. For example, she says people need imagination. It helps them put themselves in other people’s shoes and it makes them kind. Jervis has his own lesson, too. He has a crisis about charity. He prides himself on helping out the underdog but then wonders, ‘If he truly cares for the people he helps, how can his money ever be enough?’” The story of “Daddy Long Legs” unfolds through the letters Jerusha and Jervis exchange. While the actors may be on stage at the same time, it doesn’t necessarily mean they interact directly in a scene, at least not in the traditional sense. The McCoys have the timing down perfectly – adroitly playing off one another. Of course, when the two main characters on stage are married in real life, rehearsals can happen anytime and frequently, so their practice clearly shows in their performances. “They say “Good acting is reacting.” I suppose the biggest impact is that it’s easy to know how to react since we can almost predict how the other person will say his or her lines,” Darren said. “Since we are together outside of rehearsal, we get to have wonderful and important discussions about subtext and character development.” “Working across from him makes me feel very supported at all times and I know that if I drop a line or mess up he’ll be right there to catch me, and vice versa,” said Heather. “I know that we both deeply care about the success and the joy of the experience of each other and while that happens a lot in theatre after rehearsing with someone for three or four months, it just feels a lot deeper working with Darren, like we can anticipate each other’s movements and responses more.

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly Darren McCoy plays Jervis in the Whidbey Playhouse’s musical production of “Daddy Long Legs.” Final performances take place Thursday through Sunday at the community theater in Oak Harbor.

“It’s been absolutely wonderful doing this show with Darren, especially because of the romantic themes,” she continued. “It’s nice to be falling in love with someone every night when you actually already love them. We got to know each other doing a two-person musical together and it feels very “full circle” to be back onstage with him. We did “The Last 5 Years” musical five years ago this summer and a lot has happened in those years together.”

“By far, my favorite thing about the character is Jervis gets to talk to the audience and laugh with them,” said Darren. “That’s great for me because one of my biggest acting challenges is that I laugh when other people laugh! But it’s almost like Jervis knows the audience is there and he is reading Jerusha’s letters with them. He can chuckle with them and be surprised with them but fall in love with her in front of them.” With a cast of just two, it means either Heather or Darren is always on stage, sometimes alone, more often together. That can be challenging in some ways and energizing in others. “You have to constantly be “on” and if you desperately need a drink of water or to cough or clear your throat you have to work it into the character somehow,” Heather said. “It’s also really important to keep up the high energy and that’s tiring, but also really fun.” Darren is also the musical director for this play, which adds another layer of challenge. “Music directing this show is difficult because I’m not conducting,” he said. “I’m not able to make notes about errors and fix them, since I’m on stage acting. Fortunately, our instrumentalists are great and don’t even need a conductor. I suppose I’m more of a music enabler?” Those interested in catching one of the last four performances of “Daddy Long Legs,” which will be at 7:30 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, can visit www. whidbeyplayhouse.com for ticket availability. Those able to attend will be treated to high caliber performances and a sweet, funny, engaging story. “This is a musical that not many people have heard of and it’s one that has a little something for everybody that sees it,” said Heather. “I hope people are touched by the raw emotion and openness of the characters and find something in what we are saying or feeling that really speaks to them. I hope it makes people think a lot and feel a lot and be hopeful and imaginative and kind.” “I am rarely on stage as a singer and actor; I let my students do all the work,” said Darren. “However, once in a while I need to go through the same process they go through. It makes me a better educator, leader, friend and empathetic artist. To all my singers at school and in the Whidbey Community Chorus, I’m so proud to be a part of such a talented community. I hope you enjoy the show!”

Jazz duo celebrates love just in time

By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly

Little did Judy Sjerven Nicholai know how much her life would change when she met “Nick” Nicholai on that dark, dreary January day in 2013. That fateful meeting would change the course of their lives “I was looking for a piano player,” said Judy. “I was looking for a girl singer,” said Nick. The two have been making beautiful music ever since. Together they are the Just in Time Jazz Duo and they will be celebrating five years of love, marriage and music with a special concert at 2 p.m. Sunday at Click Music in Oak Harbor. Of course, if you hear Nick tell their story, he’ll say Cupid’s arrow found its mark before they met. “I fell in love before I even met her, when I heard her voice on the phone,” he said. “That’s my side of the story and I’m sticking to it.” “That first phone call was just amazing,” Judy agreed. But she just wanted to get down to business when they met and came armed with her list of 25 songs in the keys she thought best suited her voice. Nick, she said, insisted on getting acquainted. When they finally got to work on the music… “It was just lightening bolts going both ways

that first rehearsal,” recalled Judy, who said they wound up going through about 35 songs that day. “It was special, right from the very first song, which was “Just in Time.” That became our name.” Three weeks, six rehearsals and six dinners later, the duo played their first gig together on Valentine’s Day.

“I thought maybe I should get him a card, because I thought things were progressing beyond friends, but it was only three weeks,” Judy said. “But when you’re this age… “ “You can’t waste time,” Nick finished. The rest, as they say, is history. They were engaged a month later. “March 19 we were at dinner at China City – there’s a booth there that should have a plaque with our names on it – and he proposed,” said Judy. “After only two months – good grief! He kept that diamond ring under the table until I said yes. A few months later, I pulled up stakes, left my job – I was a ways past retirement, anyway. I always wanted to do jazz.” The couple married in September and they have built up a solid following, performing their beloved jazz standards from the Great American Songbook. Both Judy and Nick have impressive backgrounds in music and they bring a lifetime of

knowledge, skill and fun to bear when they perform.

Judy, who has a Bachelor of Arts in Music Education, taught music in public schools for many years and has conducted church and community choirs for more than four decades. She has also performed as a soloist, with small groups, orchestras and even performed in community theater musicals. Nick has been playing piano his whole life and holds a doctorate in music, which he earned at age 18. He has toured with the likes of Louis Armstrong and Paul Desmond, has worked as a studio musician and continues to arrange music. At age six, Nick could already play the pipe organ. As an adult, he consulted on the design of the Hammond X66 organ. “It’s more than just a job, it’s fun to do, to share music with people,” said Nick. “Now I try to make her look as good as possible with arrangements that show off her voice.” “It’s just so wonderful to be in a relationship with someone with as much musical experience and knowledge, so we can just talk about it constantly,” said Judy. “We wish everybody could enjoy their work as much as we do.” The first hour of the concert Sunday will feature the Just in Time Duo. The second half will feature Nick on the organ, with an old

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly Gerry Haveman’s love of Elvis Presley means there’s an Elvis-themed Christmas tree included in the 15 miniature and four full sized trees she and her husband, Norm, decorate every year.

friend, Barry Bernier, on drums. The two old friends, who performed as Two’s Company, will reprise some of the songs from their 1976 album “Live at Skyline.” “We’re going to play a lot of things from the original recording,” said Nick. “It’s going to be interesting – all of it is. Quite diversified, quite different.” There is a $10 cover charge for the concert. Additional information is available online at www.justintimejazzduo.com or by calling Click Music at 360-679-5544. And, there will be cake! “Come and hear these wonderful jazz standards performed with love,” said Judy. “I think we bring them to life. I just love these songs.” “It’s going to be exciting,” said Nick. “Help us celebrate our fifth anniversary.”

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Film Shorts

Fahrenheit 11/9: Michael Moore is back and he’s in fine fighting form in this documentary that examines how we got here and how we, as private citizens and stakeholders in our democracy, can battle back from the brink. ★★★★★ (R • 2 hrs. 6 min.) The House with a Clock in its Walls: Eli Roth, one of the fathers of the cinematic blight that is torture porn, is the director of this kids’ comedy starring Jack Black and Cate Blanchett and I am not at all sure how to feel about this. ★★★ (PG • 1 hr. 44 min.) Life Itself: A multi-generational family saga written and directed by Dan Fogelman, the man responsible for the multi-generational family saga “This Is Us.” Although his ideas don’t fare as well on the big screen as they did on the small one, you’re still going to want to bring a dozen hankies to the theater with you. ★ (R • 1 hr. 57 min.)

Operation Finale: My movie-star boyfriend, Oscar Isaac, hunts a real bad Nazi in this dramatization of the 1960 capture of Adolf Eichmann by Israel’s Mossad and Shin Bet. A timely account given the fact Nazis still live and walk among us. ★★★ (PG-13)

Unbroken: Path to Redemption: In 2014, Angelina Jolie helmed “Unbroken,” which garnered great critical acclaim and was nominated for three Oscars. In 2018, the film gets a sequel featuring none of the same cast or crew, but a plot that leans heavily on Billy Graham and his friend Jesus. ★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 38 min.)

Mission: Impossible–Fallout: Tom Cruise is back as Ethan Hunt, summer’s most bankable action hero who is not part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. At 56 years old, he still does nearly all his own stunts and, like its star, this is the rare film franchise that seems to be getting better with age. ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 27 min.)

For Anacortes theater showings, please see www.fandango.com. For Blue Fox and Oak Harbor Cinemas showings see ads on this page.

The Nun: A character from a movie sequel somehow gets its own spinoff–and that should tell you everything you need to know about the state of mainstream Hollywood at the moment. If you want to be freaked out all over again by the creepy nun from “The Conjuring 2,” you now get your chance. Puzzle 1 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.49) ★ (R • 1 hr. 36 min.)

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In memory of island artist Helen Ryder, WAA will present a display and sale of her work. Purchase an item at the show and enter to win the Artists’ Raffle Basket. Visit us at whidbeyalliedartists.com and follow us on Facebook

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Watch artists at work! Whidbey Allied Artists (WAA) September art show/sale, will feature art demos woodworking, painting, photography, fabric art and jewelry.

A Simple Favor: This thriller starring Blake Lively (love her) and Anna Kendrick (love her too) has all the look of a big-budget Lifetime movie–and that is not an insult. Gather up some girlfriends, smuggle in some White Claw and make a night at the movies of it. ★★★★ (R • 1 hr. 56 min.)

White Boy Rick: This based-on-a-true story account of a teenage FBI informant-turneddrug-dealer starring Matthew McConaughey seems like it should hit all of the cinematic sweet spots. If you’re starting to wonder whether the McConaissance was more myth than man, so am I. ★★★ (R • 1 hr. 51 min.)

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Searching: When his daughter goes missing, her father (John Cho, always good) tries to find her by tracking her movements through her social media accounts in this updated take on a standard-issue thriller. ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 41 min.)

The Meg: Jason Statham has fought various drug cartels, corrupt political regimes, wackadoo criminal masterminds and his own body, so naturally the only thing left is for him to fight a giant prehistoric shark. I don’t think it’s spoiling anything to say the shark probably won’t win. ★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 54 min.)

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Peppermint: Jennifer Garner returns to her action-adventure roots as a woman who sees her entire family murdered and then turns her body into a lethal weapon in order to exact revenge. Do Jen a favor and just rewatch “Alias” instead. ★ (R)

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Art Show & Sale

By Carey Ross

Crazy Rich Asians: The first movie with an all-Asian cast since “Memoirs of a Geisha,” this adaptation of the blockbuster bestseller translates to the big screen with the kind of ease only money can buy. Critically acclaimed and a success at the box office, here’s hoping Hollywood is starting to realize that representation rules. ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 1 min.)

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Christopher Robin: Christopher Robin (Ewan McGregor) is all grown up and being an adult is a big bum deal, so his stuffed friends of yore–Tigger, Eeyore, Piglet, Owl, and that honey-loving scamp Pooh–come back to life to save him from himself. Which sounds cute in theory, but if my Cabbage Patch Dolls start speaking to me, I will never recover. ★★★ (PG • 1 hr. 44 min.)

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SEPTEMBER 20 - SEPTEMBER 26, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

Let’s Dish! with Kae Harris

THE VERSATILITY OF VINEGAR This time of year we see a wealth of fall foods make their way into our homes. Whether gourds of one kind or another, or apples in every way we could imagine, the upcoming season obligates us to enjoy that which nature provides at the moment, and to which we have become accustomed. We’ve made it a tradition, passed down from generation to generation, to use all things ‘fall’ and yet, there are a couple of ways we might not readily involve some of the most utilized fruits of Autumn. I’m talking about apples, yes, but not about the myriad ways in which we can turn them into a pie, parfait, compote, breakfast item or cookie. I’m talking about a rather ancient recipe, in fact. Vinegar. I know it doesn’t sound so appetizing on its own to many people, but its importance in so many aspects of life cannot be understated. Vinegar happens to be one of the oldest known fermentation processes there is, with the very first product being wine, from which vinegar is derived. As far back as approximately 5000 BC, wine was made by the Babylonians from date palm and in Egypt from barley. In about 2500 BC, an ancient nomadic tribe, known as the Aryans, is thought to have created a wine from soured apples. This recipe would be the predecessor for apple cider and made its way into the recipe books of Greeks and Romans, who thus started producing apple cider vinegar in the process of making these soured-apple wines. What luck we should find in apple cider vinegar, as it has been used for thousands of years as not only a fermented drink, but also as a medicinal treatment for all kinds of ailments of which the uses include antiseptics, analgesics, anti-dandruff treatments, among a host of others. The Persians were said to have consumed apple cider vinegar as a way to prevent buildup of fatty tissue, whilst the Samurai of Japan were believed to ingest this potent concoction to imbue them with strength and power. In addition to the maladies apple cider vinegar is thought to cure, treat or keep at bay, it has also long been used in the preservation of food. But why vinegar? Well, to start with, food spoilage

is caused by microorganisms such as bacteria, yeasts or molds, some of which can be harmful if food contaminated with certain pathogens is ingested. In order to prevent the spoilage of foods, we create an environment which is as inhospitable to these microorganisms as possible. We make it really cold (i.e. freezing food) or we make it really acidic (i.e. using vinegar). As if all these magical uses for vinegar aren’t enough to create a stirring of admiration for the sour liquid, then how about the fact it has been and still is used as a cleaning agent of sorts today? I’ve seen it used on counter tops and in microwaves alike when I was growing up, and while the smell at first packs a powerful punch to the sniffer, I promise it doesn’t hang around too long! I’m not here to talk about cleaning, though. I’m here to talk about the ways in which we can include this food item in dishes. Ever heard of sautéing onions in a little oil, sugar and apple cider vinegar? Well, I’ll tell you it makes them deliciously tangy and if you combine it with something that enhances it, even better! Personally though, I’ve come to enjoy extra-tangy caramelized onions with something that wraps around the tanginess, ‘muffles’ it in a way and allows the sour bite to spread gently through it. Cheese does exactly that, so pairing caramelized apple cider vinegar onions inside a grilled cheese sandwich will kick a classic up a notch and possibly become a fast favorite! If that’s not something you’re up to messing with – if you want to leave your grilled cheese be – you could always mix apple cider vinegar into roasted root veggies. The sweetness of carrots, sweet-potatoes and parsnips tossed in a mixture of apple cider vinegar, olive oil, brown sugar, salt and pepper, then roasted until thoroughly cooked and wonderfully tender, can become a contender for the ‘most coveted dish’ spot at any upcoming Thanksgiving dinner. It’s a new spin on an old favorite and if it gives your dish a certain ‘something’ people will guess at – wondering just how you made it so delicious, then I say, make your apple cider roasted vegetables the new ‘it’ dish!

Of all the things I’ve come across in my gastronomic adventures, there was none so strange to me as vinegar pie. Then again, nothing in the food world should surprise anyone anymore and it’s always good to keep in mind what one person might find inedible, another finds most delectable. Such is the nature of personal preference. At first, I just couldn’t quite picture it. Was it supposed to be sweet or savory or somewhere in between? It seems a bare-bones sort of pie and I believe it hails from pioneer days, when a lot of cooking was done using ‘bare-bones’ ingredients. Wouldn’t you know it, the most ‘bare-bones’ dishes were born of necessity and resourcefulness and are, in fact, as far from bland and ‘bare-bones’ tasting as one could imagine. Such is the vinegar pie, wherein the star ingredient features only ever so slightly, in just enough concentration to give an edge to the sweetness of the dessert as a whole. With that being said dear readers, I will leave you with a recipe for this pie, which I happened across a little while ago. Who knows, maybe it ushers in a new era of sweet tradition in your home? If you try it, let me know how you like it! Please send any and all comments, questions and most definitely recipes you would like to share to letsdish.whidbeyweekly@gmail.com and we’ll do just that and Dish! Vinegar Pie 1 store bought pie crust 3 – 4 eggs at room temperature (4 eggs sets stiffer) ½ teaspoon salt 1 cup packed, light brown sugar ¾ stick butter, melted and cooled a little 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar 1 egg, beaten (for egg wash) Line a 9-inch pie pan with your pastry and crimp the edges. Line the crust with parchment paper and fill with dry beans and bake at 350°F for 15 minutes. Remove from heat and remove the parchment lining carefully, so as not to burn yourself, and set aside. Beat one egg and use as a wash to brush all over the pastry. Prick crust bottom with a sharp knife and bake again for 10–15 minutes, or until pie bottom appears to be ‘dry.’ Remove from heat and set aside. Whisk together the eggs, sugar and salt in a medium bowl, until smooth. Add in the melted butter while whisking continuously. Whisk in the apple cider vinegar and then pour mixture into the crust. Bake for 35 minutes, or until the pie’s internal temperature reaches 165°F. Filling should rise and be a rich golden-brown color on top. Set aside to cool, serve and enjoy! Refrigerate leftovers to enjoy again later! https://pastrychefonline.com/vinegarpie/ www.herbhedgegrow.co.uk/apple-cider-vinegar-natural-beauty-throughout-history/ To read past columns of Let’s Dish in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www. whidbeyweekly.com.

Dining Guide

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equity for women and girls through advocacy, education, philanthropy and research. For reservations, directions and further information, please contact Sheila Saul at sheilasaul@ hotmail.com or Gunda Vesque at gvesque16@ gmail.com. Women with a 2-year degree, RN, 4-year degree from an accredited school are eligible to join.

PBY Naval Air Museum Wednesday, September 26, 11:30am CPO Club, 1080 Ault Field Rd, Oak Harbor The featured speaker at this monthly no-host luncheon will be CAPT Alan Schrader, USN, on the hows, whys and historical background of Naval Station Bangor and US Naval Shipyard Bremerton evolving into Naval Base Kitsap. The public is invited to this event. Call 360-2409500 for directions and more information. For a list of continuous Meetings and Organizations, visit www.whidbeyweekly.com

Classes, Seminars and Workshops Getting Ready for Medicare Thursday, September 20, 2:00pm Oak Harbor Senior Center, 51 SE Jerome St. Turning 65? New to Medicare? It can seem overwhelming. If you have questions about Medicare and plans available to Whidbey Island residents, let us help you navigate the process. Subjects include: Medicare Parts A and B; Medicare Supplements; Medicare Advantage Plans; Part D Prescription Plans; Enrollment Deadlines; Low-income Assistance. Join the Statewide Health Insurance Benefits Advisors (SHIBA), for a free “Welcome to Medicare” class. No registration required. SHIBA is a program of the Washington State Office of the Insurance Commissioner. For more information, call 360-279-4580.

Oak Harbor Senior Center Resource Fair Saturday, September 22, 9:00am-2:00pm Oak Harbor Senior Center,51 SE Jerome St The Resource Fair will provide resources and information for the 50+ community. Free lunch will be served from 11:30am to 12:30pm. Vendors to include: Summer Hill, Costco, Homeplace, Whidbey Memorial, Island Eye Care, Regency, SHIBA, RE/MAX, Careage, Bayshore Chiropractic, Sno-Isle Library, Puget Sound Energy, Whidbey Health Hospice & EMS, Island Transit, Medical Safety Net, Island Senior Resources, AARP, La Conner Retirement Inn, Wallin Funeral Home, Opportunity Council, and more! For more information, call 360-279-4583.

Back Pain & Sciatica Workshop Saturday, September 22, 11:00am Rue & Primavera, Oak Harbor This is a free informational workshop. Rue & Primavera is located at 785 Bayshore Dr, Ste 102. For more information or to register, call 360-279-8323

Lunch & Learn: Trails for Wheelchairs Tuesday, September 25, 12:30pm Island Senior Resources, Langley

Celebrate Oktoberfest with Prasselkuchen! Saturday, September 22 Only

Breakfast & Lunch on the Water - Daily Fresh Baked Treats Homemade Soups & Sandwiches 360.678.5431 • 4 Front Street • Coupeville

Many forest trails are accessible for wheelchairs, those with a mobility device or who just want a relaxing walk in the woods. And many are accessible by Island Transit buses, which can carry two wheelchairs each. Find out where you could go in this free program with Island Transit Mobility Specialist Maribeth Crandell. Optional lunch by donation is at 11:45am. The Bayview Senior Center is at 14594 SR 525.

Free Life Skill Workshops: Cold Process Soap Making Tuesday, September 25, 1:00pm-3:00pm Concordia Lutheran Church, Oak Harbor 1191 SE Dock St, #2 • Oak Harbor 360-675-6500 • chrisbakeryonwhidbey.weebly.com

Presented by Concordia Community Academy. For more information or to register, visit concordiaoakharbor.org or call 360-679-1697.

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you want. This goes double on the 23rd, especially for anything that has a bottom line expressed in dollars and cents.

CHICKEN LITTLE & THE ASTROLOGER By Wesley Hallock

ARIES (March 21-April 19) It’s perfectly normal and acceptable to find yourself seized by a streak of perfectionism this week. When good enough won’t do and you simply MUST have things exactly right, just let others shake their heads and mutter. Show them who’s in charge and they’ll fall into line. Fret not on the 23rd should something be beyond your ability to change it. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) All your plotting and strategizing goes for naught in the absence of a well-presented argument to the powers that be. Be prepared to sell your idea to the person or persons in charge. Logic is the key here. Emotional vaporizing simply won’t get the job done. Should romance be on your mind, don’t hesitate to couch your approach on practicality. It’s the nuts and bolts of the matter that win them over on the 23rd. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) Whatever the source of that nagging insecurity you would so like to see go away, it’s time you met it head-on. Nothing dispels the boogie man of fear quicker than the light of understanding. This means it’s high time you educated yourself on the ins and outs of your fears and phobias. No question is too dumb to ask, if it means you’ll sleep better at night. An impartial friend is your single greatest asset on the 23rd. CANCER (June 22-July 22) Radical ideas are par for the course in all of your activities this week. So are indiscreet remarks, and the one may well be the unintended trigger of the other. Simply put, your most brilliant insight might get shot down as a hare-brained scheme by someone less visionary than you. If the fate of your pet brain child is conditioned on a higher-up’s approval, be prepared to weather their scrutiny on the 23rd. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Your current preoccupation with business and money matters means an encounter with a certain like-minded person could prove profitable. The business arena won’t necessarily be the stage for such a meeting. Sporting events and recreational activities in general could play a role here. The distinction between work and play is a fine line at all times this week, and especially so on the 23rd, when you may expect the unexpected. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) It’s enough to just be yourself this week, meaning that the less you censor your thoughts and communication, the better off you will be. The unvarnished truth is necessary to open the doors that need opening. Presenting anything less than the authentic you makes it less likely that you will get what

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) If there are problems at home this week, much of it is because of your hesitancy to speak up and say what you really think. Much of your fear is around things of the past that are unrelated to present circumstances. This past is affecting you only because you let it,and it’s ready to be released, now. Events will show you how, provided you stay authentic. Say in the clearest terms what’s on your mind, especially on the 23rd. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Jumping to conclusions has been your hazard, lately, and especially so when followed by caustic remarks. However well-intended and impartial your words, do understand that they are likely to hit the more sensitive too deeply. A moment spent searching for the way to say what you must without becoming wounding is time you won’t regret spending. Selfishness on the 23rd does little but add salt to the wound. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Much as you abhor speaking anything but the full and honest truth, a time may arise this week when being slightly less than candid becomes essential. Why might you lie? To save the life of an innocent? To ensure marital harmony? With these and similar questions being played out in the public arena, you need not experience the situation personally to learn from it. Pay attention on the 23rd.

CLUES ACROSS

47. Written works

13. Liberate

1. Feel pain

49. Pop

17. Strong laxatives

5. Interest rate

50. Consumed

24. Tub

8. Long narrative poem

51. Something comparable to another

25. Happening

12. Sedimentary rock 14. No (Scottish)

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You won’t be content to be a bystander this week if you can be directly involved in the action. The time is right to translate knowledge into power and prestige through leadership. Whatever your game, you can now turn it more easily to profit, especially the areas of finance and personal property. Your horizons expand notably on the 23rd, either directly through travel or indirectly through outlook.

15. Ribosomal ribonucleic acid

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb 18) Things left unsaid, perhaps purposely out of a need for secrecy, bear directly on your week. Both your sense of responsibility to the group and your need to uphold the group standard may play a role here. Not all of your inclinations fit easily within such constraints. The question of how to express possibly revolutionary ideas within limiting conventional standards will consume much of the 23rd.

22. Iranian village

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Social reform is a natural vehicle for you this week, powered by your present inclination for communication and cooperation with others. More directly, your own lot in life is subject to beneficial change at your own hands. By working either one-on-one or as part of a group, your ability to improve your life and the lives of others is heightened now. Do not underestimate your own strength on the 23rd.

16. Sleep gear 18. One who buys and sells securities 19. Cincinnati ballplayers 20. Of the backbone 21. Car mechanics group 23. Canadian peninsula 26. For all ills or diseases 30. Known for his “razor” 31. One who plays the viola

56. Wild goat

26. Polyvinyl acetate 27. Small island (British)

57. One-time space station

28. Neither 29. The G.O.A.T.

58. Outline of a plan

35. What Goodell oversees

59. Actress Petty 60. An electrically charged atom 61. Chewed and swallowed 62. Bones (Latin) 63. Central nervous system

36. One who engages in Dawah 37. Tall, rounded vase 38. Electroencephalograph 40. Made of clay and hardened by heat

64. Type of pipe

41. Great happiness

CLUES DOWN

42. Chinese surname

1. Vipers 2. Pal 3. One who has been to Mecca

32. Resinlike substance

4. Energy and enthusiasm

33. Educational association

5. Leaf-footed bug genus

43. Supposed emanations 44. Travelers 45. Loss of bodily movements 47. Los __, rock group 48. Seabirds 49. Used to store grain

39. A team’s best pitcher

6. Southern belle accessory 7. __ de Mornay, actress

53. “Joker” actor

42. The cost of bus travel

8. Print errors 9. Preceding

54. Portends good or evil

44. Badgerlike mammal

10. Asian nation

46. Popular sport in Ireland

11. The people in a movie

34. Inappropriate

52. Whale ship captain

55. Organized group of criminals Answers on page 15

© 2018, Wesley Hallock, All Rights Reserved

YOUR GUESS IS AS GOOD AS OURS WEATHER FORECAST Chicken Little looks at what is and fears the sky is falling. Wesley Hallock as a professional astrologer looks at what is and sees what could be. Read Wesley’s monthly forecast, with links to Facebook and Twitter, at www.chickenlittleandtheastrologer.com. To read past columns of Chicken Little and the Astrologer in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

Thurs, Sept. 20

Fri, Sept. 21

Sat, Sept. 22

Sun, Sept. 23

Mon, Sept. 24

Tues, Sept. 25

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

H-64°/L-53°

H-60°/L-53°

H-62°/L-48°

H-62°/L-49°

H-63°/L-49°

H-61°/L-45°

H-60°/L-44°

Showers

PM Rain

Cloudy with a Bit of Rain

Cloudy with Showers

Chance of Showers

Rain and Drizzle Possible

Wed, Sept. 26

Mostly Cloudy

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

H-63°/L-52°

H-59°/L-52°

H-61°/L-48°

H-62°/L-49°

H-62°/L-49°

H-63°/L-46°

H-63°/L-45°

PM Showers

Rain

Cloudy with a Bit of Rain

Cloudy with Showers

Chance of Showers

Rain and Drizzle Possible

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.

Mostly Cloudy


14 SEPTEMBER 20 - SEPTEMBER 26, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

www.whidbeyweekly.com

Whidbey Weekly

LOCALLY OPERATED

OKTOBERFEST continued from page 7

Island 911

Seriously, we do not make this stuff up! SUNDAY, SEPT. 9 2:42 pm, SW Union St. Reporting party states caught kids on camera stealing children’s toys.

Advising lawn service for location was using blower this morning and was blowing leaves, gravel and other debris over reporting party’s vehicle and on his door.

5:35 pm, NE Midway Blvd. Advising male subject stole a yo-yo from location ten minutes ago.

1:22 pm, SR 20 Reporting party advising they bought a computer program; program was installed by company virtually, then told reporting party it would not work and refunded reporting party the money. Company refunded more money than reporting party spent and asked for gift cards and hacked computer so reporting party isn’t able to use it.

MONDAY, SEPT. 10 8:41 am, SR 20 Reporting minivan just went off road and “bumped into a bunch of trees.” Appears to have run over fire hydrant; car is in bushes. 2:03 pm, SE 8th Ave. Caller states Asian family who resides at location doesn’t speak very well English; male yelling at female. Ongoing since 9 am. TUESDAY, SEPT. 11 2:23 am, SR 20 Reporting party advising he is 21 years old, was detained for BB gun situation recently; advising he is “too high” and requesting someone respond to help him with addiction and take him to hospital. 2:34 am, SW 24th Ave. Cat for pickup; “sleeping” against curb. 7:05 am, SW Harrier Cir. Advising unknown vehicle blocking caller’s driveway; wants it towed away. 10:05 am, NE Ernst St. Reporting party in lobby to discuss mental issues with wife. 1:03 pm, SR 20 Caller reporting female standing in middle of roadway on Erie St. 1:32 pm, SR 20 Female standing in middle of Erie again. 2:52 pm, SE Ireland St. Frantic female on line stating she’s trying to get into bedroom but it’s locked. 4:39 pm, N Oak Harbor St. Advising female at location with no underwear or pants on, walked in and is ripping posters down inside location. 9:43 pm, NE Barron Dr. Reporting party states fiancé was outside and saw male subject walk up to door next door and was standing there counting money after getting out of vehicle. THURSDAY, SEPT. 13 9:09 am, SR 20 Caller advising customer just threatened him via phone; customer stated he was going to come smash caller’s face in. 9:40 am, SE Hathaway St. Reporting party states multiple locations around town have chalk on sidewalk to leave behind comments. 11:18 am, NW 2nd Ave. Caller advising male driver refuses to follow correct exit signs from parking lot. 3:52 pm, SW Barlow St. Party states subject on street is yelling at passerby to not shop at store. FRIDAY, SEPT. 14 12:32 am, SE Pioneer Way Reporting party advising people are laying inside the bank and reporting party was trying to make a deposit. 12:11 pm, SW Kimball Dr. Party requesting contact in OHPD lobby.

1:42 pm, NW Crosby Ave. Caller advising last night noticed a can of screws and other small items missing. 2:27 pm, Oak Harbor Rd. Party advising house right next door to entrance of location has sign in one of the windows “Help Me,” in bright red capital letters.

- there was an event downtown,” he said. “And that carried me down there. I was able to learn about the shops and history, and that is really what it is about - keeping things down on Pioneer Way.” One of the hopes this year is to increase attendance to Oktoberfest, Williams said. “Last year I think we had around 2,000 people,” he said, “So this year we are hoping to have 2,500 to 3,000, to just continually grow the event.” Oktoberfest is intended to be a place for people to come together as a community and celebrate something that is becoming a traditional event in Oak Harbor, Williams said. “I think it is a popular event because one, it is fun,” Williams said. “When people come out they know they are going to have a good time. Two, we try to keep it local. Everything that we are doing this year is local with the Oak Harbor community, so it gives us a chance to spotlight downtown and Pioneer Way.” Food will be provided by restaurants from around Oak Harbor and the surrounding area, including Rustica, Flyers Restaurant and Brewery, Orlando’s Fish and Grill, Chris’ Bakery, and more. “We are just looking to provide a little more local feel this year with the food by having local food vendors,” Williams said. “It is a local party, really.”

Photo courtesy of The Pickled Herring Those attending Oktoberfest in Oak Harbor Saturday will have a chance to enjoy music from The Pickled Herring.

Although the vendors are from the island, the target audience for attendees goes beyond those on Whidbey, Williams said. “We did quite a bit of marketing off the island this year to try to draw people to downtown Oak Harbor and to give them a new place to go if they have not visited,” he said. “This gives people an opportunity to come out on the traditional start of Oktoberfest and experience downtown.” T-shirts and Oak Harbor Oktoberfest collector-edition beer steins, which change color when cold beverages are poured into them, will also be available at the event. “Rain or shine, it is going to happen, so come out and have a beverage, listen to some music and we will have a good time,” Williams said. “Stores will be open so you can support local shops and the downtown merchants. That is another reason why we hold it where we hold it, is to help support them and to get people in their doors that may not have been downtown before.”

CIDER continued from page 7

2:50 pm, SE City Beach St. Requesting contact referencing report of white Toyota truck going wrong way into parking lot at location and nearly hit reporting party.

Golden Paintbrush,” Urestes said. “Everything we do is really great for the environment and we love to educate people of all ages, from preschool up to retirees.”

5:18 pm, E Whidbey Ave. Advising white female neighbor in her 20s drove past reporting party and his car and took picture of him.

Urestes said the Whidbey Island Cider Festival offers a unique chance to learn more about PRI and its mission while having fun and enjoying apple season.

9:19 pm, SE Pasek St. Party advising someone is coming up to door, tormenting the dog and threatening to kill reporting party.

PRI offers trails to walk, bicycle and enjoy throughout the year as well as volunteer, educational and internship opportunities. Details can be found online at pacificriminstitute.org. PRI is located at 180 Parker Road in Coupeville.

“I enjoy seeing everybody enjoying themselves and having a good time,” she said. “This event is primarily for Pacific Rim to get more exposure, but it’s also a wonderful chance to enjoy what’s going on right here, right now.” “The Whidbey Island Cider Festival is new but very fun,” said Bishop. “Last year was the first year and it is one that we have looked forward to participating in again. Great atmosphere, lots of different cider producers and very well put together, but not at all overwhelming.”

SATURDAY, SEPT. 15 7:35 am, NW Crosby Ave. Nonstop talking, not letting dispatch have a word, something about finding a receipt from 1994 and an Ovaltine can. Says she is cleaning up today. Finds it strange she lives in 150 and Ace Hardware’s address is also 150.

“The Pacific Rim Institute venue is a really nice place to be if you like visiting a farming area on a beautiful fall day,” said Vorhis. “You get to see and taste apples being pressed into sweet cider, hear some music, see some animals. You can sample some of the better hard ciders in our state. Don’t tell anybody, but Whidbey Island is heaven if you love the outdoors!”

10:55 am, Oak Harbor Rd. Reporting party advising driving past area sees red paint on side of the window “please help me.”

The event includes the Giant Pumpkin weighoff, pony rides, face painting, family carnival games, toad races, “Bat’s Incredible” Class, a giant pumpkin carving demonstration, Pumpkin Doodling with Pauline, The Scone Lady, and a beer garden with beer by the Rockfish Grill and Anacortes Brewery, sponsored by La Conner Regional Foundation.

4:10 pm, SR 20 Caller was at location five minutes ago and went to go straight and was in wrong lane, almost hit another vehicle. Male driver threw whipped cream can at reporting party’s car. 9:08 pm, SR 20 Reporting party advising has false spy detector in room that’s shocking him. SUNDAY, SEPT. 16 6:14 am, NW Clipper Dr. Advising male is going around knocking on doors asking for help. 9:12 pm, SW Erie St. Caller reporting male by location is laying in roadway. 9:39 pm, SR 20 Male locked in bathroom and refusing to leave. 11:59 pm, SW Ulysses St. Party advising has 19-year-old son who is threatening to go to emergency room and tell staff reporting party hurt him, unless reporting party pays him. Report provided by OHPD & Island County Sheriff’s Dept.

BITS ‘n’ PIECES

continued from page

8

Skagit Valley Giant Pumpkin Festival Saturday from 9:00am to 4:00pm.

With a larger purse size, this year’s winner will receive $1,500 for the largest giant pumpkin of the weigh-off! The Festival is sponsored by the Pacific Northwest Giant Pumpkin Growers, Coastal Farm & Ranch, and Skagit Valley Food Co-op. Christianson’s Nursery is an official weigh-off site for the Giant Pumpkin Commonwealth (GPC). Christianson’s Nursery is located 15806 Best Road, Mount Vernon. For more information, visit www.christiansonsnursery.com or call 360-466-3821 or 1-800-585-8200.

Community Encouraged to Participate in Local Food Drive Across the nation, one in six children are at risk of going hungry and unfortunately, food insecurity continues to be a very real issue in every community—including right here on Whidbey Island. Fall months can be especially challenging for families already struggling to make ends meet because family resources are stretched thin due to the extra expenses related to sending kids back to school.

That’s why Banner Bank is hosting its annual bank-wide food drive all month, including at its Oak Harbor branch. Bank clients and the local community are invited to join with Banner Bank to make a food or cash donation now through Friday, Sept. 28. This cash and non-perishable food collection will assist food banks and meal-assistance programs across the four states Banner Bank serves. Locally, donations can be made the Oak Harbor Branch, 570 NE Midway Boulevard, and all donations will stay local and go directly to North Whidbey Help House. “The North Whidbey Help House provides vital services to many local families in need so we are pleased to do our part to assist their good works,” said Vicki Long, assistant vice president and Oak Harbor branch manager. “Being a part of our annual food drive is one of the rewarding aspects of working for a community bank that truly cares about the challenges facing our neighbors—it’s great to mobilize and take action to be a part of the solution.”

Island Transit Recognizes Employee of the Half Island Transit announces its January – June 2018 Employee of the Half, Jerome Moseley. The bi-annual award honors an employee chosen by fellow employees. Jerome is patient and kind interacting with paratransit riders, and is always polite and courteous. He is always a professional and does his job very well. He’s a great guy to work with! It is with great pleasure that the employees of Island Transit present Jerome Moseley with this award.

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


Foster Homes Needed! Family Tails Dog Rescue needs foster homes! We can't save dogs from high kill shelters without homes for them to stay at while they wait to find their forever home. 1 week to 3 months, a fun and rewarding way to be involved with rescue and also have a dog without the full time commitment. We pay for everything, you just provide the love and the home. Please call 360-969-2014 for more info or for an application.

ANNOUNCEMENTS Pregnant? Need baby clothes? We have them and the price is right–FREE. Pregnancy Care Clinic, open most Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10am to 4pm. Call 360-221-2909 or stop by 6th and Cascade in Langley. Be the difference in a child’s life and become a foster parent today! Service Alternatives is looking for caring, loving, and supportive families to support foster children. 425923-0451 or mostermick@ servalt-cfs.com The Whidbey Island community is encouraged to try out the paddling sport of dragon boating with the Stayin’ Alive team. Our team’s mission is to promote the physical, social, and emotional benefits of dragon boating. It has been shown to be especially beneficial to cancer survivors. Practice with us for up to 3 times for free. Life-jackets and paddles provided. Saturdays at the Oak Harbor Marina, 8:45am. Contact njlish@ gmail.com. More info at our Facebook Page: https://www. facebook.com/NorthPugetSoundDragonBoatClub?ref=hl Medical Marijuana patients unite; If you need assistance, advice, etc. please contact at 420patientnetworking@gmail. com. Local Whidbey Island help.

RIDE SHARE/VAN POOL Vanpool: Daily vanpool from Whidbey Island to Mukilteo to north Seattle seeks full/PT riders. Bob (h) 360-730-1294 or (c) 206-526-4150 (1)

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Imagine Oak Harbor’s 1st Food Forest, Saturdays 11am-3pm, at 526 Bayshore Drive. Each week, we have volunteer opportunities available to help care for our community garden, share organic gardening tips, and learn Permaculture principles. All ages and skill levels welcome. Schedule can change due to adverse weather conditions. If you have any questions, please contact us at: imagineapermacultureworld.gmail.com Mother Mentors needs volunteers! Oak Harbor Families

with young children need your help! Volunteer just a couple of hours a week to make a difference in someone’s life! To volunteer or get more info, email wamothermentors@ gmail.com or call 360-3211484. Looking for Board Members to join the dynamic Board of Island Senior Resources and serve the needs of Island County Seniors. Of particular interest are representatives from North Whidbey. For more information please contact: reception@islandseniorservices.org

WORK WANTED Caregiving services for all ages. 20 years experience in medical assistance and caregiving. Licensed as HCA and CPR certified. Can do anything from cleaning to shopping to medical care. Also love to cook, owned a personal chef service. Please call Martha 360-320-4582 (0)

JOB MARKET WAIF is hiring for both retail and animal care positions. Visit www.waifanimals.org/ jobs for more info (2) PT Evening Janitorial – Freeland/Clinton: Hiring IMMEDIATELY for part-time evening janitor, Monday-Saturday, 9 hours total per week, (one hour per shift M-F, three hours on Sat) in Freeland, half hour per visit 2x per week in Clinton. Start time flexible (after 6pm/earlier on Saturday). Compensation: $12 per hour, part-time. Easy $400+ extra income per month! Must have valid DL, cell phone, pass background/drug screening and E-Verify (USCIS). Please provide name and phone number. Resumes welcome. E-mail: susan.valenzuela@ybswa. net (2) How’d youdifficulty do? rating 0.49) Puzzle 1 (Medium, 4 5

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MUSIC Drummer Wanted: Need experienced, solid rock drummer with great meter. Practice weekly in Oak Harbor in fully equipped rehearsal/recording studio. Mostly rock, some blues, some acoustic originals and covers. Rich at rswitzer55@netzero.net or 360675-5470 before 9 pm (0)

HOME FURNISHINGS Downsizing is bad for us but a great opportunity for the right buyer. Our new, smaller home puts a high-end blonde and medium brown dining room table with two extra leaves and six upholstered and sturdy cream-colored chairs in your home today. $250 puts the entire set in your truck headed to a new home. 360-8406955 (0) Two small, indoor fountains: the soothing sounds of flowing water can bring stress relief and relaxation to your environment. The smaller one is $15 obo, the slightly larger one is $20 obo. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525. Walnut occasional table, with beveled glass top, $40 or best offer; Stained glass terrarium, with matching cover, plus wood stand. 26-1/2” tall x 101/2” diameter of cover x 14” diameter of base. $125 or best offer; Twin-size, sturdy metal bed frame, with wood roller feet. $15 obo. We can send photos. Call or text 360-3200525. No Cheating!

Quilted wall hangings, purchased at the Houston International Quilting Conference. In excellent condition, ready to hang on your wall! Quail (20” x 11”), $15 or best offer. Duck (22” diameter), $15 or best offer. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525. Fireplace tool sets: brush, shovel, and poker, in a sturdy stand. One set is 30” tall, the other set is 21” tall, $25 ea. obo; Sturdy, brown leather log tote by Eddie Bauer, never used. $20 obo. We can send photos. Call or text 360-3200525. “Happy Holidays” painted sign, 21-1/2” x 16-1/2”, $15 obo. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525.

LAWN AND GARDEN 25 aluminum silver deck post caps, $3 each; 200 feet new 8” heavy waterline, $4 a foot, obo. Can be used for waterline or drain line. 360-321-1624 Natural Barnyard Topsoil: Good for gardens, flower beds, etc. Unscreened, 10 yard loads, $225 delivered. South Whidbey 360-321-1624

MISCELLANEOUS Wind sculptures by Lyman Whittaker. We have two left, $175 and $250; Wind chimes: We have five sets, depending on size. Price range: $10–$50 or best offer. We can send photos. Call or text 360-3200525 Halogen work light, for indoor projects. The height of the

Check out our new & improved website!

www.whidbeyweekly.com 390 NE Midway Blvd #B203, Oak Harbor • 360-682-2341 light can be adjusted. $30 or best offer. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525

RECREATION 12 volt boat winch, $40 obo; Small anchor. Weighs only about 3 pounds, but has a design that will keep your small boat on the beach where you left it. $10 obo. We can send photos. Call or text 360320-0525. Camping items: 2 single air mattresses, “as new” condition, $20 each or best offer; Intex queen size coilbeam downy airbed, nearly new (used for one week for guests), easy to deflate and store when not being used, $25, or best offer; Brookstone waterproof floating lantern, for camping, patio, poolside, or emergencies, new, $25 or best offer; Old (but clean) Thermos 1-gallon jug, $5; Vintage Coleman stove, with protective denim cover, $25 or best offer; Versatile backpack, the two parts can be used separately, or (for more serious backpacking) together, $45 obo. We have photos. Call or text 360-320-0525. Sports items: Bag Boy golf cart, $15 obo; Golf umbrella, $5; Men’s wet suits, size L, $10 per item; Neoprene gloves and hats, size L, $5 each;

Water skis: Terry Competition slalom ski, with carrying bag, $30 obo; O’Brien Competition slalom ski, Kevlar/Boron, $30 obo; Wiley wood water skis, $25 obo. We have photos. Call or text 360-320-0525.

ANIMALS/SUPPLIES Excellent Grass Hay, good for horses, $7 per bale, 20 bale minimum. 360-321-1624 If you or someone you know needs help in feeding pet(s), WAIF Pet Food Banks may be able to help. Pet Food Banks are located at WAIF thrift stores in Oak Harbor (50 NE Midway Blvd) and Freeland (1660 Roberta Ave) and are generously stocked by donations from the community. If you need assistance, please stop by.

WANTED Art, Antiques & Collectibles. Cash paid for quality items. Call/Text 360-661-7298 (0) Was your Dad or Gramps in Japan or Germany? I collect old 35 mm cameras and lenses. Oak Harbor, call (970) 823-0002

FREE Miscellaneous materials in the yard. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525

CLASSIFIED INFORMATION US Postal Mail

Whidbey Weekly Classified Department PO Box 1098 Oak Harbor, WA 98277

E-Mail............classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com Telephone..................................(360)682-2341 Fax.............................................(360)682-2344 PLEASE CALL WHEN YOUR ITEMS HAVE SOLD.

Please try to limit your classified to 30 words or less, (amounts and phone numbers are counted as words) we will help edit if necessary. We charge $10/week for Vehicles, Boats, Motorcycles, RVs, Real Estate Rental/Sales, Business Classifieds and any items selling $1,000 and above. We do charge $25 to include a photo. The FREE classified space is not for business use. No classified is accepted without phone number. We reserve the right to not publish classifieds that are in bad taste or of questionable content. All free classifieds will be published twice consecutively. If you would like your ad to be published more often, you must resubmit it. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date.

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


42

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Most cars up to 5 qts. 5W20, 5W30, 10W30. Other grades extra. Some filters cost extra. Vehicles with Skid Plates may be extra. Plus $1 Environmental Disposal Fee.

WE CAN SAVE YOU UP TO $250 ON BRAKE SERVICE VERSUS OUR COMPETITORS. WARRANTIED AT 30K LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE.

STARTERS ALTERNATORS TIMING BELTS SERPENTINE BELTS

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