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September 13 through September 19, 2018

DJANGO Fest NW

2018

Tcha Limberger · Duved Dunayevsky · Dave Kelbie · Simon Planting · Cyrille Aimée · Adrien Moignard · Mathieu Chatelain Jeremie Arranger · Gonzalo Bergara · Bina Coquet Trio · The Bills · Evan Price and Jason Vieaux · Black Market Trust · Brishen · Henry Acker Trio · Hot Club of Troy · Jimmy Grant E nsemble · EVM All Stars · & Djangofest/Saga award winner, Sara L’Abriola

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Just added: Pearl Django

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3 2 18 djangofestnw.com // WICAonline.org 360.221.8268 // 800.638.7631 Whidbey Island Center for the Arts 565 Camano Ave, Langley, WA

More Local Events inside

The Whidbey Playhouse Community Theatre Presents

September 7-23, 2018 WWW.WHIDBEYPLAYHOUSE.COM

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Daddy Long Legs is presented through special arrangement with Music Theatre International (MTI). All authorized performance materials are supplied by MTI. www.MTIShows.com

Heather Good McCoy and Darren McCoy

TICKETS $20


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WE ROCKED THIS ROCK! SAVE THE DATE FOR 2019: LABOR DAY WEEKEND AUGUST 30 & 31 AND SEPTEMBER 1

A ROCK-SOLID THANK-YOU TO: Annie Cash • Island Thrift

Diamond Rentals • Hearing Health Services • Alaska USA Mortgage Company • Peoples Bank • El Cazador • Windermere Real Estate South Whidbey • Flyers Brewery • Spoiled Dog Winery •

1000 THANK-YOUs to the 250+ volunteers and the City of Oak Harbor workforce that made this festival happen, along with funding from individuals and small business donors, the Oak Harbor LTAC Committee, and Island Thrift Also, keeping us safe, a shout-out to the Oak Harbor Police Department and the Oak Harbor Fire Department

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ON TRACK with Jim Freeman

My gratitude meter got pegged last Labor Day. Thanks to TC and CC, two people who want no public acknowledgment, I had the time of my life, but without having to dance to that song by Bill Medley and Jennifer Warnes.

Tour de Sherman However, I have been authorized, with appropriate releases available upon request, to thank Jan Graham, Phyllis Sherman, and Val Hillers for providing “mimosas, muffins, quiche, and fruit” to help fuel the appreciative passengers of the Coupeville Lions Crop Tour. Why were these locals touring the Sherman Farm (www.shermanspioneerfarm.com) and Ebey’s Prairie on such a beautiful and glorious day? Because they were all in attendance at the 2018 Coupeville Lions Club Scholarship Auction, and were handpicked guests of the aforementioned initials who had the highest bid for the tour. I invited myself, dressing as an undercover columnist. Thanks much to Whidbey’s greatest auctioneer farmer and Merle Haggard impersonator Dale Sherman, as well as Al Sherman and Joe Hillers, both stand up guys and sit down comedians, for “guiding us all around Ebey’s Prairie in Dale’s Trolley while explaining the mysteries of male and female cabbage plants, sand mounds and beheadings.” If you want to learn what we learned, and have the fun we had, be the highest bidder next February at the Coupeville Lions Scholarship Auction, www. coupevillelions.org/ScholarshipAuction.html.

Well, maybe not, project jumper. I do not drive fast. I drive like a Grandpa, and have since I was a little brother, a young uncle, or a sometimes middle-aged significant other. Proof positive–driving in Freeland, with the left turn signal on my truck wearing out first. This is not because I have leftist tendencies, for seldom do I turn right. Every time I do turn right, I feel like I work for UPS. Attention? I have no trouble paying attention at work and recreation. For me, they are the same. My work is recreation. When I am not re-creating while recreating, I am thinking about it, or turning left in my truck, like a Grandpa. Stimuli? Most of my life, my income has come from my skills in being easily distracted by unimportant stimuli. What is wrong with that? It is my job to make those stimuli important. Like when Dad said once, “Jimmy, you seem to have a drink in your hand every time I see you in a picture.” “That’s right, Dad. And, I want to thank you for teaching me to stay hydrated, particularly after five in the afternoon.” Decisions decisions Impulsivity in decision making is not my bailiwick either. I lean toward over-preparation in decision making. When I bought my second car with Dad’s money (first one, too), I went to thirteen different Volvo dealers in southern California before deciding. Was that wrong?

We had more fun than a barrel of beet seeds. Clean up When I was in college, too many report cards ago, my roommate Skeeter, on an athletic scholarship for football and track, used to say I spent more time cleaning my desk than I did studying.

Life is the only project I have jumped into without following directions. All other directions I have been given are in manuals kept in my truck glove box. I am not sure where my gloves are, but I know I need a new right one.

Not knowing I would, upon graduation, be cleaning toilets in the Marines Corps, I must have been a visionary, eh?

Promises? I remember all promises because I try not to make them anymore.

According to PhD author Lara Honos-Webb, I was, at an early age, gifted with adult ADD. Subtracting ADD In her book, Gift of Adult ADD, How to Transform Your Challenges & Build On Your Strengths, Dr. Lara describes the three major categories of ADD: 1. Difficulty concentrating 2. Feeling driven by a motor 3. Impulsiveness It has been a long time since I received a perfect score. Three for three. Sign me up. I am an expert. Dr. Lara states “people with ADD are driven...by impulses, whims, and emotions.” Another perfect score. Just call me Whim Jim.

• Prone to jump into a project without following directions • Likely to forget about promises and commitments

FAX: (360)682-2344

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Whidbey Weekly LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

390 NE MIDWAY BLVD | PO BOX 1098 | OAK HARBOR, WASHINGTON 98277 Publisher & Editor.......................................................... Eric Marshall Marketing Representatives................Penny Hill, Roosevelt Rumble Graphic Design............................................................. Teresa Besaw Production Manager......................................................TJ Pierzchala Circulation Manager.................................................... Noah Marshall

Contributing Writers Jim Freeman Wesley Hallock Kae Harris Tracy Loescher Kathy Reed Carey Ross

Volume 10, Issue 37 | © MMXVIII Whidbey Weekly PUBLISHED and distributed every week. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The Whidbey Weekly cannot be held responsible for the quality of goods or services supplied by advertisers in this publication. Articles, unless otherwise stated, are by contribution and therefore the Whidbey Weekly is not in a position to validate any comments, recommendations or suggestions made in these articles. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. DEADLINES: The Whidbey Weekly is a submission based editorial with contributing writers. Please feel free to submit any information (please limit to 200 words) that you would like to share with the Whidbey Weekly. You may submit by email to editor@whidbeyweekly.com, by fax to (360)682-2344 or by postal mail to PO Box 1098, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date. For more information, please visit www.whidbeyweekly.com.

Hail, hail Freelandia No, we try to be label free here in Freeland. In Freeland, we can roam label-free, even without sidewalks. We are the label-free people of Freeland. In Freeland, we can drive and park anywhere we want that has no label, no matter how close it is to where we last parked. Ever have trouble getting a car battery in Freeland? As much as we stop and start and stop again, in Freeland, we have batteries everywhere.

• Likely to drive their cars too fast

Maybe we’ll bump into each other soon?

• Likely to struggle with paying attention in work and recreation

Remember to be cautious and careful in Freeland. Our banks and pot stores both accept cash so often the Freeland roamers are carrying rubber banded wads of greenbacks, some from Greenbank.

Analysis paralysis My score?

PHONE: (360)682-2341

360-682-2341

My credit report says things I will not reveal.

Label-free Freeland is all part of the attraction of our government-free community, where decency and courtesy meet really difficult parking.

According to Dr. Lara, “a diagnosis requires six of the nine symptoms.” How do you score?

390 NE Midway Blvd #B203, Oak Harbor

My ex said I was a defendant.

• Likely to mix up the order and sequence of well-defined tasks

• Disorganized

Saturday 10am to 2pm on the Community Green

Our parents said I was a WASP.

In Freeland, we can roam government free.

• As if driven by a motor and have difficulty stopping when involved in a task

www.whidbeyweekly.com

Yes, we can label ourselves what someone in a book says we are, or we can let our friends do it. Either way, no matter the labels, we are not required to list our ingredients to anyone but ourselves.

According to leading ADD experts, we alleged ADD’ers are described as follows: • Impulsive in decision making

GROWING SINCE 1979

Task sequencing is not a problem for me either. I know to get up before I go to bed, to brush after eating, and to floss whenever I can, but never on Whidbey Transit buses. Vibratory flossing can be dangerous.

No ADD, no ADHD, no LSMFT.

• Distracted easily by unimportant stimuli

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That “in sickness and in health” promise may have been the last one I tried. As a result of that breach, I still do not take vitamins.

Score on While ADD is not considered a mental disorder, keeping things in order mentally can be a challenge.

Yes, we are label-free here in Freeland. No longer a utopian society of nudists and retired notary publics from Panama, we Freelanders are a proud group. ADD Freeland to your bucket list.

“None of your beeswax” as we used to say on the playground. Yet my symptom score indicates big medicine is ahead, hopefully not thickened with corn starch.

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If it is, I will need more small medicine.

How else would I have known the first dealer I stopped at, Arrow Motors in Compton, would also be the last, with an even dozen dealers in between?

Not.

SEPTEMBER 13 - SEPTEMBER 19, 2018

Our parking may be difficult, but it is free. To read past columns of On Track in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

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Bits & Pieces Face takes a humorous look at what matters most in relationships, in families, friendships, and in celebrations of life.

The play by Kristin Shepard is directed by Laura Berkley Boram. Performances are September 14, 15, 21, 22, 27 28 and 29 at 7:30pm; there will be a 4:00pm performance on September 23. Doors open 30 minutes prior to the performance.

Letters to the Editor Editor, By now everyone is aware of the anonymous essay written about the chaos within the Trump White House. Mike Pence took issue with the article saying that any Trump administration official that would anonymously “… smear this president who’s provided extraordinary leadership for this country….” should do the honorable thing and resign. Extraordinary leadership? Really? It is likely that this writer and millions of other sane American citizens like me believe you and your chronic liar of a boss and all your GOP enablers who have put party before country should “do the honorable thing” and resign. Now. Bruce Howard Freeland, WA

Editor, A “Save the Pool” group of volunteers had another successful community event on Tuesday, Sept. 4. The hot dog barbeque at Flyers Restaurant was a great time for civic duty and fun. Everything was extra special because of volunteers: Delicious, high quality hot dogs, pop, cookies and fine live music. Approximately 300 people had a good time. The community of Oak Harbor needs to vote and pass the Nov. 6 levy for our pool to reopen. The average home owner will pay only $5 per month. Currently reorganization with oversight will correct its financial difficulties. There is no other public facility on Whidbey Island. It is a treasure having two pools, jacuzzi, sauna and weight room. Young and old, healthy and infirm patrons can exercise to gain health benefits and fun. This is the last opportunity to regain pool power. It is not fake news. Civic duty for all of us is necessary to make democracy work. Before coming on Whidbey 20 years ago, I lived and traveled all over the world. No where else have I found and experienced the community spirit of involved citizens greater. “Friendship Force” in Langley, Coupeville’s yearly “Harvest Festival” at Crocket Barn and Oak Harbor’s “Save the Pool” are examples of our island life.

Tickets are $14 for students and seniors and $18 for adults; on Thursday, September 27, all tickets are $12. Tickets may be purchased online at www. brownpapertickets.com/event/3596080 using a credit card; or you can email Outcast Productions for a reservation and pay for tickets at the door by cash or check by emailing ocp@ whidbey.com. For more information about Outcast Productions, visit its website www.outcastproductions.net [Submitted by Carolyn Tamler]

SICBA Home Tour - Where Dreams Become Reality The Skagit/Island Counties Builders Association (SICBA) will be hosting the 12th Annual SICBA Home Tour September 14 to 16. This year’s Home Tour features 13 homes by eight local builders, located in Camano Island, Stanwood, Oak Harbor, Coupeville, Anacortes, Mount Vernon, Burlington, Clear Lake and Sedro Woolley. All builders with homes on the Home Tour are members of SICBA and adhere to the highest standards in the construction industry.

A comedy in a funeral home? $38,000 for a Friendly Face, Outcast Productions latest show, describes the experience of Matt, who has just begun a funeral home business and is trying his best to provide good service. This heartfelt comedy recounts the story of two estranged daughters who travel to a funeral home in a small town to plan for the celebration of life for their unpleasant mother. The women of the Last Supper Committee are preparing food for the event. A young woman arrives with just three flowers for the service. It soon becomes apparent that no one else will be coming. As the mourning proceeds, relationships deteriorate. $38,000 for a Friendly

Statistics have shown if responders can provide basic hemorrhage control measures to the victims sooner, the victims’ survival rates significantly improve. This is a goal for SALT triage. The first wave of responders assess, tag and initiate lifesaving skills, then move on to the next. “SALT is a triage system that helps get lifesaving skills to more patients faster,” Moffatt added. “The procedure is being adopted nationwide, and is how we will operate. It is incumbent upon each of us to train and provide the most up-to-date protocols to the citizens we serve. Our volunteer firefighters and EMS members work extremely hard to maintain their committed level of service. I am proud of the work they perform.”

• The Clean Water Facility takes one step closer to completion by beginning the removal of the Whidbey Island Bank building • The city says a fond farewell to the aging windmill structure • Construction begins on a new west kitchen and pavilion

Submitted by a grateful “Save the Pool” volunteer.

Outcast Productions Presents: $38,000 for a Friendly Face

In the past, the department used the START method, which stands for Simple, Triage, and Rapid Treatment, which was developed in 1983. With START, first responders would carry the first available victim out, whatever that patient’s condition. This meant the victim in the last room down the hallway with the same injury may have a higher mortality rate.

Tickets are $10 per person for all 3 days. Children 15 and under are free. Tickets are available for purchase online or at any of the homes on tour. For more information, directions to the homes and to preview the tour, visit www.sicbahometour.com or download the free SICBA Home Tour app. For questions call SICBA’s Events Coordinator Lianna Neyens at 360-757-6916, or email info@sicba.org.

Please vote yes on the Nov. 6th levy. Encourage family members and friends to participate. This is an important issue of quality of life. The cause is bigger than each individual.

Jewel Czuchta Coupeville, WA

It has been endorsed by the American College of Emergency Physicians, the American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma, the American Trauma Society, and the National Association of EMS Physicians. Here in Washington, SALT is being adopted in most of the state EMS and Trauma Care Council regions. Whidbey Island is in the North Region.

City Readies for Final Structure Removals in Windjammer Park to Make Way for Continued Improvements

First Responders Learn SALT Lifesaving Techniques

Every Tuesday night the team at South Whidbey Fire/EMS trains to keep skills sharp and to adopt new requirements and techniques for first responders. Recently the focus was organizing and running a multiple casualty incident (MCI) with Incident Command System, SALT triage and communication training. “In today’s realm of possible emergencies with multiple trauma, from natural disasters to mass shootings, we need to be prepared to respond to these tragic events,” said Deputy Chief for Training Wendy Moffatt. “This type of training helps us maintain our skill sets and prepares us for when our community calls us for help.” SALT stands for Sort, Assess, Lifesaving interventions, Treatment and/or Transport. The SALT process has been around since 2011 as a result of a study by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to scientifically evaluate

LOCALLY OPERATED Hold a Bird at Whidbey Audubon’s Festival

the effectiveness of field triage. While START was good, SALT was determined to be far better. The lifesaving intervention aspect was the key change.

The SICBA Home Tour is the premier showcase of the homebuilding industry in Skagit, Island and North Snohomish Counties. Come discover the newest trends in home technology, innovative products and home design. Get inspired, meet the builders and satisfy your curiosity!

[Submitted by Lianna Neyens, SICBA Marketing/Events Coordinator]

www.whidbeyweekly.com

[Sherrye Wyatt]

Noticeable changes are coming to Windjammer Park:

The City of Oak Harbor is nearing completion of the Clean Water Facility in Windjammer Park. On-site contractor and city staff will relocate into the new state-of-the-art administration building, and removal of the Whidbey Island Bank building is scheduled to begin in mid-September. Once removed, the space will be used for additional parking and to make room for a new promenade. The removal of the bank building will open up Oak Harbor Bay views from Pioneer Way to the water. The windmill is an iconic structure in the City of Oak Harbor and beloved by the community. In 2017, an inspection revealed the original wood used to build the windmill in the 1970s has deteriorated due to the marine climate in Oak Harbor. The city will remove the structure and replace it at a more visible spot for residents and visitors to enjoy. Once a new location is identified using community input, the city’s goal is to use the original plans from the Netherlands as a basis to rebuild the windmill to modern standards, celebrating Oak Harbor’s Dutch heritage. July 25, the City Council approved additional funding for Windjammer Park Phase 1 improvements. New funding will go toward construction of a second double-kitchen on the west side of Windjammer Park and a new pavilion to welcome park visitors, providing a space for events and a stage for performances of all sizes. The existing west kitchen will be removed over the coming months to make way for these improvements. For more information about the Oak Harbor Clean Water Facility, please visit www.oakharborcleanwater.org.

Robin Llewellyn with falconer and his live falcon

Get close up to an owl or a hummingbird at Whidbey Audubon’s Bird in the Hand Festival Saturday, September 22. It won’t move and you can touch it. These creatures may have met an untimely death, but have been lovingly preserved as a teaching tool by volunteers. The event is from 10:00am to 1:00pm at the Bayview Farm and Garden greenhouse, 2780 Marshview Avenue on the way to Langley from SR 525. A biennial program, it has evolved into a full blown festival, featuring birds in Whidbey Audubon Society’s extensive Bird Specimen Library. These specially preserved birds are seen by over 1,500 members of the community each year. They are vital teaching tools organized by specimen and characteristics to be used for education, research and inspiration. A large number of birds have been added since the last Bird in the Hand presentation in 2016. Some of the new specimens include Pileated Woodpecker, Peregrine Falcon, Common Murre, Caspian Tern, Pigeon Guillemot, Rhinoceros Auklet and a Horned Grebe. Sharing the spotlight with the specimens will be falconers, one of whom will be bringing his trained owl. The organization holds a United States Department of Fish and Wildlife, Washington State Scientific Collection Permit to collect and prepare these specimens. Volunteers have been trained by taxidermist Matt Klope, a retired federal wildlife biologist who handled the Whidbey Island Naval Air Station’s endangered-species management and hunting and research programs. He and his wife, Joan, operate Whidbey Island Taxidermy in Oak Harbor. The Bird in the Hand Festival is a free community program two years in the making. Whidbey Audubon Society is proud of the many volunteers who make it possible to present this program dedicated to the birds of Whidbey Island and the birders who love them. [Submitted by Susan Prescott, Whidbey Audubon Publicity Chair]

HHRGC Fall Sportsman’s Sale and Gun Show Holmes Harbor Rod & Gun Club, at 3334 Brooks Hill Road in Langley, is pleased to announce its annual Fall Sportsman’s Sale and Gun Show will be held Saturday, September 22, from 10:00am until late afternoon. The show takes place in the main clubhouse and features more than two dozen tables of guns, ammo, optics, knives, reloading gear, fishing gear, boating equipment, and all manner of other sporting goods. An FFL will be on site to facilitate firearm transfers. Though HHRGC is a private club, the public is welcome to attend this event. Admission is by donation. For more information, contact Michael at 360-2217574. [Submitted by Michael McInerney, HHRGC]

WSU Extension Offers Class in Sustainable Small Farming and Ranching Do you live on rural acreage and wonder what you could do with your land? Perhaps you have always dreamed about having a small farm and want to learn more about how to do so. WSU Extension Island County is offering an 11-week class in Sustainable Small Farming and Ranching to help you explore what is possible. From the award-winning Cultivating Success™ program, the class connects students with farmers and exposes them to real world situations through a community-based, experiential approach. Whether you are a community member wanting to learn the basics of farming/ranching or an experienced farmer/rancher wanting to try something

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www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OWNED new, Cultivating Success provides educational opportunities for you to be successful! Through in-class activities, guest lectures, and field trips, participants will learn how to apply successful whole farm management principles to a small farm operation. Evaluate your farm’s resources, explore vegetable, flower or livestock production, and develop marketing strategies, in a bilingual course with like-minded students. Classes are Thursday evenings from 6:00pm to 8:30pm, September 27 through December 6, 2018. Two class locations are offered and will be connected through video-conferencing. For more Information, contact Loren Imes at loren.imes@wsu.edu or call 360-639-6059. Offered in collaboration with Skagit Valley College SAGE Program ENVAG170. Community participants will receive WSU Continuing Education Credits. Extension programs and policies are consistent with federal and state laws and regulations on nondiscrimination regarding race, sex, religion, age, color, creed, national or ethnic origin; physical, mental, or sensory disability; marital status, sexual orientation, or status as a Vietnam-era or disabled veteran. Evidence of noncompliance may be reported through your local Extension office. [Submitted by Loren Imes, WSU Extension Island County]

Whidbey Follies Making Comeback After 25 years, the Whidbey Follies is making a comeback. Whidbey’s own version of Saturday Night Live was first staged in 1989 as a fund raiser for Concerts on the Cove. The show, written and directed by Pat and David Howell, was an annual event until 1993 when the Howells moved to Oregon. They’re back and so are the Follies. Performances for Follies 2018: “You’ve Got To Be Kidding” will be September 29 and 30 at the Coupeville High School PAC. The show satirizes people, places, events, politics and life here on the island. According to David Howell, the Follies will feature the new “Sisters of

Perpetual Preservation,” whose predecessors made their debut in 1991 tackling the controversial issue of vinyl siding on St. Mary’s church and whose mission is still the preservation of historical integrity. The show will also feature appearances by Johnny Bulldog, the Saratoga Sirens and local band Wild Man Cooley. Proceeds from the production will benefit the Island County Museum and Historic Whidbey in its efforts to preserve the 1860’s Haller house. Tickets are available at the Salty Mug Coffee Shop and Aqua Gifts in Coupeville, The Freeland Liquor Store, and Wind and Tide Books in Oak Harbor. [Submitted by David Howell]

Local Business News Guardian Northwest Title Company Expands Into Island County First American Title of Island County merges with and changes name to Guardian Northwest Title & Escrow Company Guardian Northwest Title Company, a Skagitbased title and escrow company, last week announced the completed expansion into Island County. Through its long-standing working relationship with First American Title of Island County, the two companies have merged and have changed the name to Guardian Northwest Title & Escrow Company. Servicing the Mount Vernon and Anacortes area for over 40 years, the locally-owned Guardian Northwest Title & Escrow Company has built strong ties within the real estate industry and local community. Enhancing the real estate transaction experience through the Skagit County region, now, through its merged partnership with First American Title of Island County, Guardian Northwest Title & Escrow Company will be able to expand their brand offerings into the Camano and Whidbey Island markets. “It’s been our mission since day one to assure that our role enhances the real estate transaction experience in the Skagit County region,” said Gale Hickok, president and CEO, Guardian Northwest Title & Escrow. “By extend-

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ing into Island County, we can now offer that same quality of customer service and title and escrow experience to both the Camano and Whidbey Island communities.” In addition to this merged partnership encompassing both Skagit and Island County offices, the company has also unveiled it has officially changed its name to Guardian Northwest Title & Escrow Company. “We have always offered escrow services, but our former name wasn’t reflective of that service; now with the official name change it accurately showcases our full-service offerings as well as bringing the Island County offices into the Guardian family,” said Hickok. Guardian Northwest Title & Escrow Company will be maintaining its headquarters in Mount Vernon with branch offices in Anacortes, Camano Island, and Oak Harbor. As a part of the Guardian Northwest Title & Escrow Company offerings, is its subsidiary First American Exchange of Skagit County, which offers 1031 tax exchange facilitation services in all 50 states. The Camano Island branch office is located in the newly built Camano Commons office park complex at 848 N. Sunrise Boulevard, Suite F204. The Whidbey Island office – which serves all of Whidbey Island – is located at 121 NE Midway Boulevard in Oak Harbor. In conjunction with this announcement, a celebratory End of Summer Cook-Out will be held at the Camano Island office on Thursday, September 13 and the Oak Harbor office on Thursday, September 20. The festivities kickoff at 4:30pm at each location and will feature finger foods and beverages. About Guardian Northwest Title & Escrow Founded in 1976 by a local-area attorney, then known as Skagit County Title, emerged as a fast growing title insurance company for the Skagit region. Known for its solid reputation and knowledge in the industry, First American Title Insurance Company – a nationally recognized title insurance underwriter – partnered with Skagit County Title for co-branding

and market share purposes. In 2006, current CEO and then General Manager, Gale Hickok, purchased the company and grew the business into what is now known as Guardian Northwest Title & Escrow Company and First American Exchange of Skagit County. For more information, www.gnwtitle.com or 360-4240115.

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Bayshore Chiropractic Celebrates 20th Anniversary As any small business owner knows, getting started isn’t a simple process. Dr. Dawn Keith-Madeiros was no exception. 20 years ago she purchased her practice from Dr. Jennifer Hess. Dr. Dawn’s original office was only available for a three month lease, but she’d seen a sign that her current building was up for rent. She met with the owner and told him that she’d rather buy. Remarkably, he agreed to 3-percent down for a commercial waterfront property, which was unheard of at the time. It was nothing short of a miracle, a “God Shot”, as she describes it. Dr. Dawn (as her patients fondly call her) moved into her current location on Bayshore Drive in 1999. Over time, her office has expanded to include five massage therapists, and more recently, the addition of Dr. Daniel Klope, who interned at Bayshore in high school and graduated from the University of Western States, her alma mater. In addition to chiropractics, Dr. Dawn incorporates deep tissue work, stretching, and active home care. Her goals are to restore function, reduce pain, and help her patients live their best lives. She treats a wide range of people, and a wide variety of injuries, and she and her staff strive to make each individual feel as if they are at home at Bayshore Chiropractic. August 8, Dr. Dawn celebrated 20 years in practice. She is proud to be part of the growing community in Oak Harbor, and is thrilled for what the future holds. Bayshore Chiropractic is located at 840 SE Bayshore Dr. St 101 in Oak Harbor. For more information, call 360-675-1066.

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SEPTEMBER 13 - SEPTEMBER 19, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

What’s Going On

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED for discussion during the meeting to absolutescience@hotmail.com. Whidbey Island Camera Club, a community club, is open to the public. If you have questions, please email tina31543@comcast.net

British Commonwealth/DBE Charitable Group Wednesday, September 19, 4:30pm-7:00pm

All entries are listed chronologically, unless there are multiple entries for the same venue or are connected to a specific organization (such as Sno-Isle Libraries) in which case all entries for that venue or organization are listed collectively in chronological order under one heading.

Island Transit’s Birding By Bus

Dine Out for Kids

Children’s Day

Thursday, September 13, 7:00am-4:30pm Sunshine Drip Coffee Lounge, N. Main St, Coupeville A portion of proceeds support the Coupeville Schools Foundation.

Whidbey Audubon Field Trip Friday, September 14, 9:00am Deer Lagoon, Langley Join Whidbey Audubon Society’s Darwin Wile for a unique expedition that starts from this master birder’s home on Deer Lagoon. Expect to see at least 50 different species during the trip. Meet at the Bayview Park & Ride to organize carpools to his home. This free, threehour trip begins with a preview of what Wile has seen lately then go down to the dikes to observe more closely shorebirds, blue heron, eagles, ducks and probably a few surprises. Questions? Contact Darwin at dardrifter@ gmail.com.

Island Herb Vendor Day Friday, September 14, 3:00pm-6:00pm Island Herb, Freeland Representatives from Verdelux will be on site with product displays and information. Island Herb is located at 5565 Vanbarr Pl, Unit F. For more information, call (360) 331-0140 or visit whidbeyislandherb.com

Coupeville Community Photograph Saturday, September 15, 11:30am Coupeville Farmers Market The Annual Community Photo will take place at the Farmers Market!

Raptor Day Saturday, September 15, 1:00pm-3:00pm Pacific Rim Institute, Coupeville Get up close and personal with the hunters of the air. This family friendly event is free. While you’re there take a walk along the trails of the Pacific Rim, located at 180 Parker Road. For more information, call 360-678-5586 or visit www.pacificriminstitute.org

Buffalo Field Campaign Road Show Saturday, September 15, 7:00pm Langley Whale Center, 105 Anthes Ave. Journey through 21 years of resistance on behalf of the Last Wild Buffalo through stories, music and archival footage, featuring the new film, “Our National Mammal.” For more information, email info@OrcaNetwork.org or visit www.buffalofieldcampaign.org. Admission by donation.

Live Music: Original Jim Saturday, September 15, 7:00pm-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville Jim sets up a solid foundation for his tunes with laid-back arrangements, tasty improvisation, s​ trong vocals, rhythmic guitars, a little keyboard and a unique way to the groove. No cover. For more information, call 360-6825747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

Island Herb Vendor Day Friday, September 21, 3:00pm-6:00pm Island Herb, Freeland Representatives from Avitas will be on site with product displays and information. Island Herb is located at 5565 Vanbarr Pl, Unit F. For more information, call (360) 331-0140 or visit whidbeyislandherb.com

Saturday, September 22 Take Island Transit to Whidbey Audubon’s Bird in Hand Event at Bayview. Later ride the bus to Crockett Lake for birdwatching with an Audubon guide. To RSVP call 360-678-9536 or email Travel@IslandTransit.org Saturday, September 22, 10:00am-2:00pm South Whidbey Community Park, Langley There will be bounce houses, 30+ exciting, interactive booths, and even a free lunch (while supplies last). All this will be provided to you at no cost, courtesy of local organizations and businesses that support children and their families. For more information, call 360-2215484 or visit www.swparks.org. Community Park is located at 5495 Maxwelton Road.

Jamboree by the Sea Saturday, September 22, 10:00am-4:00pm Catalina Park and the Marina, Oak Harbor Hosted by the Deception Pass Sail and Power Squadron, the Jamboree will stress family boating involving safety, education, and awareness on our waters. This free event will include demonstrations from North Whidbey Fire and Rescue, Sheriff’s harbor division, U.S. Customs and Border, a virtual trainer, classes on boating safety for kids, ABC’s of boating signups, boat inspections, knot tying, rock painting, crabbing class, youth sailing and kayaking and much more.

Fall Sportsman’s Sale and Gun Show Saturday September 22, 10:00am Holmes Harbor Rod and Gun Club, Langley The show takes place in the main clubhouse and features more than two dozen tables of guns, ammo, optics, knives, reloading gear, fishing gear, boating equipment, and all manner of other sporting goods. An FFL will be on site to facilitate firearm transfers. Though HHRGC is a private club, the public is welcome to attend this event. Admission is by donation. The show will run until late afternoon. For more information, call 360-221-7574.

Oktoberfest Saturday, September 22, 2:00pm-8:00pm Historic Downtown Pioneer Way, Oak Harbor Live music, beer garden, food, shopping, with free admission! Presented by the Oak Harbor Main Street Association.

Upcoming Sno-Isle Library Events See schedule below Cost: Free Friday Fun with SAM (Science, Art, Music) Fridays, September 14, 21, 28, 10:00am Freeland Library Join us on the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Fridays each month as we explore stories through the lens of science, art, and music. Caregiver required. 2nd Friday Nonfiction Book Group Friday, September 14, 10:30am-12:00pm Coupeville Library Enjoy reading nonfiction? Bring a friend and join the discussion of “On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons From the Twentieth Century” by Timothy Snyder. Farmers Market Book Sales Saturdays, September 15, 22, 29 10:00am-2:00pm Coupeville Farmers Market Shop locally at the Friends of the Coupeville Library book nook. Books for all ages! All proceeds benefit the Coupeville Library. Friends of the Clinton Library Book Sale Saturday, September 15, 10:00am-3:00pm Clinton Community Hall, 6411 S Central Ave. Thousands of books for sale at bargain prices. Additional fiction and nonfiction every month. Proceeds support the Clinton Library.

Painting Fall Leaves with Carla Walsh Saturday, September 15, 11:00am-12:00pm Clinton Library Join artist Carla Walsh, and have fun painting a book mark with fall leaves using watercolors in this free class. All materials are supplied. Discovering Dragonflies Monday, September 17, 2:00pm Freeland Library Did you know that dragonflies have excellent vision but can’t hear, have six legs but can’t walk, are fierce predators of other insects, but are harmless to humans? Learn more about these fascinating flying insects and how to identify and photograph them as we welcome Dr. James Walker, “Dragonfly Whisperer.” An Afternoon with Claudia Castro Luna Wednesday, September 19, 2:00pm Freeland Library Join Washington State Poet Laureate Claudia Castro Luna as she builds awareness and appreciation of poetry through public readings, workshops, lectures, and presentations. Everyone is welcome.

Religious Services South Whidbey Community Church Sundays, 9:00am-9:45am Adult Bible Study 10:00am-11:00am Worship Deer Lagoon Grange, 5142 Bayview Rd, Langley September 16 Message: “David Strengthens Himself” Pastor Darrell Wenzek. Worship is followed by a potluck lunch and great fellowship. For more information, call 360-221-1220.

Healing Rooms Every Thursday, 6:30pm-8:30pm 5200 Honeymoon Bay Road, Freeland The Healing Rooms are open to anyone desiring personal prayer for physical, emotional, or spiritual needs. There is a team of Christians from several local churches that are dedicated to praying for healing the sick in our community. All ministry is private, confidential, and free. Teams are available to pray for individuals who drop by on a first-come, first-serve basis. For more information, contact Ann at (425) 263-2704, email healingwhidbey.com, or visit the International Association of Healing Rooms at healingrooms.com.

Meetings & Organizations Republican Women of North Whidbey Thursday, September 13, 11:30am Oak Harbor Elks Club 155 NE Ernst St. Our guests this month will be Terresa Hobbs, Island County Republican Party Chairman and Allen McPheeters, Island County Republican Party Vice Chairman. Join us and spend time with like-minded women while learning how to become more involved. Cost is $10 for lunch. For more info contact Rita Drum at ritadrum777@gmail.com or phone 631-7075980.

Job Search Support Group for Old People Monday, September 17, 10:00am-11:30am Freeland Library Over 65? Trying to get a job? Let’s support each other in our job searches. Brainstorm. Review resumes. Create a new career. No charge. Offered by Beverly Rose, who is starting her newest, latest career as a Career Coach! You can contact Beverly at bubbybev@ whidbey.com

Whidbey Island Camera Club Tuesday, September 18, 6:30pm-8:00pm Oak Hall, Room 306, SVC, Oak Harbor The theme for September is ”Long Exposure.” You may submit up to two (each) photographs

If you are a woman who loves all things British - a good cuppa tea, digestive biscuits and shortbread, the Royal Family, history, traditions and culture - please come to an informational Open House near Greenbank. DBE is a registered non-profit 501(c)(3) fun and social group that supports local charities and an extended care facility. Please call 206-619-5095 to RSVP for planning purposes & location of the Open House. Refreshments will be served, including tea of course! For more information, visit www.dbenational.org/wordpress or www.dbeinwa.org

Community Swing Band Rehearsal Wednesday, September 19, 7:00pm South Whidbey Community Center, Langley Are you a trumpet or trombone player who loves playing Big Band music? An extensive library of Basie, Ellington, Anthony, Miller, Kenton, Brown, and Q. Jones; Charts arranged by Niehaus, Nestico, Jones, Wolpe, and J. Williams. If you are interested, call Dale Zeigler at 425-269-9029. The South Whidbey Community Center is located at 723 Camano Ave.

South Whidbey Garden Club Friday, September 21, 9:00am-11:45am St. Peter’s Church, Clinton September’s program: “Gardeners Know The Best Dirt!” Kicking off our new year, we will be meeting in discussion groups, sharing successes and failures in our gardens, favorite tools, watering systems and favorite spots to find blooming treasures, etc. Bring your ideas to share. Refreshments provided and the public is welcome.

Island County Amateur Radio Club Saturday, September 22, 9:00am-12:00pm 1 NE Sixth Street, Coupeville The meeting, held in the county commissioner’s hearing room, is free and open to the public. For more information, see www. w7avm.org or contact ki7qlg@w7avm.org.

AAUW New Member Social Saturday, September 22, 3:00pm-5:00pm Private Home, 955 Condra Lane, Oak Harbor Join the American Association of University Women (AAUW) for drinks and snacks and hear about what they do to support women and girls on the island, at the state level and nationally. The purpose of AAUW is to advance equity for women and girls through advocacy, education, philanthropy and research. For reservations, directions and further information, please contact Sheila Saul at sheilasaul@ hotmail.com or Gunda Vesque at gvesque16@ gmail.com. Women with a 2-year degree, RN, 4-year degree from an accredited school are eligible to join. For a list of continuous Meetings and Organizations, visit www.whidbeyweekly.com

Classes, Seminars and Workshops Partner in Command: A Free Seminar Saturday, September 15, 10:00am-12:00pm Oak Harbor Yacht Club, 1301 SE Catalina Dr Designed to assist first mates and other less experienced crew members to take control of a vessel in emergency. For more information, contact Pat Waters 360-720-2589) or Fred Lemke 619-225-8734.

Lunch & Learn: Estate Planning for Seniors Tuesday, September 18, 12:30pm Island Senior Resources, Langley Doug Kelly, a Clinton estate planning attorney, will discuss what a senior citizen should consider for advance directives, wills, and WHAT'S GOING ON

continued on page

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Whidbey Weekly

NEWS www.whidbeyweekly.com

Go fly a kite at festival p. 10

LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

SEPTEMBER 13 - SEPTEMBER 19, 2018

DjangoFest Northwest is all about that gypsy jazz By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly If you listen closely, you may hear the sweet strains of gypsy jazz carried on the breeze throughout the City by the Sea, as the 18th annual DjangoFest Northwest gets underway next week. From Sept. 18 through 23, Whidbey Island Center for the Arts once again brings artists from all over the world to Langley for a six-day celebration of the very best in Django music, the largest such event in North America. “It is considered the most prestigious Django Festival in North America. The best of the best come to play this festival,” said guitarist Henry Acker, who, at age 14, is making his second appearance at DFNW. “It feels like one of the happiest places I have ever been to. All the players and concert goers are all super friendly and happy to be there. Also, Whidbey Island is insanely beautiful.” Django gets its name from Belgian-born guitarist Jean “Django” Reinhardt, one of Europe’s first jazz musicians to

use the acoustic guitar as the lead instrument. The style is often described as free-spirited, lively and fun – all of which embodies the spirit of DjangoFest Northwest, where in addition to workshops and concerts, impromptu “djams” can spring up anywhere. “Gypsy jazz is the kind of music that grabs you instantly. The more you learn about the people, the culture and the story behind it, the more you love it,” said vocalist Cyrille Aimée, who will perform Friday, Sept. 21 at 8 p.m. “I love the freedom this music has, and the energy. The fact it’s acoustic guitar-based makes it a very nomadic kind of music. Jams can start anywhere and anytime.” DjangoFest has certainly earned its stellar reputation and it has definitely grown over the years. What started as just a night or two of concerts has grown into a six-day festival with dozens of artists, performances and workshops. Growth of this musical celebration continues despite setbacks this year, including the death of founder and artistic director Nick Lehr and the recent retirement of WICA’s longtime executive director Stacie Burgua, who worked with Lehr to plan and produce the event from the beginning. But change is inevitable, and as the saying goes, the show must go on. Fortunately, it is built on a strong foundation. “We have hired Django artist Simon Planting as the new DFNW artistic director for 2018 and 2019 and Stacie is contracting with WICA to work this year’s festival as she introduces new WICA executive director, Verna Everitt, to everything this entails,” said Deana Duncan, DFNW festival coordinator. “Also new this year is a sixth day. We are bringing festival favorite Pearl Django back for a Whidbey Island community celebration of DjangoFest NW and a kick off of Nick Lehr’s memorial,” Duncan continued. “This is the first time we’ve had a Tuesday night concert and the first time we’ve had a pay-what-you-will – the concert is by donation.” Also new this year is a stronger collaboration with the Island County Fairgrounds, under the management of the Port of South Whidbey, which Duncan said offers options for even more growth in the future.

Photo Courtesy of Black Market Trust Black Market Trust, an American pop/vocal jazz band that combines great American standards with the gypsy jazz of Django, will be performing at 3 p.m. Friday, Sept. 21 during the 18th annual DjangoFest Northwest, taking place in Langley Sept. 18 through 23.

“They are creating a fantastic camping area with a bonfire and have received city permission to have late night Djams well past the time everything else in town will close,” she explained. “It’s going to be a great party up there this year! We are looking at adding a DjangoFest Northwest second stage at the fairgrounds in the future.” It takes a huge amount of time, planning and volunteers to

JOIN US FOR FALL REHEARSALS

Photo Courtesy of Henry Acker Jazz guitar prodigy Henry Acker, 14, will light up the DjangoFest stage with the Henry Acker Trio at 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 21. Acker’s debut CD, “14,” will be available for purchase at DjangoFest Northwest, Sept. 18-23 in Langley.

put DFNW together every year. Details such as working with a lawyer on Visas for international artists to finding lodging – most of which is provided by local residents – takes organization and forethought. Planning for the next DjangoFest begins as soon as the current festival ends, if not in the middle of it. The payoff for the hard work comes when eager audiences fill the auditoriums for concerts and workshops and when artists come together to share their joy. “Our favorite part about sharing our music is when we can feel the audience having fun and enjoying the show,” said Jeffrey Scott Radaich, with Black Market Trust, who will be performing Friday, Sept. 21 at 3 p.m. “What appeals to us about performing at DjangoFest is the chance to see all of the other amazing musicians from around the world. The energy and overall exciting sound of Django and the Hot Club was what first grabbed us and it’s something we’ll always aspire to.” “It’s just great to see the smiles on people’s faces when you have a really good show. I love making new friends through the music,” said Acker, whose trio will perform at 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 21. “I love the fact that everybody playing this music seems to be having so much fun. I also love the

See DJANGOFEST continued on page 8

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MUSICIANS GET YOUR SWING ON! Are you a trumpet or trombone player who loves playing Big Band music? An extensive library of Basie, Ellington, Anthony, Miller, Kenton, Brown, and Q. Jones; Charts arranged by Niehaus, Nestico, Jones, Wolpe, and J. Williams.

ASK ABOUT FINANCING! 1ST & 3RD WEDNESDAY OF EACH MONTH, 7PM SOUTH WHIDBEY COMMUNITY CENTER, 723 CAMANO AVE, LANGLEY Bring your instrument & music stand. If you are interested, call Dale Zeigler at 425-269-9029

Serving WhidBey & Anacortes www.islandheatpumps.com 360.321.4252

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8

SEPTEMBER 13 - SEPTEMBER 19, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Island 911

Seriously, we do not make this stuff up! MONDAY, AUG. 6 8:26 am, SR 20 Female guest at desk advising she is being forced to pay other people’s bills and other things that are not making sense. 7:15 pm, SW Freund St. Report of female screaming in area, cannot see, only hear; when asked if she needed help, female said no. 7:50 pm, SR 20 Caller advising female transient at location was very aggressive when asked to leave. Subject told caller “You are a Jew, are you from the Middle East?” 11:34 pm, SE Barrington Dr. Caller is being belligerent, saying he’s not doing drugs and wants to be taken off list. Stopped in July 4 weekend, won’t give phone number, when trying to get one, said “Now you’re blaming me;” disconnected due to incoming calls. MONDAY, AUG. 20 6:58 am, SR 20 Party requesting contact in reference to night manager receiving call that Taco Bell was under investigation. Night manager needs to take all the money in store, go get a green card and load money onto it and send it. 12:22 pm, SR 20 Reporting party advising while walking behind Saars someone was taping her. 3:10 pm, SE Pioneer Way Caller states transients have been staying by generator; are defecating and leaving behind broken glass. 3:50 pm, SW Barlow St. Advising male exposed himself. 4:42 pm, NE 4th Ave. Stating two teenagers doing “everything but having sex” on lawn for two hours. THURSDAY, AUG. 30 2:25 pm, NE Barron Dr. Reporting party states estranged boyfriend took her vehicle and told her he left it running at Parkwood. 4:16 pm, W Whidbey Ave. Advising of dead crow in driveway. 6:18 pm, NE Harvest Dr. Reporting party has messages on cell phone soliciting sex. TUESDAY, SEPT. 4 6:41 am, SE Ely St. Advising female laying in road on Barrington; in her 50s, blonde curly hair, no pants and a T-shirt. 10:02 am, SE Regatta Dr. Third-party caller advising male subject yelling in bathroom, reporting party went to area and heard yelling as well. 1:49 pm, SW Beeksma Dr. Party advising car has been sitting in front of her house for the past 30 minutes. Subjects inside wave at her when she looks out at them. She went and asked them what they were doing and told them she was calling law enforcement. 4:30 pm, SE Ireland St. Caller advising found small baggie of powdery, white substance at soccer practice; he has it so his players are not around it.

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4:40 pm, SE Barrington Dr Party in lobby to report motor vehicle accident that occurred in Las Vegas. 9:29 pm, SR 20 Caller advising 30 minutes ago was buying phone from subject. Subject took money for phone out of his hand and drove off. Advising phone doesn’t work. WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 5 8:56 am, NW 2nd Ave. Reporting party advising Friday students were seen breaking glass and burying glass in the rocks on playground. THURSDAY, SEPT. 6 1:06 am, SE Jerome St. Requesting call referencing having raccoons on porch. States did not shoot them but wants to know if legally he can. FRIDAY, SEPT. 7 9:04 am, SW 24th Ave. Advising neighbor has violated order; has placed material in reporting party’s yard. Reporting party found feces in his yard and states neighbors did it. 11:16 am, SW Erie St. Report of female by flag pole for past two hours crying and talking to herself. SATURDAY, SEPT. 8 1:21 am, NW Crosby Ave. Reporting party states male subject in driveway. Says he’s waiting for neighbor, is arguing with reporting party’s son.

LOCALLY OPERATED

Life Tributes CAROL ANN KERN-LORANC February 5, 1940 – August 17, 2018 Carol Ann Kern-Loranc of Oak Harbor, Wash. passed away of natural causes Friday, August 17, 2018 in Everett, Wash. Carol was born in Missoula, Mont. February 5, 1940 to Charles and Gloria (Aldrich) Baldwin. Carol grew up in Missoula and was the oldest of four children. She received her GED in 1994. Carol moved to Oak Harbor in 2009. She was active in the Oak Harbor Elks Lodge #2362 and in 2016-2017 held the office of Chaplain. One of her passions was the Washington Elks Therapy Program for Children, where she donated money as well as her time. She also enjoyed playing bingo, puzzles, crocheting, cross stitch, and her beloved dog, “Dusty.” Carol is survived by four children: Gloria (Edward) Kent of Athabasca, Alberta, Canada; Paula (Rick) Geist of Oak Harbor; Keith Fried of Plano, Texas; and Sherri (Monty) Allen of Plano, Texas. Also surviving are six grandchildren: Steven Geist of Custer, Wash.; Michael Geist of Bellingham, Wash.; James Kirk of Roff, Okla.; Brittany Santibanez of Plano, Texas; Tadashay Morrison of Plano, Texas and Bryan Morrison of Louisville, Ky., and nine great-grandchildren. Her siblings, Harold (Colleen) Baldwin and Linda G. Marry of Missoula, Mont., and Bruce (Sue) Baldwin of Florence, Ariz., as well as nine nieces and nephews also survive. She was preceded in death by her parents Charles and Gloria and two children, Tana Rae Fried and Richard A. Fried. A memorial service for Carol was held at the Oak Harbor Elks Lodge. There will be an additional memorial service scheduled for a later date in Missoula, Mont. where Carol will be laid to rest with her family and children. The family suggests memorials to the WA Elks Therapy Program for Children, C/O Oak Harbor Elks Lodge, 155 NE Ernst St., Oak Harbor, WA 98277, 360-675-7111. Arrangements were entrusted to Wallin Funeral Home, Oak Harbor, Wash.

Life Tributes can now be found onlineat www.whidbeyweekly.com

DJANGOFEST continued from page 7

2:23 am, SR 20 Advising subject came in with black mask on, stole case of water and took off on bicycle. 7:02 am, SE Pioneer Way Advising male walked over to reporting party from laundromat, took a picture of reporting party, then walked away. 8:03 am, N Oak Harbor St. Advising vehicle went off road and crashed into reporting party’s telephone box around 10 p.m. 12:10 pm, NE Regatta Dr. Reporting party advising large group of motorcycles running red lights; advising a few pulled into intersection, blocking traffic to let the rest of the motorcycles go through. 12:31 pm, SE Dock St. Caller advising one of his employees was just told he would get ticketed if he continued to park his vehicle outside of his business. Caller advising has been parking there for years and other officers have said it was okay. 2:02 pm, SE Pioneer Way Party states vehicle went over the sidewalk and crashed into bushes. 2:53 pm, SR 20 Reporting party advising received call from female. Female told reporting party she used her card at location and the owner stole from her card and transferred money to Mexico. 5:25 pm, SE Glencoe St. Advising a drone was flying two feet away from caller’s vehicle while she was driving; ongoing problem. Report provided by OHPD & Island County Sheriff’s Dept.

Photo Courtesy of Whidbey Island Center for the Arts From Europe to Broadway, acclaimed vocalist Cyrille Aimée is just one of dozens of artists performing next week during DjangoFest Northwest. You can catch Aimée in concert Friday, Sept. 21 at 8 p.m.

fireworks of the soloists that play over the beautiful bouncy music.” “I love making people happy through my music,” said Aimée. “I grew up listening to gypsy jazz and it’s the reason I sing today.” Tickets to DjangoFest sell out quickly, so Duncan recommends getting them as soon as possible, if you haven’t already. “We sell around 2,000 tickets usually for that one week and we know many more people come to the island that can’t afford tickets,” she said. “They camp and stay with friends in order to participate in the impromptu Djams that pop up all over Langley. It’s a chance to rub elbows with world class musicians and possibly play with them under a tree at the coffee shop.”

A complete lineup of the concerts and workshops at this year’s DjangoFest Northwest can be found online at djangofestnw.com. Anyone who has an opportunity to attend should check it out, say organizers. “This is a once-in-a-lifetime chance to see these particular artists in this line up. Some of them rarely come to the U.S.,” Duncan said. “If you enjoy world class music and the heartbeat of gypsy jazz, you don’t want to miss the festival.”

It’s an event that suits the City by the Sea.

“What an exciting time to be joining WICA,” said new Executive Director, Verna Everitt. “I have a wonderful opportunity to jump into one of Langley’s heritage events. I so look forward to absorbing the multitude of details that go into the six-day event. What fun it’s going to be!”

“DjangoFest Northwest has become an ‘heirloom’ event for the city of Langley and South Whidbey,” Duncan said. “We’ve been told by merchants and residents that this festival helps maintain a vibrant downtown and continues our tradition of being an artist’s haven. Visitors travel from around the world to attend.”

“Django fans are not going to want to miss the extraordinary women on the bill this year,” said Acker. “Cyrille Aimée’s vocal ability is out of this world and Saga Award Winner Sara L’Abriola is just a phenomenal guitarist. Throw in the two guitar giants Adrien Moignard and Gonzalo Bergera and you have one epic festival.”

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The views expressed in this column are not As a mother to boys, I have also discovered necessarily that of Whidbey Weekly and its the voracious appetite many parents joke staff. To read all “Homesteading on Whidbey” about. Filling my freezer with fresh organic columns in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Puzzle 1a(Easy, difficulty rating 0.33) library at www.whidbeyweekly.com. chicken we raised ourselves has been digital

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She still laughs about the time I maimed her and she needed stitches, but she also reminds me that had she let me quit I would probably have never attempted it again. Ironically, when she needed to slaughter her fifty meat birds this summer I went over to help her, as I can now clean a bird within a couple of minutes. This doesn’t mean that I enjoy killing an animal, as I actually prefer my husband to do it while I butcher. I do, however, have a new appreciation and respect for where my food comes from. Being involved with every step, from buying the day old chicks to eating chicken tacos with my family, is our new “normal.” I enjoy knowing I am feeding my family healthy food, I enjoy knowing the animals are well fed and taken care of and I enjoy eating delicious meals. This is why I raise my own meat. One day I hope to have enough property to raise larger animals and have beef.

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That being said, how is it a girl who cried when her father cooked crab is now raising her own chickens and rabbits for meat? To be honest, up until a few years ago I found this whole grisly business too macabre to participate in. When we had to move back to the United States from overseas two years ago my husband wanted to eat our laying hens. I nearly cried at the thought of it. Now, I am the one teaching my husband how to butcher and clean chickens. My evolvement, or devolvement, into raising my own food has a lot to do with a change in perspective as a result of motherhood. I want my children to be in touch with their surroundings, to know where food comes from, and I want them to have access to healthy food. Because of this, it was not a big leap to go from gardening and teaching my boys about healthy eating to raising our own meat.

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We “savages,” as my mother calls us, who are embracing our roots and getting back to how it used to be, can be anyone. We live amongst you, fitting into society inconspicuously. Our homesteading journeys are unique, as are our motives and techniques. My journey started long ago when I was a half-vegetarian, releasing prawns into the front yard to save them from the pot. I know how ridiculous “half-vegetarian” sounds, but I never felt comfortable calling myself a vegetarian when I had a love for cheeseburgers. Besides the delicious burgers, I mostly refrained from eating any type of animal because my bleeding heart was so filled with guilt if ever I tried to enjoy one of my mother’s delicious dishes. I was a peanut butter and jelly kind of kid who loved veggies from grandpa’s farm and carbs, hold the meat.

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I was skeptical at first, unsure if I could actually do this and more unsure if I could bring myself to eat the meat after all was said and done. To ease myself into this lifestyle, I raised three Cornish chicks two years ago while my husband was on deployment. I brought in an expert, my friend Helga, to help me slaughter them when it was time. I was so nervous I nicked her with the very sharp knife when it was my turn to slaughter a bird. She had to take over and slaughter the birds for me, while she was bleeding through her jeans. I wanted to cry, I wanted to take her to the hospital, but mostly I just wanted to stop. Being the tough sensible woman she is, she shouted commands at me, instructing me about how to skin and clean the birds. The whole while she kept saying, “we can go to the hospital when you finish because we aren’t wasting the meat.” When I finished cleaning the birds, we put them in zip-locks bags in my refrigerator to rest and Helga said, “look, you did it! Now, that wasn’t so bad, was it?”

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Alright folks, I am going to broach the seemingly taboo area of homesteading many find unpalatable…meat. Let’s discuss the where, the why, the what, and the who of raising your own meat. How does one even start down this savage path of raising an animal to later slaughter and eat, and who are these people?

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THE MOBACKS ARE COMING!

Mossyback Morris Men’s annual Whidbey tour is Saturday By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly The Mossyback Morris Men of Seattle have been doing an annual tour of Whidbey Island for almost as long as they’ve been around.

Photo Courtesy of the Mossyback Morris Men Members of the Seattle men’s dance group, the Mossyback Morris Men, will be on Whidbey Island Saturday for the group’s 32nd annual tour of the island.

The traditional Morris dancers will make their 32nd annual appearance at locations across the island Saturday, beginning in Coupeville at 10 a.m. They will appear at Bayview Market at 11:30 a.m., Whidbey Island Winery at 2 p.m. and at Boy and Dog Park in Langley at 4 p.m.

Members of the Mobacks come from all walks of life. Perhaps even better, there are no special dance skills or physical abilities needed to learn the art of Morris dancing.

Formed in 1980, the Mobacks, as they call themselves, perform a traditional style of English dance thought to be at least a thousand years old. “Through the ages, the dance evolved into various styles - Border, Northwest, Cotswold, Sword,” said dancer Peter Lemme. “The Mobacks embrace a Cotswold (southern England) tradition, notably as danced in the English villages of Ducklington and Bledington. The dance was revived in the early 1900s, spreading beyond the borders, including to the U.S. There are literally hundreds of teams all around the world actively dancing in one tradition or another.”

“We have personally observed that anyone can participate in Morris Dancing,” Lemme said. “Dancers will be rewarded with stronger bones, from doing what is essentially a cardio-vascular and respiratory workout. Each dance is quite vigorous and lasts from three to five minutes.” While the Mobacks are all men, there are plenty of groups which feature a mix of men and women or just women, and quite often they will perform together. The desire to perform with other Morris dance groups is what got the annual Whidbey Island tour going 32 years ago.

This year the Mossyback Morris Men will be joined by members of the Vancouver Morris Men, Bridgetown Morris Men of Portland, Ore., and special guests Minnesota Traditional Morris of Minneapolis. The performances are free. “We do pass the hat to those watching us dance, and we promise good luck and fertility for those that contribute,” Lemme said. “Proceeds generally ‘go down the drain,’ as beer appears to be the ideal complement to dancing itself.” Lemme said Whidbey Island hospitality also keeps them coming back. “Each town is unique. We have always been warmly received (especially Coupeville) regardless of the weather,” he said. “Coupeville and Langley draw the biggest crowds, that can number as many as 50. We have some stops where it seems there are more dancers than watchers. But that just makes it more fun, as we can lavish more attention on the lucky few.”

Each dance has a style particular to a village. Dancers perform an intricate series of steps, hops, turns and hand motions that can include the use of handkerchiefs or sticks. Lemme said the moves themselves are fairly fast to learn, but putting it all together can take some time. “The timing of the stepping and kicks and the hand motions can take months to align comfortably,” he said. “As with most dance, it is a learned motion, with repetition including weekly practices to build muscle memory. “The Mobacks have been dancing together for so long we bring a deep repertoire that crosses many traditions and numbers around 30 dances,” continued Lemme. “We focus on about 10 or 15 dances to tour with, so we don’t have to repeat any. We include a few dances we made up ourselves.”

“We enjoy touring with other teams, and notably our good friends, the Vancouver Morris Men,” Lemme said. “Whidbey Island is a happy intermediate stop between our ‘villages’ and offered a great venue for a fall tour.”

Photo Courtesy of the Mossyback Morris Men The Mossyback Morris Men, a traditional men’s Morris dance group from Seattle, will bring its annual tour to Whidbey Island Saturday, with appearances in Coupeville, Bayview and Langley. Morris dancing is a traditional form of English dancing featuring hops, jumps, spins and more, as they demonstrated last year at Bayview Farmers Market.

Anyone who wishes to get a better understanding of Morris dancing can check out a video Lemme put together at https:// youtu.be/sK8N67xQPIQ. You can also find out more about the Mossyback Morris Men on Facebook or online at www. mossyback.com. “I have been dancing with the Mobacks for 35 years,” said Lemme. “We have fun. We always do. If fun is what you seek, then come join the Mobacks.”

Festival set to bring high-flying fun to Whidbey Island By Kacie Jo Voeller Whidbey Weekly The skies above Whidbey Island will be filled with more different flying objects than usual this weekend, as colorful kites of all shapes and sizes take flight at the island’s kite festival. Kite fliers and spectators will gather for the 2018 Whidbey Island Kite Festival Saturday and Sunday, with festivities starting at approximately 10 a.m. and continuing throughout each day. The event will take place at the Camp Casey Conference Center, just south of Coupeville. Featured events will include sporkite competitions, single-line challenges, and even

kites flying to music. The Whidbey Island Kite Festival Association and the Whidbey Island Kite Fliers collaborate each year to put on the festival. Lisa Root, co-chairman of the event and an avid kite flyer herself, said beyond the competitions, other events will aim to get festival attendees involved, including kids’ kite-making, a bag raffle, and kite-flying lessons. The event typically attracts about 1,500 or more people each day, she said. “It’s sort of a relaxing day of fun and a good place to take kids and do something different,” she said. At noon on both days, there will be a mass

ascension of kites, with delta and box/cellular kites scheduled for Saturday’s liftoff and flat/ bowed and soft kites set to take off Sunday. The ascensions will be followed by one of the most anticipated events at the festival, Root said. The popular teddy bear drop will occur after the ascensions, at approximately 1 p.m. each day. Wind permitting, stuffed bears will parachute in on a kite line, and the kids chase after them one at a time. Root said she recalled one past festival day where the weather was gray, and few spectators had shown up prior to the bear drop. “But I tell you, at one o’clock, you couldn’t believe the group of people who were there waiting for the teddy bear drop,” she said. “I mean, they come no matter what the weather for the teddy bear drop.” Another activity for the kids is the running of the bols, a circular kite, Root said. “They (the bols) are big round circles and they (the kids) have to run into the wind,” she said. “It’s like dragging a stone behind you depending on the wind, so they run heats with the kids running across the field doing that. Of course, the kids love to do it, and then let some of the adults try it too.” The festival is free, with parking run by the Boys and Girls Club, who have a $1 donation fee for the service. The Central Whidbey Lions Club will have food such as hot dogs and soda available for purchase.

Photo Courtesy of Whidbey Island Kite Festival Association Kites of all shapes, colors and sizes will fill the sky near Camp Casey this weekend for the annual Whidbey Island Kite Festival. The fun begins each day at approximately 10 a.m.

off the air conditioning and keep the doors closed so there is no breeze, no nothing, and you make the kite fly yourself.” The kite festival also gives local businesses a chance to take part, Root said. “Each different event we have is sponsored by a different company in the community, so it allows the community to participate,” she said. For Root, a longtime member of the kite club on the island, kite flying was something started by chance with a trip to the beach and a $4.95 kite in a bin at Toys R Us. “We were going to the beach and I went to Toys R Us to get something for the beach,” she said. “I walked in, and there were a bunch of kites in a box so I picked up a kite for $4.95, thinking it was just one of these little triangular kites you put up in the air and everybody flies. It wasn’t, it was a dual-line kite and my husband figured out how to fly it and said, ‘Let’s buy a better kite,’ then it was ‘Let’s buy another kite,’ then, ‘Let’s buy more kites.’” Root spent around 15 years in kite competition. Part of the reason she and her husband relocated to Whidbey Island after coming to a kite festival in the area was due to the good kite-flying conditions.

The indoor kite flying competition portion of the event will take place 7:30 p.m. Saturday at Coupeville High School.

“We have good wind and good places to fly,” she said. “We came up here for the festival and competition, we liked it and we stayed and continued to compete; then we moved here and continued the festival.”

“You have to move your arms and body around to make the kite fly; they fly on 10-12 foot lines,” Root said. “Outdoors you need wind, inside there is no wind. They shut

For more information about the 2018 Whidbey Island Kite Festival, please visit www.whidbeykites.org or email Lisa Root at lroot0208@aol.com.

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Film Shorts Courtesy of Cascadia Weekly

By Carey Ross Alpha: I don’t know how historically accurate this man-meets-wolf story is, but if you’re into survival stories in which boy and beast come together to triumph over nature, this is the movie for you. ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 36 min.) BlacKkKlansman: Spike Lee tells the crazybut-true story of the time a black police officer and his Jewish partner infiltrated the Ku Klux Klan in 1970s Colorado–and he does it as only Spike Lee can. ★★★★★ (Unrated • 1 hr. 28 min.) Christopher Robin: Christopher Robin (Ewan McGregor) is all grown up and being an adult is a big bum deal (tell me about it, Chris), so his stuffed friends of yore–Tigger, Eeyore, Piglet, Owl, and that honey-loving scamp Pooh–come back to life to save him from himself. Which sounds cute in theory, but if my Cabbage Patch Dolls start speaking to me, I will never recover. ★★★ (PG • 1 hr. 44 min.) Crazy Rich Asians: The first movie with an all-Asian cast since “Memoirs of a Geisha,” this adaptation of the blockbuster bestseller translates to the big screen with the kind of ease only money can buy. Critically acclaimed and a success at the box office, here’s hoping Hollywood is starting to realize that representation rules. ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 1 min.) God Bless the Broken Road: According to its official bio, “this film combines elements of faith, country music and stock car racing.” My hand to God, I am not making this up. ★ (PG • 1 hr. 51 min.) Kin: Two brothers–one an adopted teen, the other newly paroled–find themselves in possession of a mystical weapon and on the run from the FBI, soldiers from another world and James Franco. I’d run from James Franco too. ★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 42 min.) The Meg: Jason Statham has fought various drug cartels, corrupt political regimes, wackadoo criminal masterminds and his own body, so naturally the only thing left is for him to fight a giant prehistoric shark. I don’t think it’s spoiling anything to say the shark probably won’t win. ★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 54 min.) Mission: Impossible–Fallout: Tom Cruise is back as Ethan Hunt, summer’s most bankable action hero who is not part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. At 56 years old, he still does nearly all his own stunts and, like its star, this is the rare film franchise that seems to be getting better with age. ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 27 min.) The Nun: A character from a movie sequel somehow gets its own spinoff–and that should tell you everything you need to know

about the state of mainstream Hollywood at the moment. If you want to be freaked out all over again by the creepy nun from “The Conjuring 2,” you now get your chance. ★ (R • 1 hr. 36 min.) Operation Finale: My movie-star boyfriend, Oscar Isaac, hunts a real bad Nazi in this dramatization of the 1960 capture of Adolf Eichmann by Israel’s Mossad and Shin Bet. A timely account given the fact that Nazis still live and walk among us. ★★★ (PG-13)

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Searching: When his daughter goes missing, her father (John Cho, always good) tries to find her by tracking her movements through her social media accounts in this updated take on a standard-issue thriller. ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 41 min.) A Simple Favor: This thriller starring Blake Lively (love her) and Anna Kendrick (love her too) has all the look of a big-budget Lifetime movie–and that is not an insult. Gather up some girlfriends, smuggle in some White Claw and make a night at the movies of it. ★★★★ (R • 1 hr. 56 min.)

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Peppermint: Jennifer Garner returns to her action-adventure roots as a woman who sees her entire family murdered and then turns her body into a lethal weapon in order to exact revenge. Do Jen a favor and just rewatch “Alias” instead. ★ (R) The Predator: If we must have a retooling of the Predator franchise, I suppose the man responsible for some of the most over-thetop movies of the 1980s, Shane Black, is the right man to have at the helm. If you’re trying to parse the previous sentence, I believe the term you’re looking for is “damning with faint praise.” ★★ (R • 1 hr. 41 min.)

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Unbroken: Path to Redemption: In 2014, Angelina Jolie helmed “Unbroken,” which garnered great critical acclaim and was nominated for three Oscars. In 2018, the film gets a sequel featuring none of the same cast or crew, but a plot that leans heavily on Billy Graham and his friend Jesus. ★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 38 min.) White Boy Rick: This based-on-a-true story account of a teenage FBI informantturned-drug-dealer that stars Matthew McConaughey seems like it should hit all of the cinematic sweet spots. If you’re starting to wonder whether the McConaissance was more myth than man, so am I. ★★ (R • 1 hr. 51 min.) For Anacortes theater showings, please see www.fandango.com. For Blue Fox and Oak Harbor Cinemas showings see ads on this page.

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Let’s Dish! with Kae Harris

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newfound love of café au crème and an expertly brewed espresso stands out in a crowd and, coupled with one of the standard sandwiches or pastries found on just about every French café menu, will find you in good stead for a delicious cultural experience. There are no half-measures in French cafés and regardless of what you opt for as your beverage or your meal, the full measure is served each and every time! Tarte tatin, croque monsieur, croissants and a bevy of other French delights will undoubtedly rouse your taste buds and awaken the thirst or hunger for the café experience. While the food between cultures differs in cafés, the premise seems to remain the same – a place of gathering, observation, escape and immersion.

CAFÉ DAYS What is the one thing, the world over, which seemingly changes little and yet can vary quite vastly from country to country? Cafés. These are hotbeds of conversation, places where we can escape the office, turn into the office or just sit and observe the other café patrons. Perhaps they too are observing the other café patrons themselves, which might make you the observee and the observer. This is where we can find our favorite brew, where what we thought might have been our favorite can be as fluid as the dark delicious liquid itself. It’s where creativity is inspired and a cup of coffee (or tea) revitalizes the café patron. Cafés weren’t just about coffee, either. They still aren’t, completely. The first coffee houses seem to have come about in the late 1400s to early 1500s in Mecca. They were said to be a place of political gatherings and in the mid to late 1500s, were so popular across the region, Imams supposedly banned both coffee and coffee houses due to the politics discussed therein. And it is thanks to an Ethiopian goat herder named Kaldi who, through careful observation of the gustatory predilections of his animals as they moved merrily from one coffee shrub to another, discovered the red pods and was able to experience the presumed first-taste of coffee for himself. A monk who had been observing the goat herder gathered the berries and brewed a tincture from the beans and was thus himself inspired.

difference lies in the kinds of food served and the way coffee or tea is made at each café, from place to place, country to country. Oh, and the fact that today we don’t tend to discuss politics at these venues anymore and it’s probably a very good thing! I happen to like a stand-alone, ‘mom n’ pop’ coffee house, myself, because it offers something so unique each and every time. There’s a sense of ‘the cup of coffee I’m drinking is the only cup like it!’ Whether or not it’s true is likely a matter of perception; nevertheless, the downhome cozy feel of these small places of coffee, tea and yummy things, is unbeatable. Now, this isn’t to say the largest and most well-known coffee houses throughout the United States and indeed the world aren’t just as good. Of course they are. They mightn’t be the enormous café-lover magnets they’ve become were it not for the ambiance they entice us in with, the delectables which satisfy any small craving we might have and the way in which they provide us a sort of reprieve from whatever it is each of us might be needing a reprieve. We can rest assured when we travel from one region to the next, whether in our own country or not, a café is more than likely going to offer us similar things regardless of where in the world it is. Wi-fi? Likely. Coffee? Definitely. Something tasty? Almost certainly. A sense of familiarity is comforting and this is what cafés seem to bring where ever they’re located.

The concept of the coffee house eventually made its way to Europe and by the 17th century, via Venetian merchants, gained entry to England and France. There is a long and complex history behind the namesake of the coffee house and how it was, as a structural building, established for the purpose of being a café.

But it isn’t just the brew that’s attractive to patrons, because cafés serve more than just this beverage. Whether it’s coffee or tea or even juices and smoothies now, many a person comes into a café a little peckish and well, if they aren’t they often will be after perusing the menu or seeing the display of tasties as they order their beverage.

All the same, the practice of going to a café to gather amongst friends or loved ones, or neither, if you prefer a little quiet time for yourself, has not changed much since its institution. To sit amongst what we might perceive to be ‘like-minded’ individuals is still seen throughout society in just about every culture. I think the

So, what is the first food that springs to mind when you think of a coffee shop? This will differ from person to person, mood to mood. For me, I instantly think of a plain croissant. It takes me on a journey, a trip to France where wouldn’t you know it, cafés in and around Paris have been causing quite a stir! A revival and a

Dear Readers, we might not have authentic Parisian cafés here but we have a different kind, equipped with a uniqueness all their own and no doubt, travelers from other parts of the world seek out the experience of what our cafés here in America offer! I’m including, however, a simple recipe for croque monsieur, a dish which originated in France, the name given to it for the French verb ‘croquer,’ to crunch or bite. It’s a simple ham sandwich with a history of its own and with its moniker, nothing could be more French with a cup of coffee - though due to its saltiness, a glass of wine or sparkling water might be a better option! Please send any and all comments, questions and definitely recipes you would like to share to letsdish. whidbeyweekly@gmail.com and we’ll do exactly that – Dish! Easy Croque Monsieur 2 to 3 tablespoons butter 2 to 3 tablespoons flour 1 cup milk 4 slices firm sandwich bread 4 ounces ham (Black Forest is really good) 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 cup grated Gruyere cheese, plus a little for topping 1 cup parmesan, grated 1 tablespoon butter Salt and pepper to taste Preheat oven to 450° F. Melt butter in saucepan and whisk in flour. Whisk for a minute and slowly add milk, salt and pepper. Continue to cook and whisk until the white sauce has thickened. Assemble sandwiches: bread, mustard, sauce, ham, Gruyere, parmesan and top with bread. Brush sandwiches with melted butter and place in a large skillet over medium heat. Toast until light golden brown and remove from heat. Place sandwiches on a cookie sheet and spoon more sauce and cheese over the top. Bake until cheese melts and turns very lightly brown. Allow to cool a little, serve and enjoy! https://bonjourparis.com/food-and-drink/parisbrewing-history-coffee-since-time-louis-xiv/ To read past columns of Let’s Dish in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www. whidbeyweekly.com.

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long-term planning. Get better prepared to move forward with your own attorney after this free program. Optional lunch by donation is at 11:45am. The Bayview Senior Center is at 14594 SR 525.

Free Life Skill Workshops: Power of Prayer Part 2 Tuesday, September 18, 1:00pm-2:30pm Concordia Lutheran Church, Oak Harbor Presented by Concordia Community Academy. For more information or to register, visit concordiaoakharbor.org or call 360-679-1697.

Getting Ready for Medicare Thursday, September 20, 2:00pm Oak Harbor Senior Center, 51 SE Jerome St. Turning 65? New to Medicare? It can seem overwhelming. If you have questions about Medicare and plans available to Whidbey Island residents, let us help you navigate the process. Subjects include: Medicare Parts A and B; Medicare Supplements; Medicare Advantage Plans; Part D Prescription Plans; Enrollment Deadlines; Low-income Assistance. Join the State-wide Health Insurance Benefits Advisors (SHIBA), for a free “Welcome to Medicare” class. No registration required. SHIBA is a program of the Washington State Office of the Insurance Commissioner. For more information, call 360-279-4580.

Oak Harbor Senior Center Resource Fair Saturday, September 22, 9:00am-2:00pm Oak Harbor Senior Center,51 SE Jerome St The Resource Fair will provide resources and information for the 50+ community. Free lunch will be served from 11:30am to 12:30pm. Vendors to include: Summer Hill, Costco, Homeplace, Whidbey Memorial, Island Eye Care, Regency, SHIBA, RE/MAX, Careage, Bayshore Chiropractic, Sno-Isle Library, Puget Sound Energy, Whidbey Health Hospice & EMS, Island Transit, Medical Safety Net, Island Senior Resources, AARP, La Conner Retirement Inn, Wallin Funeral Home, Opportunity Council, and more! For more information, call 360-279-4583.

Back Pain & Sciatica Workshop Saturday, September 22, 11:00am Rue & Primavera, Oak Harbor This is a free informational workshop. Rue & Primavera is located at 785 Bayshore Dr, Ste 102. For more information or to register, call 360-279-8323

Race on in for Whidbey’s Best BBQ before enjoying the Hydroplanes! We Cater!

360-679-3500

601 NE Midway Blvd Oak Harbor Follow us on Facebook & Twitter

CATCH THE GAME! Join us for NFL and College Football Games! $3 Tacos Every Tuesday! Live Music Fridays & Saturdays Stop by to register for the Bennett Boyles Memorial Golf Tournament!

Featuring Local Craft Beer, Wine & Ciders 103 S. Main • Coupeville • 360.682.5747 www.penncovebrewing.com

HAPPY HOUR MONDAY-FRIDAY 3-6PM

Help us celebrate with delic ious samples!

Breakfast & Lunch on the Water - Daily Fresh Baked Treats Homemade Soups & Sandwiches 360.678.5431 • 4 Front Street • Coupeville

6

1191 SE Dock St, #2 • Oak Harbor 360-675-6500 • chrisbakeryonwhidbey.weebly.com

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www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

SEPTEMBER 13 - SEPTEMBER 19, 2018

13

LOCALLY OPERATED

synergy that makes a group more powerful than the sum of its parts. All you must do on the 13th is ask.

CHICKEN LITTLE & THE ASTROLOGER By Wesley Hallock

ARIES (March 21-April 19) Some open-minded discussion would go far to relieve the tension in your life. Nothing clears the air and sets matters right quicker than an honest heart-to-heart talk. Of talk, there’s likely to be plenty this week, but how honest and open-minded is it likely to be? That depends on your ability to detach from what you believe to be true, just long enough to really hear the other side. The 13th is a prime day to try. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Nerves are on edge in many arenas this week, making it difficult to venture an opinion without stepping on someone’s toes. Pushing people’s buttons may not be your intent, but it’s unlikely that you are as innocent of the practice as you might prefer to think. Think twice before posing loaded questions, and if you must ask, brace yourself for some exceedingly candid answers. The truth can hurt on the 13th. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) The issue you are ignoring in hopes it will simply go away is unlikely to grant your wish. You must get involved and meet the issue head-on if you would resolve it. All concerned must have their say, and it falls to you to hear them out dispassionately. Getting excited prematurely because others’ opinions differ from yours solves nothing. Take a patience pill on the 13th and sharpen your listening skills. CANCER (June 22-July 22) Every story has two sides, a fact that could mire you in controversy before the week is out. Convincing arguments may come at you from many directions. Neutral though your sympathies may be, meaning you would prefer not to choose sides, choose you must. Be wary of the belief that by not choosing, you remain uninvolved. There is no wrong response on the 13th, except for no response at all. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You could become a major player in events that don’t directly involve you. At a time when agitation is everywhere apparent, your steady presence is calming, and your way of treating all people fairly and equally earns their trust. Do not be surprised, therefore, to find yourself welcomed into circles you don’t normally travel. The strength to say what needs to be said on the 13th further enhances your influence. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) A situation that you cannot resolve alone is responsive to the joint efforts of people known to you. You have it in your power to secure their commitment to your cause. The sheer power of numbers is on your side here, but numbers alone do not make the difference. What matters even more is the magical

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) A lot is happening at once this week, making it seem that no matter what you do, the situation on a different front calls for you to do something else. To excel, you must remain in control while acting simultaneously on all fronts. Daunting as your caped-crusader to-do list may appear, there is a way to let it unfold that makes it easier to live than to contemplate. The hectic 13th is not without its compensations. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Events this week seem calculated to bring out your competitive nature. It’s unlikely that any of your challenges can be distinguished from your own strongly held personal beliefs. Simply put, your situation arises from your fixed notion of the way things should be. Since nothing worthwhile is ever accomplished without clear and burning desire, this means you’re right where you want to be. The 13th is weighted in your favor. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) A major task before you this week involves looking at two conflicting facts that both appear to be true, and deciding which of them is false. Complicating this is the fact that it’s not an either-or situation. The truth might be something else, entirely, something not yet on your radar. With your life resembling the plot of a suspense novel, who is the hero of the story? The 13th asks that you entertain the question. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Your ambitions may presently exceed your means to accomplish them, but don’t let that discourage you from pursuing your dreams. Circumstances now in flux could change your picture overnight. People and situations yet to appear have the power to swing matters in your favor. By holding a steady course in your chosen direction, the odds of your eventual success greatly improve. Look for a boon on the 13th. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb 18) Ultimate solutions to some long-standing irritations are possible now. Don’t underestimate the likelihood that the true nature of the annoyance differs entirely from what you initially thought. Relevant facts that are soon to emerge may rewrite your views. Remain open to all possibilities, or risk the dismissal of the key piece of your puzzle. It’s the most innocent-appearing person who impacts you most on the 13th. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Your belief in a better future has new driving forces behind it this week. Your feelings of optimism have never had a better grounding in reality, so hold your focus and keep your wits about you. Let the upsetting forces you may encounter at times serve to direct your efforts. Events on the 13th all relate to the central picture, no matter how obscure or obtuse they may appear to be at the time. © 2018, Wesley Hallock, All Rights Reserved

Chicken Little looks at what is and fears the sky is falling. Wesley Hallock as a professional astrologer looks at what is and sees what could be. Read Wesley’s monthly forecast, with links to Facebook and Twitter, at www. chickenlittleandtheastrologer.com. To read past columns of Chicken Little and the Astrologer in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

CLUES ACROSS 1. A greeting 5. A type of hall 9. Planes need one 11. Wealth 13. The act of exciting 15. A movement downward 16. Type of storage 17. A funny and sad play 19. After cinco 21. Dry white Italian wine 22. Where golfers begin 23. Witnesses 25. Relaxing places 26. Of she 27. Discontinued compact car 29. Resulted 31. Large Irish castle 33. Offer for a price 34. One type is Irish 36. Free-swimming invertebrate 38. A type of tale 39. The middle of the month 41. Christmas 43. ‘__ death do us part

44. Goes with Gomorrah 46. Ethnic group of Thailand 48. “Grown Ups” funnyman 52. A type of index 53. A mass of rocks 54. Splashed 56. Kids’ playground necessities 57. Sears and London are two 58. Strip of cloth 59. Church CLUES DOWN 1. Progressive decay of a bone or tooth 2. Deliberately contrary events 3. Unit of mass 4. Kiln 5. Soybean paste 6. Electronic counter-countermeasures 7. Made the bed 8. One who mails 9. Bar bills 10. Automotive vehicles 11. Breaks

12. Swelling of the eyelid 14. Asian country 15. Couches 18. Stare with mouth wide open 20. Member of U.S. Navy 24. A sulk 26. Greetings 28. Craftsmen 30. Mongolian city __ Bator 32. Did again 34. Sunrooms 35. Start over 37. Georgians love them 38. Women 40. “Snake Tales” cartoonist 42. Pariahs 43. Caps 45. Gradually become less solid 47. Goats 49. French city Le __ 50. Exhale 51. Homes have at least one 55. Type of power cable Answers on page 15

YOUR GUESS IS AS GOOD AS OURS WEATHER FORECAST Thurs, Sept. 13

Fri, Sept. 14

Sat, Sept. 15

Sun, Sept. 16

Mon, Sept. 17

Tues, Sept. 18

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

H-63°/L-52°

H-61°/L-48°

H-62°/L-46°

H-65°/L-47°

H-64°/L-48°

H-64°/L-49°

H-59°/L-46°

Rain

AM Rain

Partly Sunny

Partly Sunny

Mostly Cloudy

Partly Sunny

Wed, Sept. 19

Partly Sunny

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

H-63°/L-52°

H-62°/L-49°

H-65°/L-48°

H-68°/L-51°

H-66°/L-51°

H-67°/L-51°

H-64°/L-50°

Rain

Rain

Mostly Cloudy

Partly Sunny

Mostly Cloudy

Mostly Cloudy

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Partly Sunny


14 SEPTEMBER 13 - SEPTEMBER 19, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

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Foster Homes Needed! Family Tails Dog Rescue needs foster homes! We can't save dogs from high kill shelters without homes for them to stay at while they wait to find their forever home. 1 week to 3 months, a fun and rewarding way to be involved with rescue and also have a dog without the full time commitment. We pay for everything, you just provide the love and the home. Please call 360-969-2014 for more info or for an application.

GARAGE/ESTATE SALES Garage Sale: Saturday, Sept. 15, 10am-3pm and Sunday, Sept. 16, 10am-2pm, 4781 Koontz Ranch Lane, Oak Harbor. High-end furniture, tools, bicycles, housewares, holiday decorations, and other miscellaneous items.

ANNOUNCEMENTS Be the difference in a child’s life and become a foster parent today! Service Alternatives is looking for caring, loving, and supportive families to support foster children. 425923-0451 or mostermick@ servalt-cfs.com

RIDE SHARE/VAN POOL Vanpool: Daily vanpool from Whidbey Island to Mukilteo to north Seattle seeks full/PT riders. Bob (h) 360-730-1294 or (c) 206-526-4150 (2)

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Imagine Oak Harbor’s 1st Food Forest, Saturdays 11am-3pm, at 526 Bayshore Drive. Each week, we have volunteer opportunities available to help care for our community garden, share organic gardening tips, and learn Permaculture principles. All ages and skill levels welcome. Schedule can change due to adverse weather conditions. If you have any questions, please contact us at: imagineapermacultureworld.gmail.com Mother Mentors needs volunteers! Oak Harbor Families with young children need your help! Volunteer just a couple of hours a week to make a difference in someone’s life! To volunteer or get more info, email wamothermentors@ gmail.com or call 360-3211484. Looking for Board Members to join the dynamic Board of Island Senior Resources and serve the needs of Island County Seniors. Of particular interest are representatives from North Whidbey. For more information please contact: reception@islandseniorservices.org

WORK WANTED Winter is coming! Firewood delivered, gutters cleaned,

chimney cleaning. Mason 3606632-0279 Coupeville (0) Caregiving services for all ages. 20 years experience in medical assistance and caregiving. Licensed as HCA and CPR certified. Can do anything from cleaning to shopping to medical care. Also love to cook, owned a personal chef service. Please call Martha 360-320-4582 (1)

JOB MARKET WAIF is hiring for both retail and animal care positions. Visit www.waifanimals.org/ jobs for more info (3) PT Evening Janitorial – Freeland/Clinton: Hiring IMMEDIATELY for part-time evening janitor, Monday-Saturday, 9 hours total per week, (one hour per shift M-F, three hours on Sat) in Freeland, half hour per visit 2x per week in Clinton. Start time flexible (after 6pm/earlier on Saturday). Compensation: $12 per hour, part-time. Easy $400+ extra income per month! Must have valid DL, cell phone, pass background/drug screening and E-Verify (USCIS). Please provide name and phone number. Resumes welcome. E-mail: susan.valenzuela@ybswa. net (3)

MUSIC Drummer Wanted: Need experienced, solid rock drummer with great meter. Practice weekly in Oak Harbor in fully equipped rehearsal/ recording studio. Mostly rock, some blues, some acoustic originals and covers. Rich at rswitzer55@netzero.net or 360-675-5470 before 9 pm (1)

HOME FURNISHINGS Downsizing is bad for us but a great opportunity for the right buyer. Our new, smaller home How’d you do? Puzzle 1 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.33) 5 8 7 6 3 2 1 9 4 4 1 2 9 5 8 7 3 6

6 3 9 1 7 4 5 2 8 8 5 4 7 9 6 3 1 2

2 7 6 4 1 3 9 8 5 1 9 3 2 8 5 4 6 7

3 4 1 8 6 7 2 5 9 9 2 8 5 4 1 6 7 3

7 6 5 3 2 9 8 4 1

puts a high-end blonde and medium brown dining room table with two extra leaves and six upholstered and sturdy cream-colored chairs in your home today. $250 puts the entire set in your truck headed to a new home. 360-8406955 (1) Two small, indoor fountains: the soothing sounds of flowing water can bring stress relief and relaxation to your environment. The smaller one is $15 obo, the slightly larger one is $20 obo. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525. Walnut occasional table, with beveled glass top, $40 or best offer; Stained glass terrarium, with matching cover, plus wood stand. 26-1/2” tall x 101/2” diameter of cover x 14” diameter of base. $125 or best offer; Twin-size, sturdy metal bed frame, with wood roller feet. $15 obo. We can send photos. Call or text 360-3200525. Quilted wall hangings, purchased at the Houston International Quilting Conference. In excellent condition, ready to hang on your wall! Quail (20” x 11”), $15 or best offer. Duck (22” diameter), $15 or best offer. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525. Fireplace tool sets: brush, shovel, and poker, in a sturdy stand. One set is 30” tall, the other set is 21” tall, $25 ea. obo; Sturdy, brown leather log tote by Eddie Bauer, never No Cheating!

used. $20 obo. We can send photos. Call or text 360-3200525. “Happy Holidays” painted sign, 21-1/2” x 16-1/2”, $15 obo. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525.

LAWN AND GARDEN 25 aluminum silver deck post caps, $3 each; 200 feet new 8” heavy waterline, $4 a foot, obo. Can be used for waterline or drain line. 360-321-1624 Natural Barnyard Topsoil: Good for gardens, flower beds, etc. Unscreened, 10 yard loads, $225 delivered. South Whidbey 360-321-1624

MISCELLANEOUS Wind sculptures by Lyman Whittaker. We have two left, $175 and $250; Wind chimes: We have five sets, depending on size. Price range: $10–$50 or best offer. We can send photos. Call or text 360-3200525 Halogen work light, for indoor projects. The height of the light can be adjusted. $30 or best offer. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525

RECREATION 12 volt boat winch, $40 obo; Small anchor. Weighs only about 3 pounds, but has a design that will keep your small boat on the beach where you left it. $10 obo. We can send photos. Call or text 360320-0525.

Whidbey Residential Rentals, Inc. 360-675-9596 www.whidbeyres.com 285 NE Midway Blvd • Suite #2 • Oak Harbor Camping items: 2 single air mattresses, “as new” condition, $20 each or best offer; Intex queen size coilbeam downy airbed, nearly new (used for one week for guests), easy to deflate and store when not being used, $25, or best offer; Brookstone waterproof floating lantern, for camping, patio, poolside, or emergencies, new, $25 or best offer; Old (but clean) Thermos 1-gallon jug, $5; Vintage Coleman stove, with protective denim cover, $25 or best offer; Versatile backpack, the two parts can be used separately, or (for more serious backpacking) together, $45 obo. We have photos. Call or text 360-320-0525. Sports items: Bag Boy golf cart, $15 obo; Golf umbrella, $5; Men’s wet suits, size L, $10 per item; Neoprene gloves and hats, size L, $5 each; Water skis: Terry Competition slalom ski, with carrying bag, $30 obo; O’Brien Competition slalom ski, Kevlar/Boron, $30 obo; Wiley wood water skis, $25 obo. We have photos. Call or text 360-320-0525.

ANIMALS/SUPPLIES Excellent Grass Hay, good for horses, $7 per bale, 20 bale minimum. 360-321-1624

If you or someone you know needs help in feeding pet(s), WAIF Pet Food Banks may be able to help. Pet Food Banks are located at WAIF thrift stores in Oak Harbor (50 NE Midway Blvd) and Freeland (1660 Roberta Ave) and are generously stocked by donations from the community. If you need assistance, please stop by.

WANTED Art, Antiques & Collectibles. Cash paid for quality items. Call/Text 360-661-7298 (1) Was your Dad or Gramps in Japan or Germany? I collect old 35 mm cameras and lenses. Oak Harbor, call (970) 823-0002

FREE Miscellaneous materials in the yard. We can send photos. Call or text 360-320-0525

PERSONALS Mexico: seeking all information/help about Jalisco Mexican state, Lake Chapala area, town of Ajijic, Ex-pat community. Seeking one-level, two bedroom, two bath house to rent or purchase in the future. No real estate agents, please. Call JM 360-730-3244 (0)

CLASSIFIED INFORMATION US Postal Mail

Whidbey Weekly Classified Department PO Box 1098 Oak Harbor, WA 98277

E-Mail............classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com Telephone..................................(360)682-2341 Fax.............................................(360)682-2344 PLEASE CALL WHEN YOUR ITEMS HAVE SOLD.

Please try to limit your classified to 30 words or less, (amounts and phone numbers are counted as words) we will help edit if necessary. We charge $10/week for Vehicles, Boats, Motorcycles, RVs, Real Estate Rental/Sales, Business Classifieds and any items selling $1,000 and above. We do charge $25 to include a photo. The FREE classified space is not for business use. No classified is accepted without phone number. We reserve the right to not publish classifieds that are in bad taste or of questionable content. All free classifieds will be published twice consecutively. If you would like your ad to be published more often, you must resubmit it. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date.

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Business Spotlight Caring Goes The Extra Mile

Putting heart into quality service

Fall into Fitness and THRIVE! Let’s schedule your year-end review. Gene Kelly Barner Financial Advisor

144 NE Ernst Street, Suite C Oak Harbor, WA 98277 (360) 675-8239

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

Gutter Cleaning Safely from the Ground.

Starting at $99.00*

*For up to 100’ of gutters

Safety is #1 for us and here’s why it should be #1 with you too! 90,000 Hospitalized injuries happen every year from people who fall off ladders! Professionals are NOT immune! Why risk someone falling on your property? You can be held liable. WE offer a Gutter Cleaning Service that is affordable and safe.

360-675-3005

Free Estimates • Licensed & Insured www.crystalcleanwindowswhidbey.com

Fall is in the air and specials are everywhere. One of the best specials available to us here, right under our noses, is at Thrive Community Fitness. Being active and getting fit has never been simpler and now is the time to start your journey to fit and healthy, that’s for sure!

Serving all Whidbey Island and beyond

746 NE Midway Blvd • Oak Harbor

360-675-5777 info@whidbeymemorial.com www.whidbeymemorial.com

This family-oriented fitness center is owned and operated by Mike and Celese Stevens, two of the most passionate individuals our region boasts. Their dedication to community wellness and healthy lifestyles is tangible and manifested in their willingness to serve each and every person who walks through Thrive’s doors. Where community is concerned, Thrive is at the helm of this ship and its dedication to the people who make up our wonderful communities is the cornerstone of the fitness center’s service to all. This month, all new members will see 20% of their sign-up fee donated to North Whidbey Help House. In addition, they will be accepting needed donations October 20! Because your well-being is paramount to the staff at Thrive, they’re always in the know, on the up and up with the latest and greatest trends in not just physical activity and exercise, but also where recovery is concerned. From temporary relief of minor aches and muscle soreness, stiffness and tension, to deep relaxation, increase in circulation and more rapid recovery times after exercise, the hydromassage is just one more reason to sign up and become a member of this wonderful community fitness center. In fact, with a prime membership, you can indulge in a ten-minute massage each and every day!

At Jersey Mike’s, we offer a sub above – one that’s measured in more than inches or seconds ‘til served. We carefully consider every aspect of what we do – every slice, every sandwich, every store – we provide our customers with sustenance and substance too.

31595 SR 20, Suite A5 Oak Harbor • 360-682-5245 Daily 10am - 9pm

Whether it’s the fitness classes, superior quality amenities, their top-notch staff or the excellent value for money memberships and services they offer, Thrive is a fitness center you’ll love being part of! This is a place where vim, vigor and zest meets enthusiasm and commitment, where community bonds are strengthened and an active environment fosters a healthy, happy life! For more information about their amazing membership packages, guest passes, classes and other services call 360-675-2600, visit their website at www.thrivecf.com or better yet, check it out for yourself, 32650 Hwy 20, Bldg D, Oak Harbor and just see how you Thrive at this fitness center!

12 Months FREE Financing Mon - Sat 9am-6pm Sunday 11am-5pm “A Family Tradition Since 1912” 2015 Broadway, Everett, WA 98201 • 425-259-3876 • EricksonFurniture.com

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360-675-2600 • 32650 Highway 20 Building D, Oak Harbor • thrivecommunityfitness.com

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Whidbey Weekly, September 13, 2018  

DjangoFest Northwest Island 911 Let's Dish Homesteading on Whidbey Whidbey Weekly News On Track with Jim Freeman Bits & Pieces What's Going...

Whidbey Weekly, September 13, 2018  

DjangoFest Northwest Island 911 Let's Dish Homesteading on Whidbey Whidbey Weekly News On Track with Jim Freeman Bits & Pieces What's Going...