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August 9 through August 15, 2018

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Island Angler By Tracy Loescher

GROWING SINCE 1979 Closed August 11th for Arts & Crafts Festival Open again August 18th on the Community Green

Thursdays 4pm-7pm Just off Hwy 20 Next to Vistor Center

COHO SEASON King salmon were given that name for a reason. Chinooks, also known as “Kings,” are the largest and most celebrated species of all the Salmonids. The largest king salmon caught on record was in the 1970s in the waters off British Columbia by a commercial fisherman, which weighed an incredible 126 pounds. The record sport-caught king was taken from the Kenai River in Alaska in 1985 and weighed a line-stretching 97.4 pounds. However, right on the heels of the kings for popularity are the Coho salmon, sometimes called “Silvers.” The record coho was caught in 1989 in, surprisingly, the Salmon River in upstate New York, tipping the scale at 33.4 pounds. Coho might not have the overall size of a king salmon but the fighting ability of a coho is fierce. Cohos are famous for jumping after being hooked; once they are, a coho salmon will race wildly through the water column, pulling the drag on your reel and then, in what seems to be an instant, the coho will launch into the air, shaking their head side-to-side, spinning, twisting, and doing endover-end cartwheels trying to dislodge the hook that is holding them back. The majority of the coho we will catch in the Puget Sound will be in the 9- to 15-pound range, but don’t be fooled by the size - these fish are tough! Coho are aggressive feeders and can be caught by trolling from a boat and by casting lures from the shores of the island’s beaches, or drifting herring under a floating device. Marine Area Nine on the west side of Whidbey Island is one of the more popular areas to fish for coho because of the easy access to the fish. The fish will be migrating into the Puget Sound traveling through the Strait of Juan De Fuca. Many of the migrating fish will turn south at Point Wilson, continuing south and crossing over to the west side of Whidbey Island from Marrowstone Island. Other fish will continue south to Possession Point, where the majority of these fish turn north and head for their native rivers like the Snohomish, Stillaguamish, and the Skagit.  The coho use the island’s shorelines to help navigate their way home; this is when fishing from shore is at its best. Set your fishing clocks to be at the beach two hours before and after the high and low tides; this is when the fish seem to be closest to shore and are usually in the mood to bite. Keeper coho are being caught right now off the beach at Lagoon Point and Bush Point, and if fish are there, they will also be traveling along the Admiralty Bay beach. This gravely beach has lots of elbow room and lots of coho have been caught from this area. From the beach,

set yourself up with a 7.5- to 8.5-foot spinning rod, with a medium size spinning reel (3500 or 4000); fill the spool with your choice of good quality 15-pound monofilament line, next, pick up a few old reliable pink “BuzzBomb” casting lures (2 ½-inch size) and in addition, visit our Ace Hardware and pick up a couple of the chartreuse “Rotator” lures. The Rotator rigs up just like a BuzzBomb. All fishing gear seems to be overpriced to me, but these two casting lures will get you started with a better-than-average chance at catching a coho from the beaches. Other colors that work on coho are the pearl with a blue stripe BuzzBomb and the pink Rotator. When you get to the beaches you will see what other fishermen are getting bites on and catching fish with; take notes and adjust accordingly. Last year, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife restricted us from catching coho from a boat in Marine Area Nine for most of the short season; assuming they give us the green light this year, trolling for coho is very exciting. The coho take down from a downrigger or other diving device is unmistakable - they slam the lure and run with it, so grab the rod and hold on. If you fished during the winter for Blackmouth or have been out for the short but hot July fishing on Mid Channel Bank, then you already have the right gear to drop down to catch coho. Just increase your boat speed; coho love a fast-moving bait. A large green or all chrome flasher followed by a Mother of Pearl, Cookies and Cream, Irish Flag, or Herring Aid Coho Killer will get bit. Also the “Ace-hi” flies in green, and Mother of Pearl have been getting some good takedowns. Cut-Plug Herring is always productive and while fishing with herring requires more attention to the bait, it has caught many, many coho. Keep in mind Dogfish sharks are very fond of meat, so you may be forced to switch to artificial offerings. Coho caught in saltwater is some of the finest table fare you will eat. The flesh is bright orange, firm and rich with flavor; slice a couple gills to release the fish’s blood and get them on ice, this will ensure the fish will be at its best. Take advantage of the Coho season while it lasts! From the middle of August through the first part of October is the high point of the salmon season, so fish now. With the low numbers of returning coho, the state will close the season at the drop of a hat, so check the WDFW web site (wdfw. wa.gov) often for emergency closures. This is a great time to be a salmon fisherman or woman, so take the kids, be careful, and GOOD LUCK out there!

It’s Fishing and Crab Season!

150 SE Pioneer Way • Oak Harbor • 360-679-3533

Ace is the only stop you need for fresh and saltwater fishing gear, crab pots, licenses, Discover Passes, and more!

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ON TRACK with Jim Freeman

What a week, eh? Not that I remember everything that happened, but at least what I do remember is memorable, like this joke from an Oregon painter who lives by the North Umpqua River. Ever heard of Sicilian Alzheimer’s?

You forget everything but the grudge. Deer me For me, this is a great time of year. The grass is a beautiful yellow-brown, so mowing is not needed. The caboose is a warm solid steel, so a wood stove is not needed. Yes, this is one of the few times of the year when I can enjoy the outdoors without mowing or splitting wood. My standard viewing point while outdoors is enjoyed while seated in my ten dollar Fred Meyer folding blue chair. I have been told the chair is perfect for doing nails while reading. For me, the chair, with its firm plastic backing, allows me to watch the mama deer and her baby in their favorite place, in the blackberry bush cul-de-sac. For years, generations of deer have been birthed on this property, always returning to their special spot on the hill. Like kids coming home during their first college break, the deer are here every year. Same place. Same time. Most years, there are two does. This summer just the one, but, like all predecessor deer, just as cute and just as jumpy. Like baby calves, the new birthed deer is ready to roll, jump, and basically take off as fast as possible, regardless of direction. Not unlike a 2-year-old granddaughter chasing ducks at the park. We seniors smile, remembering rapid movement, feeling the joy of no longer having that need to fill.

Whidbey Weekly This morning, I said “Hi Gary” to Gary Roth, well-known developer, builder, and signature karaoke singer of Neil Diamond’s crowd pleaser, Sweet Caroline. Gary was seated in the commander’s seat of his giant truck, on the Newman Road side of Southern Cross, Too, where the rubber meets the road, and the baristas grind the beans.

“He did? What have I ever done for him?” I queried, an oft-seldom used word. “He said he felt sorry for you because your truck was so dirty and he knew you had to pick up the 20-percent difference on your eye surgery because you had lousy insurance.” “Did he really say that?” I asked, having already queried. “No,” said Amy, “I just want you to feel uncomfortable.” At that point, the line for coffee began to build up even more. Some folks were not seeing the non-punctuated yellow sign which states, Two cars each window please. Next time I see Harry or Jill, I’m going to ask them if they would like to hire a senior to help seniors and juniors read the sign, and answer any questions about what it means. Imagine the extra coin I could generate by selling those airplane size miniatures of Bailey’s to the folks in line. Of course, once the word got around about how many miniatures I was buying from Ken at Freeland Liquor, I’d be down the street at the sheriff’s office for an interview, or up in Coupeville at the Crossbar Hotel awaiting further instructions.

What is in these eye drops, anyway? Who would think of such criminal acts?

I talk to the deer. I get tired of listening to myself, so, with deer as an audience, I have more to say. I wonder what they think. Do they wonder what I think? If I were a deer in the headlights, would they be halogen or LED? What a great time to sit outdoors. I can almost hear the blackberry vines growing, or is that the sound of the Fed Ex truck backing up? Enjoy our outdoors, even if you are looking at them from the inside. Thanks Charlie A tip of the conductor’s hat to Charlie who picks up his Whidbey Weekly at the customer service desk at Payless in Freeland. Charlie is a one-of-a-kind guy who sports a No Regerts tattoo on his arm. That is not a typo on Charlie’s tattoo. He just wants to see who is paying attention at Payless. My law school roomie from West Virginia used to say with a smile, and his great Ben Creek accent, “Our family was too poor to pay attention.” Celebrity sightings Another collateral benefit to my recent eye surgery is being able to see people from far away. This may open up job opportunities in homeland security, or in stalking stalkers, but for now, I am just thrilled to know who is waving at me.

Presented by Concordia Community Academy Beer Making Class on 11 Aug 12-3:30 pm Self Defense for Seniors on 15 Aug 1-2:30 pm Burglar Proofing your Home on 21 Aug 1-2:30 pm Avoiding Fraud, I.D. Theft & Scams on 29 Aug 1-2:30 pm At Concordia Lutheran Church • 590 Oak Harbor Street • Oak Harbor More info and register at Concordiaoakharbor.org or call 360-679-1697

PHONE: (360)682-2341

FAX: (360)682-2344

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Whidbey Weekly LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

390 NE MIDWAY BLVD | PO BOX 1098 | OAK HARBOR, WASHINGTON 98277 Publisher & Editor.......................................................... Eric Marshall Marketing Representatives................Penny Hill, Roosevelt Rumble Graphic Design............................................................. Teresa Besaw Production Manager......................................................TJ Pierzchala Circulation Manager.................................................... Noah Marshall

Contributing Writers Jim Freeman Wesley Hallock Kae Harris Tracy Loescher Kathy Reed Carey Ross

Volume 10, Issue 32 | © MMXVIII Whidbey Weekly PUBLISHED and distributed every week. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The Whidbey Weekly cannot be held responsible for the quality of goods or services supplied by advertisers in this publication. Articles, unless otherwise stated, are by contribution and therefore the Whidbey Weekly is not in a position to validate any comments, recommendations or suggestions made in these articles. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. DEADLINES: The Whidbey Weekly is a submission based editorial with contributing writers. Please feel free to submit any information (please limit to 200 words) that you would like to share with the Whidbey Weekly. You may submit by email to editor@whidbeyweekly.com, by fax to (360)682-2344 or by postal mail to PO Box 1098, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date. For more information, please visit www.whidbeyweekly.com.

Maybe getting these eyes of mine fixed was not such a good eye-dea.

For me, it was probably the last time I fell down one.

Deer never have to worry about changing batteries in their hearing aids. Their ears are so sophisticated they can change direction like a satellite dish looking for a signal.

FREE LIFE SKILL WORKSHOPS

As I was about to tell Gary how much I enjoyed his version of Sweet Caroline, particularly his leading the audience in the “da da da” chorus, he drove off, not unlike the Lone Ranger leaving a discussion before the non-knowing person asks who the masked man was. “Gary got your coffee,” said Amy, the trickster barista with the sister who just had a bachelorette party but would not let me attend even if I cross-dressed.

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I could see Gary all the way from the other drive-up window, from the Scott Road side of the booth, within view of Frontier Lumber and all their pick up trucks.

When is the last time you rolled down a hill?

The deer look at me look at them. Their ears are perked. Mine are plugged.

AUGUST 9 - AUGUST 15, 2018

No joke here Our community thanks to the dedicated volunteers of IDIPIC, the Impaired Driving Impact Panel of Island County. In a recent email, IDIPIC Director Mike Diamanti wrote – “I’m contacting you so IDIPIC can get a mention in your column about the busy travel season. We want everyone to stay sober and safe, especially during this busy travel time of year. “Second, a big shout out to Island Thrift, as any IDIPIC donations we receive up to Labor Day will be matched by Island Thrift, which supports many community organizations such as Boys and Girls Clubs of Coupeville and Oak Harbor, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Island County, Compass Health, Holiday Art Classes for Kids, Oak Harbor Music Fest, Pigfest, Oak Harbor Senior Activity Center, and many more. “We are a Washington State registered 501c3 non-profit since the year 2000, and we rely on donations and support from our Partners in Prevention, such as Island Thrift, and many more listed on our website: http://idipic.org/ Any questions or feedback, contact Mike Diamanti, IDIPIC Director, via e-mail at idipic@ idipic.org.” Back to school Ms. Felts welcomed her fifth graders back to school with her typical first day enthusiasm. After introducing herself to the students, she wrote on the blackboard, “I ain’t had no fun all summer long.” Then, Ms. Felts asked the class, “How should I correct this sentence?” Little Johnny raised his hand and replied, “Get yourself a new boyfriend.” To read past columns of On Track in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www. whidbeyweekly.com.

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*Manufacturer’s mail-in rebate offer valid for qualifying purchases made 6/30/18–8/13/18 from participating dealers in the U.S. only. Each window fashions unit must include PowerView Motorization to qualify for rebate. Rebate will be issued in the form of a prepaid reward card and mailed within 4 weeks of rebate claim receipt. Funds do not expire. Subject to applicable law, a $2.00 monthly fee will be assessed against card balance 6 months after card issuance and each month thereafter. Additional limitations may apply. Ask participating dealer for details and rebate form. ©2018 Hunter Douglas. All rights reserved. All trademarks used herein are the property of Hunter Douglas or their respective owners. 18Q3NPPBW1

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AUGUST 9 - AUGUST 15, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

Bits & Pieces Useless Bay Women Golfers Raise $51,000 for Cancer Care

The RAB is a key element of the NAS Whidbey Island environmental program. As an advisory board the RAB is designated to act as a forum for open discussion and exchange of information regarding environmental cleanup and restoration projects at NAS Whidbey Island between the Navy, representatives of government agencies, and local community members.

merchandise, to keeping the venue clean and safe, to serving guests in the beer and wine garden, and more.

Community members interested in learning more about our restoration program or the RAB are encouraged to attend the August 14 meeting. For more information, call Mike Welding at 360-257-2286, or email at michael. welding@navy.mil.

“Everyone who serves the festival, from the volunteers who work a shift on the weekend to the leadership team on the board of directors, serves at no pay,” said Cynthia Mason, board of directors president. “For all of us, it is truly a labor of love, inspired by the power of music. Every dollar we raise – through grants, donations, and festival sales – goes straight toward putting the best possible musical acts on stage, and toward providing the students of our county with opportunities to pursue their musical dreams.”

[Submitted by Thomas Mills, Public Affairs Specialist, NAS Whidbey Island]

Two Public Meetings Set With Finalists for Executive Director

Left to right: Ako Shimozato, Helen Taylor, Nancy McClain, Sharon Sanford, Ellen Sargent, Diane Anderson, Lorrie Bredal, Cathy James, Claudia Cox, Traci Winn, Ricki Vadset, Christie Karvasek and Leslie Dana

The Useless Bay Women’s Golf Association set a new record with their Cancer Care Tournament and Cancer Awareness Week, raising over $50,000 to support oncology services at WhidbeyHealth. The golfers held the annual tournament on Tuesday, July 10. “These women are amazing!” said Helen Taylor, executive director of the WhidbeyHealth Foundation. “Every year, this event grows and serves more people needing cancer care here on the island.” Event chair, Ellen Sargent, and her mighty team of volunteers made sure that the 80 golfers and 110 luncheon guests had a day to remember. “I want to thank everyone who helped to make this event successful,” said Sargent. “We couldn’t do it without our donors and all the sponsors who support us every year!” This year’s event included games at the men’s tournament and a sock-hop on the Saturday night following the tournament, that was enjoyed by more than 150 club members and guests. Funds raised will be used to purchase cooling technology that helps patients who need chemotherapy prevent hair loss during treatment. [Submitted by Helen Taylor, WhidbeyHealth Foundation]

Island Transit 2018 Bus Roadeo Winner Island Transit is pleased to announce that Kat Glasgow is the winner of the local 2018 Bus Roadeo. She will represent Island Transit at the Washington State Bus Roadeo in Kennewick, Wash. Eligibility requirements are based on establishing positive reinforcement for operators who are sincerely dedicated to providing the best of service, courtesy, and safety to Island Transit customers. The course is based on ten problem areas encountered on a daily basis, and is a seven minute, scored event. It tests driving skills and safety training.

The public will have an opportunity to see, hear and meet the finalists to become the next executive director of Sno-Isle Libraries. Two events are scheduled for Thursday, August 16. At these events, each finalist will have an opportunity to share their views and thoughts followed by an informal reception where attendees may engage with the finalists and others. The names of the finalists will be released August 13. The two 90-minute events are scheduled for: 11:00am, Coupeville Recreation Hall, 901 NW Alexander St., Coupeville 6:30pm, Marysville Library, 6120 Grove St, Marysville In addition to the August 16 public events, the finalists will tour Sno-Isle Libraries facilities on August 15 and then participate in individual interviews on August 17 with members of the library district’s Board of Trustees. The executive director position is hired by the Board of Trustees. A three-member committee including Board President Marti Anamosa and trustees Susan Kostick and Rico Tessandore is conducting the search with the assistance of Library Strategies International LLC. There were 19 applicants by the July 1 deadline for first consideration. The search committee narrowed the list to six semifinalists and conducted initial interviews July 26-27. Following the finalist interviews, a decision by the board is anticipated in late August. Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory will retire in early December after more than 33 years with the library district and the past 16 years as executive director. A new executive director is expected to take over following Woolf-Ivory’s departure. [Submitted by Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, Sno-Isle Libraries]

Farmers Market Tour

[Submitted by Meg Heppner, Assistant to the Executive Director, Island Transit]

Saturday, August 18, tour both the Coupeville and Bayview Farmers Markets by Island Transit. Judy Feldman, director of the Organic Farm School, will be onboard to discuss organic farming as you ride the bus from the Coupeville Farmers Market celebrating its 40th year, to the Bayview Farmers Market. Bring your own bag and some cash for lunch at one of the market vendors or a nearby café on this free, festive, farm fresh tour on Island Transit. RSVP at Travel@islandtransit.org or call 360-678-9536.

NAS Whidbey Island Restoration Advisory Board

[Submitted by Maribeth Crandell, Island Transit Mobility Specialist]

The next NAS Whidbey Island Restoration Advisory Board (RAB) meeting has been rescheduled for Tuesday, August 14, from 5:00 to 7:00pm at the Chief Petty Officer’s Club/ Bakerview Restaurant, located at 1080 W Ault Field Rd #138, Oak Harbor. Interested community members are invited to attend the meeting.

Oak Harbor Music Festival Seeks Volunteers

Several topics will be discussed; including, the State Petroleum Cleanup Program, Military Munitions Response Program, and the CERCLA Program (including work at the Area 6 landfill and drinking water PFAS investigation).

The Oak Harbor Music Festival is in its seventh year bringing three days of free musical entertainment to Pioneer Way in the heart of the city on Labor Day weekend. The 2018 Festival kicks off Friday evening, August 31, and runs through Sunday evening, September 2. The festival is seeking community volunteers to support the event. Volunteers can help out in a wide array of roles, from selling event

It takes a mammoth effort from the whole community, including hundreds of volunteers, to make the Music Festival work, say event organizers.

Since establishing the scholarship awards in 2013, the Festival has provided $30,000 in scholarships to Island County students for advanced music studies. In addition, the Festival’s annual Teen Talent Contest has given dozens of young performers a first taste of standing on a professional-level stage in front of a loud, supportive crowd. Volunteers are asked to please contact: Gary Jandzinski, Operations – gjandzinski@ comcast.net River Powers, Merchandise Sales – riverpowers@yahoo.com Bill Walker, Beer and Wine Garden – paddlazz@comcast.net or visit www.oakharborfestival.com/volunteer to share how you’d like to help. Oak Harbor Music Festival’s mission is to inspire our community with the power of music. As a 501(c)(3) organization, the festival has provided scholarships to graduating seniors from all three of Whidbey’s high schools for six years. For more information, visit www.oakharborfestival.com or www.facebook.com/OHMusicFest/ [Submitted by Cynthia Mason, board president]

Woodworkers Guild Presents the 15th Annual “Art + Wood = Woodpalooza” Exhibition The Whidbey Island Woodworkers Guild presents the “Art + Wood = Woodpalooza @ WICA” Exhibition – the 15th Annual Show of Whidbey’s finest woodwork. This year’s show promises exceptional work by twenty of Whidbey’s best! The free exhibition will be held at Whidbey Island Center for the Arts (WICA), Zech Hall, from 12:00 to 5:00pm, September 1-3, with a reception Friday, August 31 from 6:00 to 9:00pm. During the exhibition, you are invited to spend quality time with woodworking artisans while you experience the beauty of their creations. You’ll learn firsthand the inspiration and process that go into each artist’s work, while enjoying many scenic island views as you discover Langley. The Guild seeks to support professional woodworkers as well as inspire and educate the budding amateur and provide awareness to the general public of the skills available locally from its talented members. In 2001, the Whidbey Island Woodworkers Guild was formed to bring together the woodworking community of Whidbey. Now in its fifteenth year, the Guild includes makers of furniture, cabinetry, architectural woodwork, turners, clock makers, sawyers, carvers, restorers, musical instrument makers, boat builders and refinishers. Please visit www.woodpalooza.com for more information.

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How Can You Help Your Kids Pay for College?

It’s still summer, but we’re getting close to a new school year. One day, though, “back-to-school” will mean “off to college” for your children. Will you be financially prepared to help your kids cope with the costs of higher education? Your first step, of course, is to know what you’re up against, so here are some numbers: For the 2017-18 academic year, college costs (tuition, fees, room and board) were, on average, nearly $21,000 for in-state students at four-year, public schools and nearly $47,000 for students attending private colleges or universities, according to the College Board. And you can probably expect even bigger price tags in the years to come. To help prepare for these costs, you might want to consider putting your money in a vehicle specifically designed to help build assets for college, such as a 529 education savings plan. All withdrawals from 529 plans are free from federal income taxes as long as the beneficiary you’ve named uses the money for qualified college, trade school or graduate school expenses. Withdrawals for expenses other than qualified education expenditures may be subject to federal, state and penalty taxes on the earnings portion of your plan. (However, tax issues for 529 savings plans can be complex, so please consult your tax advisor before investing.) You can generally invest in the 529 savings plan offered by any state, but if you invest in your own state’s plan, you may be able to claim a tax deduction or receive a tax credit. By starting your 529 plan early, when your children are just a few years old, the investments within the plan have more time for potential growth. Plus, you can make smaller contributions each year, rather than come up with big lump sums later on. A 529 plan is not the only education-savings tool you can use, but it has proven effective for many people. Yet you may also want to consider ways to keep college costs down in the first place. For one thing, your children may be eligible for various forms of financial aid. Some types of aid depend on your family’s income, but others, such as merit-based scholarships, are open to everyone. But you don’t have to wait until you get an offer from a school’s financial aid office – you can explore some opportunities on your own. For example, many local and national civic and religious groups offer scholarships to promising young people, and your own employer may even provide some types of grants or assistance. Plus, your state also may offer other benefits, such as financial aid or scholarship funds. It can certainly take some digging to find these funding sources, but the effort can be worthwhile. Here’s another option for reducing college costs: Consider sending your child to a local community college for two years to get many of the “general” requirements out of the way before transferring to a four-year school for a bachelor’s degree. Community colleges are typically quite affordable, and many of them offer high-quality programs. A college degree is costly, but many people feel it’s still a great investment in their children’s future. And by taking the appropriate steps, you can help launch that investment. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Jeffery C. Pleet, CLU®, ChFC®

Financial Advisor 630 SE Midway Blvd. Oak Harbor, WA 98277 (360) 679-2558 jeffery.pleet@edwardjones.com

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

[Submitted by Gary A. Leake, Guild Secretary]

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Whidbey Weekly

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OWNED Program Year 2019 Island County 2% Hotel-Motel Tourism Lodging Tax Application Period: July 15, 2018 - August 31, 2018 The application packet is available for the 2019 Island County 2% Hotel-Motel Tax Tourism Promotions. Funding is generated from overnight lodging in the unincorporated areas of Island County. The purpose of this program is to support and promote the tourism economy of lsland County. Island County estimates $291,600.00 in lodging tax revenue will be available for allocation for grants to support tourism in 2018. Historically, the program has funded approximately 20-25 proposals for Whidbey and Camano Island events, visitor centers and tourism activities.

tives from entities who collect the lodging tax, and organizations who are eligible to apply for the grant funds. For this reason, a conflict of interest policy has been added to ensure public confidence in the ethical allocation of these tax dollars.

AUGUST 9 - AUGUST 15, 2018

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HISTORIC DOWNTOWN OAK HARBOR PIONEER WAY

(b) The marketing and operations of special events and festivals designed to attract tourists; (c) Supporting the operations and capital expenditures of tourism-related facilities owned or operated by a municipality or a public facilities district created under Chapters 35.57 and 36.100 RCW; or (d) Supporting the operations of tourism-related facilities owned or operated by nonprofit organizations described under 26 U.S.C. Sec. 50l(c)(3) and 26 U.S.C. Sec. 50l(c)(6) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended. The Island County Lodging Tax Advisory Committee will review all timely and complete applications received by August 31, and then make its recommendations for funding to the Board of Island County Commissioners. The review committee membership, as established by state law, is comprised of representa-

Th

The proposal form is posted on the County’s website, at https://www.islandcountywa.gov/ commissioners/Pages/Home.aspx and may also be requested by contacting Pam Dill at pamd@ co.island.wa.us or 360-679-7353.

pla

an

[Submitted by Pam Dill]

me

Application open for Valerie Sivinski Fund Grants

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In 2016, the Haller House (Whidbey Island) received $1,000 to remove and replace cedar shingle roof

The Valerie Sivinski Fund is an annual program of the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation that provides grants of up to $2,000 to organizations engaged in historic preservation around Washington State. The goal of the fund is to provide small yet meaningful amounts of money to help support historic preservation where it really happens – at the community level. The Washington Trust is pleased to announce that the application for the 2019 round of Sivinski Fund grants is now open. The deadline for submitting an application is Monday, October 1, 2018. Established in 1997, the Sivinski Fund has awarded grants to 138 projects totaling over $145,000 worth of funding and services to BITS & PIECES

continued on page

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Sunday, August 12 12:00 PM – 5:00 PM Featuring Pioneer Way Merchants: Red’s Boutique, Popsies, Purple Moon, Whidbey Wild Bird, Paint Your World, Frida’s A Beautiful Mess, Garry Oak Gallery, Just Because, Thavin & Marcob, Whimsies & More

12

21+ RECREATIONAL & MEDICAL MARIJUANA

MONDAY:

Ph

Ph

Lodging tax revenues may only be used as provided in RCW 67.28.1816(1). This section provides that lodging tax revenues “may be used, directly by any municipality or indirectly through a convention and visitors bureau or destination marketing organization” for: (a) Tourism marketing;

Art

music inspires

Whidbey Island POP UP Saturday, August 11th 11am - 3pm The Oak Harbor Yacht Club 1301 SE Catalina Dr Oak Harbor 10% Of All Sales From This Event Will Be Donated To The Oak Harbor Music Festival

MMCWS.com

7656 State Route 20, Unit A • Anacortes • 360-422-3623

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AUGUST 9 - AUGUST 15, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

What’s Going On All entries are listed chronologically, unless there are multiple entries for the same venue or are connected to a specific organization (such as Sno-Isle Libraries) in which case all entries for that venue or organization are listed collectively in chronological order under one heading.

Island Herb Vendor Day Thursday, August 9, 3:00pm-6:00pm Island Herb, Freeland Representatives from Sitka will be on site with product displays and information. Island Herb is located at 5565 Vanbarr Pl, Unit F. For more information, call (360) 331-0140 or visit whidbeyislandherb.com

Black Tie & Blue Jeans Thursday, August 9, 6:00pm-9:00pm Island County Fairgrounds, Langley Rotary Club of Whidbey Westside presents a Party with a Purpose in the Historic Pole Building. A fun filled evening with assorted tastes from local restaurants, local wines, spirits and brews, live music, dancing, raffle baskets, a live auction & more. Benefiting local vocational scholarships, and Rotary International Polio Plus Fund. Tickets $65 in advance, $70 at the door. Tickets and details at: blacktie-bluejeans.com

5th Annual Midsummer Antique Fair & Market Friday, August 10, 5:00pm-8:00pm Saturday, August 11, 9:00am-4:00pm Christianson’s Greenhouse & Nursery, Mount Vernon Tickets to Friday’s early shopping event are $10 (to benefit Skagit Symphony) each and available at eventbrite.com. Admission Saturday is free and includes four fabulous shopping areas: Meadow Schoolhouse; Rose Gardens; North Meadow Field; Primrose Antiques & Gifts. For more information, visit www.christiansons nursery.com

Dance the Night Away! Garage of Blessings Fundraiser Friday, August 10, 6:30pm-12:00am Elks Lodge, 155 NE Ernst St, Oak Harbor This is a fundraiser for new windows at the new building. Enjoy hors d’oeuvres, cash bar, and dessert auction! Social hour is 6:30pm-7:30pm. The dance is 7:30pm-12:00am. Tickets are $25, available at www.thegarage ofblessings.com.

All-You-Can-Eat Breakfast Saturday, August 11, 8:00am-12:00pm Coupeville Mason Center Whidbey Lodge #15 Breakfast includes eggs, bacon, sausage, pancakes, orange juice, coffee or tea. Tickets are $8 for adults, $4 for children 4-12, free for 3 and under. Located on the corner of 8th and North Main Streets.

Whidbey Island POP UP Saturday, August 11, 11:00am-3:00pm Oak Harbor Yacht Club, 1301 Catalina Dr. Featuring products by glassybaby and India Hicks. 10% of all sales will be donated to the Oak Harbor Music Festival.

Fort Casey Big Guns 50th Anniversary Saturday, August 11, 1:30pm Fort Casey State Park, Coupeville Please join Washington State Parks in celebrating the 50th anniversary of the big guns and the fascinating story of their journey from Subic Bay in the Philippines to Fort Casey State Park. A rededication ceremony features keynote speakers, Army National Guard Band, Presentation of Colors, expert panel, tours, demonstrations and opportunities to explore batteries. The event is free and open to the public, a Discover Pass is required for vehicle access. Light refreshments will be provided. For more information, call 360-678-4519.

From North India to the Northwest Saturday, August 11, 7:00pm UUCWI, 20103 SR 525, Freeland Island Consort presents sitar master Pandit Debi Prasad Chatterjee & saxophonist Neil Welch with James Patterson, horn; Roxanna Patterson, viola and Sheila Weidendorf, piano in this concert of Hindustani classical music and contemporary Western classical music (works by Rebecca Clarke~Richard Bissill~Charles Koechlin~Alan Hovhanhess & more!). Bliss out to traditional ragas and modern raga-inspired fusion. By donation at the door (suggested $20 but pay what you can). For more information, visit www.island consort.org

Live Music: Just In Time Jazz Duo Sunday, August 12, 11:00am-1:00pm Rustica Café, Oak Harbor Timeless standards from the great American Songbook are given new life by amazing keyboard stylings and mellow vocals of Nick and Judy Nicholai.

Sidewalk Sale Sunday, August 12, 12:00pm-5:00pm Pioneer Way, Oak Harbor Oak Harbor Main Street would like you to join the Historic Downtown Oak Harbor Merchants for a sidewalk sale. Enjoy the Pig Fest then wander up the street and see what treasures you can find.

LWC Youth Team Activity Wednesday, August 15, 3:00pm Langley Whale Center, 105 Anthes Ave. Kids of all ages are invited to the Langley Whale Center’s free Youth Team Activity. Learn about the connection of salmon and the Southern Resident Orcas, and how kids can help these endangered species. Lesson is followed by a hands on activity and snack. Walk ins are welcome or RSVP at wendylsines@gmail.com

Concerts in the Park: The F Street Project Wednesday, August 15, 6:00-7:30pm Community Park, 5495 Maxwelton Rd, Langley The F Street Project features stellar players performing an eclectic mix of music from rock to jazz with excursions into country and blues along the way. Sure to please the most discerning listener, the enchanting vocal talents of Dawn Madsen and Devi Rae Dawn compliment the super tight combo of drummer Corey Fish and bassist Charlie Gould. Rounding out the group are blues guitarist Stacy Weick and keyboardist Richard Lowell, the group’s leader and founder. Topping off this dynamic combination are the soulful stylings of Whidbey’s own Bruce Gallagher on sax and flute. Bring a picnic dinner, grab a blanket or lawn chair, and invite your family and friends to this FREE concert series!

Lions Club Blood Drive Thursday, August 16, 11:00am-5:00pm Coupeville United Methodist Church Sponsored by the Coupeville Lions Club. One pint of blood can save 3 lives and the Lions have helped save hundreds of lives in our community hospitals throughout Western Washington. To donate, just drop in or you may schedule an appointment: DonorSched@ bloodworksnw.org or call 1-800-398-7888. The church is located at 608 North Main St. For more information, call Sue Hartin 503-7893595.

Junior Ranger Program: Trees & Tree Rings Saturday, August 18, 1:00pm-2:00pm or 2:00pm-3:00pm Fort Ebey State Park, 400 Hill Valley Rd, Coupeville Discover the many parts of a tree. Learn how a tree grows. Act out life as a tree and color

your own tree ring. Wear weather appropriate clothing. A Discover Pass is required for parking. For more information, contact Jackie French at jackie.french@parks.wa.gov or call 360-678-1186.

WAIF Wag’n’Walk 5K Run/1 K Walk Festival Sunday, August 19, 10:00am-3:00pm Greenbank Farm Join the fun and help raise funds to find forever homes for WAIF dogs & cats! Games for dogs and humans, canine demonstrations, fun contests, delicious food, beer and wine garden. To register and for more information, vis www.wagnwalk.org

Upcoming Sno-Isle Library Events See schedule below Cost: Free Lit for Fun Book Group Thursday, August 9, 9:00am-11:00am Freeland Library Join us for a discussion of Barbara Kingsolver’s “Prodigal Summer,” a hymn to wildness that celebrates the prodigal spirit of human nature, and of nature itself. 2nd Friday Nonfiction Book Group Friday, August 10, 10:30am-12:00pm Coupeville Library Enjoy reading nonfiction? Bring a friend and join the discussion of “Alexander Hamilton” by Ron Chernow. Campfire Family Sing-Along with Bryan Stratton Friday, August 10, 6:00pm Freeland Library The best part of summer evenings is sitting around a campfire singing. Gather your friends and family and join us as we sing well-known favorite camp songs. Explore Summer - Any Way You Rock It with Eric Ode Saturday, August 11, 3:00pm-4:00pm Clinton Community Hall, Central Ave. Children’s author, poet, and award-winning songwriter Eric Ode is ready to rock! Join in the fun at this concert of call-and-response songs, movement songs, rhythm instruments and more. North Sound Writers Group Monday, August 13, 10:00am-1:00pm Freeland Library Join other writers to discuss, problem solve, share and receive feedback, and work on the craft of writing. Everyone is welcome. For more information about this group visit, northsoundwriters.com Discuss the Classics with Rita Drum Monday, August 13, 1:30pm-2:30pm Oak Harbor Library Please join us as we continue to discuss “The Dubliners” a collection of short stories by James Joyce. We would so enjoy your insights! For more information, contact Rita Bartell Drum at ritadrum777@gmail.com or 631-7075980. Rockin’ Swing Dance Series for Teens: Rockabilly Style Monday, August 13, 4:00pm-5:30pm Oak Harbor Library Trying to stay active and have fun this summer? Come learn how to swing dance for free! Make new friends, listen to great music, and learn all about how to swing dance! Snacks and water will be provided, and a partner is not needed. Whether you attended our dance series and want to look the part, or just want to rock that vintage vibe, we’ll show you how to bring elements of the era into your style.

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED Minecraft Tuesday, August 14, 3:30pm-5:00pm Freeland Library Play Minecraft with your fellow tweens and work together or on your own to build the greatest Minecraft structure! Space is limited. For grades 4-12. Saving Treasured Family Photos - Using Digital Formats Tuesday, August 14, 6:00pm-7:00pm Clinton Library Learn to scan photos and save them for the future. Techniques for storing digital copies will be shared. Registration required. Sign up on the Sno-Isle Libraries events page or contact the Clinton Library at 360-341-4280. Whidbey Island Earthquakes: What to Expect, How to Prepare Wednesday, August 15, 2:00pm-3:30pm Freeland Library Find out about local earthquakes in this popular documentary produced by Whidbey Island’s 4-HD Video Editing Club for the local American Red Cross. Followed by a question and answer session with Robert Elphick and the American Red Cross. Explore Summer: Trees and Tree Rings Wednesday, August 15, 2:00pm Coupeville Library Discover the fascinating world of trees. Kids will learn how trees grow and form tree rings. Each participate will receive a tree ring disc. For children ages 5-11 and their caregivers. Oak Harbor Mayor and Fire Department Visit the Library Thursday, August 16, 10:30am-11:30am Oak Harbor Library Celebrate summer reading, and meet Mayor Severns and the Oak Harbor Fire Department crew. Learn fire safety tips for your entire family and climb aboard a fire truck! Fun for everyone! Be sure to bring your camera. Explore Summer - Teen Movie Matinee: “School of Rock” Thursday, August 16, 2:00pm-3:45pm Coupeville Library What if your teacher turned your class into a rock band? Join us for snacks and a matinee of the Jack Black comedy classic “School of Rock!” PG-13. South Whidbey at Home Book Group Thursday, August 16, 3:00pm Freeland Library Join us for a great book discussion of Madeline Albright’s “Fascism: A Warning.” You don’t need to be a member of South Whidbey at Home to attend - everyone is welcome!

Religious Services Prayer Group Every Tuesday, 4:00pm-5:30pm St. Hubert Catholic Church, Langley Charismatic Prayer and Praise group. Everyone welcome. For more information, call Bill at (360) 222-4080 or email Sobico@comcast.net.

Filipino Christian Fellowship Sundays, 2:00pm Meets at Church on the Rock, 1780 SE 4th Ave., Oak Harbor. www.ohcfellowship.com

Concordia Lutheran Church Sunday service, 9:30am Bible Study & Sunday School, 10:45am 590 N. Oak Harbor Street For more information, visit www.concordiaoakharbor.org or call (360) 675-2548.

Teaching Through God’s Word Sundays, 9:00am & 11:00am Calvary Chapel, 3821 French Road, Clinton For more information, visit ccwhidbey.com.

Unitarian Universalist Sunday Service Sundays, 10:00am Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland All are welcome. Values-based children’s religious exploration classes and childcare will be provided. Visit www.uucwi.org for more information. The Unitarian Universalist Congregation building is located at 20103 Highway 525, two miles north of Freeland. WHAT'S GOING ON

continued on page

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Whidbey Weekly

NEWS www.whidbeyweekly.com

Big guns celebrate 50 years p. 10

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AUGUST 9 - AUGUST 15, 2018

Community at the heart of new Langley center By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly

South Whidbey will celebrate its new community center in a fun, festive open house Friday from 3 to 8 p.m. The South Whidbey Community Center, formerly the old Langley Middle School, has been in the works for about a year and now all the tenants are moved in and it’s time to show the community what it can offer. “It’s really remarkable the ideas and opportunities people have brought forward,” said Gail LaVassar, executive director of the SWCC and its parent organization, Readiness to Learn Foundation. “The people at the SWCC want to be there to provide something for the community.” This former Langley educational landmark will continue its legacy of providing instructional and educational opportunities, but this time for the entire community, not just school-age youth. It’s a natural extension of what the building was built for back in the early 1940s and what South Whidbey School District officials had hoped would happen. “Last year when they closed Langley Middle School the school board and superintendent had a vision of turning it into a community center,” explained LaVassar. “Through my role with Readiness to Learn Foundation, they asked me to begin looking to bring people in to partner with a community center.” The center now has 23 tenants LaVassar describes as a blend of nonprofit organizations, recreational, educational and artistic programs. “The open house really is for each organization there, to show the community what it offers,” she said. Tenants include Readiness to Learn Foundation, Families and Students in Transition, The Backyard alternative fitness playground, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Island County, Create Space Langley, Island County Historical Society’s Langley Archive and Research Center,

See COMMUNITY continued on page 8

Photo Courtesy of Coupeville Festival Association Thousands of people are expected to flock to Coupeville Saturday and Sunday for the 54th annual Coupeville Arts and Crafts Festival. The event will feature nearly 200 artisans and craftsmen selling their handmade, unique items.

Coupeville Arts and Crafts Festival celebrates creativity By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly The 54th annual Coupeville Arts and Crafts Festival, which will take place from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday in Coupeville’s picturesque downtown, is a kaleidoscope of creativity. This year’s event will boast more than 180 artisans offering handcrafted items ranging from photography to jewelry, fine arts to fiber arts, woodworking to wearables, gourmet goodies to garden art, sculpture and much more. At least 15,000 people are expected to converge on Coupeville over the weekend, making this event one of the longest-running and biggest traditions on Whidbey Island. “It’s a good thing and it can be not so good – how do you make a treasure new each year?” said Carol Moliter, president of the Coupeville Festival Association, which puts on the Arts and Crafts Festival.

Part of the challenge of putting the festival together every year, in addition to ensuring the best quality items, is trying to anticipate trends, so shoppers are happy with the array of participating vendors. “Trends and interests change,” said Moliter. “For instance, photography was huge 10 years ago. Now garden art is absolutely the rage. How do you track that? It goes back to our vendor committee. During the jury process, they select categories based on how well the previous festival generated income. They can see if one category falls off or another increases and that’s how we try to predict what people will be most interested in.” Organizers want participating vendors to do well, because vendors agree to share a portion of their sales with the festival association. Those fees pay for the next year’s festival with more than a little left over for the association to share with the community. And this year the association may reach a huge milestone.

“I think we’ve managed to do that, to keep if fresh,” she continued. “The decision many years ago to go to juried art has allowed us to make sure we have nothing but exceptional quality items offered by our vendors.”

“We have been giving back about $45,000 annually in grants, scholarships and awards,” Moliter said. “If we clear $30,000 this year – and we won’t know until it’s all over – then we will have surpassed the $1 million mark in giving back to the community. I’m totally in awe of it.”

Folks attending the CACF will NOT find tables of mass-produced, imported items. They WILL find one-of-a-kind art and hand-made items produced by artisans and craftsmen of all kinds, whether it’s handmade soaps or candles to paintings, blown glass, ceramics, hand woven scarves or hand-tooled leather.

Not bad for a community organization that is run completely by volunteers. A seven-member board is at the center of the planning, but Moliter said it is strictly because of all the volunteers who participate that the association is able to continue to put the Arts and Crafts Festival together every year. “We truly can’t do this without volunteers,” she said. “This is our only fundraiser. It takes a whole year to put this one festival on. We typically get about 200 volunteers for the event and they give anywhere from an hour to two days of their time. “That’s part of the scary part of putting this together – we do rely on volunteers,” Moliter continued. “It’s just one of those things you step out on faith.” Anyone interested can sign up at the website (www.coupeville festival.com) right up until the event. Moliter said volunteers will be fed and will get a T-shirt. People are especially needed to help tear things down Sunday afternoon. “We’ll work them hard, but we’ll make sure we feed them and get them plenty of water,” she said. “It’s a small thank you.” One new addition to the festival is a larger fleet of golf carts Moliter hopes will be of help to volunteers, vendors and patrons alike.

Photo Courtesy of the Readiness to Learn Foundation The new South Whidbey Community Center, which offers activities and learning opportunities for people of all ages, will celebrate with an open house Friday from 3 to 8 p.m.

Photo Courtesy of Coupeville Festival Association Garden art is very popular this season and the Coupeville Arts and Crafts Festival will have plenty on display.

“We’ll be making them available to vendors and we want vendors to use them, or if someone needs help getting back to their car if

See ARTS & CRAFTS continued on page 10

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COMMUNITY continued from page 7

Island 911

Seriously, we do not make this stuff up!

Photo Courtesy of the Readiness to Learn Foundation The South Whidbey Community Center, which is celebrating with an open house from 3 to 8 p.m. Friday, seeks to create a place where people of all ages can have and learn about a variety of different topics.

Langley Farmers Market, Living Design Foundation, Opportunity Council, Skagit Valley College, South Island CrossFit, South Whidbey Children’s Center, South Whidbey Schools Foundation, Tiger Martial Arts, Whidbey Children’s Theater, Whidbey Homeless Coalition and Whidbey Veteran’s Resource Center, to name most. The SWCC also offers affordable space community organizations can rent. “We have three rooms set aside as community spaces that can be rented by the hour,” said LaVassar. “They can use the rooms for nonprofit organization board meetings, classes and general needs of organizations in the community that don’t have space for those things normally.” Community response to the center over the past year has been impressive, said LaVassar. “I’m so pleased by the readiness of the community to put this together and to offer such quality programming and so many creative ideas. The synergy of that readiness to embrace this is really thrilling,” she said. Friday’s open house will offer all kinds of

activities and programs for all ages and skill levels, including indoor kite making, rock climbing, ping pong, blob tag, a scavenger hunt, barbecue, pie, popcorn and prizes. Those attending can get a passport and explore what the center offers, such as indoor kite flying, sewing, crafting, painting, art tours and exhibits and even a pie-making demonstration. There will be Fairy Magic with Hahna Luna and live entertainment in the community courtyard from 6 to 8 p.m., featuring Marla Kelly, Brady Willis and Celia Jacobson-Ross. LaVassar thinks it’s a great opportunity to find out what the Community Center has to offer and to start making connections. “It’s going to be fun, with music, activities, prizes – the day is going to be a blast,” she said. “Come and see all the new resources and activities being offered to our community.” For more information, visit www.south whidbeycommunitycenter.org. The South Whidbey Community Center is located at 723 Camano Ave. in Langley.

FRIDAY, JUNE 8 2:11 pm, SE Ely St. Reporting strange object in road, looks electronic; “It has a blue light on it; whatever it is, it’s active.” 6:13 pm, NE 4th Ave. Caller advising computer was hacked; person told caller to pay $3,000 or videos of sexual nature will be added to caller’s Facebook page. SATURDAY, JUNE 9 6:44 am, SW Erie St. Reporting party advising someone signed up for door at 8 am and there are two petitioners there taking up both doors, refusing to move; requesting assistance. 7:20 am, SR 20 Advising female seen hanging on light post, now slowly walking down street. 2:27 pm, SW Rosario Pl. Advising a blue and red spotted snake in reporting party’s back yard contained by bricks, doesn’t know what to do with it. 2:28 pm, SW Erie St. Advising male is stealing merchandise, trying to leave; now states there is a fight. 9:46 pm, NE Izett St. Caller advising very intoxicated male tried to force himself into caller’s car after offering caller money for a ride. SUNDAY, JUNE 10 1:55 am, SE 9th Ave. Woman outside “disturbing the peace;” extremely loud, yelling for no reason. Reporting party states it’s loud and he needs to sleep for work. Woman is arguing with herself as if there is someone else there, but there is no one there. MONDAY, JUNE 11 8:10 am, SE Barrington Dr. Caller inquiring about when policy changed regarding homeless being able to stand on sidewalks. 1:32 pm, SE Bayshore Dr. Advising transient looking in window and upsetting customers.

Photo Courtesy of the Readiness to Learn Foundation The new South Whidbey Community Center, which offers activities and learning opportunities for people of all ages, will celebrate with an open house Friday from 3 to 8 p.m.

Coupeville Chamber of Commerce Business of the Month

CONGRATULATIONS TO AUGUST’S WINNER! From your friends at the Coupeville Chamber of Commerce & Whidbey Weekly

6:46 pm, SW Erie St. Subject in parking lot with pants down. 7:29 pm, SR 20 Disorderly male shouting about a shopping cart. 11:54 pm, SW Erie St. Advising male subject laying in street. TUESDAY, JUNE 12 12:42 am, NE Harvest Dr. Reporting subject talking about drugs, money and prostitutes. 7:54 am, NE Midway Blvd. Reporting subject sleeping on table. 9:43 am, SR 20 Reporting party terminated employee this morning and employee’s boyfriend came to location, made statements he would “make her transgressions known to everyone.” 12:52 pm, NW 2nd Ave. Advising racoon living in attic at location. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13 8:34 am, SW 3rd Ave. Reporting birds flew into power lines and wires are sparking.

6:25 pm, SR 20 Caller advising people getting into right lane to jump ahead of traffic. 9:57 pm, SR 20 Party states strange guy in dark vehicle said “I’m watching you.” 10:26 pm, SW 3rd Ave. Advising suspicious subject is hanging around bushes and keeps peeking around corner. THURSDAY, JUNE 14 5:56 am, SE 9th Ave. Caller advising front door is locked and he can’t make key work because of arthritis. 10 am, NE 7th Ave. Transient white male hanging out near gyro place, being beligerant. Reporting party asked him to leave and subject gave reporting party the finger, then followed reporting party into his business. 1:32 pm, SR 20 Reporting party manages property and has received reports from people living there about multiple racoons. 4:37 pm, SE Pioneer Way Five male subjects destroying plants outside; caller chased them away; states they are grown men, irritating people. 5:03 pm, SR 20 Reporting party advising male subject might have gun; possible BB gun or shot gun; states “was sketchy because he’s peering around the corner.” 10:47 pm, SE Regatta Dr. Males reported walking down Regatta yelling at each other; one male on foot, one person driving. FRIDAY, JUNE 15 7: 21 pm, SW Kimball Dr. Caller advising around 4:30 pm today, neighbor yelled at children. SATURDAY, JUNE 16 1:18 am, NE Goldie St. Advising transient male came out of woods and passed out on sidewalk next to business. 10:37 am, SW 6th Ave. Advising two deer “seemed stressed;” now west bound on SW 6th going in and out of road. 4:31 pm, SE Fisher Ct. Caller advising someone is sleeping in her room. Subject has been staying there, but it’s weird. 8:44 pm, SR 20 Reporting party advising jewelry store owner called law enforcement on him wrongfully. SUNDAY, JUNE 17 11:23 am, S Oak Harbor St. Party advising previously lost his bike and did not report it with law enforcement; has now recovered it at location, however bike is chained up with someone else’s lock. 11:07 pm, NW Hiyu Dr. Caller advising was at state park and ranger told her she could not light floating lanterns at the park. Report provided by OHPD & Island County Sheriff’s Dept.

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Unity of Whidbey Sundays, 10:00am 5671 Crawford Road, Langley If you’re one of the “spiritual but not religious” people who questions your childhood faith or is looking for something more, Unity of Whidbey may feel like a homecoming. Visit our website: unityofwhidbey.org

Whidbey Quakers Sundays, 4:00pm-5:00pm Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland Whidbey Islands Friends Meeting (also known as Quakers) meet in silent worship and community, with occasional spoken messages, every Sunday at the Unitarian Universalist building. For more information, contact Tom Ewell at tewell@whidbey.com or go to www. whidbeyquakers.org.

First Church of Christ, Scientist Worship, 10:00am Sunday School to age 20, 10:00am Wednesday Testimony Meeting, 2:30pm Christian Science Reading Room Tuesday & Friday, 11:00am-3:00pm Wednesday 3:30pm-5:30pm The church and Reading Room are located at 721 SW 20th Court at Scenic Heights Street, Oak Harbor. Call (360) 675-0621 or visit christianscience.com Services and Sunday School are also held at 10:30am on South Whidbey at 15910 Highway 525, just north of Bayview and across from Useless Bay Road; testimony meetings are held the first Wednesday of each month at 7:30pm.

Galleries & Art Shows

Meetings & Organizations Langley Whale Center No Host Coffee Tuesday, August 14, 11:00am Wifire Coffee Bar, Freeland Want to learn more about our local whales and how you can help our endangered orcas? Join the Langley Whale Center staff and volunteers at a no host coffee. You can learn about the various volunteer opportunities at the Langley Whale Center and Orca Network’s Sighting and Stranding Networks, events and educational outreach. For more information, email wendylsines@gmail.com

Whidbey Island Camera Club Tuesday, August 21, 6:30pm-8:00pm Oak Hall, Room 306, SVC, Oak Harbor The theme for August is “Depicting what summer means to you.” You may submit up to 3 photographs for discussion during the meeting to absolutescience@hotmail.com. Whidbey Island Camera Club, a community club, is open to the public. If you have questions, please email tina31543@comcast.net

Island Transit Public Hearing Friday, August 24, 9:30am Island Transit Main Office, 19758 SR 20, Coupeville Public Hearing to give feedback on the draft of the 6-year transit development plan. For a list of continuous Meetings and Organizations, visit www.whidbeyweekly.com

Classes, Seminars and Workshops Free Life Skill Workshops: Beer Making

CACF Juried Art Gallery

Saturday, August 11, 12:00pm-3:30pm Concordia Lutheran Church, Oak Harbor

Saturday, August 11, 10:00am-6:00pm Sunday, August 12 10:00am-4:00pm Coupeville Rec Hall, 901 NW Alexander St.

Presented by Concordia Community Academy. For more information or to register, visit concordiaoakharbor.org or call 360-679-1697.

The opening reception of the Coupeville Arts and Crafts Festival juried art gallery, organized by the Pacific NorthWest Art School, is Friday August 10, 7:00pm. Tickets can be purchased at Garry Oak Gallery, Penn Cove Gallery, Pacific NorthWest Art School, Artworks Gallery, Rob Schouten Gallery, or at the door.

Free Life Skill Workshops: Self Defense for Seniors

Featured Artists: Judith Burns and Gaylen Whiteman

Free Medicare Workshop

Reception: Saturday, August 11, 2:00pm-5:00pm Artworks Gallery, Greenbank Farm Burns, who works in acrylics and mixed media is featuring an exhibit inspired by Music, Art and Literature. The collection is titled, “A Civilization is remembered by its Culture”. Judith says she enjoys recreating places she has visited for performances. Gaylen paints in watercolors, oils and acrylics and is presenting her images of animals and sunsets. She calls her exhibit “All things bright and beautiful, All creatures great and small.” During the reception there will be light snacks and beverages and live music by guitarist Quinn Fitzpatrick. Artworks Gallery artists will be on hand to greet visitors.

“Medieval Meditations: New Paintings by Marcia Van Doren” Opening Reception: Saturday, August 11, 2:00pm-5:00pm Raven Rocks Gallery, Greenbank Farm Marcia Van Doren has created a world with one foot in ancient times and the other in this morning’s garden. Mixing symbols and design elements from medieval days and images of places and people from today, she has created vignettes of possibilities known only in the heart. While visiting the gallery, be sure to also enjoy the kiln formed glasswork by Dale Reiger, elegant designer clothing by Teri Jo Summer and gloriously colorful “BOHO Poles” by Tim & Tonah Potter. And as always, there will be a steady flow of new artwork from all of the gallery artists, including new fine art print and card selections from Mary Jo Oxrieder and Windwalker Taibi.

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Whidbey’s Largest Selection of Fine Art Supplies

GENE’S ART & FRAME SINCE 1967

www.genesartframing.com

360-675-3854 • 250 SE Pioneer Way • Oak Harbor 9:30-6 Monday-Friday • 10-5:30 Saturday • Closed Sunday

Wednesday, August 15, 1:00pm-2:30pm Concordia Lutheran Church, Oak Harbor Presented by Concordia Community Academy. For more information or to register, visit concordiaoakharbor.org or call 360-679-1697 Friday, August 17, 10:00am Oak Harbor Senior Center, 51 SE Jerome St. Each remaining day this year, 10,000 Americans will turn 65. Are you one of them? If so, you need to understand Medicare enrollment deadlines, benefits, and insurance options. The State-wide Health Insurance Benefits Advisors (SHIBA) offers free, unbiased information on Medicare Parts A and B, Medicare Part D - Drug Plans, Supplemental Plans, Medicare Advantage Plans, and cost-saving programs for those who are income eligible. No registration required.

NRA Personal Protection In The Home Class Friday, August 17, 6:00pm-9:00pm Saturday, August 18, 8:00am-6:00pm NWSA Range, 886 Gun Club Rd., Oak Harbor Cost: $35, includes a book This class builds on skills already gained in other shooting classes and shooting styles, which the student must be able to show documentation or competency. The class also gives a thorough legal brief, provided by an attorney, on the provisions of law pertaining to the ownership and use of a firearm. Defensive shooting skills are emphasized in this class. This class includes shooting on the NWSA Pistol Range. For questions or to register, call NRA instructor John Hellmann at 360-6758397 or email NWSA.Training@gmail.com. Additional information can be found at www. northwhidbeysportsmen.org.

Free Life Skill Workshops: Burglar Proofing Your Home Tuesday, August 21, 1:00pm-2:30pm Concordia Lutheran Church, Oak Harbor Presented by Concordia Community Academy. For more information or to register, visit concordiaoakharbor.org or call 360-679-1697.

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Fort Casey honors its big guns

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly The big guns at Fort Casey will be rededicated in a special 50th anniversary ceremony at 1:30 p.m. Saturday at the historic state park. The guns are the only two in the U.S. and two of only four that exist in the world.

By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly They are breaking out the big guns for a grand celebration to be held at 1:30 p.m. Saturday at Fort Casey State Park. Wait, that’s not quite right. Let me rephrase that. Fort Casey’s big guns, which are on permanent display at the historic park and have been since 1968, will be honored in a special ceremony Saturday. The ceremony marks the 50th anniversary of the dedication of the Fort’s two 10-inch “disappearing” guns – the only two such guns in the United States and two of only four in existence in the world. “This is the only place in the U.S. you can see these guns in place as they would have been when the fort was operational,” said Jon Crimmins, area manager for Central Whidbey State Parks. “It’s like nothing we have anywhere else.” The story of Fort Casey’s big guns is quite fascinating. Even Crimmins, who grew up down the road from Fort Casey and climbed all over the two guns as a child, didn’t know all the details at first. Constructed in the late 1800s, Fort Casey was part of what was called the “Triangle of Fire,” which included Fort Flagler and Fort Worden. In 1902, when the Coast Guard Artillery Corp took control of Fort Casey, two 10-inch guns – weighing 125 tons each - were installed on disappearing carriages, meaning the guns were lowered just out of sight for loading and would be raised up to fire. While never used in battle, the guns were fired often for training purposes up until 1942. “The guns had an eight-mile range,” said Crimmins. “It’s three miles to Port Townsend. The concussion when they were fired was so

heavy, that at the officer’s houses at Camp Casey, the plaster on the ceilings would crack.” When the guns were fired, the recoil from the shot was so strong it would send the 125-ton gun back down into its loading position. Shells alone for the guns weighed 600 pounds and it took a team of 26-men to haul the shells up from the artillery room below to load the weapon. The soldiers could typically fire the gun, reload it and fire again in under a minute. But the government declared the guns obsolete in 1942, and they were removed and scrapped for their metal, as they were at forts all over the country. When Washington State Parks took over Fort Casey in 1956, decisions had to be made about how best to share the park’s history. “Here we’ve got these three great forts, but no way to show what they were used for,” said Crimmins. That changed in 1958, when a naval pilot from NAS Whidbey Island got involved. “Lt. David Kirchner contacted Washington State Parks, telling them he had heard through a friend there were two similar 10-inch guns at Fort Wint on Subic Bay in the Philippines,” Crimmins said. “That began a huge community effort to raise money to bring the guns to Fort Casey.” The cost to move the two guns was going to be $30,000, which was a lot at the time. (That’s equivalent to about $260,000 today.) The Coupeville Lions Club and American Legion Post 129 in Oak Harbor held fundraisers, but they couldn’t come close to raising the amount needed. Efforts continued for nearly 10 years, until others became interested in acquiring the guns, including the State of Oregon and the Smithsonian Institute.

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly Area Manager for Central Whidbey State Parks, Jon Crimmins, says it is thanks to community efforts Fort Casey State Park got its big guns 50 years ago. A rededication ceremony for the guns will be held at 1:30 p.m. Saturday at Fort Casey.

“At that point the state legislature got involved and appropriated the money to bring the guns to Fort Casey,” said Crimmins. “Then it became a question of how to get the guns out, because Fort Wirt was socked in by jungle.” It took months to get to the guns, dismantle them and move them a half-mile to the docks. The guns were transported across the Pacific Ocean by the SeaLand vessel San Francisco. At one point during the voyage one of the 33-ton gun barrels came loose in severe weather. It arrived in Seattle hanging over the ship’s railing. From there the guns were taken to the Bremerton Naval Shipyard where they were cleaned and painted. Then they were taken to Fort Casey where they were reassembled in place (with no instructions). While the original guns at Fort Casey were only used in practice, their counterparts from Subic Bay still bear battle scars, according to Crimmins.

“When you look at them closely, you can see they’re filled with pock marks,” he said. “They definitely saw action. That’s a sure sign it wasn’t from here.” Saturday’s ceremony will closely resemble the dedication ceremony held at Fort Casey 50 years ago to the day. There will be political dignitaries, the 9th Coast Artillery Regiment will present colors dressed in period costumes and the National Guard Band will play some of the songs played during the original ceremony. Crimmins will lead a panel discussion featuring people who were instrumental in getting the guns to Fort Casey. The event is free, but a Discover Pass is required for parking. “I’m excited,” said Crimmins. “So many people care about this park and these guns. There have been volunteers working for over a month to get ready for this. It was a community effort to get the guns here and now the community has come back out to help us get ready. It’s come full circle.”

ARTS & CRAFTS continued from page 7 they’ve got too much stuff to carry, which we hope everybody does,” she said.

Moliter said she expects this year’s festival to be another funfilled weekend for all involved.

All day parking for the festival is $5 and benefits the Coupeville Boys and Girls Club. Overflow parking will be available around the Island County Courthouse and Whidbey SeaTac Shuttle will be making continuous loops from the overflow parking to the festival, so people can flag them down as well.

“There’s music, food, a wine and beer garden and children’s activities,” she said. “The kids who come and participate in that have a quality experience.” There is a full slate of musical artists scheduled this weekend as well. Saturday’s lineup includes Eric Madis and the Blue Madness Trio at 11 a.m.; Del Ray and Steve James at 1 p.m.; and the Jelly Rollers will take the stage at 3 p.m. Sunday gets started at 11 a.m. with Sundae + Mr. Goessl; the Mark Riley Trio will perform at 1 p.m.; and at 3 p.m., local band Backyard Bison will help close the festival. The entertainment stage, wine and beer garden and food court are located between the main parking area and artisan booths. Children’s activities are located nearby in the library and most are free. Parental supervision is required. The information booth can be found at the corner of Coveland and Alexander Streets.

Photo Courtesy of Coupeville Festival Association The 54th annual Coupeville Arts and Crafts Festival, which takes place Saturday and Sunday, will feature a huge variety of arts and crafts such as blown glass, fiber art, paintings, photography, metal work, jewelry and much more.

“You just can’t beat this location,” Moliter said to encourage people to attend. “It’s right on the water and even if it’s hot, we’ve got that breeze. It’s so beautiful. All I can say is, it will be a totally different experience and one people will treasure.”

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Film Shorts Courtesy of Cascadia Weekly

By Carey Ross Ant-Man and the Wasp: Marvel’s most inconsequential hero is also its most fun (sorry, Guardians), and Paul Rudd one of its most inspired casting decisions since Robert Downey Jr. became Tony Stark. Chalk up yet another win for the Marvel Cinematic Universe. ★★★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 58 min.) BlacKkKlansman: Spike Lee tells the crazybut-true story of the time a black police officer and his Jewish partner infiltrated the Ku Klux Klan in 1970s Colorado–and he does it as only Spike Lee can. ★★★★★ (Unrated • 1 hr. 28 min.) Christopher Robin: Christopher Robin (Ewan McGregor) is all grown up and being an adult is a big bum deal (tell me about it, Chris), so his stuffed friends of yore–Tigger, Eeyore, Piglet, Owl, and that honey-loving scamp Pooh–come back to life to save him from himself. Which sounds cute in theory, but if my Cabbage Patch Dolls start speaking to me, I will never recover. ★★★ (PG • 1 hr. 44 min.) The Darkest Minds: This is a movie in which a bunch of kids with some kind of superpowers come together to form a coalition, and then rise up and resist the adults ruining the world in order to take control of the future. Doesn’t seem like the worst premise for a movie–or a political movement–if you ask me. ★★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 44 min.) Death of a Nation: The poster for this film melds Abraham Lincoln’s face with Donald Trump’s, so it is my hope it is a time-traveling presidential romp in which Lincoln journeys to the future to vanquish Trump and finish out his presidency and not a shrill anti-liberal screed with a name derived from another film widely regarded as being blatantly racist. Zero stars forever. (PG-13 • 1 hr. 49 min.) Dog Days: I know you’re expecting me to mock this movie, but as long as the dogs have as much screen time as the humans do, two thumbs way up. ★★★ (PG • 1 hr. 52 min.) Equalizer 2: Because this stars Denzel Washington (in his first sequel ever), the acting will be better than it has any right to be for an action sequel. Because this was directed by Antoine Fuqua, it will be way more stylish than it has any right to be for an action sequel. ★★★ (R • 2 hrs. 9 min.)

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom: With all apologies to the original “Jurassic Park”movie, which was really good and scary as crap, and Chris Pratt, who I once tried on as my movie star boyfriend, and director J.A. Bayona, who helmed the excellent and creepy “The Orphanage,” but I need the dinosaurs in this movie to experience an extinction-level event so this franchise will die. ★★ (2 hrs. 9 min.) Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again: I don’t care what critics say. I love Meryl Streep. I love ABBA. I’ve never been to Greece, but I have a feeling I love it too. All of that, plus Cher as Grandmamma Mia. Count me in. ★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 50 min.) The Meg: Jason Statham has fought various drug cartels, corrupt political regimes, wackadoo criminal masterminds and his own body, so naturally the only thing left is for him to fight a giant prehistoric shark. I don’t think it’s spoiling anything to say the shark probably won’t win. ★★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 54 min.) Mission: Impossible–Fallout: Tom Cruise is back as Ethan Hunt, summer’s most bankable action hero not part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. At 56 years old, he still does nearly all his own stunts and, like its star, this is the rare film franchise that seems to be getting better with age. ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 27 min.) Slender Man: I guess if emoji can get themselves a movie, it was only a matter of time until an internet meme did. Hollywood’s next great plot concept: a tweet that’s gone viral. Imagine the possibilities. Or don’t. ★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 33 min.) The Spy Who Dumped Me: Dear Hollywood, I need you to start writing better parts for genius comedic actresses like Kate McKinnon because you are wasting her talent with this mediocre buddy comedy. ★★ (R • 1 hr. 56 min.)

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Like us on:

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THE MEG PG-13 MISSION IMPOSSIBLE FALLOUT PG-13 CHRISTOPHER ROBIN PG COMING SOON: SICARIO 2, EQUALIZER 2, SPY WHO DUMPED ME

Movie Hotline 360-279-2226 Book A Party or Special Showing 360-279-0526 1321 SW Barlow St • Oak Harbor

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August 11 at 7pm Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Whidbey Island Tickets available at the door. Suggested donation $20/adults $5/students

Pandit Debit Prasad Chatterjee (star), Sheila Weidendorf (piano), Neil Welch (saxophones) with special guests James Patterson (fr. horn), Roxanna Patterson (viola), and more Ravi Albright (tabla)

Now Showing! Thursday, Aug 9 thru Thursday, Aug 16

CHRISTOPHER ROBIN(PG) THE MEG (PG-13) THIS WEEKS SPECIAL: ROOT BEER FLOATS $3.50

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FARAWAY ENTERTAINMENT YOUR LOCAL MOVIE THEATER

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Every row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every column of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9

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360-679-4003 877-679-4003 www.seatacshuttle.com

Teen Titans Go! to the Movies: The popular animated children’s series gets the big-screen treatment, and during a summer dominated by one superhero blockbuster after another, each bigger and more bombastic than the last, this kid-friendly cartoon superhero spoof is the cinematic palate cleanser we need. Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation: I ★★★★ (PG • 1 hr. 24 min.) feel a little bad about constantly forgetting this For Anacortes theater showings, please see animated franchise exists considering it continwww.fandango.com. For Blue Fox and Oak ues to crank out pretty decent film after pretty Harbor Cinemas showings see ads on this decent film. Dracula can’t get no respect. Puzzle 1 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.51) page. ★★★★ (PG • 1 hr. 37 min.)

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Box Office & Snack Bar Opens At 4pm • 1st Movie Begins At Dusk 11 & Over $6.50; Kids 5-10 $1.00; 4 & Under Free GO KARTS ARE NOW OPEN MONDAY-FRIDAY 4PM SATURDAY 11AM , SUNDAY 12:30PM

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360-675-5667 • www.bluefoxdrivein.com

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/sudoku on Thu Jul 26 17:55:51 2018 GMT. Enjoy!

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AUGUST 9 - AUGUST 15, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Let’s Dish! with Kae Harris

The Art of Cooking “What garlic is to food, insanity is to art,” proclaimed Augustus Saint-Gaudens. And isn’t art seeming chaos at times? Isn’t it often indecipherable to some of us where others might see, with total clarity, exactly what some art is about? Food and art are often interwoven and have been since the beginning of recorded history. Food in all the myriad ways it’s presented and art in the innumerable ways it’s represented are both a creation of individual conception and a preference which may not be for everyone from dish-to-dish, piece-topiece. Our history tells us cave paintings dating back to the Stone Age incorporated food in the works themselves. By utilizing plant or fruit juices and even animal fats, these early artists were able to preserve that epoch in time on the rocks and stones around them. You see, food is practical in that it not only sustains us, but provides a platform from which we can express ourselves creatively. Food and meal preparation can essentially be seen as a work of art. I have created some works of art in my kitchen before – some were rather tasty, others may have had an admirer or two – the avant-garde kind who could see the potential, perhaps. But who was it who actually recognized the role food plays enough to make art with it? Some people make an absolute production, a whole display of magnificent proportions out of food. You just have to turn on the TV and watch any of the many food programs out there to see all the possibilities right at your fingertips when cooking and creating. Personally, I love watching the baking or chocolate competitions and seeing how talented and inventive humans are when making great sculptures that aren’t just amazing to look at, but delicious to eat. Back to my question. Who was it who made art and food a movement? A man by the name of Filippo Tommaso Marinetti. He was part of the ‘Futurist’ movement and utilized the industrial era (at the turn of the 20th century) to make wondrous works of art. He published a book in 1932 called ‘The Futurist Cookbook,’ wherein he described cooking as a performance – completely new and fresh on the culinary scene, apparently. Since then,

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many an artist and chef (though I have begun to think they are one and the same) has employed such a bold approach to their works, whether ‘artart’ in the conventional sense or ‘food art.’ All this food-art has made me think about the ways in which we like to perhaps set our own tables. For special occasions or holidays, we tend to decorate and adopt a theme. Thanksgiving is a prime example and I have mentioned before about a platter my friend and I make. We make a cute turkey on a platter using pepperoni, crackers, cheeses and olives. This becomes a centerpiece of sorts and while it’s delicious to eat, it’s a little unnerving to watch your art being consumed, I’ll admit. How about birthdays? This is another classic example of how we take an event and turn it into our very own gallery. We might order or make a cake in a particular theme. Most recently, unicorns have been a very popular subject to adopt and there are never-ending examples of unicorn creations for parties online. From fondant (eww – not my favorite) horns topping thick swirled buttercream frosting on cupcakes, to making an actual unicorn out of a basic round sponge, complete with piped flowers for the mane in trademark purple, pink, teal and gold colors – it’s an example of how art plays a major role in how we represent or mark occasions. Some of the more fantastic and whimsical art is done of course, professionally, using sugar to create sculptures so epic, you’d never guess it was edible! Some food art is so hyper-realistic it really would be a shame to eat it. I’ve come across so many amazing sculptures made entirely out of all things edible, but one artist whose work really pulled me in was a self-taught sculptor by the name of Shinri Tezuka. Apparently, he is one of the youngest practitioners of making amezaiku. This is a traditional Japanese candy that has been made for over a thousand years and involves heating sugar until it is liquid, then quickly shaping and forming it into a work of art. Tezuka’s work is so realistic I don’t know if I would be able to eat it, even if it is made of sugar – and I have a sweet tooth! From sea life to lollipops depicting amazing scenes, Tezuka’s art takes food to a whole new level of delightfully delicious.

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Knowing many artists are self-taught with very little if any formal training, it makes me wonder what we are ALL capable of. What amazing works of art could you or I create in the kitchen? How about we start small and simple? A disappearing chocolate ball for example? It might sound as though some prestidigitation is involved at first, and, in a sense, there is. But it’s supposedly not too difficult to make and a novelty at any dinner or special occasion. Dear readers, I wanted to really highlight the integral role food plays in our lives and how it has been the inspiration and basis of so many movements, especially where art is concerned. I believe the two are and will likely always be linked and maybe you could embrace you own inner food artisan! I am including the recipe for the Disappearing Chocolate Balls and if you try them, let me know how it went! Please send any and all comments, questions and certainly recipes you would like to share to letsdish. whidbeyweekly@gmail.com and we can do just that and Dish! Disappearing Chocolate Balls Chocolate (any kind you like, dark, milk or white) Semi-circle molds (any size, but a small to medium size might be best) Fresh Strawberries Whipped cream or crème fraiche (optional) Melt chocolate in a double boiler or the microwave and then fill the semi-circle molds, ensuring the chocolate comes all the way up the sides. Tip out excess chocolate, ensuring just the sides of each semicircle is coated, into a large bowl and set aside as you will use the excess to create more chocolate semi-circles as needed and to use as a hot sauce to make magic. Let the mold set upside down. When the chocolate semi-circles are set, pop them out of the mold. Place a dab of melted chocolate onto a plate and set one semi-circle onto it so it sticks without tipping over. Fill this with a filling of your choice (I happen to like fresh strawberries with clotted cream), and then take another chocolate semi-circle and touch the sealing edges to the bottom of a warm pan (exercise caution here). Quickly stick this onto the semi-circle that is already set up with the filling and ensure it sticks to form a nice ball. When serving time comes, heat up some chocolate syrup or reheat the excess chocolate from earlier with a dash of heavy cream to form a thick, decadent sauce that’s hot. Again, exercise caution! Pour the hot sauce over the chocolate ball and let your guests be amazed when the chocolate ball ‘disappears!’ www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/food-art-culturaltravel-180961648 www.thisiscolossal.com/2016/10/a-peek-insidejapanese-candy-sculptor-shinri-tezukas-amezaikustudio To read past columns of Let’s Dish in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

BITS ‘n’ PIECES

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local historic preservation organizations and advocates engaged in the important work of preserving Washington’s cultural heritage. Historic places not only represent our history but are part of our collective cultural identity. Preserving historic places allows communities to build a future on that meaningful identity and the valuable historic resources already at hand. Historic resources contribute to vibrant communities and architectural diversity. “For over 20 years, the Valerie Sivinski Fund has been a catalyst for local historic preservation projects that protect our state’s shared history,” said Jennifer Mortensen, the preservation services coordinator of the Washington Trust. “This grant program truly embodies the mission of the Washington Trust by supporting local, grassroots preservation, which is the lifeblood of our movement. Grant awards from the Sivinski Fund help make local preservation possible.” Sivinski Fund grants are designed to support “bricks and mortar” projects that contribute to the preservation of a specific historic place. Projects that include costs directly related to physical materials and preservation are preferred, but grant funds may also be used to hire preservation professionals or organize preservation advocacy efforts for a specific historic resource. Applications must be submitted by an organized group such as an incorporated nonprofit, an unincorporated citizens or advocacy group, a public agency or civic organization, or a religious organization. Applicants for Sivinski Fund grants are required to become members of the Washington Trust (at the nonprofit level or above) if they are not already current members. The deadline for submitting applications for the 2019 round of Sivinski Fund grants is Monday, October 1, 2018. The online application form, along with all program details, can be accessed on the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation’s website at: preservewa. org/sivinski. The application process is entirely online, and must be submitted by midnight of the due date. Award recipients will be announced at the Washington Trust’s annual Sivinski Holiday Benefit in December. Please contact Jennifer Mortensen at 206-4622999 or via email at jmortensen@preservewa. org for more information. [Submitted by Washington Trust for Historic Preservation]

Dining Guide Come Enjoy Some Award Winning BBQ after the Coupeville Arts & Crafts Festival 601 NE Midway Blvd Oak Harbor

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Enjoy the sunshine and a savory sandwich on our dog friendly outdoor patio!

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as fast with half the effort is also possible, merely by enlisting a helper. Life is all in how you approach it. Think through your rebellion carefully on the 12th, with special attention on teamwork.

CHICKEN LITTLE & THE ASTROLOGER By Wesley Hallock

ARIES (March 21-April 19) An unsatisfactory situation that you can no longer ignore begs your attention this week. No doubt you can think of more appealing things than a do-over of something that was no fun the first time, but the pressure for you to act is building. The longer you delay, the more likely you are to feel the push of certain people with a stake in the matter. The 12th is a likely tipping point, after which, events unfold rapidly. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You and a like-minded partner might conclude from a variety of clues that the time is right for you to collaborate on a mutually exciting joint project or undertaking. If so, you are not wrong. Any and all agreements, formal or informal, made this week are backed by beneficial leverage and power that bodes well for their eventual success. Anything done with spirit on the 12th is a seed sown in fertile soil. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) Bluster against injustice if you will, but empty complaints unbacked by solutions are unlikely to solve anything. The good news is that events this week are likely to open your eyes to new possibilities. Solutions are in the works that will take time, and the sooner you go to work on them, the better. And if you are already working for change? In that case, fasten your seatbelt. The 12th marks a period of rapid acceleration. CANCER (June 22-July 22) Your role this week is simply to tell the truth as you see it. In many cases, this amounts to being the squeaky wheel whose lament calls for grease. No matter how constructive your criticisms, they may not win you many friends, but that is not the point. The point is to defend the values that you hold dear. Others in their struggle to define their own course deserve your total candor. Don’t hesitate to give it on the 12th. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) This week you are playing a role within a role. You might experience it as the curious state of being simultaneously humbled and empowered. To understand, notice your feelings as you watch the sunrise or the changing of the tide. On the 12th, this feeling of belonging within something that dwarfs you individually may play out within some much larger institution, such as a university or hospital, of which you are a part. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Rebellious feelings are likely this week, and the rebellion of choice may be to simply do less. A negative example would be watching the dishes pile up while you refuse to wash them. In the positive, doing the dishes twice

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Your ability to see both sides of the conflict is no excuse to sit on the sidelines this week. Whatever your arena, at home or out in the world, your role is the same. See what the two sides have in common, align around that, and work outward from there. In short, yours is the role of peacemaker. You do it naturally, but now that you know, you are doubly empowered. The 12th is the best of times. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Your opportunities this week are limitless or few, depending on your view. There is a way of seeing that recognizes every obstacle as concealing an opportunity, if only you can see your way clear to reach it. Whatever your goal, there is a path to success, and the clues to that path have seldom been more apparent or vivid. Take heart and be especially attentive on and after the 12th. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Your reputation for delivering blunt fact makes others uneasy at times, but not this week. It’s that very quality of honesty no matter what that certain others want. What you say and think carries great weight as those others plot their future course. Circumstance will bring them and you together in the right way at the right time. Be yourself on the 12th and know that behind the scene, much is happening. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) The lesson of this week could be that what strikes you as logical and practical changes over time. This fact underscores the importance of keeping an open mind. Later down the road, when today’s ridiculous has become tomorrow’s enlightened prescience, you might be glad for not automatically dismissing a key bit of data out of hand. Be alert on 12th and after, when the makings of sheer genius abound.  

CLUES ACROSS 1. Sacred bull (Egyptian myth.) 5. One-time European money

50. Type of sword 55. “Sin City” actress

25. More (Spanish) 26. Electronic data processing

8. Disfigure

56. Female reproductive cells

27. Buffer solution to separate DNA and RNA

11. Polish city

57. Afflicted

28. Primate

13. Move quickly on foot

59. One point north of northeast

29. Scattered

60. Garland

14. Landlocked West African country

34. Evergreen tree

15. Used in aromatherapy

61. Spiritual leader

35. What engaged couples will say

16. The greatest of all time

62. Negative

36. Barbie’s friend

63. Tooth caregiver

37. Midway between south and southeast

17. Type of horse

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb 18) Your best and brightest idea might get you branded as an outsider, short term, but remember: Outsiders set the tone of tomorrow and thereby change the world. Do yourself and the world a favor this week. Whatever the situation, when you feel that you have nothing important to contribute, stop yourself and ask, what if it is the only time that day that you are wrong? The opportunities to be wrong in such a way are many on the 12th.

18. Volcanic craters

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) A healthy dose of intuition often makes the difference between a wise move and a dumb one. Wise moves are distinctly possible this week, stemming from a healthy jolt to your creative faculties that could come at any time. Being no stranger to such, that’s all the warning you need. It will interest you to know, however, that the vibes coming your way on the 12th are top-notch. Enough said.

33. Nigerian peoples

© 2018, Wesley Hallock, All Rights Reserved

49. Hebrew unit of liquid capacity

20. Type of graph (abbr.) 21. Supporters 22. North and South are two 25. Spread 30. Adjusted 31. Vietnamese offensive 32. Nazi architect

64. Cheek

39. A position from which progress can be made

CLUES DOWN 1. Form of “to be” 2. A hand has one

40. Showed up

3. Thought

41. Insecticide

4. Physical body

42. Type of milk

5. Removes 6. One who perpetrates wrongdoing 7. Make one 8. Kate and Rooney are two

44. Verandas 45. Annoyingly talkative 46. Abba __, Israeli politician 47. “Heat” director

9. __ Ladd, “Shane” actor

48. Plant genus

10. Makes fun of

52. Prejudice

12. Space station

53. Actor Idris

14. Gene

45. Produce

19. Satisfy

54. Freedom fighters (slang)

47. Ancient kingdom near Dead Sea

23. Livid

58. Criticize

24. It comes after “et”

38. When you hope to get there 41. Ridicules 43. Allied Powers vs. Central Powers

51. Swiss river

Answers on page 15

YOUR GUESS IS AS GOOD AS OURS WEATHER FORECAST Chicken Little looks at what is and fears the sky is falling. Wesley Hallock as a professional astrologer looks at what is and sees what could be. Read Wesley’s monthly forecast, with links to Facebook and Twitter, at www. chickenlittleandtheastrologer.com. To read past columns of Chicken Little and the Astrologer in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

Thurs, Aug. 9

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North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

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North Isle

North Isle

H-74°/L-58°

H-72°/L-60°

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H-71°/L-54°

Sunny

Showers

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Mostly Sunny

Mostly Sunny

Possible Showers

Wed, Aug. 15

Sunny

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

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South Isle

H-81°/L-60°

H-73°/L-59°

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H-73°/L-54°

H-75°/L-57°

H-75°/L-57°

H-77°/L-57°

Sunny

Mostly Cloudy

Showers

Mostly Sunny

Sunny

Possible Showers

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.

Sunny


14 AUGUST 9 - AUGUST 15, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

www.whidbeyweekly.com

Whidbey Weekly

Life Tributes BEVERLY J. GILLIES November 26, 1938 – August 1, 2018

Beverly J. Gillies was born November 26, 1938 in Watertown, South Dakota. She passed away at her home suddenly August 1, 2018. We guess she thought three months was long enough without Dad, the love of her life, that she decided to go be with him and her Lord in heaven. Our mother was a homemaker and she took care of Dad and us five kids. She loved to garden and she loved family gatherings, especially the visits from her grandkids and great grandkids. Mom was a member of the Navy Wives bowling league up until about two years ago and did this most of her life. Her favorite color was pink. Mom was not a fancy person. When you saw her, she was in her blue jeans and pink sweatshirts which she had hundreds of. In her honor and memory, some of us kids and grandchildren will be wearing pink sweatshirts and Avon jewelry to her service. Mom had quite the collection of Avon jewelry. I am sure she will be laughing at us but she will know we all love and miss her very much! Beverly was preceded in death by her husband of 59 years, Tearle Gillies, three sisters, grandchildren and both her parents. She is survived by her children Randall Gillies, Linda (Tony) Baeyan, Patricia (James) Peterson, Robin Bowden (Gary Latting) and Vicki Gillies (Robert Watt JR). Also surviving are sister Kay (Ray) Carlisle and brother Garry Black, brother-in-law Leslie (Marlys) Gillies, sister-in-law Sonya (Charles) Welch, 22 grandchildren, and 29 great grandchildren. Funeral services for Beverly will be held at Wallin Funeral Home August 8, 2018 with viewing from 12-1 p.m. and services starting at 1 p.m. Burial to follow at Maple Leaf Cemetery where we will lay her to rest with Dad. Immediately after, there will be a reception at Wallin Funeral Home.

LOCALLY OPERATED

down a meal at Charlie’s. His love for food and art melded as Charlie took a job cooking while he was studying art in Italy. The arts were his life. He went to the School Of Visual Arts and Pratt in New York City and the Academy Of Art in Florence, Italy. He received scholarships and a grant from the Andy Warhol/Rockerfeller Foundation. He was an urban pioneer, living and starting galleries in the Soho District of New York City as well as building lofts and gallery spaces. He began skeet shooting in New York, participating in various competitions in New York and Connecticut. He won many awards and patches. As much as he was involved in skeet shooting, his main passion was in the visual arts. He leaves his lovely wife, Karen, his sister, Kathy, and cousin, Vince, whom he loved dearly. And, let’s not forget his 1984 Saab, too. Arrangements entrusted to Wallin Funeral Home, Oak Harbor, Wash. Please visit Charlie’s page in the Book of Memories online at www.wallinfuneralhome.com to share memories and leave condolences.

DOROTHY L. CORT October 30, 1924 – July 20, 2018

Dorothy L. Cort began a long, eventful life October 30, 1924 near Bristow, Okla., the second of four daughters born to James and Jewell Legg. They moved often following oil exploration until the second World War began in 1941. In 1942, the family moved to California where she began work at Douglas Aircraft. There she met and married Norman G. Cort, Jr., (U.S. Navy) in 1944. After the war, they bought a home in Redondo Beach, Calif., where their three sons were born. In January 1956, they transferred from California to a new oil refinery in Anacortes, Wash. and settled on Whidbey Island for 33 years. Their three sons, Steven, John and Larry, grew up in Penn Cove and graduated from Oak Harbor High School in 1966, 1970 and 1973. In 1963, she began work at U.S. Naval Air Station Whidbey Island and remained there for 20 years, the last five spent as Budget Officer. In 1989, after she and husband Norman retired, they moved from Whidbey Island to Semiahmoo near Blaine, Wash. which they enjoyed until she lost her husband of 52 years. She remained there until 2001, when she began traveling with long-time friend Clayton “Smokey” Hoover. They were later married and moved to Wickenburg, Ariz., to enjoy life on 2-½ acres of horse property, traveling the world and visiting families in Washington, Idaho and Oklahoma. She lost Smokey in 2013 and she sold their property and returned to Oak Harbor after 25 years.

To leave condolences or share messages, please visit Beverly’s Book of Memories online at www. wallinfuneralhome.com

Preceding her in death were son John (1972), husband Norman (1996), husband “Smokey” (2013), and son Larry (2015). She is survived by son Steven and wife Sharon (Enumclaw, Wash.), three grandchildren, Wendy (Boston, Mass.), Kristine (Renton, Wash.) and Michael (Enumclaw), two great-granddaughters, Alessa and Aria, one sister, Pat Kulbeth (Guthrie, Okla.) a stepdaughter in-law, Claudia Urquhart and a stepson in-law, Gary Schuyten and families.

JEAN CAROL (BRATTAIN) ANDERSON

She made Regency on Whidbey her home and appreciated the kindness of the staff and making new friends.

December 7, 1930 – March 28, 2018

Private burial services will be held at Maple Leaf Cemetery.

Jean Carol (Brattain) Anderson, 87, died March 28, 2018, at Regency on Whidbey in Oak Harbor. Her husband of 67 years, Murray Anderson, died eight days later at the same facility. Jean was born in Tonasket, Wash. and her family moved to Hope, Alaska when she was 10. A Memorial Service for Jean and her husband Murray will be held Saturday, August 11, at the Oak Harbor Senior Center between the hours of 2 and 6 p.m. Her family will be traveling to Hope, Alaska to scatter some of her cremated ashes on her parents’ graves. Survivors include daughters Edona Anderson of Palm Desert, Calif., Crystal Bedford of Fort Collins, Colo., and Carrie Anderson of Burlington. Read the full obituary and add memorials to Jean at her online guestbook at bit.ly/jeananderson.

MURRAY ARDEN ANDERSON January 13, 1928 – April 5, 2018

Murray Arden Anderson, 90, died April 5, 2018, at Regency on Whidbey in Oak Harbor, where his wife of 67 years, Jean, died eight days earlier. Murray was born on Whidbey Island and has many family members and friends who mourn his and Jean’s passing. A Memorial Service for Murray and his wife Jean will be held Saturday, August 11, at the Oak Harbor Senior Center between the hours of 2 and 6 p.m. Survivors include daughters Edona Anderson of Palm Desert, Calif., Crystal Bedford of Fort Collins, Colo., and Carrie Anderson of Burlington. Read the full obituary and add memorials to Murray at his online guestbook at bit.ly/ murrayanderson.

CHARLES KATINAS August 4, 1941 – July 27, 2018

Charles C. Katinas was a unique individual with a great curiosity for diverse subjects: art, music, cultures, languages and cuisines. He was born in Brooklyn, New York August 4, 1941. After a short illness, he passed away peacefully Friday, July 27, 2018 at WhidbeyHealth Medical Center, Coupeville, Wash. Charlie was a New Yorker who told you his honest opinion - not for the feint of heart. He was a wonderful friend, artist and cook. Charlie was a Renaissance man. He was Lithuanian born and bred; steeped in the culture, food and language. Charlie was so well known for his homemade foods of sausage, sauerkraut, New York-style pickles, cordials, and lasagnas. No one turned

HOWARD A MILLER Howard Miller passed away July 24, 2018 at home with his family. He lived a full life. He drove many crazy by being grumpy but he was loved by those, too, for being kind and gentle hearted. Howard Miller was born to Lucille Sourbeck and Howard F. Miller. He joined his older sister Althea. A few years later, little sister Sue joined the crew. Howard was the only boy of the family. He followed his father and joined the military, but he joined the Navy. Howard was stationed in California with the Navy when he met his wife, Barbara. They married in California. After being married for six years, Howard and Barbara welcomed their first child, Marc. Marc enjoyed six years of being an only child. He became a big brother to a sister, Bryanna. They welcomed another sister, Carrie only two years later. All three siblings welcomed their tiny sister, Melissa. She was the last one to join the crazy Miller clan. The four Miller children grew up watching their father leave and return on boats over the years. Howard and family lived many years in California but called Oak Harbor home for 24 years. Howard loved his family dearly. His grandchildren helped him stay healthy and fight for a good life. Howard served on the USS Coral Sea, USS Enterprise, and USS Carl Vinson. Howard fought in the Vietnam War. He taught SERE school for years. He served a total of 21.5 years in the US Navy. His last duty station in the Navy was security at NAS Whidbey. In 1997, he was medically retired from the Navy with congestive heart failure. He and his family were shocked with the news. In February of 2004, he received a pacemaker and defibrillator to help him with his heart. He had this for many years. In August 2009, he received his LVAD (Left Ventricular Assist Device) which was an adjustment for Howard and his family. After waiting many years on the transplant list, he received a phone call November 16, 2015 saying there was a heart for him. He received his new heart November 17, 2015 which became the longest day of waiting for the family. This gave him a chance at a new journey in life. Many would describe Howard as a grumpy, but kind man. He could be the grumpiest man, but he would help you out as much as he could when you needed help. He is survived by his wife Barbara; four children, Marc, Bryanna, Carrie, and Melissa; two sisters, Althea and Sue; two sons-in-law, Jason and Eric; daughter-in-law Stephanie; and eight grandchildren – Traci, Jayde, Masyn, Aiden, Abigail, Elizabeth, Raelynn, and Karsyn. He has many other family members and friends by whom he is survived. The Miller family suggests memorials in Howard’s name be made to WAIF. To donate online, go to www.waifanimals.org/donate, or mail your donation to: WAIF, PO Box 1108, Coupeville, WA 98239. A private service will be held at a later date. Arrangements entrusted to Wallin Funeral Home, Oak Harbor, Wash. Please visit Howard’s page in the Book of Memories online at www.wallinfuneralhome.com to share memories and leave condolences.

Life Tributes can now be found online at www.whidbeyweekly.com Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


ANTIQUES/VINTAGE Vintage, antique and collectibles show. Friday, August 10 and Saturday, Aug. 11, 9am–4pm, Sunday, Aug. 12, 9am–1pm, 26431 SR 20 and Holbrook (across from Three Sisters Market in Coupeville.)

ANNOUNCEMENTS Pregnant? Need baby clothes? We have them and the price is right–FREE. Pregnancy Care Clinic, open most Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10am to 4pm. Call 360-221-2909 or stop by 6th and Cascade in Langley. Be the difference in a child’s life and become a foster parent today! Service Alternatives is looking for caring, loving, and supportive families to support foster children. 425923-0451 or mostermick@ servalt-cfs.com The Whidbey Island community is encouraged to try out the paddling sport of dragon boating with the Stayin’ Alive team. Our team’s mission is to promote the physical, social, and emotional benefits of dragon boating. It has been shown to be especially beneficial to cancer survivors. Practice with us for up to 3 times for free. Life-jackets and paddles provided. Saturdays at the Oak Harbor Marina, 8:45am. Contact njlish@ gmail.com. More info at our Facebook Page: https://www. facebook.com/NorthPugetSoundDragonBoatClub?ref=hl Medical Marijuana patients unite; If you need assistance, advice, etc. please contact at 420patientnetworking@gmail. com. Local Whidbey Island help. If you or someone you know has been a victim of Homicide, Burglary, Robbery, Assault, Identity Theft, Fraud, Human Trafficking, Home Invasion and other crimes not listed. Victim Support Services has Advocates ready to help. Please call the 24-hr Crisis Line 888-3889221. Free Service. Visit our web site at http://victimsupportservices.org

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Imagine Oak Harbor’s 1st Food Forest, Saturdays 11am-3pm, at 526 Bayshore Drive. Each week, we have volunteer opportunities available to help care for our community garden, share organic gardening tips, and learn Permaculture principles. All ages and skill levels welcome. Schedule can change due to adverse weather conditions. If you have any questions, please contact us at: imagineapermacultureworld.gmail.com Mother Mentors need volunteers! Oak Harbor Families

with young children need your help! Volunteer just a couple of hours a week to make a difference in someone’s life! To volunteer or get more info, email wamothermentors@ gmail.com or call 360-3211484. Looking for Board Members to join the dynamic Board of Island Senior Resources and serve the needs of Island County Seniors. Of particular interest are representatives from North Whidbey. For more information please contact: reception@islandseniorservices.org

33-1/3 records, $1 each. 360341-6473 (0)

JOB MARKET

APPLIANCES

Whidbey Island Conservation District is accepting applications for a full-time, non-exempt position of Farm and Forest Natural Resource Specialist. Job description, including qualifications, duties, and benefits, plus application materials and submission instructions available at www. whidbeycd.org. Application deadline: August 15, 2018 (0) Staff Accountant, Jones Accounting Associates, Oak Harbor, WA: Day to Day bookkeeping for a variety of non profit and for profit entities. Payroll processing and EFTPS , Sick Pay and Vacation pay documentation, must be a Quick Books Pro Advisor or be able to pass test to be such. Able to assist clients with Quick Books Online and well as Desk Top versions. Travel to client work sites as needed. able to attend a board meeting and explain a financial statement to the clients. Train bookkeepers to assist. Prepare all tax reports for state and federal entities as needed. Monitor and prepare 1099s and submit such. Monitor Efile of income tax returns. Full-time, $18–$22/hour; 3 years Accounting experience; Bachelor’s degree. Required work authorization: United States (0) Island Hospital is actively seeking Housekeepers and Dishwashers (Dietary Aide 1). Full Time (FULL BENEFITS) and Reserve positions available! Please apply online: www. islandhospital.org/careers (1)

Stainless Steel Free-Standing Dual Fuel Cooking Range (Propane case iron grills/ electric oven – requires 4 wire cord/220 volt). Good condition. Designed for between counter cabinets – 36 inches wide. Clock, Timer, Convection, etc. $150, U-Haul. Can email photo 360-914-4304 (0)

Exercise machine, walker, $17. Coupeville, 360-678-7591 (1) How’d youdifficulty do? rating 0.51) Puzzle 1 (Medium, 5

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360-675-9596 www.whidbeyres.com 285 NE Midway Blvd • Suite #2 • Oak Harbor MUSIC

HOME FURNISHINGS Solid Oak claw-foot table with six chairs. 4’ round, 4’ x 6 with leaf. $300 OBO. 360-4999106 (1) Table: 40” x 60” with 12-inch leaf, $20. Coupeville, 360678-7591 (1) Ikea Furniture: 29.5” x 59.5” white table, $20; standing table/desk chair, $20. 360678-8449 (0)

LAWN AND GARDEN Water feature: Ceramic bowl, diameter 20-inches, height 17-inches. Bottom liner diameter 36-inches, depth 11-inches. Platform, rocks and motor included, $250. Penn Cove area, 360-678-3421 (1) Dahlias, $3 per bouquet. Coupeville, 360-678-7591 (1) Patio Set: Round table with glass top, umbrella, 4 chairs, $75. 360-341-6473 (0) 25 aluminum silver deck post caps, $3 each; 200 feet new No Cheating!

8” heavy waterline, $4 a foot, obo. Can be used for waterline or drain line. 360-321-1624 Natural Barnyard Topsoil: Good for gardens, flower beds, etc. Unscreened, 10 yard loads, $225 delivered. South Whidbey 360-321-1624

MISCELLANEOUS 8-ft steel stepladder, $35. Coupeville, 360-678-7591 (1) Two garage remote openers, new, $17. Coupeville, 360678-7591 (1) TOOLS: Delta Scroll Saw, 15-inch, model 45-150, $60; Stinger wet/dry vacuum, 2.5 gal, $16; 2 gallon sprayer, $5; 2 jumper cables, $5 each; 7 piece Forstner router bit set in box, $15; 25-piece drill bit set in case, $14; 8-foot ladder, $10; siphon kit, $7; Outboard motor ears for flushing, $2; 2 garage door openers, universal - works with all brands, $15; 2 Black & Decker Jig Saws – Skil variable speed w/case, $25, 2-speed, $15, variable speed, $20; Handy stitch miniature electric sewing machine, $15. Coupeville, 360-678-7591 (1) Office chair, black leather, new condition, $60; Office chair, gray fabric, $30. 360-3416473 (0) We are in the process of a making a serious downsizing effort, and we have items for sale in the following categories: costume jewelry; furniture; garden tools; hand tools; kitchen items; luggage (including duffel bags, tote

Love, Mom, Dad & Andrew bags & backpacks); puzzles and toys; sports items; storage racks; yard equipment (boat trailer winch, and 30 gallon sprayer); and other yard items. If you are interested in seeing what we have available, please call 360-678-1167 to make an appointment. Looking for Xmas, Bday, Father’s Day, or just Gifts in general? These are LOCAL made crafts, I have about 50-60 of these available. They are $16.00/ea, plus shipping if you want them mailed. CASH preferred. Dimensions are: 5-6”W X 17”L. Contact me at ljohn60@gmail.com.

RECREATION Osprey Exos 38 Ultralight Backpack under 2.5 lbs. Very comfortable, easy to carry,$105. 360-678-2207 (1)

LOST/FOUND Lost my wallet between Goss Lake and the Bayview Shopping Center Friday, July 27, early in the afternoon. If found please call Francoise at 360321 4387. Thank you. (0)

ANIMALS/SUPPLIES Excellent Grass Hay, good for horses, $7 per bale, 20 bale minimum. 360-321-1624 If you or someone you know needs help in feeding pet(s),

WAIF Pet Food Banks may be able to help. Pet Food Banks are located at WAIF thrift stores in Oak Harbor (50 NE Midway Blvd) and Freeland (1660 Roberta Ave) and are generously stocked by donations from the community. If you need assistance, please stop by.

WANTED Art, Antiques & Collectibles. Cash paid for quality items. Call/Text 360-661-7298 (1) Was your Dad or Gramps in Japan or Germany? I collect old 35 mm cameras and lenses. Oak Harbor, call (970) 823-0002

FREE 50-inch color TV, HD, great picture. Coupeville, 360-6787591 (1) WorldBook Encyclopedia, © 1991. Call 360-914-4303 (0)

PERSONALS Mexico: seeking all information/help about Jalisco Mexican state, lake Chapala area, town of Ajijic, ex-pat community. Seeking one-level, two bedroom, two bath house to rent or purchase in the future. No real estate agents, please. Call JM 360-730-3244 (1)

CLASSIFIED INFORMATION US Postal Mail

Whidbey Weekly Classified Department PO Box 1098 Oak Harbor, WA 98277

E-Mail............classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com Telephone..................................(360)682-2341 Fax.............................................(360)682-2344 PLEASE CALL WHEN YOUR ITEMS HAVE SOLD.

HEALTH/FITNESS

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Whidbey Residential Rentals, Inc.

Happy 16th Birthday, Alex!

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Please try to limit your classified to 30 words or less, (amounts and phone numbers are counted as words) we will help edit if necessary. We charge $10/week for Vehicles, Boats, Motorcycles, RVs, Real Estate Rental/Sales, Business Classifieds and any items selling $1,000 and above. We do charge $25 to include a photo. The FREE classified space is not for business use. No classified is accepted without phone number. We reserve the right to not publish classifieds that are in bad taste or of questionable content. All free classifieds will be published twice consecutively. If you would like your ad to be published more often, you must resubmit it. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date.

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


32

$

95

Basic Oil & Filter

36

$

95

Includes 4X4 & SUV

4295

$

Most cars up to 5 qts. 5W20, 5W30, 10W30. Other grades extra. Some ďŹ lters cost extra. Vehicles with Skid Plates may be extra. Plus $1 Environmental Disposal Fee.

WE CAN SAVE YOU UP TO $250 ON BRAKE SERVICE VERSUS OUR COMPETITORS. WARRANTIED AT 30K LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE.

STARTERS ALTERNATORS TIMING BELTS SERPENTINE BELTS

BRAKES TIRES TUNE-UPS EXHAUST

UP TO

1

$ 00

Flat Rate Auto Repair only $7995 per hour

PER GAL LON D ISCOUNT T ODAY!

always

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At Hilltop Service Center we only repair and replace parts that are needed. We will not oversell or install unnecessary parts. We are highly trained brake technicians, not high pressure sales people.

79

$

7995*

$

4 cyl

95

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8995*

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6 cyl

9995*

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8 cyl

79

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79

$

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11995

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Whidbey Weekly, August 9, 2018  

Coupeville Arts & Crafts Festival On Track with Jim Freeman Island 911 Let's Dish Film Shorts Bits & Pieces What's Going On Island Angler

Whidbey Weekly, August 9, 2018  

Coupeville Arts & Crafts Festival On Track with Jim Freeman Island 911 Let's Dish Film Shorts Bits & Pieces What's Going On Island Angler