Whidbey Weekly, April 26, 2018

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April 26 through May 2, 2018

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OakHarborChamber.com More Local Events inside

FRIDAY, MAY 4 • 7p.m. Doors open 6:30 p.m.

Harvest Fest Races Zumba & Hula by Ate Flo SW Syrian Refugee Project WICA • 565 Camano Ave, Langley, WA Coupeville Green Knights of Columbus Langley United Methodist Church SATURDAY, MAY 5 • 7p.m. Women Who Changed America SNO-ISLE LIBRARIES Coupeville Oak Harbor Langley Doors open 6:30 p.m. FOUNDATION Page 6 Page Elks 6 Lodge • 155 NE Ernst St, Oak Harbor, WA Page 9 Jill S. Tietjen, P.E. FREE COMMUNITY EVENT • FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT SNO-ISLEFOUNDATION.ORG/SUNDBERG


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APRIL 26 - MAY 2, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

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$25 - Adults $20 - Seniors/Military FREE for Students under 18

TICKET OUTLETS ClickMusic - Oak Harbor bayleaf - Coupeville Moonraker Books and Blue Sound Music - Langley cash/check/CC at the door

ONLINE Tickets & INFORMATION www.sowhidbey.com orchestra@whidbey.com 360-929-3045

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April 28 • South Whidbey High School • 7pm April 29 • Oak Harbor High School • 2:30pm

Whidbey Seatac Shuttle Whidbey Weekly Island Thrift

Family Guide by Amy Hannold

Prairie Days: April 27-28 and May 11-12 at Pacific Rim Institute. Acquaint yourself with this special piece of Ebey’s Landing National Historic Reserve. Enjoy free birding & photography tours, prairie walks and other activities. Stop by the Native Plant Sale to add local color and heritage to your garden. Pacificriminstitute.org. Kids Bowl Free: Register your kids (ages 18 and younger) to enjoy 2 free games of bowling every day, all summer long. The purchase of “Adult Family Members” and “Summer Shoe Rental” passes complete the package for affordable family fun this summer. Participating centers include Oak Bowl (May 1 to October 31) and NASWI’s Convergence Zone (June through August). Kidsbowlfree.com Showcase of the Arts: Be amazed by the best of Whidbey Island’s high school student art created in five categories: wall art, sculpture, jewelry/wearables, ceramics and photography. The art show is open Friday, May 4, 10am-7pm and Saturday, May 5, 10am-5pm, at the Coupeville Rec Hall. whidbeyisland-wa.aauw.net Sending Youth to Summer Camp Sale: Living Word of Oak Harbor invites you to a rummage sale, Friday, May 4, 1-6pm and Saturday, May 5, 9am-4pm. Carwashes and “Cinco-de-Mayo” nachos will also be available Saturday. Donations to the sale are welcome, contact the church, (360) 6755008, 490 NW Crosby Avenue. Spring Bazaar: Shop from a selection of arts and crafts items, jewelry, gift baskets, handmade goods, unique gifts, signs, and morejust in time for Mother's Day! Saturday, May 5, 10am-3pm at Regency on Whidbey, 1040 SW Kimball Drive, Oak Harbor. Touch-a-Truck: Explore and learn about different types of vehicles in Stanwood, May 5, 10am-2pm. A “no horns” hour, from 10-11am, begins the event for those sensitive to noise. Rain or shine, free admission. The fun includes hands-on activities and demonstrations representing first-responders, construction and other organizations. Bring ear protection, if desired. 2805 271st St NW, Stanwood. Discoverstanwoodcamano.com. May Faire: Whidbey Island Waldorf School presents a spring festival featuring maypole dances, field games, crafts, face painting, cake walk, and more, May 5, 10:30am1:30pm. Activities are free, food and drink for purchase. Wiws.org. Go Fishing: Holmes Harbor Rod & Gun Club invites families to the Annual Fishing Derby at Lake Albert Saturday, May 12. This is a free event for all kids, ages 14 and under. Fishing will begin at 9am and end at 1pm. Bring your fishing gear and bait, there will be prizes for the largest fish. Free lunch for the kids, adults by donation. Lake address is 5292 Hawthorne Lane, Langley – located in Freeland, inside the “Maple Glen” community. For more youth fishing events, go to wdfw. wa.gov/fishing/kids. Plant, Small Animal and Tractor Fair: All sorts of plants, shrubs, trees and veggie starts will be for sale at the Skagit County Fairgrounds, May 12, 8am-2pm. Watch operating antique farm machinery while you shop for master-gardener-grown plants, get gardening advice and stroll a variety of vendors. Meet and greet with 4-H animals, 10am-1pm. Free parking & admission. Extension.wsu.edu/skagit/mg. Penn Cove Water Festival: A day of Native American canoe racing, entertainment, crafts and culture May 12, 11am-5pm. Experience

music, story-telling, dance and artist demonstrations, authentic Native food, and youth & educational activities. Penncovewaterfestival. com. Sensory Fun for the Family: Join the Whidbey Family Connections group and familyservice providers for kid-friendly activities Saturday, May 19, 3-5pm at the Coupeville Rec Hall. The group connects Whidbey Island families who support loved ones with developmental delays or medical conditions with others, resources and training. Island County Parent to Parent, (360) 675-4093. Paine Field Aviation Day: The Washington Pilots Association, Flying Heritage & Combat Armor Museum, Historic Flight Foundation, and Paine Field will host the 23rd annual Paine Field Aviation Day Saturday, May 19, 10am-5pm. The admission ticket gives you entrance to both museums, plus prime viewing for the flying demonstrations. Static aircraft displays, simulators, and engaging exhibits. Flyingheritage.com. PAWZ by the Sea 5K/10K Run/Walk and Kids Run: Walk or run May 28, on behalf of Happy Hounds 4-H Club and the Good Cheer Pet Food Bank. Four-legged friends and kids welcome. Register at Pawzbythesea.com. Summer is coming so don’t delay – make your plans today! Some of the most popular summer camps are filling up fast. Lakeside Bible Camp (ages 8 to 18): Archery, BMX-Biking, creative activities, kayaking, water sports, new friendships, adventures and life-changing Gospel-centered education. Lakeside Bible Camp also offers Family Camps and Parent & Child Camps. LakesideBibleCamp.org JR Russell’s “Magic Camp” (Ages 8-12): Magician JR Russell invites kids to Discover Magic this summer. As they learn & perform magic, kids are also taught important life skills. SWParks.org Camp Kirby (Day & Residential Camps, grades 1-12): Archery, waterfront activities, arts & crafts, 40-foot climbing tower, and hiking located on 47 acres of forest, grasslands and beach that spread 1-1/2 miles along Padilla Bay. campfiresamishcouncil.org Calyx Nature Camps (Ages 5-10): Calyx Camps nurture connection, curiosity, creativity and compassion through intentional nature and arts-based learning, located in the 347-acre classroom at South Whidbey State Park. Calyxschool.com Whidbey Island Brass Camp (Ages 11-18): A week-long day camp for middle & high school brass players who have been in band or taken private lessons for at least 1 year. Seanbrownmusic.weebly.com Padilla Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve: Ongoing, fun, educational events for Mini Explorers (ages 3-5), Junior Ecologists (ages 6-9), families and adults. Summer is the season for Mudflat Safaris and Beach Seines, two field-based family programs to introduce you to Padilla Bay's amazing plants and animals. Aquarium tours give a close-up encounter with amazing animals. Padillabay. gov. Summer Camps for Kids with Special Needs: Seattle’s Children’s Hospital hosts a directory of these camps: Cshcn.org. For a guide to local camps, summer activities and Whidbey-Area events, go to WhidbeyIsland.MacaroniKid.com.

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APRIL 26 - MAY 2, 2018 www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALL LOCALL Y OWNED Y OWNED

ON TRACK with Jim Freeman

Given the glorious week of weather we have enjoyed, my inside the caboose productivity has been minimal. I have had enough of maximal. Time to get real and enjoy our organic, gluten-free, Vitamin D

laced sunshine. As we used to yell at Lake Norfolk, Arkansas, “Sunscreen, sunscreen, we all scream for sunscreen.” Quote of the week “I've never been anywhere in the U.S. with this concentration of such weird people” reportedly said with admiration by a local singer/ songwriter/musician featured on page A10 in Island Life, last Saturday, April 21 @ www. southwhidbeyrecord.com. Tell 'em the Whidbey Weekly sent ya.

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Whidbey Weekly

www.whidbeyweekly.com APRIL 26 - MAY 2, 2018

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letter used in the English language does not appear even once in the paragraph. Congrats on however you did. For extra credit, what was Nelson Riddle's middle name? Hint—Steve Allen used to yell it to his audience on his TV show. Answer—Smock, as in Nelson Smock Riddle, Jr. Rest stop While some folks have a bucket list to prioritize anticipated procrastinatory pleasures, I have a GDBD list. Get Done Before Dead. I got this idea years ago at a rest area in Pennsylvania. I was resting at the time, not just stopping and going. I find it a metaphorical violation to spend too little time at a rest stop. I stay even longer at a rest area. There is more room to rest. Last week, I added to my GDBD list, “publish a photo essay/poetry book about rest areas in the USA.” Mom wrote a song once on toilet paper. The first line was, “Last night you told me you loved me.”

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We agree.

Her second line was “Did you mean it sweetheart?”

Weirdness without prejudice is one reason we feel so safe here.

Then the song ended. Mom had no more tissue.

Would you not agree our nine digit zip-code acceptance of one another throughout the adjacent ports o'mail of 98236, 98239, 98249, 98253, and 98277 has fostered freedom of thought?

Like the relationship, it was the end of the roll.

390 NE MIDWAY BLVD | PO BOX 1098 | OAK HARBOR, WASHINGTON 98277

For me, there is a poetry to rest stops. I would like to share the rest of the rest stops' history, delineating such nuggets through prose, poetry and photos.

Publisher & Editor.......................................................... Eric Marshall

Has your mind not wandered safely on our local beaches, on our hiking trails, or in line at coffee huts Whidbey Island wide?

For example, the Henry W. Lunt Roadside Park, pictured above, the very first rest stop in Utah.

Production Manager......................................................TJ Pierzchala

Ever since Dion sang The Wanderer, back when our 9th grade boys quartet was singing Goober Peas at lunch-time, I have wanted to wander. Like Dion, I'm that type of guy. But, because I love it here, I just let my mind wander while the rest of me waits, often sitting, sometimes standing, but always at the ready. One must be ready to let one's mind wander. I always take lots of water. At my age, one must stay fabricated. Riddle up Thanks to Keith Jacobs for sharing the following five riddles. I was able to correctly identify none out of the five, but I do have great success with anything dealing with Nelson Riddle. 1. A murderer is condemned to death. He has to choose between three rooms. The first is full of raging fires, the second is full of assassins with loaded guns and the third is full of lions that haven't eaten in 3 years. Which room is safest for him? 2. A woman shoots her husband. Then she holds him under water for over 5 minutes. Finally, she hangs him. But 5 minutes later they both go out together and enjoy a wonderful dinner together. How can this be? 3. What is black when you buy it, red when you use it, and gray when you throw it away? 4. Can you name three consecutive days without using the words Wednesday, Friday, or Sunday? 5. This is an unusual paragraph. I'm curious as to just how quickly you can find out what is so unusual about it. It looks so ordinary and plain you would think nothing was wrong with it. In fact, nothing is wrong with it! It is highly unusual though. Study it and think about it, but you still may not find anything odd. But if you work at it a bit, you might find out. Try to do so without any coaching. The answers are: 1. The third room. Lions that haven't eaten in three years are dead 2. The woman was a photographer. She shot a picture of her husband, developed it, and hung it up to dry (shot; held under water; and hung). 3. Charcoal, as it is used in barbecuing. 4. Sure you can name three consecutive days, yesterday, today, and tomorrow! 5. The letter "e" which is the most common

I spoke with the grandson of Mr. Lunt who donated the land, originally containing two out buildings and a pond. The achievements of his grandfather are worth sharing with those of you who do not take the time to read such raised lettering. Like John Lennon said, “getting there is better than being there.” Of course, Mr. Lennon was talking about his rise to fame, not the next rest stop.

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Volume 10, Issue 17 | © MMXVIII Whidbey Weekly

PUBLISHED and distributed every week. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The Whidbey Weekly cannot be held responsible for the quality of goods or services supplied by advertisers in this publication. Articles, unless otherwise stated, are by contribution and therefore the Whidbey Weekly is not in a position to validate any comments, recommendations or suggestions made in these articles. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. DEADLINES: The Whidbey Weekly is a submission based editorial with contributing writers. Please feel free to submit any information (please limit to 200 words) that you would like to share with the Whidbey Weekly. You may submit by email to editor@whidbeyweekly.com, by fax to (360)682-2344 or by postal mail to PO Box 1098, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date. For more information, please visit www.whidbeyweekly.com.

Mr. Lunt was born January 25, 1863, and passed away the day after Christmas, in 1926. “The park is dedicated in recognition of his contribution to the scenic, economic and spiritual development of Southern Utah. Mr. Lunt served as Vice Chairman of the State Road Commission and, 'did more than any other individual in the history of Southern Utah to promote the development of the highway system to these rural areas and to open the road system to the scenic parks of Southern Utah.' (Governor Henry Blood) Henry Lunt unselfishly served the tradition of his pioneer ancestry. He made great personal and financial sacrifices to further the state of Utah. Among many positions, he served as: State Senator, County Commissioner, Mayor of Cedar City, City Councilman, President of the Telephone Company, President of the Mercantile, City Manager, LDS Bishop and Stake President. He was recognized as a peacemaker and was devoted to his family. Mr. Lunt's vision provided this park. With the expansion of the highway, he wanted a resting spot by this natural spring for weary travelers. This first roadside park in Utah was named for and dedicated to Mr. Lunt on Dec. 27, 1940. May this place remind all to perpetuate the Pioneer Spirit of Love, Humanity and Devotion to God, Family, State and Community that Henry W. Lunt embodied.”

Contributing Writers Jim Freeman Wesley Hallock Kae Harris Tracy Loescher Kathy Reed Carey Ross

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I asked Mr. Lunt's grandson his name. “Gary.” “Gary, my name is Jim. I'd like to write about this beautiful rest area.” As I walked toward my rented U-Haul, parked hopefully and proudly between two 18 wheeler long trucks, I looked back at Gary. “One R or two in Gary?” “Two.” Make that Garry. Another item on my GDBD list is this column. Get Done Before Deadline. Thanks for making my list. To read past columns of On Track in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www. whidbeyweekly.com.

Whidbey’s Largest Selection of Fine Art Supplies

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APRIL 26 - MAY 2, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

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Bits & Pieces Coupeville Marshals Office, City Hall, 4 N.E. Seventh St, Coupeville Oak Harbor Police Department, 860 S.E. Barrington Drive, Oak Harbor

[Submitted by Wylie Farr, Island County Sheriff’s Office]

April 2018 – Island County Grange Month

Letters to the Editor Editor, With our 40th consecutive season off to a solid start, the Coupeville Farmers Market would like to publicly thank and recognize those who contributed significantly to our special year. First and foremost, our amazing loyal local customers who showed up in high winds and then again in overcast drizzle these last two market days. You make it all worth it! And, pardon the semi-pun, you are the wind beneath our wings. To the Coupeville Festival Association – the grant award from you has helped us “spiff up and look smart” in a big way. The market is all about community collaboration and we are proud to claim CFA as one of our community partners. And finally – to Whidbey Weekly staff – you ROCK! From help with logo concepts, advertising language, and a beautiful article from Kathy Reed, everyone connected with Whidbey Weekly has been wonderful and a delight with whom to work. We are excited to keep it going throughout this special 40th season. Coupeville Farmers Market Board of Directors Dorothy Mueller, Jessica Fisher, Elizabeth-Phoenix Agin, Byron Burns, Nancy Skullerud, Michael Case-Smith Market Manager Peg Tennant and our growing list of member vendors

Taking Back Unwanted Prescriptions On Saturday, April 28, from 10:00am to 2:00pm the agencies listed below and the Drug Enforcement Administration will give the public another opportunity to prevent pill abuse and theft by ridding their homes of potentially dangerous expired, unused, and unwanted prescription drugs. Bring your pills for disposal to the sites listed below. (The DEA cannot accept liquids or needles or sharps, only pills or patches.) The service is free and anonymous, no questions asked. This initiative addresses a vital public safety and public health issue. Medicines that languish in home cabinets are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse, and abuse. Rates of prescription drug abuse in the U.S. are alarmingly high, as are the number of accidental poisonings and overdoses due to these drugs. Studies show that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabinet. In addition, Americans are now advised that their usual methods for disposing of unused medicines (flushing them down the toilet or throwing them in the trash) pose potential safety and health hazards. “I can’t emphasize the importance of turning in your un-used prescription medication. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, half of young people who inject Heroin started off abusing prescription drugs. Even more disturbing is the startling statistic from the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids that indicates 4 out of every 10 teens who misused or abused a prescription drug took it from their parent’s medicine cabinet. Don’t leave your prescription meds unsecured in our community. Please bring them in for disposal.” Mark Brown, Island County Sheriff Island County Sheriff Office, 5521 E. Harbor Road, Freeland

The community and friends of Deer Lagoon Grange are invited to an open house event on Sunday, April 29, at 2:00pm. Deer Lagoon Grange has been serving south Whidbey for 91 years and will be celebrating its participation in the community. Island County Commissioner Helen Price Johnson will present the Island County Commissioner’s Proclamation of April 2018 as “Island County Grange Month”. This year marks the creation of the Grange movement 150 years ago on the Potomac River. The Grange has contributed at every level to our society (community granges, county, state, and the National Grange). The membership advocates American values and honors our hometown roots. Deer Lagoon Grange is celebrating: Its service through educational efforts to help people develop their potential; service by volunteer effort to manage and staff several departments of the Whidbey Island Area Fair; nonpartisan legislative advocacy including several resolutions submitted to and adopted by the Washington State Grange; strengthening social connections; supporting agriculture, and supporting the youth of South Whidbey. Deer Lagoon Grange will be presenting its annual “Community Citizen Award” to Darrell Wenzek. He is being recognized for his efforts to help troubled families and individuals. Darrell is pastor of South Whidbey Community Church, which supports the ministries of Helping Hand, Lakeside Bible Camp, Pregnancy Care Clinic, Samaritan’s Purse and Young Life. The program for the Open House will include the following speakers: Goosefoot Foundation, Sandy Whiting; Whidbey Grown, John Burks; Whidbey Island Fair, Carol Coble. Deer Lagoon Grange is located at 5142 Bayview Road, Langley. [Submitted by Patricia Prochaska]

Her Story is Our Story: America Has More Than Just Founding Fathers Jill Tietjen starts with the names. Some are familiar, like Amelia Earhart, Oprah Winfrey and Helen Keller. Others, less so. There’s Lane Bryant, a company that would’ve been called Lena Bryant after the founder’s name except for a clerical error. Her firm produced the first commercially available maternity garment in 1904 and continues today. And Florence Seibert, whose work in developing the test for tuberculosis. Or Stephanie Kwolek, the chemist who invented the bulletproof fabric, Kevlar. Familiar names or not, the point of Tietjen’s book, “Her Story, a Timeline of the Women Who Changed America” is that women, their stories and their accomplishments, are the story of all Americans. Tietjen brings those stories to Whidbey Island as part of the Trudy Sundberg Lecture Series: Friday, May 4, 7:00pm, WICA, 565 Camano Ave., Langley Saturday, May 5, 7:00pm, Elks Lodge, 155 NE Ernst St. Oak Harbor Both events are free and open to the public. Seating may be limited, doors open at 6:30pm each night. Tietjen said she expects the “book to be the start of many discussions and conversations related to women’s achievements throughout history. ‘Her Story’ captures the broad spectrum of human endeavor.” Tietjen is an electrical engineer as well as author and national speaker on the history

of scientific and technical women. She is a member of the Colorado Women’s Hall of Fame and received the Daughters of the American Revolution History Award Medal for “Her Story.” The choice of Tietjen and this book is wellaligned with the namesake of the lecture series. Trudy Sundberg was a beloved Whidbey Island teacher and civic activist who passed away in 2013. Sundberg was known for her commitment as an Oak Harbor High School educator and community leader whose causes ranged from progressive politics to founding the Save Our Kids Crusade to support for the arts and promoting the Whidbey Camano Land Trust. Family members, friends and the Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation joined together to establish the Trudy Sundberg Memorial Fund to underwrite a lecture series in Sundberg’s name that reflects her many areas of interest and promote lifelong learning. The Trudy Sundberg Lecture Series is sponsored by the Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation, Humanities Washington, Jennifer Wynn of Windermere Real Estate – Whidbey Island, Island Thrift, Davido Consulting Group, Inc., Friends of the Clinton Library, Friends of the Freeland Library, League of Women Voters Whidbey Island, Whidbey Sun and Wind, American Association of University Women (AAUW) Whidbey Island Branch, Terra Firma Wealth Management, Whidbey Island Bank and Whidbey Telecom. For more information, contact Marshall F. Goldberg, (360) 675-5888, mfgold@comcast. net. [Submitted by Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, Sno-Isle Libraries]

20th Annual Eagles Plant & Garden Sale Twenty years and counting – It’s now a great South Whidbey tradition! This is the place to find a great selection of locally grown plants and trees at bargain prices. Big, healthy gallon size tomato plants, hanging baskets, fuchsias, grasses, ground cover, bedding plants, rhodies, herbs, landscape trees, assorted veggies and more. Once you’ve loaded up your vehicles, you are invited to come back inside where you can grab a snack or, on Sunday, buy raffle tickets for a chance to win a cool Weber BBQ and an assortment of other great prizes, many donated by local businesses and thoughtful individuals to help the fundraising effort. The Eagles is located one mile south of Freeland on SR 525. Doors open at 9:00am Saturday, May 5 and Sunday, May 6. [Submitted by Bruce Howard]

Cinco de Mayo Party and Concert

Dance your rear off at WICA’s first Cinco de Mayo bash, a drop-in DJ party in Zech Hall from 2:00pm to 7:00pm on May 5. The houseparty will feature dance music, snacks, and no-host bar. Pizza, margaritas, beer, and sodas will be available for purchase. Open to all ages, there will also be outdoor games, weather permitting. Bring your friends and family for a lively community celebration! The party continues at 7:30pm with a concert by Mexican-American group Las Cafeteras. The LA Times describes Las Cafeteras as a “uniquely Angeleno mishmash of punk, hiphop, beat music, cumbia and rock … live, they’re magnetic.” Concert begins at 7:30pm. Tickets are $22 for adults and $20 for youth. For tickets or more information, call (360) 221-8268 or visit https://tickets.wicaonline.org [Submitted by Chase Norman, WICA]

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED Skagit Valley College Selects Pam Wessel-Estes as the Special Assistant at SVC’s South Whidbey Island Center Skagit Valley College is pleased to announce that Pam Wessel-Estes has been selected to serve as the Special Assistant at SVC’s South Whidbey Island Center, which recently relocated to the Community Center in Langley, located at 723 Camano Avenue. In this position, Pam will oversee the daily operations of the South Whidbey Center. She will work collaboratively with high school faculty and staff to provide outreach and information about SVC to college bound students. In addition, she will work with community partners in support of providing high quality adult education and training at the Center. “I am delighted with the opportunity to work with the professionals and leaders of Skagit Valley College and contribute to the College’s focus on excellence in serving students,” said Pam. “My passion is working to support the higher education needs of our communities, individuals, and families on south Whidbey Island.” Pam holds a BA from Western Washington University and a MA from Antioch University Seattle in psychology with a focus on community development. She has more than 35 years of experience working in human/social services and directing non-profit organizations. She served the Snohomish Health District in Everett for 14 years, most recently as the policy analyst. In addition, she served as executive director of two non-profit organizations and managed numerous programs and projects. She is a native of Washington and resides with her spouse on south Whidbey Island. They have two young adult children. Fall Quarter registration for Returning Students begins May 10. Registration for New Students begins May 30 at the South Whidbey Center and all SVC locations. Hours of operation at the South Whidbey Center are Monday through Wednesday from noon to 5:00pm, and Thursday by appointment. To learn more about programs at the South Whidbey Center, contact Pam Wessel-Estes, (360) 341-2324, pam.wessel-estes@skagit.edu or visit online at www.skagit.edu/getting-started [Submitted by Arden Ainley, Chief Public Information Officer, SVC]

AAUW Scholar Recognition & Scholarship Awards Night Each year the highlight for the Whidbey Island branch of AAUW (American Association of University Women) is Scholar Recognition and Scholarship Awards Night. This year was no exception. Dozens of members, parents, siblings, teachers, counselors and sponsors gathered the evening of April 17 in Coupeville to honor Whidbey’s top female students with scholarships and stipends totaling over $17,000. Eleven 7th grade students were awarded scholarships to AAUW’s Tech Trek, a weeklong science camp in July, hosted in our region by Pacific Lutheran University and Eastern Washington University: Abigail Ramirez, Brynn Schmid and Abigail Place of Coupeville Middle School; Miley Davidson of North Whidbey Middle School; Sydney Lupien, McKaela Meffert, and Sydney Walker of Oak Harbor Home Connection; Parker Forsythe, Abigail Ireland, Grace Miller and Nikki Murnane of South Whidbey Middle School. Nine juniors were chosen to receive stipends and certificates as STEM Scholars, nominated by their Science, Technology and Math teachers as being tops in their fields: Melissa Otto (Science), Madison Rixe (Technology) and Sarah Wright (Math) of Coupeville High School; Sophia Mischke (Science), Natalie Hahn (Technology) and Julia Beumer (Math) of Oak Harbor High School; Carlie Newman (Science), Laura Miller (Technology) and Lynda Moran (Math) of South Whidbey High School. Last, but not least, three seniors were awarded Academic Scholarships to the college of their choice: Sofia Hassapis of Coupeville High School, Ainsley Pollitt of Oak Harbor High School and Nora Anastasi of South Whidbey

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APRIL 26 - MAY 2, 2018 www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALL LOCALL Y OWNED Y OWNED High School. After a rigorous selection process, these students were chosen from among 29 applicants based on their academic achievements, school activities, community service, work experience and two essays. The purpose of AAUW is to advance equity for women and girls through advocacy, education, philanthropy and research. If you would like to join AAUW in these efforts, please contact Barb Bland at barble@comcast.net or Erlene Little at ErleneJoe@earthlink.net. [Submitted by Sue Norman, AAUW Whidbey Island]

Preliminary Navy Findings From Drinking Water Testing Near NAS Whidbey Island Area 6 The following information is provided as part of the Navy’s water testing program around the Area 6 landfill near Ault Field. As of April 13, 2018, the Navy has sampled 15 drinking water wells and 13 groundwater wells near the Area 6 Landfill. Preliminary results for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) samples have been received for 15 drinking water wells and 13 groundwater wells. Results for three drinking water wells are above the action level established for PFOS and/or PFOA. All affected residences were provided bottled water within 24 hours of receiving preliminary results. No exceedances of the action level for PFOS and/or PFOA were identified for the groundwater wells. Preliminary results for 1,4-dioxane and vinyl chloride have been received for 14 drinking water wells and 13 groundwater wells. No exceedances of the action levels for 1,4-dioxane or vinyl chloride were identified for the drinking water wells and groundwater wells. In February 2018, the Navy notified people in the sampling area by letter to arrange sampling. There are still residents in the sampling area who have not signed up to have the Navy test their drinking water. The Navy believes it is important to test as many wells in the identified sampling area in order to identify and address potential exposures

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Whidbey Weekly

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in drinking water. If you know that you fall in the sampling area, or suspect you might, and want to have your well tested, please call (360) 396-1030, and a Navy representative will call you back to make arrangements. Out of respect to residents’ privacy, test-result data will only be released by the Navy to the affected residents.

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The Navy is working directly with residents, community leaders and federal, state and local agencies on this important national issue and will keep the community informed while respecting the privacy of individual residents.

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Updates and additional information on this project is available at http://go.usa.gov/xkMBc.

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[Submitted by Mike Welding, Public Affairs Officer, NAS Whidbey Island]

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Local Business News

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Health Services Celebrates One Year at New Location Dr. Kristine Jarrell, owner of Hearing Health Services, is thrilled to announce a ceremonial Ribbon Cutting on May 18, 2018 at 4:30pm to commemorate the first anniversary of her new audiology clinic in Coupeville. Join Dr. Jarrell and her team, along with members of Coupeville Chamber of Commerce and the Oak Harbor Chamber of Commerce, celebrating a central location that services the hearing needs of all Whidbey Island and help raise awareness that May is National Better Speech and Hearing month! Dr. Jarrell has been serving Whidbey Island’s communities for over 20 years and specializes in providing a full range of hearing services to patients of all ages. Visit Dr. Jarrell for a free hearing consultation at her new clinic and discover your path to better hearing. Dr. Jarrell is honored to have been voted the most trusted audiologist on Whidbey five years in a row. Hearing Health Services is located at 20 N.W. Birch Street, Coupeville, WA 98239. For more information, call 360-678-1423 or visit www. coupevillehearing.com

DONATIONS NEEDED! FREE PICK UP! Your donations are tax deductible! Support Habitat For Humanity With Your Gently Used Appliances & Furniture

20%

! S T A E S E V O L & S A F O S L L OFF* A

Your Support Helps Place Families In Homes of Island County

New mattresses at Both Stores!

*Blue Price

2 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU! FREELAND • 1592 Main Street

OAK HARBOR • 290 SE Pioneer

southstore@islandcountyhabitat.com

store@islandcountyhabitat.com www.habitatfurnitureandmore.info

360.331.6272

FREELAND STORE ONLY We carry building materials: Cabinets, hardware, doors and flooring. (Bring donations of building supplies to Freeland location)

360.675.8733

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED AT BOTH STORES!

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6

APRIL 26 - MAY 2, 2018

Whidbey Weekly

LOCALLY OWNED

What’s Going On All entries are listed chronologically, unless there are multiple entries for the same venue or are connected to a specific organization (such as Sno-Isle Libraries) in which case all entries for that venue or organization are listed collectively in chronological order under one heading.

Early Childhood Open House Friday, April 27, 8:30am-10:00am Whidbey Island Waldorf School, Clinton Open to all parents in the community with children 1-6 years old. Come with your child to experience a morning together at WIWS with play, songs, a forest walk and craft activity. The Early Childhood teachers will be available to answer your questions about the school programs. Free admission, all are welcome. WIWS is located at 6335 Old Pietila Road. For more information, visit www.wiws.org

Island Herb Vendor Day Friday, April 27, 3:00pm-6:00pm Island Herb, Freeland Representatives from Ceres will be on site with product displays and information. Island Herb is located at 5565 Vanbarr Pl, Unit F. For more information, call (360) 331-0140 or visit whidbeyislandherb.com

Island Jazz Collective Friday, April 27, 6:30pm-9:30pm Oak Harbor Senior Center, 51 SE Jerome St. Tickets: $15 Enjoy a night of music, dancing, appetizers and no host bar. Everyone 21+ welcome. Tickets available at the Oak Harbor Senior Center and at the door. For more information, call (360) 279-4580.

Ballroom Dancing Friday, April 27, 6:30pm-9:30pm Deer Lagoon Grange Hall, 5142 Bayview Rd, Langley Suggested donation $12 Music by Steve Ellis

“Sonic Sea” Friday, April 27, 7:00pm UUCWI, 20103 SR 525, Freeland This award winning documentary describes the tragic consequences for marine life due to noise from seismic oil exploration, ship noise and the Navy’s active sonar and explosives testing programs. Discussion follows. All welcome. Co-sponsored by Whidbey Environmental Action Network, Coupeville Allies and NW Coast Protectors. No charge. Donations appreciated.

Live Music: Chuck Dingée Friday, April 27, 7:00pm-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville Chuck Dingée has been playing guitar and singing professionally for over 40 years. His extensive repertoire of classic rock, folk-rock, and other tunes is quite diverse. No cover. For more information, call (360) 682-5747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

Coupeville Garden Club 50th Annual Plant Sale Saturday, April 28, 9:00am-4:00pm Coupeville Rec Hall, 901 NW Alexander St. The 50th anniversary plant sale will feature an increased selection of tomatoes (both hybrid and heirloom) specifically chosen for success in Puget Sound gardens and speciality geraniums. Tried and true annuals and perennials including peonies, dahlias, canna lilies, ferns, and succulents will be available for purchase and all plants have been grown organically. A variety of garden art (concrete leaves, stepping stones, and glass art) will be for sale as well as raffle prizes selected to please gardeners of all ages.

Taking Back Unwanted Prescriptions Saturday, April 28, 10:00am-2:00pm Island County Sheriff Office, 5521 E Harbor Rd, Freeland Coupeville Marshals Office - City Hall, 4 NE Seventh St, Coupeville Oak Harbor Police Department, 860 SE Barrington Dr, Oak Harbor The above agencies and the Drug Enforcement Administration will give the public another opportunity to prevent pill abuse and theft by ridding their homes of potentially dangerous expired, unused, and unwanted prescription drugs. Bring your pills for disposal to the above sites. (The DEA cannot accept liquids or needles or sharps, only pills or patches.) The service is free and anonymous, no questions asked.

SW Garden Club Plant Sale Saturday, April 28, 10:00am-2:00pm Bayview Community Hall, Langley Find great plants at great prices at the new indoor location. Garden art, garden items and books, freshly baked goods, many locally donated raffle packages, local artists and specialized growers will be included. Proceeds from the plant sale help fund horticulture related projects, student scholarships and educational programs throughout our community. Contact Christine at (360) 221-2203 or visit southwhidbeygardenclub.com for more information. The Bayview Community Hall is located at 5242 Bayview Rd.

Holland Happening “Walk of Honor Car Show”

and characters of Damon Runyon. Music and lyrics by Frank Loesser. Book by Jo Sterling and Abe Burrows. Directed by Linda McLean. Produced by Darren McCoy and Melissa Gibson. Festival seating tickets are $10 for students, $15 for adults, and available at the door beginning at 6:15pm for each show. Presale tickets are available at the ASB Office April 23-27.

20th Annual Eagles Plant & Garden Sale Saturday, May 5, 9:00am-4:00pm Sunday, May 6, 9:00am-2:00pm Eagles Aerie #3418, Freeland Visit the Eagles big sale to find a great selection of plants and trees grown in the Northwest at bargain prices. Big, healthy, gallon size tomato plants, hanging baskets, fuchsias, grasses, ground cover, bedding plants, Rhodies, herbs, landscape trees, assorted veggies and more. Head inside to grab a snack or buy raffle tickets to win an assortment of great prizes, many donated by local businesses. The Eagles Aerie is located at 16691 SR 525. For more information, call (360) 321-5636.

Gift & Craft Fair Saturday, May 5, 10:00am-3:00pm Regency on Whidbey, Oak Harbor Everyone is welcome. Regency is located at 1040 SW Kimball Dr. For more information, call (360) 279-2224.

Star Party Friday, May 11, begins at dark Prairie Overlook next to Coupeville Cemetery

Located between Midway and Pasek Streets, trophies will be presented for the top three finishers in People’s Choice voting. $20 per vehicle. Entry includes dash plaque. This third annual event is a fundraiser for the Rotary Club of Oak Harbor.

Explore the night sky and view distant galaxies, planets and nebulas at this free public Star Party hosted by the Island County Astronomical Society (ICAS). No telescope is needed and all ages are welcome to attend. Be sure to dress warmly and note that the event will be canceled if the weather is cloudy. For more information, contact Bob Scott at ICAS_President@outlook.com, or visit www.icas-wa.org.

Requiem

Soroptimist Shred Event

Saturday, April 28, 1:00pm-4:00pm SE Pioneer Way, Oak Harbor

Saturday, April 28, 7:00pm South Whidbey High School, Langley Sunday, April 29, 2:30pm Oak Harbor High School Presented by the Saratoga Orchestra in collaboration with Whidbey Community Chorus & Oak Harbor High School Choirs. Tickets are $25 for adults, $20 for senior/military, and free for students under 18. Tickets and information at www.sowhidbey.com

Matthew Laslo’s Magic Now Saturday, April 28, 7:30pm Whidbey Island Center for the Arts, Langley Tickets: $18 adults, $15 for youth 12 & under Matthew Laslo is a 17-year-old award-winning magician who thrills audiences worldwide with both close-up and grand illusions. Magic Now is filled with humor, awe, wonder and lots of audience participation. For tickets or more information, call (360) 221-8268 or visit www. wicaonline.org

South Whidbey Tilth 1st Annual Nettle Festival Sunday, April 29, 11:00am-2:00pm Tilth Campus, 2812 Thompson Rd, Langley Come celebrate all things nettle at the opening day of the farmers’ market! Taste testings of soup, pesto, frittata & more. Recipe handouts and information on making nettle compost tea, nettles in biodynamic agriculture, and herbal medicine.

Guys & Dolls Thursdays, May 3 & 10, 7:00pm Fridays, May 4 & 11, 7:00pm Saturdays, May 5 & 12, 7:00pm Oak Harbor High School The OHHS Fine Arts Department presents a musical fable of Broadway based on a story

Saturday, May 12, 10:00am-1:00pm Whidbey Island Bank, 5590 Harbor Ave, Freeland Time to spring clean your filing cabinets. Securely dispose your personal and financial records. Licensed & Bonded shredding company. Paper only, staples ok. Minimum donation is $5 for Bankers Box or grocery bag, $10 for oversized box or garbage bag. All proceeds benefit Soroptimist International of South Whidbey Island programs and training.

High Tea Saturday, May 12, 12:00pm Oak Harbor Senior Center, 51 SE Jerome St. $15 per person Tea includes a gracious selection of finger sandwiches, scones, quiche, tea cakes and cookies. Fancy hats encouraged. Limited seating available. Tickets available at the Oak Harbor Senior Center. Call (360) 279-4580 for more information.

Open Skate Fridays Every Friday, 6:00pm-8:00pm Roller Barn, 98 NE Barron Dr, Oak Harbor Proceeds support Boys & Girls Club. $5 per skater and $3 for general admission. Last Friday of the month, skate with the Whidbey Island Roller Girls! Sorry, checks not accepted, credit card fees apply. For more information, call (360) 240-9273.

Upcoming Sno-Isle Library Events See schedule below Cost: Free Lit for Fun Book Group - The Underground Railroad Thursday, April 26, 9:00am-11:00am Freeland Library Join us for a discussion of Colson Whitehead’s

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED “The Underground Railroad,” a tale of one woman’s ferocious will to escape the horrors of bondage and a shattering meditation on our history. For adults. Whidbey Reads Presents - South Whidbey at Home Book Group: Before the Wind Thursday, April 26, 3:00pm-4:30pm Freeland Library Join us for a great book discussion of Jim Lynch’s “Before the Wind,” this year’s Whidbey Reads book! You don’t need to be a member of South Whidbey at Home to attend - everyone is welcome! Rocket Science.....it’s a Blast! Friday, April 27, 1:00pm-2:00pm Coupeville Elementary Multipurpose Room A fun and hands-on introduction to rockets! Students will learn how rockets work and why scientists use them. Made By Hand - Come Play in the Mud! Saturday, April 28, 10:00am-12:00pm Freeland Library Make a unique planter using hypertufa. It’s porous, lighter than concrete, will survive frost and is easy to work with. For teens and adults. Registration required. Antiques - A Valuable Collection or an Accumulation? Saturday, April 28, 10:00am-12:00pm Clinton Community Hall, 6411 S. Central Ave. Learn from Bette Belle, an expert appraiser with 29 years of experience, what’s hot and what’s not in the antique marketplace. Ready Readers Baby & Me Storytime Monday, April 30, 9:30am Coupeville Library Wiggle and giggle with your baby through stories happy songs, rhymes and activities that inspire a love of reading. For newborns through 24 months. Caregiver required. Poetry of Place - Poems of Island Life Monday, April 30, 5:00pm-8:00pm Coupeville Library Celebrate Poetry Month with members of the Red Book Poetry Group and Oak Harbor Poetry Project. They will read poems inspired by island life. Open mic open to all. LEGO in the Library Tuesday, May 1, 4:00pm-5:30pm Coupeville Library Build your best with LEGO(R) in this open session for creating by yourself or with a building buddy. We’ll also build with Squigz this month. For ages 5 and up. Main Frame with the Pacific Science Center Wednesday, May 2, 2:00pm-5:00pm Freeland Library What do we have in common with a cougar or an opossum? Cooperative groups will construct mini human skeletons and real animal skeletons and then compare their form and function. Wednesday Night with the Stars: “Wonder” Wednesday, May 2, 5:30pm-7:30pm Coupeville Library Join us for popcorn and a movie! This month we are showing “Wonder.” Rated PG. Meet Poet Lena Khalaf Tuffaha Thursday, May 3, 2:00pm Oak Harbor Library Tuffaha’s most recent book is “Water & Salt,” a book of poems from Red Hen Press, published in April 2017. It is available for check out at Sno-Isle Libraries. This program is for teens and adults. Refreshments provided by Skagit Valley College Student Life.

Religious Services Prayer Group Every Tuesday, 4:00pm-5:30pm St. Hubert Catholic Church, Langley Charismatic Prayer and Praise group. Everyone welcome. For more information, call Bill at (360) 222-4080 or email Sobico@comcast.net.

Filipino Christian Fellowship Sundays, 2:00pm Meets at Church on the Rock, 1780 SE 4th Ave., Oak Harbor. www.ohcfellowship.com WHAT'S GOING ON

continued on page

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17


Whidbey Weekly

NEWS www.whidbeyweekly.com

Fauré's "Requiem" p. 14

LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

APRIL 26 - MAY 2, 2018

Whidbey Homeless Coalition fosters community conversation By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly Solutions to any issue are often born from conversation and that is the hope of the Whidbey Homeless Coalition, which held a Community Café-style conversation about homelessness Monday night in Oak Harbor. About 50 people attended the event, held at the Oak Harbor Senior Center. Attendees were seated at tables of three or four and asked to converse about three main questions: What is your experience of homelessness and how does it make you feel? What is it to be homeless on Whidbey? If your mother, brother, daughter were homeless in another community, what would you hope for them? “It’s good to have this conversation and get people engaged on this issue,” said Ursula Roosen-Runge, executive director of the Whidbey Homeless Coalition. “People come with all sorts of ideas about what homelessness looks like; maybe a few people will leave with a different idea.” Roosen-Runge said there are many misconceptions about what homelessness really is, and said events like the one Monday night help educate and enlighten people, hopefully spurring substantive conversations within the community that lead to solutions. “There are people who see somebody panhandling, or who may be drunk or talking to themselves and think that’s probably what homelessness is,” she said. “But it’s a much bigger issue than that. It could be people who have been working and paying rent who have suddenly lost their housing because they can’t afford a rent increase. “We believe when people in the community engage in the conversation by simply talking and raising their concerns, it helps generate

See HOUSING continued on page 18

Photo Courtesy of Oak Harbor Chamber of Commerce The grand parade, to be held at 11 a.m. Saturday, is a traditional favorite each year among those attending Holland Happening in downtown Oak Harbor.

Holland Happening goes international By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly With springtime and tulips comes the annual celebration of Oak Harbor’s heritage, long known as Holland Happening, running Thursday through Sunday in the city’s historic downtown. But this year the longtime celebration has a decidedly international flair, as evidenced by the change to the name “Holland Happening an International Festival.” “It is really just a slight change, and in just one area,” said Christine Cribb, executive director of the Oak Harbor Chamber of Commerce, which puts on the event. “This idea has been in the works for a few years now. It is still a fabulous Holland Happening; the HH committee recognized the need for and wanted to find a way to celebrate all the diversity in the heritage of our community and have been working on ways to showcase the diversity, while still remaining the fun tulip event that it is.”

“Obviously, Jan Ellis’s love for this event is what kept it alive and thriving. She started the event,” said Cribb. She will get a wonderful recognition read to the public during the parade.” Annual attendance for Holland Happening has averaged about 8,000 people the past several years, which never ceases to amaze and please organizers. “The attendance for the parade is pretty remarkable, and the carnival, and the street fair,” Cribb said. “This event kicks off event season in our community. Of course, with all outdoor events the weather plays a huge part.” Rain or shine, this weekend could be the perfect time to pull out those Klompen and enjoy some of the international fun that is Holland Happening.

As Cribb noted, much of the event remains the same. The Davis Amusement Carnival, held in the lot next to Alfy’s Pizza on Bayshore Drive, opens at 4 p.m. Thursday and Friday, at 11 a.m. Saturday and at noon Sunday. Advance tickets to the carnival can be purchased at the Oak Harbor Chamber office prior to its opening Thursday. Other traditional events haven’t changed, either. “The crowd favorite and traditional Klompen Canal race which is held on Sunday and the popular HH parade, where tulips must be displayed on every entry and of course, the street sweepers and town crier,” said Cribb. The biggest change will be in the international street fair, which will be held along Pioneer Way Saturday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. “The street fair will be themed by blocks,” explained Cribb. “Of course a Dutch block, and a Tribal block featuring the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community, a Norwegian, an Asian Pacific featuring Fil-Am, an All American, and an Irish block!” Cribb said there will be close to 100 vendors participating in the street fair and each block will feature themed music. The grand parade, one of the biggest parts of the celebration, will begin at 11 a.m. Saturday, winding its way along Bayshore Drive onto Pioneer Way. This year’s parade grand marshal will be a familiar face to many, said Cribb.

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly Vivian Rogers-Decker, homeless liaison with Oak Harbor Public Schools, left, and Ursula Roosen-Runge, executive director of the Whidbey Homeless Coalition, help facilitate discussion at a community conversation on homelessness Monday night in Oak Harbor.

“Sande Mulkey. She has retired and has been in community service for so many years, it seemed like the perfect time to recognize her.” This year’s Holland Happening, which has been going on for nearly half a century, will be the first without longtime advocate and supporter Jan Ellis, who passed away last year. Her contribution to the festival will not go unrecognized.

Photo Courtesy of Oak Harbor Chamber of Commerce The Klompen Canal Races are but one of the popular events at Holland Happening an International Festival taking place Thursday through Sunday in downtown Oak Harbor. The races will be held at 2 p.m. Sunday on Pioneer Way.

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8

APRIL 26 - MAY 2, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Make a Difference By Loren Imes

WSU Extension Farms & Food Systems & Master Gardener Coordinator

Preserving Whidbey's Beauty through Traditions and Farming Living here on Whidbey Island, I sometimes feel time has slowed. We live in a place very similar to the time of my youth. I grew up in western Wisconsin, in a town on the Mississippi River called La Crosse. At the time, there was a thriving downtown, full of a diverse range of locally owned businesses. You could get anything you needed in town. Things were centrally located and the town stopped at the city limits where farms began. Part way through my childhood, my Mother went back to college to earn her Master’s Degree. She was enrolled at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, a little over two hours away, so it was too far to commute. Instead, she got a small apartment and would either come home on the weekends or we would go visit her. When we visited her, in addition to being able to see my Mom (hi Mom), my second favorite part of this trip was stopping at one of two large roadside vegetable stands not far apart from each other along the highway. I loved seeing the bins in these stands overflowing with produce: apples, onions, cabbages, acorn squash, and more. There was so much abundance it felt comforting and looked delicious. And because these were authentic farm stands, where the produce was grown right there on the farm, or perhaps on a neighboring farm, the displays were always changing with whatever was in-season. On one trip, we might see a huge hay wagon full of sweet corn. But in a few weeks, a load of winter squash might have taken its place. It was so exciting to see what was new and fresh and in-season. Those changing displays marked the passage of time and told a story of the seasons. After the stand would close for the winter, remembrances of the changing bounty made you smile and gave you something to look forward to in the next year. The regular visits to those farm stands also created a tradition which added structure to our lives. We had lots of little family traditions that almost always had a food related component. In the fall, we would cross the Mississippi River into Minnesota to sample and buy apples from an area that grew dozens of different varieties. Whenever we took one highway, we would stop at a certain creamery to get some particular type of cheese that was their specialty. If we took

www.whidbeyweekly.com

Whidbey Weekly

a different route, we would stop at a different shop that made ice cream. This was the “Dairy State” after all! The point is these were all small, local farm businesses who took pride in the products they made. You were buying from the family that made these foods, with real ingredients. You could only get it from them. They were your neighbors. They remembered you when you came in and would ask about the things you talked about last time you were there. It was unique and special, and created a sense of community and place. Sixteen years ago, my wife and I made the decision to move our family to Whidbey Island after living in the suburbs of Seattle. We knew we wanted to own some land where we could try our hand at farming. After looking all over the Puget Sound, and even considering moving back to the midwest, we chose Whidbey because of the abundant and beautiful natural resources, farmland in active use, and a community of thoughtful people who are actively engaged in preserving what makes this island special. We purchased an existing farm from a couple who had retired here and raised cattle. They moved to some land they owned adjacent to our farm and shared with us how to raise cattle and make hay. We did that in addition to growing vegetables that we sold at the local farmers market, a CSA, and to local restaurants. We love being a part of the farming community here. We appreciated being warmly welcomed by the long-time farmers and hope to be as welcoming to all of the young, new farmers who have settled here in recent years. I am really encouraged by these new farmers. They have searched out internships and training opportunities offered by organizations such as the Organic Farm School, the Whidbey Island Conservation District, and WSU Extension. There are many other local organizations as well who are working to support local farmers in many different ways; Goosefoot, South Whidbey Tilth, Whidbey Island Growers Association, Island County Farm Bureau, and Whidbey Island Grown. All of these organizations share the goal of seeing farmers succeed. To be successful, farmers need to be able to sell their products. There are different ways to do this, but as you might guess from the experiences I described from my childhood,

LOCALLY OPERATED

ones that allow a direct relationship between the farmer and the eater are my favorite. Knowing the person who grows the food on your plate and having a mutual appreciation for that relationship is something we should make a conscious decision to support. Our relationships are a foundation for building a strong community. Farmer’s markets are unique in their ability to strengthen a community. The market is a place to get fresh, local food, but it is also a social event. You will almost always see someone you know; a neighbor, friend or someone you haven’t seen in a while. Or perhaps the farmer you bought from last time will remember you and tell you about something new they have that you need to try. And when you establish this kind of relationship with several farmers at the market, you are building a special bond. They worry about you when you miss a week! And farm stands, where you are physically at the place where the food is grown is just plain fun. Now that I am older, I think I realize why my parents would stop at those produce stands. It is so much fun to take children to a place like Sherman Pioneer Farm to choose a pumpkin or go to Bell’s Farm to pick strawberries. Their eyes light up with excitement – about vegetables of all things! And it creates those traditions I mentioned that were so important to me as a child. Our kids are grown now but they still ask to go pick strawberries in June. And while we grow our own pumpkins, I think they would prefer to go buy them at a farm stand. Dining out can be another delicious way to make a difference. Many local restaurants and food related businesses are members of Whidbey Island Grown (www.whidbeyislandgrown.com), a member-based organization whose mission is to support local agriculture by promoting Whidbey Island as a destination for authentic rural, farm, and culinary experiences and products. Their goal is for people to think of local farms and great food when they hear about Whidbey Island. And, as a place where farmers can make a living because there is enough demand for their products. I was back in Wisconsin last summer for a short trip to visit my Mom who was undergoing surgery. I didn’t get a chance to drive past those farm stands from long ago so I am not sure if they are still there. Instead, I flew into Minneapolis and rented a car to drive down to my hometown. The changes on my drive through the landscape disturbed me. Dairy farms that once dotted the landscape and practiced rotations of corn, cows and soybeans to naturally build soil fertility, had been replaced by thousands of acres of monocropped corn. Small towns you used to be able to identify just by recognizing the local shops that gave each town its unique personality, were now indistinguishable from the next, having the exact same corporate chain stores in each. This was not the landscape I remember. Nor is it a place I would desire to visit, much less live in. I haven’t done much traveling to other parts of the world, although I hope to someday. Part of the lure of visiting another place is

to engage with what is unique and special about the place. Maybe it is natural beauty, architectural history, or unique wildlife. Many times a destination is known for their culinary traditions. Sampling the local foods are what connect you to their traditions and creates a sense of place. I believe we have that sense of place here on Whidbey Island. We certainly have the natural beauty, and if we choose to support our local farmers we can build our farm based culinary traditions. We already have several, such as Willowood Farm’s Rockwell beans, Penn Cove Shellfish, and Hubbard Squash from Sherman’s Pioneer Farm. And there are newer ones too, including Three Sisters Beef, Glendale Shepard cheeses, Whidbey Island Distillery, and others. This takes effort and it has to be a conscious decision. If we don’t actively choose our path, it will be chosen for us based on factors important to others. As a community, what is important to us? The loganberry farm at Greenbank is an example of a lost culinary tradition, but also an example of how engaged citizens worked hard to chart a direction that was important to them. They made a difference. I am always a bit surprised when I hear some of the reasons why people don’t buy from local farmers. Do you have to buy ALL of your food locally? Of course not. Our society sometimes encourages “either/or” thinking. Instead, why not choose “both/and”? Can we shop at grocery stores for many of our needs but also make a conscious choice to buy some local eggs, meats, cheese or veggies, too? So here is a challenge for you – start a new tradition this year. Take your kids or grandkids to one of the roadside stands or farmers markets here on Whidbey Island, buy something that looks delicious, and have the kids help you prepare it. Not only will this be a fun activity to do, but you will also help keep farmers farming. Supporting local agriculture is an active, conscious, easy, and delicious way to preserve and maintain the scenic beauty of our island. Local Agriculture Resources There are currently six farmers markets that stretch the length of the Island. Combine those with a growing number of farm stands and CSA’s and Whidbey is becoming a great place for locally grown food. For more information, visit http://extension. wsu.edu/island/agriculture/

SOUTH WHIDBEY EAGLES 20TH ANNUAL PLANT & GARDEN SALE

ShoNuff Foods Proudly Presents a Special Event!

LOCALLY GROWN • BARGAIN PRICING

2 DAYS ONLY!

SATURDAY, MAY 5TH, 9AM-4PM • SUNDAY, MAY 6TH, 9AM-2PM HANGING BASKETS • FUCHSIAS • GRASSES • BEDDING PLANTS GROUND COVERS • LANDSCAPING TREES • RHODIES • AZALEAS HERBS • VEGETABLES • FRUIT TREES TOMATOES – BEST NORTHWEST VARIETIES

• RAFFLES • PRIZES • FUN •

360-321-5636 • EAGLES AERIE • LOCATED ONE MILE SOUTH OF FREELAND ON HWY 525 THIS EVENT HELPS SUPPORT OUR ISLAND CHARITIES.

THE SHONUFF

POP UP DINER Wednesday & Thursday, May 16 & 17, 2018 • 3pm - 8pm $19.50 per person “Family Style” available both days, call for reservations

Coachman Inn • 32959 SR 20, Oak Harbor

Don’t miss out on this feast! Reserve your seats now!

www.shonufffoods.com or 360-471-7780 To Go orders welcomed! Reservations Required for meal planning. All sales are final.

The BBQ You Love, Prepared by the Pitmasters You Trust

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"Serving Whidbey Island Since 1961" 1-800-679-3878 • www.broadviewappliance.com

Come see us at Booth 34 during Holland Happening!

“Welcome to the P.I.T.”

Indoor Firearms Training & Supply

951 NE 21st Court • Oak Harbor • 360-720-2619 • PacificIndoorTactical.com

Tackle Football Ages 7-14 • Cheer Ages 6-14 Registration begins April 28th! Early Registration Discount Ends June 15!

360-675-2600

32650 Highway 20 Building D Oak Harbor, WA thrivecommunityfitness.com

JOIN THRIVE COMMUNITY FITNESS! Working to energize the lives of our members and transform the health of our community.

Come see us at our booth at Holland Happening, Saturday, April 28, 10am-7pm Sunday, April 29, 10am-5pm

To register or for more information visit OHFCL.org

Teen Talent Contest For teens ages 12 - 18 or grades 6 - 12

CALENDAR OF EVENTS ENTRY DEADLINE Tuesday June 18th FINAL COMPETITION Thursday June 28th PERFORMANCE DATE Sunday, September 2nd

Are you ready to perform? • Do you love to sing? Do you have a group or band that would like a spot on the big stage at the Oak Harbor Music Festival? Your chance is here again! Island County teens are invited to enter the TEEN TALENT CONTEST to win the chance to perform LIVE at the Oak Harbor Music Festival on Sunday, Sept. 2nd. For full contest rules and submission guidelines,

visit oakharborfestival.com.

THURSDAY, APRIL 26TH

4:00PM | Davis amusement Carnival 5:00-7:00PM | the art Walk on Pioneer reCePtion

FRIDAY, APRIL 27TH

10:00AM-7:00PM | the art Walk on Pioneer 4:00PM | Davis amusement Carnival

SATURDAY, APRIL 28TH

8:00AM | ohCs eagle run 10:00AM-7:00PM | the art Walk on Pioneer 10:00AM-7:00PM | international street Fair 11:00AM | granD ParaDe 11:00AM | Davis amusement Carnival 1:00PM | rotary Walk oF honor Car shoW

SUNDAY, APRIL 29TH

10:00AM-5:00PM | the art Walk on Pioneer 10:00AM-5:00PM | international street Fair 12:00PM | Davis amusement Carnival 2:00PM | klomPen Canal raCes

Supported by the Oak Harbor Music Festival. NON PROFIT 501(c)(3) EIN#46-1637770

sno-isle.org

360-675-3755 | OakHarborChamber.com | 32630 SR 20, Oak Harbor, WA 98277


HOLLAND HAPPENING FESTIVAL 2018 Time for a Sweet Treat! lunch

LUMPIA & ORIENTAL

We’re

360-679-3707 • 1281 SE Ely St DOWNTOWN OAK HARBOR

brunch

italian inspired farm to table comfort food

SEE US DURING HOLLAND HAPPENING FOR WHIDBEY’S BEST LUMPIA & PANSIT!

Perla’s

dinner

Let Us Help You With Your Party or Event!

Open Daily: 11am-6pm 851 SE Pioneer Way, Suite 101 (360)240-8937

360.675.4053 Way #102

A Musical Fable of Broadway

Music and Lyrics by: FRANK LOESSER

DATES & SHOWTIMES: May 3, 4, 5 & 10, 11, 12 Doors Open at 6:15 pm Show begins at 7pm

Book by: JO SWERLING and ABE BURROWS

BIRTHDAY PARTIES • WEDDINGS GRADUATIONS • BBQ’S & PICNICS CLASS REUNIONS • RETIREMENTS & MUCH MORE!

visit us at www.rusticacafe.com for current hours, menus & events like us on facebook and follow us on twitter

Window Cleaning Roof & Gutter Cleaning Pressure Washing

Based on a story and characters of Damon Runyon

WE HAVE SUPPLIES FOR EVERY OCCASION PLATES, NAPKINS, TABLECLOTHS & CENTERPIECES

seasonal menus showcasing local farms, fishermen, wineries

Popcorn, Ice Cream & Sweets

OHHS Fine Arts Departments present

Director: Linda

McLean

Producers: Darren

McCoy

Melissa Gibson

STUDENTS: $10 ADULTS: $15

270 SE Cabot Dr #2 Oak Harbor

LOCATION: Oak Harbor High School Student Union Building

*Contact Us Today For A Competitive Price Quote* Festival seating tickets are available at the door at 6:15 pm for each show.

360-544-3068

670 SE Pioneer

GUYS & DOLLS

Oak Harbor

is presented through special arrangement with Music Theater International (MTI). All authorized performance materials are also supplied by MTI. 423 West 55th Street, New York, NY 10019 www.MTIShows.com – Tel: (212) 541-4684 – Fax: (212) 397-4684

360-395-5748 • acleanstreak.com Fully Licensed & Insured CLEANCS851PA

Your Home & Garden Headquarters!

Tiptoe through the Tulips then tiptoe on in to Island Thrift for Name brand clothes and merchandise at affordable prices

The Store with the Big Heart All proceeds donated to community programs

(360)675-1133 Your locally owned ACE Hardware Store

600 SE Barrington Drive • Oak Harbor Hours: Mon-Sat 9am-5:30pm Donation Hours: Mon-Sat 9am-4pm

150 SE Pioneer Way Downtown Oak Harbor • 360-679-3533

We have everything you need to get your projects done!

1 2 3 4 5 6 8 9 10 11 12 13

Julies Lumpia Cosmic Ice Cream Sequim Valley Nordic Lodge Arbia’s Pizza Ray’s Foods Toppins Fil-AM Road Runner A.B’s Gyro Ohana BBQ Island Concession

14 Mission Out Reach 15 Whidbey Island Kettle Korn 16 Hotshot Espresso 17 Orlando’s Fish & Grill 20 Fil-AM 21 Bombay Trends 22 Awesome Anime 23 Tibetan Handi Craft 24 Neat Stuff 25 Gideon 26 Rise Academy of Arts 27 Uncle Stinky

28 PBY Naval Air Museum 29 Equestrian Crossing 30 Whidbey Island Fair 31 Cutco Cutlery 32 Renewal by Anderson 33 Kara’s Creations Wind Chimes 34 Pacific Indoor Tactical 35 Over the Line Art 36 ICD/WICD 37 Imagine a Permaculture World

Penn Cove Water Festival

Saturday, May 12, 2018 • Historic Coupeville

Share in the Culture ~ Continue the Tradition 33650 SR 20 Oak Harbor 360-679-6626 diamondrentalsinc.com

TRIBAL CANOE RACES NATIVE CRAFTS • DANCING • STORYTELLING YOUTH ACTIVITIES • EDUCATIONAL EXIBITS PennCoveWaterFestival.com

38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47

Lstoy’s Jewelry Hens at Work NW Community Pools & Rec Spoiled Brat Crew Boy Scouts of America Whidbey Golf Civility First NASWI FCPOA Salty Keels Major Megan M McClung Unit 1210

48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58

Frontier Communication Girl Scouts of America Oak Harbor Football and Cheer League Free Born Metal Art Emerald City Arts Gary Oak Society Boys and Girls Club Absolute Nuts Gutter Helmet Island Electric Ecuadorian Crafts

59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69

A Touch of Dutch Sugar Studio OHHS Guild Art Club Face Painting Natural Way Chiropractor Campfire – Samish Council Fox Island Trading Co Curves / Jenny Craig Spin Café Art To Suit You Harley Exteriors Mary Kay

Unique “Old World” Charm on Beautiful Whidbey Island

80 WAIF 81 Swinomish Casino 82 Swinomish Tribe 83 Swinomish Tribe 84 Swinomish Tribe 85 Swinomish Tribe 86 Island Green Blasting 101 Auld Holland Inn 102 Chamber Klompen Shoes/ Race 103 Whidbey on Wheels – Visitors Info

sponsored in part by

Labor Day Weekend

Dutch architecture, antique furnishings, and colorful gardens. Feel as if you’ve stepped through time. Unique guest rooms with private bath Air Conditioning HDTV Complimentary High Speed Internet Refrigerator and microwave Continental Breakfast The Windmill Suite is lovely and perfect for that special occasion with a separate sitting area, fireplace and jetted tub for two. A Must See! We offer Military & Government Rates reservations@auld-holland.com

33575 State Route 20 • Oak Harbor • 360-675-2288 • www.auld-holland.com

70 Comcast 71 Color Street 72 Indian Arts 73 North End Fitness Center 74 Winchester Homemade Jewelry 75 Northwest Dips Sprint 76 Friday Harbor House of Jerky 77 Kangen Water Info 78 Cricket Wireless 79 Oak Harbor Lions Club

C A N N A B I S C O M PA N Y

HOLLAND HAPPENING

SATURDAY, APRIL 28TH TO SUNDAY, APRIL 29TH 10% OFF ALL DUTCH TREAT AND DUTCH BERRY FLOWER 10% OFF SELECTED EDIBLES

www.OakHarborFestival.com 33858 State Route 20 • Suite 102 Oak Harbor • 360-682-2420 www.kaleafawa.com OPEN 7 DAYS A week! MON-SAT 8am to 10pm • SUNDAYS 10am to 8pm NON PROFIT 501(c)(3) EIN#46-1637770

Cannabis has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated consumption of this product. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.


HOLLAND HAPPENING FESTIVAL 2018 Time for a Sweet Treat! lunch

LUMPIA & ORIENTAL

We’re

360-679-3707 • 1281 SE Ely St DOWNTOWN OAK HARBOR

brunch

italian inspired farm to table comfort food

SEE US DURING HOLLAND HAPPENING FOR WHIDBEY’S BEST LUMPIA & PANSIT!

Perla’s

dinner

Let Us Help You With Your Party or Event!

Open Daily: 11am-6pm 851 SE Pioneer Way, Suite 101 (360)240-8937

360.675.4053 Way #102

A Musical Fable of Broadway

Music and Lyrics by: FRANK LOESSER

DATES & SHOWTIMES: May 3, 4, 5 & 10, 11, 12 Doors Open at 6:15 pm Show begins at 7pm

Book by: JO SWERLING and ABE BURROWS

BIRTHDAY PARTIES • WEDDINGS GRADUATIONS • BBQ’S & PICNICS CLASS REUNIONS • RETIREMENTS & MUCH MORE!

visit us at www.rusticacafe.com for current hours, menus & events like us on facebook and follow us on twitter

Window Cleaning Roof & Gutter Cleaning Pressure Washing

Based on a story and characters of Damon Runyon

WE HAVE SUPPLIES FOR EVERY OCCASION PLATES, NAPKINS, TABLECLOTHS & CENTERPIECES

seasonal menus showcasing local farms, fishermen, wineries

Popcorn, Ice Cream & Sweets

OHHS Fine Arts Departments present

Director: Linda

McLean

Producers: Darren

McCoy

Melissa Gibson

STUDENTS: $10 ADULTS: $15

270 SE Cabot Dr #2 Oak Harbor

LOCATION: Oak Harbor High School Student Union Building

*Contact Us Today For A Competitive Price Quote* Festival seating tickets are available at the door at 6:15 pm for each show.

360-544-3068

670 SE Pioneer

GUYS & DOLLS

Oak Harbor

is presented through special arrangement with Music Theater International (MTI). All authorized performance materials are also supplied by MTI. 423 West 55th Street, New York, NY 10019 www.MTIShows.com – Tel: (212) 541-4684 – Fax: (212) 397-4684

360-395-5748 • acleanstreak.com Fully Licensed & Insured CLEANCS851PA

Your Home & Garden Headquarters!

Tiptoe through the Tulips then tiptoe on in to Island Thrift for Name brand clothes and merchandise at affordable prices

The Store with the Big Heart All proceeds donated to community programs

(360)675-1133 Your locally owned ACE Hardware Store

600 SE Barrington Drive • Oak Harbor Hours: Mon-Sat 9am-5:30pm Donation Hours: Mon-Sat 9am-4pm

150 SE Pioneer Way Downtown Oak Harbor • 360-679-3533

We have everything you need to get your projects done!

1 2 3 4 5 6 8 9 10 11 12 13

Julies Lumpia Cosmic Ice Cream Sequim Valley Nordic Lodge Arbia’s Pizza Ray’s Foods Toppins Fil-AM Road Runner A.B’s Gyro Ohana BBQ Island Concession

14 Mission Out Reach 15 Whidbey Island Kettle Korn 16 Hotshot Espresso 17 Orlando’s Fish & Grill 20 Fil-AM 21 Bombay Trends 22 Awesome Anime 23 Tibetan Handi Craft 24 Neat Stuff 25 Gideon 26 Rise Academy of Arts 27 Uncle Stinky

28 PBY Naval Air Museum 29 Equestrian Crossing 30 Whidbey Island Fair 31 Cutco Cutlery 32 Renewal by Anderson 33 Kara’s Creations Wind Chimes 34 Pacific Indoor Tactical 35 Over the Line Art 36 ICD/WICD 37 Imagine a Permaculture World

Penn Cove Water Festival

Saturday, May 12, 2018 • Historic Coupeville

Share in the Culture ~ Continue the Tradition 33650 SR 20 Oak Harbor 360-679-6626 diamondrentalsinc.com

TRIBAL CANOE RACES NATIVE CRAFTS • DANCING • STORYTELLING YOUTH ACTIVITIES • EDUCATIONAL EXIBITS PennCoveWaterFestival.com

38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47

Lstoy’s Jewelry Hens at Work NW Community Pools & Rec Spoiled Brat Crew Boy Scouts of America Whidbey Golf Civility First NASWI FCPOA Salty Keels Major Megan M McClung Unit 1210

48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58

Frontier Communication Girl Scouts of America Oak Harbor Football and Cheer League Free Born Metal Art Emerald City Arts Gary Oak Society Boys and Girls Club Absolute Nuts Gutter Helmet Island Electric Ecuadorian Crafts

59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69

A Touch of Dutch Sugar Studio OHHS Guild Art Club Face Painting Natural Way Chiropractor Campfire – Samish Council Fox Island Trading Co Curves / Jenny Craig Spin Café Art To Suit You Harley Exteriors Mary Kay

Unique “Old World” Charm on Beautiful Whidbey Island

80 WAIF 81 Swinomish Casino 82 Swinomish Tribe 83 Swinomish Tribe 84 Swinomish Tribe 85 Swinomish Tribe 86 Island Green Blasting 101 Auld Holland Inn 102 Chamber Klompen Shoes/ Race 103 Whidbey on Wheels – Visitors Info

sponsored in part by

Labor Day Weekend

Dutch architecture, antique furnishings, and colorful gardens. Feel as if you’ve stepped through time. Unique guest rooms with private bath Air Conditioning HDTV Complimentary High Speed Internet Refrigerator and microwave Continental Breakfast The Windmill Suite is lovely and perfect for that special occasion with a separate sitting area, fireplace and jetted tub for two. A Must See! We offer Military & Government Rates reservations@auld-holland.com

33575 State Route 20 • Oak Harbor • 360-675-2288 • www.auld-holland.com

70 Comcast 71 Color Street 72 Indian Arts 73 North End Fitness Center 74 Winchester Homemade Jewelry 75 Northwest Dips Sprint 76 Friday Harbor House of Jerky 77 Kangen Water Info 78 Cricket Wireless 79 Oak Harbor Lions Club

C A N N A B I S C O M PA N Y

HOLLAND HAPPENING

SATURDAY, APRIL 28TH TO SUNDAY, APRIL 29TH 10% OFF ALL DUTCH TREAT AND DUTCH BERRY FLOWER 10% OFF SELECTED EDIBLES

www.OakHarborFestival.com 33858 State Route 20 • Suite 102 Oak Harbor • 360-682-2420 www.kaleafawa.com OPEN 7 DAYS A week! MON-SAT 8am to 10pm • SUNDAYS 10am to 8pm NON PROFIT 501(c)(3) EIN#46-1637770

Cannabis has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated consumption of this product. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.


HOLLAND HAPPENING Let us help you bring family together

Free Peace of Mind Tire Protection Whatever the road throws at you, from potholes to nails any road hazard, we guarantee you’re protected.

Free Lifetime Tire and Mileage Care

FREE WITH EVERY PASSENGER CAR, LIGHT TRUCK, AND SUV TIRE PURCHASE 31720 STATE ROUTE 20 OAK HARBOR • 360-679-1535

• Free Brake & Alignment Checks • Over 445 Locations To Serve You • Free Flat Tire Repairs • Free Tire Rotations • Free Tire Rebalancing • Free Air Checks

105 Anthes Ave, Langley, WA Open Thursdays through Mondays, 11 am till 5 pm

Free Admission to Educational Exhibits

Ocean Listening Booth, Whale Skulls, Harbor Porpoise Skeleton and bone specimens

Learn about our local gray whales, orcas and other marine mammals Check out our Whale Sightings Map Free Lending Library, whale tattoos and stickers Fun Gift Shop

FRIDAY & ONLY! FRIDAY SATURDAY & JANUARY FRIDAY &SATURDAY ONLY! TH JANUARY26 & 27TH, 2018 SATURDAY ONLY! JANUARY26TH & 27TH, 2018 AT YOUR TH TH 27 , 2018 26 LOCAL SEARS life & cycle boatAT YOUR business auto

Locally owned and operated by Carol Vinson and Jim Woessner

30 30 30 PLUSPLUSPLUS 5 12 512 12 10% 10% 10% 20 20 OFF 0 OFF OFF % % %APPLIANCES

360-675-0660

230 SE Pioneer Way • Oak Harbor

up to

We Support up to Holland Happening!

360-221-7505 AT YOURLOCAL SEARS (800) 321-3737 STORE HOMETOWN www.orcanetwork.org (360) 679-4949 home LOCAL SEARS HOMETOWNtradewindsins.com STORE OFF HOMETOWN OFF STORE1

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OFF APPLIANCES EXTRA APPLIANCES EXTRA EXTRA % 1

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free delivery* on appliances over $499 with your Sears card OR on all appliances over $499 offwith your Sears card *For Shop *Your Way members In participating stores. Local curbside with a qualifying Searsdelivery card free delivery. Additional fees may apply. See store for details. special financing on appliances over $499 with your Sears card ances months on all appliances over $499 *For Shop * Your Way members In participating stores. Local curbside with a qualifying card ears card delivery. Additional fees may apply. See store for details. freeSears delivery special financing 3

months special financing4

3

4

%

LAWN & OFF & GARDEN UP % LAWN TO OFF & GARDEN % LAWN OFF GARDEN 4

pliances over $499 ualifying Sears card

on appliances over $499 with your Sears card UP *For Shop Your Way members In participating stores. Local curbside TO delivery. Additional fees may apply. See store for details.

‡Advertised savings range from 5%-20%. Offer excludes Everyday Great ‡ Price items, clearance, closeout, generators, accessories, attachments and snow throwers. Offer good thru 1/27/18.

vertised savings range from 5%-20%. Offer excludes Everyday Great Price items, clearance, closeout, generators, accessories, ‡ attachments and snow throwers. Offer good thru 1/27/18.

ludes Everyday Great Price items, clearance, closeout, generators, accessories, nd snow throwers. Offer good thru 1/27/18.

ALMOST ALMOST EVERYTHING ALMOST EVERYTHING EVERYTHING

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Exclusions apply. See The Details section. Offers good 1/26 & 1/27/18 only.

T Exclusions apply. See The Details section. THE DETAILS Offers good 1/26 & 1/27/18 only. IMPORTANT SPECIAL FINANCING/DEFERRED INTEREST DETAILS (when offered): Interest will be charged to your account from the purchase date if the purchase balance is not paid in full within the promotional period or if you make a late payment. Minimum payments SM Sears Home Improvement Account valid on installed sales only. Offer is only valid for consumer accounts in good standing; is subject to change without required. With credit approval, for qualifying purchases made on a Sears card (Sears Commercial One® accounts excluded) T Exclusions apply. See The Details section. notice; see store for details. May not be combined with any other promotional offer. SearsTHE cards: As of 12/1/2017, APR for purchases: DETAILS OffersVARIABLE good 1/268.24%-26.24% & 1/27/18 only. or NON-VARIABLE 5.00%-26.49%. MINIMUM INTEREST CHARGE: UP TO $2. See card agreement for details, including the APRs and fees applicable to you. Sears cards are issued by Citibank, N.A. APPLIANCE OFFER: (1) Advertised savings range from 5%-30%. (1,3) Bosch®, Whirlpool®, KitchenAid®, Maytag®, Amana®, LG® and Samsung® appliances limited to 10% off. Offers exclude Hot Buys, G/DEFERRED INTEREST DETAILS (when offered): InterestDacor, will beGE®, charged to your account from the purchase date if the purchase balance is not paid in full within the promotional period or if you make a late payment. Minimum payments Super Hot Buys, Special Purchases, Jenn-Air®, ® GE Profile™, GE Café™, Dyson®, air conditioners, waterSMheaters, water softeners, dehumidifiers, clearance, closeouts and Everyday Great Price items. See store for additional exclusions. Offers good thru 1/27/18. (3) or qualifyingCannot purchases made on with a Sears card (Sears Commercial accounts Sears Home Improvement Account valid Home on installed sales only. Offer SM is applies only valid consumer accounts only. in good subjectto toappliances change without onfor installed merchandise (4)standing; 12 monthsisapplies over $499 after discounts and coupons when you be combined other Sears card discounts. One Excludes Searsexcluded) Commercial One® accounts and Outlet Stores. Sears Improvement Account not be combined with any other promotional offer. Sears cards: As of 12/1/2017, APR for purchases: VARIABLE 8.24%-26.24% or NON-VARIABLE 5.00%-26.49%. MINIMUM INTEREST CHARGE: $2. See forto details, including T DETAILS Special Financing/Deferred use a qualifying Sears card. See above forTHE Important Interest Details. Excludes Outlet Stores. Offer good thru 1/27/18. EXTRA 10% OFFER: 10% savingsUP offTO regular andcard saleagreement prices apply merchandise only. May not be used to reduce a layaway or you. Sears cards are issuedNot by Citibank, N.A.Buys, APPLIANCE OFFER: (1) Advertised savings rangeGreat from Price 5%-30%. 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The SEARS mark a service mark of Sears Brands, LLC. air cards. conditioners, heaters, water softeners, clearance, closeouts anddealers Everyday Great Price items. Seeappliance store forLLC additional exclusions. Offers good thru 1/27/18. (3)orders ™, Dyson®, destal and gift Bosch®, water Whirlpool®, KitchenAid®, Maytag®, LG®, Samsung®, Frigidaire®, Electrolux® and Electrolux Icon® brands to 10% off . Not valid on commercial or previous purchases. Taxisand shipping SM al One® accounts and Outlet Stores. Sears Home Improvement Account applies on installed merchandise only. (4) 12 months applies to appliances over $499 after discounts and coupons when you urchases only. Offers valid 1/26 and 1/27/18 only. Only available at Sears Hometown Stores. We offer product warranty. T d Interest Details. Excludes Outlet Stores. Offer good thru 1/27/18. EXTRA 10% OFFER: 10% savings off regular and sale prices apply to merchandise only. May not be used to reduce a layaway or day Great Price items, closeout andoperated clearance, consumer dealers electronics, Stearns & Foster, iComfort, iComfort Simmons Beautyrest Elite, GE®,Appliance GE Profile , home appliance ™, GE Café™ etown Stores may be independently by authorized of Sears Authorized Hometown Stores, LLC or Hybrid, by authorized franchisees of Sears Home Showrooms, LLC. The SEARS markaccessories, is a service mark of Sears Brands, LLC. enAid®, Maytag®, Amana®, LG®, Samsung®, Frigidaire®, Electrolux® and Electrolux Icon® appliance brands limited to 10% off. Not valid on commercial orders or previous purchases. Tax and shipping y. Only available at Sears Hometown Stores. We offer product warranty.

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13 APRIL 26 - MAY 2, 2018 www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALL LOCALL Y OWNED Y OWNED

13

Whidbey Weekly

www.whidbeyweekly.com APRIL 26 - MAY 2, 2018

LOCALL LOCALL Y OPERA Y OPERA TEDTED

attractive, it’s because they’re preferable to no communication at all. You’ll probably encounter both on the 27th.

CHICKEN LITTLE & THE ASTROLOGER By Wesley Hallock

ARIES (March 21-April 19) Remember that pet peeve of yours that was triggered into action recently? It’s time to take stock of the explosion. Hopefully, the dust has settled and you may safely examine the repercussions. Count yourself lucky if you didn’t burn any bridges that you’ll come to regret. Moving forward, you probably have learned a thing or two that could come in handy later. Events on the 27th should prove revealing. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Get up and go for tackling difficult tasks is largely lacking in you this week. Waiting for the mood to strike before you act often means you never get started. Just as deadly is putting things off until the perfect time to begin. The ongoing difficulties you may be witnessing in the lives of the more ambitious around you offers little incentive to emulate them, it is true. A good solution on the 27th is to work smarter, not harder. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) The urge to spend is best tempered with value judgement this week. You’ll want to make sure you’re getting your dollars worth before reaching for your wallet. Input from others in this regard is likely to be overly negative. For that reason, you’re best bet is to reserve the final decision on big ticket items to yourself alone. Buyers remorse on the 27th comes of not honoring your intuition. CANCER (June 22-July 22) Shake-ups at work due to some major restructuring have likely been troubling you or someone close to you. The worst of that should be behind you this week, but the effects are sure to be long-lasting or permanent. Communications about this and other matters will be emotionally driven on the 27th, and, therefore, less factually accurate than is healthy for you. It’s a good day to be objective and in control of your emotions. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Becoming emotionally attached to your possessions needlessly complicates your relationships this week. Even if you are willing to share the things you have, attaching conditions to their dispersal lessens the good you could otherwise do. Realize that it’s not the object that you’re attached to, but it’s emotional content. That is something you can never lose, even if the object itself is lost. Conduct your affairs on the 27th accordingly. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Your personal views and feelings about a variety or matters are easily conveyed to others this week, making it a good time to reach out and communicate. Those in need of sympathy, warmth and understanding are likely to seek you out, making it a two-way street. If argument and controversy are

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Your day-to-day actions have been a source of conflict for some time, forcing you to examine your beliefs about a variety of things. A climax has been reached in that regard, allowing you to think now about moving forward to more harmonious times. Though you may not feel much like socializing early week, better days are just ahead. Honesty with yourself is the best policy on the 27th, even if you elect to hold your thoughts secret. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) What might be termed a financial facelift has been ongoing in your life for some time, probably resulting in some major changes in your attitudes toward money. Your new outlook will serve you well going forward and related expansions are already on your horizon. Examine your goals early week without getting too attached to any of them. Your wants and desires as you know them on the 27th will change many times. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) You’ve been gradually reshaping your personality for so long, you’re probably not aware of it. Others are keenly aware, however, a fact that may explain recent turmoils. Discussions with your intimates around this issue are likely this week. Expect much clearing of the air as a result. Change is an ongoing situation with you, so don’t expect matters to end there. Life will always be a process, with the 27th being a case in point. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Your horizons are due to expand in some way this week. Physical journeys are distinctly possible, but equally so are mental expansions born of intellectual journeys that take place without your ever leaving your chair. Far from being escapism, such a pilgrimage will a serve practical purpose for you. Not the least of these is a better understanding of yourself. An aspect of self underlies all that happens on the 27th. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb 18) The active pursuit of your goals has no doubt hit some major obstacles recently. Goal revision is not always the answer, and where it is not, the battle for what you want has been uncommonly fierce. The turning point in these regards has already been reached and the waters ahead promise smoother sailing. Cherish your victories and get ready for a change of direction. The 27th offers clues. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Fighting for your beliefs has in some way consumed a major part of your time in recent days. Your vicarious support of people on the front lines in the public eye is no less consuming. Whatever the form of your battle, time now to accept the outcome and move forward. You stand to achieve more now than at any time in your life. Don’t limit yourself or your thinking on the 27th and be ready for an exciting revelation. © 2018, Wesley Hallock, All Rights Reserved

CLUES ACROSS

40. One point east of southeast

14. Cover the sword 18. Eyeglasses

7. European viper

41. Female cattle’s mammary gland

10. Finch-like birds

44. Small fries

20. Metal-bearing material

12. Civil rights college organization

45. Optimistic in tough times

23. Primitive persons

13. A person who organizes

48. Make less distinct 49. Surrounds

25. Group of countries (abbr.)

14. Small carnivorous mammal

50. Cost per mile

26. Before

15. City in Sweden

51. A local church community

29. Spanish be

16. Grayish-white

CLUES DOWN

30. Opposite of the beginning

17. Google certification (abbr.)

1. “Beastmaster” actor Singer

31. With three uneven sides

18. Six (Spanish)

2. Rice-distilled liquor

19. The highest adult male singing voice

3. Messenger ribonucleic acid

32. Gives a permanent post to

21. Political action committee

4. Wet, muddy ground

36. Cavalry sword

5. Have an obligation to

38. Gland secretion

6. Defunct Chevy convertible truck

40. Marine invertebrate

7. Deer-like water buffalo

42. Pairs

8. Skin lesion

44. English broadcasting network

1. Latin American dances

22. Exterior part of a home 27. And, Latin 28. Where pirates hide their bounty 33. Six

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36. Diego is one

10. Where kids play ball

37. __ Carvey, comedian

11. Roman judge

38. Aromatic plant

12. One who endures hardship without complaint

39. Carry with great effort

24. Wild ox

45. Calendar month 46. Comedic actress Gasteyer 47. Company that rings receipts Answers on page 19

YOUR GUESS IS AS GOOD AS OURS WEATHER FORECAST Chicken Little looks at what is and fears the sky is falling. Wesley Hallock, as a professional astrologer, looks at what is and sees what could be. Read Wesley’s monthly forecast, with links to Facebook and Twitter, at www. chickenlittleandtheastrologer.com. To read past columns of Chicken Little and the Astrologer in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

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14 APRIL 26 - MAY 2, 2018

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“Requiem” a celebration of Whidbey’s musical talent By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly The Saratoga Orchestra joins forces with Whidbey Community Chorus and Oak Harbor High School Choirs for two very special performances this weekend – Saturday at 7 p.m. at South Whidbey High School in Langley and Sunday at 2:30 p.m. at Oak Harbor High School. This collaboration brings together some of the best the island has to offer, both instrumentally and vocally, for several pieces, such as “Battle Hymn of the Republic” and “Baba Yetu,” which is the theme song for the video game “Civilization IV” and is a Swahili translation of the Lord’s Prayer. Headlining the performance will be Gabriel Fauré’s “Requiem.” “A Requiem is the Mass for the dead and Fauré’s 'Requiem' is filled with beauty and poignancy,” said Anna Edwards, musical director of the Saratoga Orchestra. “His vision of his requiem was to provide comfort to mourners rather than impress upon them the enormity of death.” “The crowning piece is Fauré’s 'Requiem,' which was first performed in the late 1800s,” said Darren McCoy, OHHS choir and Whidbey Community Chorus director. “Since requiems are traditionally a Mass for the Dead, we will be dedicating this performance to the victims of school shootings.” Part of what makes these joint performances special are the people who participate, from students to instructors. “Brandon Nelson is a percussionist in the orchestra and the band director for OHHS,” McCoy said. “He will be singing one of the baritone solos and I will be singing the other one. Christina Queeno, who is the music director at First United Methodist, will be singing the soprano solo Saturday and high school junior Reed Richards will be singing the soprano solo Sunday.”

Photo Courtesy of Saratoga Orchestra The Saratoga Orchestra will perform Gabriel Fauré’s “Requiem” this weekend, along with the Whidbey Community Chorus and choirs from Oak Harbor High School. Performances will be held at 7 p.m. Saturday at South Whidbey High School and at 2:30 p.m. Sunday at Oak Harbor High School.

“It is a joy to work with Darren and his fabulous students,” said Edwards. “Whidbey Island is so lucky to have such incredible music teachers throughout the island. Darren’s choirs are absolutely top notch. The Saratoga Orchestra is thrilled to partner with his terrific high school ensembles in addition to the Whidbey Community Chorus.”

'performance' environment, but what is important is bringing together our community through the joy of music.”

South Whidbey High School band director Chris Harshman also performs as Saratoga Orchestra’s principal bassoonist, according to Edwards.

“For the student who recently lost several family members, a requiem hits really close to home,” he said. “For the people who served in the military, the 'Battle Hymn' carries a sense of resolute determination. For those that have religious backgrounds, 'Baba Yetu' is a joyful expression of faith.

This weekend’s concerts are not the first time Saratoga Orchestra and massed choirs have performed together. “Darren McCoy and I started doing joint projects four years ago, during my first season as music director of Saratoga Orchestra,” Edwards said. “The project involved our full orchestra and over 200 singers. It was such a success and quite a learning experience for the students and community singers, that we’ve been wanting to collaborate again.” “Almost two years ago, I became the director of the Whidbey Community Choir and I immediately started thinking about how we could get the two groups to join forces,” McCoy said. “I sat down with [Saratoga Orchestra Executive Director] Larry Heidel and Anna Edwards about a year ago and decided we wanted to try bringing together the orchestra and three choirs for a really large event with a wide variety of literature.”

Photo Courtesy of Saratoga Orchestra The Whidbey Community Chorus joins forces with choirs from Oak Harbor High School and the Saratoga Orchestra for two concerts this weekend – 7 p.m. Saturday at South Whidbey High School and 2:30 p.m. Sunday at Oak Harbor High School.

“All of the musicians look forward to this collaborative project all year long,” said Edwards. “Logistically, there are no auditoriums that will accommodate this many musicians, so we must resort to performing in the gymnasiums at both South Whidbey and Oak Harbor high schools. It may not be the best

McCoy said he thinks the five pieces being performed represent something for everyone and may mean different things to different people.

General Admission tickets are $25 for adults and $20 for senior citizens or military. Students under 18 are admitted free (under 14 must be accompanied by a paying adult). Tickets are available at Blue Sound Music and Moonraker Books in Langley, bayleaf in Coupeville, and Click Music in Oak Harbor. Cash, checks or credit cards are accepted at the door. For information and online tickets, please visit www.sowhidbey. com or call 360-929-3045. “Everybody loves classical music. But sometimes they just haven’t found out about it yet,” said McCoy. “What better way to find out about it than to see our local students and community members come together in honor of those who died before their time?” “I am continually amazed at the depth of talent Whidbey Island offers,” Edwards said. “Our concerts provide fantastic music that showcases both our young and local talent. The members of the Saratoga Orchestra are some of the top musicians in Washington and we love performing for our friends and neighbors.”

Welcome to Serendipity Lane

By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly

What began as a sketch on a napkin has been turned into a piece of art along Pioneer Way in downtown Oak Harbor. About 40 people gathered Friday afternoon for the unveiling of “Serendipity Lane,” a metal arch marking a staircase between Mr. Music and ResCare HomeCare. The project is a collaboration between the Oak Harbor Main Street Association, the City of Oak Harbor, the Skagit Valley College Welding Club, Skagit Powder Coating and the Oak Harbor Garden Club. Initially conceived by the OHMSA as a way to enhance the connection between the downtown and the waterfront, Oak Harbor

architect Ferd Johns sketched his idea on a napkin over a cup of coffee. The rest, as they say, is history. “This is what happens when you have teamwork – you get something magnificent and beautiful like this,” enthused Matthew Williams, OHMSA’s executive director. “This is just the first step in our efforts to connect the business community to the waterfront.” OHMSA paid for the project by making a donation to Skagit Valley College’s welding program. Under the supervision of welding instructor Mary Kuebelbeck, members of the welding club donated their time to fabricate the archway.

“This has been a great lesson and practical application of the skills we’re learning,”

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly Oak Harbor Mayor Bob Severns and Oak Harbor Main Street Association Executive Director Matthew Williams unveil the new Serendipity Lane archway last Friday afternoon in downtown Oak Harbor.

said Buddy Grett, who was the lead on the project. Grett estimates members of the welding club put in about 60 hours of time outside of regular classes, and in some cases work, building the arch. “It’s been an amazing experience,” he said. “It’s brought the club and classes together and built a lot of camaraderie.” For former Oak Harbor resident and current welding student Jessica Holbrook, the project took on special meaning.

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly Members of the Skagit Valley College Weld Club pose beneath the Serendipity Lane Archway they built for the Oak Harbor Main Street Association. The arch was unveiled Friday in a brief ceremony and is located on Pioneer way between Mr. Music and ResCare HomeCare.

“I got into a lot of trouble when I was younger,” she said. “Then I got involved in the welding program and to have an opportunity to do something to give back to the community, it’s just an honor to be part of it.”

“These students are as good as anybody I’ve worked with in my professional career,” said Johns, praising the quality of the work and the students’ ability to make necessary adjustments as the project moved along. Once the students finished building the structure, Skagit Powder Coating added the finishing coat of black paint. Oak Harbor Public Works employees put the piece in place and the Oak Harbor Garden Club worked on beautifying the area at the foot of the stairs, cleaning out weeds and planting a terraced garden area next to the steps. “It was definitely challenging,” said SVC student Eddie Feliciano of the project. “But I loved watching everyone’s reaction.”

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Film Shorts Courtesy of Cascadia Weekly

A Quiet Place: John Krasinski directs himself and wife Emily Blunt (who elevates every project she takes on) in this smart, truly terrifying creature feature in which silence isn’t just golden, it’s a matter of life and death. With a tagline of “If they hear you, they hunt you,” this one will haunt you. ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 30 min.)

I Feel Pretty: Amy Schumer receives a head injury in a SoulCycle class, gains the self-confidence of a supermodel and begins to win at life. If this is the body-positivity message you’re looking for, and you’d like it to come from a white, blonde, conventionally pretty woman, I guess this is the movie for you. ★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 50 min.)

Avengers: Infinity War: This is the biggest superhero movie in history and one of the most expensive films ever made. The Marvel Cinematic Universe is riding high on an unprecedented string of critically and commercially successful movies (hello, "Black Panther"), so there’s more than just the fate of the world at stake here. ★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 36 min.)

Isle of Dogs: Unlike everyone else of my general age, I do not enjoy Wes Anderson movies. With one exception: "Fantastic Mr. Fox." For some reason, when animated, all of the precious contrivances that irritate me so much about Anderson’s filmmaking become charming. Here he brings his stopmotion technique to a story about dogs, and I’m here for every last good boy and girl. ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 41 min.)

Black Panther: This movie blew by $1 billion in worldwide box office. Between this and "Wonder Woman" (the other top-grossing superhero origin story of all time), looks like that age-old Hollywood belief that it takes a white male to anchor a successful big-budget blockbuster franchise is like so many other age-old beliefs: untrue and outdated. Get with the times, Tinseltown. Representation = $$$.★★★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 14 min.) Blockers: A teen sex comedy which puts horny girls looking to lose their virginity at the center of the story, taps the considerable comedic gifts of Leslie Mann, and begs the question of who is the better pro-wrestlerturned-comedic-actor: John Cena or the Rock. ★★★★ (R • 1 hr. 42 min.) Blumhouse’s Truth or Dare: I guess when your company produces "Paranormal Activity" (budget: $15,000; box office revenue: $200 million-plus) and then you follow it up with a couple of Oscar nods (for "Whiplash" and "Get Out"), you get to tag your name onto your movie’s titles (even when it’s illadvised to do so), like this one starring Lucy Hale about a game of Truth or Dare that has some horrific consequences. ★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 40 min.)

Ready Player One: After a long run of serious films, Steven Spielberg is back in the cinematic comfort zone he created: fantastical stories in which young people are the heroes rife with nostalgia and good, old-fashioned teamwork. This time, he’s got Ernest Cline’s bestseller and a $175 million budget to work with and the results are predictably popcornworthy. ★★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 20 min.) Sherlock Gnomes: The initial chapter of this animated series featuring garden gnomes gone wild was "Gnomeo and Juliet." What’s next? A Christmas movie called "Gnome for the Holidays?" "Sweet Gnome Alabama?" "A Prairie Gnome Companion?" "Gnomeward Bound?" "Gnome is Where the Heart Is?" The possibilities are endless. ★ (PG • 1 hr. 26 min.)

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AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR PG-13 I FEEL PRETTY PG-13 A QUIET PLACE PG-13 COMING SOON: BLOCKERS, TRUTH OR DARE, SUPER TROOPERS 2, 5/11 LIFE OF THE PARTY, 5/18 DEADPOOL 2

Movie Hotline 360-279-2226 Book A Party or Special Showing 360-279-0526 1321 SW Barlow St • Oak Harbor

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Now Showing! Thursday, April 26 - Single Feature

AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) Friday, April 27 thru Sunday, April 29

AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR (PG-13) A WRINKLE IN TIME (PG) SPECIAL: FREE CHILI & CHEESE ON ANY HOT DOG Box Office & Snack Bar Opens At 4pm • 1st Movie Begins At Dusk 11 & Over $6.50; Kids 5-10 $1.00; 4 & Under Free

Go Karts are now open Fri 4pm-Dusk, Sat 11am-Dusk & Sun 12:30pm - Dusk *Cash prices

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Light the way to a cure. Last year, hundreds of candles burned brightly through the night as Relay for Life participants walked by their light. This year they’ll be there again, in memory of a loved one who lost their life to cancer, someone currently fighting cancer or in honor of a survivor.

Super Troopers 2: If you liked the first "Super Troopers," you’ll like the sequel. The bar is not exactly sky-high here, folks. ★ (R • 1 hr. 39 min.)

On a scale from 1 to 10...5.5

Answers on page 19

FARAWAY ENTERTAINMENT YOUR LOCAL MOVIE THEATER

Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero: This is the animated-but-true story of the U.S. military’s most decorated dog soldier, Sgt. Stubby. Currently, there are two animated movies about very good dogs in theaters, and I can’t help but feel like this is an incredible time to be alive. ★★★★★ (PG • 1 hr. 25 min.)

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Rampage: Just a few months ago, we were having a serious national debate about Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson as a possible presidential candidate and now here he is starring in this movie with a giant ape. America, get your s**t together. ★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 47 min.)

I Can Only Imagine: I can only imagine how this true-life story of the Christian megahit “I Can Only Imagine” was green-lit. I can only For Anacortes theater showings, please see imagine how Trace Adkins came to be cast www.fandango.com. For Blue Fox and Oak in this thing. Actually, I can’t imagine any of Harbor Cinemas showings see ads on this it. But your imagination might be better than page. mine. ★★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 50 min.) Puzzle 1 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.55)

Every row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every column of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9

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360-679-4003 877-679-4003 www.seatacshuttle.com

By Carey Ross

Beirut: Jon Hamm takes his world-weary– and booze-soaked–Don Draper act to the Middle East, where he plays a former diplomat called back to his old life to engage in high-stakes hostage negotiation for the life of a friend. Don’t worry. Don Draper’s got this. ★★★★ (R • 1 hr. 50 min.)

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Honor your loved one with a Luminaria. Luminarias can be ordered on our website www.relayforlife.org/whidbeyislandwa Relay For Life is a chance to make the greatest impact in the fight to end cancer. Each new team brings us one step closer to saving more lives. Join a team or form a team. Learn more at: www.relayforlife.org/whidbeyislandwa Email: relaywhidbey@gmail.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/whidbeyrelay

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Come join us and see for yourself what Relay For Life is all about!

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RELAY FOR LIFE OF WHIDBEY ISLAND

June 1-2, 2018 North Whidbey Middle School

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/sudoku on Mon Apr 2 17:07:21 2018 GMT. Enjoy!

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APRIL 26 - MAY 2, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Island 911

Seriously, we do not make this stuff up! Sunday, Feb. 11 7 am, W Troxell Rd. Reporting male running around screaming and banging on firehouse, “I hate God.” 10:37 am, Cemetery Rd. Caller advising received information in reference to brother; remains were removed from grave and another person was buried in same location. 4:40 pm, Jones Rd. Reporting male threatening to hit him with hammer; subject lives at corner house; reporting party is at location to buy car and subject started threatening him, saying it was his car. 5:01 pm, Topaz Ct. Requesting call; wants to talk to deputy about personal matters; advising not an emergency and not urgent. Reporting party recalled, still wants contact. 7:59 pm, SR 20 Caller reporting male subject dancing and jumping around in the parking lot, smoking something. Monday, Feb. 12 12:58 pm, N Main St. Reporting party advising male came inside location and refused to leave; when he heard 9-1-1 dialed he left, stating he was going to go to sheriff's office. 9:15 pm, Cabrini Ct. Advising “suspicious barking” heard in area; barking at specific intervals; believes it could be organized dog fighting. 9:19 pm, Pear St. Reporting party advising received call from unknown woman in Langley who said male needed to get out of her face; woman sounded older. Tuesday, Feb. 13 8 am, Lincoln St. Caller advising garbage truck backed into her vehicle; driver still on scene, telling caller he did not hit her vehicle. 11:13 am, Possession Beach Walk Reporting a port-a-potty about 100 yards out, floating north. Advising Coast Guard. 1:08 pm, Saratoga Rd. Reporting party requesting contact. States has to go to well and is worried about male being at location. Male is verbal

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with everyone and is representing himself as a property owner. 3:05 pm, Deception Cir. Reporting cat in tree; caller has climbed tree to get cat a few times and cat runs up tree; caller very upset and doesn't want to call a tree service.

Life Tributes Martha Gwen VanDusen December 10, 1968 – March 19, 2018 Martha “Marty” Gwen VanDusen passed away in Everett, WA March 19, 2018 from injuries sustained in an auto accident. She was 49 years of age. Marty was born December 10, 1968 in Manassas, VA to William and Margaret (Bauer) VanDusen. She attended elementary school in Virginia through the third grade then moved with her family in 1979 to Oak Harbor, WA. Marty was a 1987 graduate of Oak Harbor High School.

9:06 pm, Honeymoon Lake Dr. Party advising son stole money and green suitcase wine holder; money was taken two days ago, suitcase was today. 9:54 pm, East Harbor Rd. Caller would like to talk to officer about “living in his car and drinking.” Caller is living in vehicle in Freeland area, wants to make sure he doesn't get a DUI for drinking in vehicle he resides in. WEDNESDAY, FEB. 14 4:11 am, West Beach Rd. Alarm company advising 58-year-old female is seven months pregnant with rapid heart beat. 9:26 am, Silver Lake Rd. Requesting call referencing scammed by “fake jury duty;” bought $750 worth of Visa cards and gave them the numbers. 10:03 am, S Main St. No emergency, very difficult to understand caller; he just woke up and is in work truck; doesn't know where he is. 3:20 pm, Bonito Way Caller reporting suspicious vehicle in front of caller's property for approximately 10 minutes; believes may be the same burglars who came to caller's house last year. 2:27 pm, Heller Rd. Reporting party saw male sitting in front of her deck in front yard; neighbor said male looks “spooky” and “wanked out;” can still see male now. Reporting party told neighbor to stay in her house. 2:53 pm, Ocean Dr. Advising 12-year-old child is “out of control;” opened reporting party's mail, threw it in a puddle, tried to kick in the door. Has not hurt anyone, no weapons. 6:51 pm, Cultus Bay Rd. Caller reporting vehicle took out all the mailboxes; third party information states it appeared to be a Blazer-style vehicle. Report provided by OHPD & Island County Sheriff’s Dept.

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After graduation, Marty attended Northwestern College in Orange City, IA, where she majored in history. She graduated in 1991 with a Bachelor’s Degree. Marty was married to Mark Vander Meulen for several years before divorcing in 2008. Prior to 2008, Mark and Marty lived in DeKalb, IL and Pittsburg, PA. In both locations, Marty used her history degree, serving as a docent and tour guide in restored historical homes. She later was hired as a docent and a demonstrator of various science related experiments at the Carnegie Science Center, one of four Carnegie Museums in Pittsburg. Also in Pittsburg, her love of theater, which began in her college days, continued with her talented costume designs for the casts of several plays. After her divorce, Marty moved back to Washington, and her love of children led her to a new career in pre-school and daycare. For the last 4 ½ years she was employed at Bright Horizons at West Seattle as a Child Care Specialist and performed some administrative duties. At the time of her death she was involved with the development of curriculum for pre-school children. Besides her love for children and history, Marty enjoyed learning foreign languages and spoke some French, Spanish and enough Portuguese to get her by when she traveled on a mission trip to Brazil and more recently to the Azores. Marty is survived by her mother Meg VanDusen of Oak Harbor, and brother Eric (Frances) VanDusen of Hampton, VA. Also surviving is an uncle, John Bauer, of Salem, OR. She was preceded in death by her father William and a niece, Katy VanDusen. A memorial service for Marty will be held Saturday, May 5 at 1:00 pm at the First Reformed Church of Oak Harbor with Pastor Matt Waite and Chaplain David G Lura officiating. A reception will follow in Wezeman Hall. The family suggests memorials in Marty’s name to the Oak Harbor Education Foundation, PO Box 1801, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Arrangements were entrusted to Wallin Funeral Home. Family and friends are encouraged to share memories and condolences at www.wallinfuneralhome.com.

InaMae Meininger 10/26/1925 – 4/6/2018 InaMae Meininger of Oak Harbor, WA and Lynnwood, WA. Passed away April 6, 2018. No services are currently pending.

Tearle A. Gillies September 6, 1934 – April 18, 2018 Tearle A. Gillies was born September 6, 1934 in Watertown, SD and passed away April 18, 2018 at Fidalgo Care Center in Anacortes, WA after a long battle with cancer. Tearle enlisted in the US Navy and, after experiencing a stroke and a long recovery, retired in San Diego as a Lieutenant Commander. He then moved his family back to Whidbey Island where he had been stationed previously and has lived here the past 43 years. Tearle enjoyed his morning coffee at McDonalds with his group of buddies. One of the things his family will miss the most is his singing to them as little kids and carrying on that tradition right up the line to the great grandchildren. From nursery rhymes to Dino “Dean Martin,” he enjoyed them all. Those who knew him well will miss his constant taunting (teasing) of Beverly and then, with a smirk on his face, turning away and laughing. Tearle leaves behind his wife of 59 years, Beverly, and five children; Randall Gillies, Linda (Tony) Baeyan, Patricia (James) Peterson, Robin Bowden (Gary Latting), and Vicki Gillies (Robert Watt Jr). Also surviving is brother, Leslie (Marlys) Gillies and sister Sonya (Charles) Welch. He was especially proud of his 22 grandchildren and 28 great-grandchildren. They were his greatest joy and he loved them dearly. He was preceded in death by both his parents, one sister, one brother, and three grandchildren. The family would like to extend their heartfelt gratitude to the loving nursing staff and Doctor at Fidalgo Care Center for taking great care of our Dad for the past year.

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A traditional funeral service for Tearle will be held beginning with a viewing Monday, April 30, 2018 from 1-5 pm at Wallin Funeral Home followed by a funeral service Tuesday, May 1 at 1:00 pm at the funeral home. Burial at Maple Leaf Cemetery will follow the funeral service. Arrangements were entrusted to Wallin Funeral home & Cremation LLC. To leave condolences or share messages please visit Tearle’s Book of Memories page on the funeral home website at www.wallinfuneralhome.com.

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Let’s Dish! with Kae Harris

Adventures of a Curious Appetite – International Cuisine With Holland Happening this weekend we’ll see a wealth of different foods grace our beautiful Oak Harbor. From the all-American fare to traditional Dutch cuisine (including my favorite: stroopwafels) – Holland Happening is where everything tasty is! So, with this in mind, I decided to share with you some of my favorite international dishes. I’ve found over the many years I’ve traveled, that where ever I go I quickly find a dish that just nestles itself into the heart of my belly. I’m going to move across the globe in this article and tell you a little about my favorite foods in the hope that if and when you get a chance, you might try them for yourself! I’ll start in North America - Canada to be exact. With its extremely close proximity to us (or us to them depending on which way you look at it), we have the ability to take a drive across the border, passports in hand, and indulge in a little Canadian cuisine. In my opinion, there’s nothing tastier than poutine. It’s just amazing and while the origins are debated today, it doesn’t in any way make the dish itself less delicious. The most popular story of the origins of poutine is in 1957, a patron named Eddy Lainesse decided to ask the owner of the restaurant Le Lutin qui rit to mix cheese curds with French fries for him. However, if you thought that would be that and we know for sure who invented it and where, then think again, because a Drummondville restaurant called Le Roy Jucep registered a trademark stating it was, in fact, the birth place of the poutine we know today – served as a dish of cheese curds, French fries and gravy. But the speculation doesn’t stop there. Another possible birthplace of the dish alludes to a Princeville restaurant called La P’tite Vache which was located right by a dairy. This dairy apparently produced cheese curds but had nowhere to sell them – at first. They soon began selling the curds to La P’tite Vache, which in turn sold them, along with French fries in bags, to their customers so they could mix the two together at their tables.

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Pretty nifty right? But whatever the origin, the gastronomic delight is much the same. The basic concept is French fries, smothered in gravy and topped with cheese curds. Of course, there are numerous variations of the dish, and when I spent a few days in Vancouver a few years ago, I had the opportunity to try some of the many different kinds of poutine the city’s restaurants boast. Even Canada's fast food chains invariably serve poutine, that’s how good it is. If you want to try some yourself, it’s simple to make – a quick online search will point you in the right direction! Moving onward in pursuit of culinary treasures everywhere, I’ll take you to Guam. A long flight, yes, but a destination as tropical as any place can be and as vibrant in culture as it is in scenery. After having lived on the Island for three years, it’s safe to say I had a few favorite foods. It took a little while to discover which dish was actually ‘the best’ – as per my taste buds – but rest assured, I found it. Every night of the week a fantastic place called Chamorro village was open for browsing and enjoyment. This is where I got my first taste of chamorran fare. First of all, chicken kelaguen is a top contender. It’s a spicy chicken dish where the meat has been marinated for ages in lemon and hot peppers, onions and salt. Served with titiyas (Chamorro tortillas) it’s absolutely wonderful. And even better than that, for me, was a simple ‘sauce’ called finadene. With its almost briny undertones, this extra-strong sauce is made using vinegar, soy sauce and lemon juice. Chop up some hot chili peppers, onions and even tomatoes and enjoy on anything from chicken to pork and everything in between. But by far my all time, top-of-the-list favorite thing to eat, something I would indulge in often, was siopao. I used to stop at the Circle K on Marine Corps Drive and buy a couple of these. One for now, the other, also for now. This is a steamed, stuffed bun with Chinese (Cha Siu Bao) and/or Filipino (Siopao Asado) origins. With ingredients such as pulled pork or chicken, soy and oyster sauce, hoisin sauce, sugar and chopped garlic, all mixed together to form the filling for the soft, fluffy steamed bun that envelopes

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it, you’re in for a treat when you pick up a siopao, I promise!

WHAT’S GOING ON

While I have favorite dishes I am telling you all about here, there are hundreds and hundreds more I could talk about.

Every Thursday, 6:30pm-8:30pm 5200 Honeymoon Bay Road, Freeland

The next dish is more of a snack or a treat and we actually are privy to its delectability here in the states. Mochi is often found at frozen yogurt stores as a topping or add-in and the chewy contrast it gives to the smooth, cold creamy texture of the yogurt works magic in your mouth. This treat is a Japanese cake made of glutinous rice which is pounded into a paste and formed into shapes. It is either eaten right away or cured and dried for later consumption. It is said to date as far back as the 10th century, if not a little earlier, and was used as Imperial offerings during religious events. It is also said that because the little mochi cakes are calorie dense, they provided an efficient means of transporting energy into a person’s body and took up little room when carried around. For this reason, farmers supposedly eat it for stamina, and Samurai warriors were said to favor it for its transportability and ease with which it could be prepared. It’s also believed the sound of mochi being pounded was a sign of impending battle for the Samurai. The gentle flavor and gelatinous bite mochi has is something else entirely! If you haven’t tried it yet, I really hope you will soon! Dear readers, I could go on for weeks, months even, about all the delicious dishes I’ve had the opportunity to try and to be sure, there are too many to list. I might forget some! In any event, I will include a recipe for finadene because it isn’t often I find dipping sauces this good. If you try it, let me know how you like it! Please send all comments, questions and definitely any recipes you might like to share to letsdish.whidbeyweekly@gmail.com and we’ll do just that – Dish! Finadene 1 cup soy sauce ½ cup fresh lemon juice ½ cup chopped green onions 6 small, hot red peppers 1 cup cherry tomatoes 4 slices lemon

www.justapinch.com/recipes/sauce-spread/ dip/finadene-local-dip.html www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Mochi http://labanquise.com/en/poutine-history.php To read past columns of Let's Dish in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

Healing Rooms

The Healing Rooms are open to anyone desiring personal prayer for physical, emotional, or spiritual needs. There is a team of Christians from several local churches that are dedicated to praying for healing the sick in our community. All ministry is private, confidential, and free. Teams are available to pray for individuals who drop by on a first-come, first-serve basis. For more information, contact Ann at (425) 263-2704, email healingwhidbey.com, or visit the International Association of Healing Rooms at healingrooms.com.

Concordia Lutheran Church Sunday service, 9:30am Bible Study & Sunday School, 10:45am 590 N. Oak Harbor Street For more information, visit www.concordia oakharbor.org or call (360) 675-2548.

Teaching Through God’s Word Sundays, 9:00am & 11:00am Calvary Chapel, 3821 French Road, Clinton For more information, visit ccwhidbey.com.

Unitarian Universalist Sunday Service Sundays, 10:00am Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland All are welcome. Values-based children’s religious exploration classes and childcare will be provided. Visit www.uucwi.org for more information. The Unitarian Universalist Congregation building is located at 20103 Highway 525, two miles north of Freeland.

Unity of Whidbey

If you’re one of the “spiritual but not religious” people who questions your childhood faith or is looking for something more, Unity of Whidbey may feel like a homecoming. Visit our website: unityofwhidbey.org

Whidbey Quakers Sundays, 4:00pm-5:00pm Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Freeland Whidbey Islands Friends Meeting (also known as Quakers) meet in silent worship and community, with occasional spoken messages, every Sunday at the Unitarian Universalist building. For more information, contact Tom Ewell at tewell@whidbey.com or go to www.whidbeyquakers.org. WHAT'S GOING ON

continued on page

Enjoy Some Award Winning BBQ after the Holland Happening Festivities

601 NE Midway Blvd • Oak Harbor

360-679-3500 • www.thebbqjoint.net

JOIN THE FUN! Friday, April 27, 7pm Live Music w/ Chuck Dingee Saturday, May 5, 6pm Farmstrong Brewers Night LIVE Music w/Bobby O’Neal Cinco de Mayo Celebration! Featuring Local Craft Beer, Wine & Ciders $3 Tacos every Tuesday Televising all Seattle 103 S. Main • Coupeville • 360.682.5747 Mariners Games! www.penncovebrewing.com

HAPPY HOUR MONDAY-FRIDAY 3-6PM

Breakfast & Lunch on the Water - Daily Fresh Baked Treats Homemade Soups & Sandwiches 360.678.5431 • 4 Front Street • Coupeville

6

Sundays, 10:00am 5671 Crawford Road, Langley

Mix all ingredients, except for the hot peppers and lemon slices, together in a medium bowl. Dice three hot red peppers and add to the sauce mixture. Add in the lemon slices and remaining three peppers, whole, and stir. Serve over rice, fish, chicken, eggs – anything you like, really – and enjoy!

Dining Guide

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Come up and see us after the parade for Dutch Apple Pie Dutch Apple Fritters Dutch Potato Rolls & Banket! 1191 SE Dock St, #2 • Oak Harbor 360-675-6500 chrisbakeryonwhidbey.weebly.com

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APRIL 26 - MAY 2, 2018

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Whidbey Weekly

LOCALLY OWNED

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HOUSING continued from page 7

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly At least 50 people discuss the issue of homelessness at a community conversation hosted by the Whidbey Homeless Coalition Monday night at the Oak Harbor Senior Center.

ideas to help solve these problems,” Roosen-Runge continued. “That has value.” Those in attendance ranged from volunteers to professionals who work with the homeless to former and currently homeless individuals. People shifted to a new table for each of the three questions, enabling different conversations with each new topic. A summary of discussion points at the end of the evening revealed several ideas that were consistent, such as the importance of educating the community and raising awareness about what homelessness is; recognizing and providing resources for those suffering from mental illness; the need for housing; and treating those who are homeless with respect, dignity and compassion. “This is a complex issue, but if our hearts are in the right place we can work toward solutions,” said Fran Stevens, one of the table captains. “If each one of us in this room reached out to just one person every day, imagine what a great thing that would be.”

WHAT’S GOING ON

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First Church of Christ, Scientist Worship, 10:00am Sunday School to age 20, 10:00am Wednesday Testimony Meeting, 2:30pm Christian Science Reading Room Tuesday & Friday, 11:00am-3:00pm Wednesday 3:30pm-5:30pm The church and Reading Room are located at 721 SW 20th Court at Scenic Heights Street, Oak Harbor. Call (360) 675-0621 or visit christianscience.com Services and Sunday School are also held at 10:30am on South Whidbey at 15910 Highway 525, just north of Bayview and across from Useless Bay Road; testimony meetings are held the first Wednesday of each month at 7:30pm.

Galleries & Art Shows 21st Annual All-Island High School Showcase of the Arts Friday, May 4, 10:00am-8:00pm Saturday, May 5, 10:00am-5:00pm Coupeville Rec Hall, 901 NW Alexander St Presented by the American Association of University Women (AAUW) Whidbey Island Branch. Prizes will be awarded for Wall Art, Sculpture, Jewelry/Wearable, Ceramics and Photography. Come see what these young men and women have created.

Meetings & Organizations Island County Amateur Radio Club

“There are a lot of like-minded people here tonight,” said Vivian Rogers-Decker, homeless liaison for Oak Harbor Public Schools and the founder of Spin Café in Oak Harbor. “It’s easy to sit in on a conversation with people who agree with you, but it’s much harder to be part of a conversation with people who don’t, so I applaud those of you who came tonight who were willing to do that.” Rogers-Decker encouraged participants to remember many of Whidbey Island’s homeless include children and families, further compounding an already complex issue. The Whidbey Homeless Coalition currently operates the House of Hope in Langley, which provides 90-day temporary housing for adults and families with children who are experiencing homelessness and the Haven, a year-round overnight shelter in Oak Harbor. More information on the Whidbey Homeless Coalition and its shelters and programs can be found online at whidbeyhomeless.org or by calling 360-900-3077.

construction starting in the fall, at the earliest. Information about the 2040 Long Range Plan will also be shared at this meeting.

Coupeville Garden Club Thursday, May 3, 9:30am Coupeville Rec Hall, 901 NW Alexander St. Meeting begins with coffee and social time, program begins at 10:00am. Program: Discover what you can find in an apothecary and explore the magic and medicine of plants: what can you grow for herbal teas, soothing ointments, edible blossoms and other natural remedies. Speaker: Wendy Young, Doctor of Pharmacology. Raffle Prize: Win a basket of herbs, oils, and spices. The public is invited to attend.

Greenbank Garden Club Thursday, May 3, 9:30am Greenbank Progressive Club, 715 Bakken Rd. Doors open at 9:30am for a social time followed by the business meeting starting promptly at 10:00am. The May meeting is our Annual Potluck and Round Table Discussion. New members and guests are welcome.

Whidbey Weavers Guild Thursday, May 3, 10:00am-2:00pm Pacific Rim Institue, 180 Parker Rd, Coupeville Bring a brown bag lunch and your own beverage cup. Program: Elisabeth Hill: Deflected Doubleweave. For more information, visit www.whidbeyweaversguild.org

W.I.G.S. (Whidbey Island Genealogical Searchers)

Saturday, April 28, 9:00am 1 N.E. Sixth Street, Coupeville

Tuesday, May 8, 1:00pm Fire Station #25, 2720 Heller Rd, Oak Harbor

Meeting is held in the Island County commissioner’s hearing room. Guests are welcome to attend. Visit www.w7avm.org or email ai7f@ w7avm.org for more information.

Bill Waite will speak about his study of the American Civil War and how he became interested in researching ancestors who were engaged in the war and share their stories. He will display original letters and collectibles from the Civil War period. All are welcome to attend. For more information contact us at whidbeygensearchers@gmail.com.

WSF Open House Tuesday, May 1, 5:30pm-7:30pm Clinton Community Hall, 6411 S. Central Ave. Washington State Ferries staff will be available to share the latest project designs, take comments and answer questions about the SR 525 - Clinton Passenger & ADA Improvement project. WSDOT is currently finalizing the design of the new pick-up/drop-off zone and related pedestrian improvements. The project will be advertised for bids this summer with

Relay for Life Wednesday, May 9, 5:30pm Oak Harbor Elks Lodge, 155 NE Ernst St. The Event Leadership Meeting will be held from 5:30pm-6:30pm. Team Relay Rally is from 7:00pm-8:00pm. For more information, email relaywhidbey@gmail.com

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly A community conversation about homelessness on Whidbey Island generates much discussion Monday evening at an event sponsored by the Whidbey Homeless Coalition.

For a list of continuous Meetings and Organizations, visit www.whidbeyweekly.com

Classes, Seminars and Workshops Japanese Pruning Workshop Saturday, April 28, 10:00am-1:30pm Meerkerk Rhododendron Gardens, Greenbank Cost: $75

from Sound Native Plants and Lisa Kaufman from the Northwest Straits Foundation will highlight the “why” and “how” of effective landscape management at this workshop designed specifically for shoreline landowners. Please register at: https://www.surveymonkey. com/r/Whidbey2018

DUI/Underage Drinking Prevention Panel

Join revered Japanese Master Gardener, Masa Mizuno, for a pruning workshop. The event includes a demonstration, opportunities to explore the gardens, a question and answer session, and a Japanese sushi luncheon. All proceeds benefit NW Language & Cultural Center’s Global Cultures Program. To register, call (360) 321-2101 or visit www.nwlacc.org

Thursday, May 3, 6:45pm Oak Harbor Library meeting room

Back Pain & Sciatica Workshop

AARP Driver Safety Class

Saturday, April 28, 11:00am-12:00pm North End Fitness Center, Oak Harbor This free informational workshop, presented by Rue & Primavera Physical & Occupational Therapy, will offer 3 simple steps to quick and natural healing. To register, call (360) 279-8323. North End Fitness is located at 2800 Goldie Rd.

AARP Driver Safety Class Wednesday, May 2, 8:30am-4:30pm Wednesday, October 17, 8:30am-4:30pm Oak Harbor Senior Center Cost $15 AARP members; $20 for nonmembers This class can save you money, but more importantly, you learn safety strategies and basic vehicle maintenance. Preregister by calling (360) 632-1752.

Shoreline Vegetation Management Thursday, May 3, 6:00pm-8:00pm Bayview Community Hall, 5642 Bayview Rd, Langley Free Workshop Shoreline landowners in Island County are invited to attend a free workshop on coastal processes and shoreline erosion management using native vegetation. Island County’s marine shorelines support marine food webs and the local economy. People who live and work on shoreline properties have a large role to play in their protection and restoration. Ben Alexander

No pre-registration required, no late admittance allowed. Open to all and required by local driving schools for driver’s education students and parents. For more information, call (360) 672-8219 or visit www.idipic.org. Saturday, May 5, 8:30am-4:00pm Island Senior Services, Bayview Senior Center, Langley Cost $15 AARP members; $20 for nonmembers This class can save you money, but more importantly, you learn safety strategies and basic vehicle maintenance. Preregister by calling (360) 321-1600.

DUI/Underage Drinking Prevention Panel Saturday, May 5, 12:45pm Trinity Lutheran Church, Freeland No pre-registration required, no late admittance allowed. Open to all and required by local driving schools for driver’s education students and parents. For more information, call (360) 672-8219 or visit www.idipic.org.

Understanding Social Security Wednesday, May 16, 5:30pm-6:30pm Free Seminar Join Chris Renfro, Edward Jones Financial Advisor, for an educational seminar where you will learn key facts about the Social Security Program including how benefits are calculated, choosing the right time to file, receiving benefits while working, provisional income and tax implications and more. Dinner provided by Serendipity Catering. To reserve your space, call (360) 678-6580 or email Deirdre.fairfax@ edwardjones.com

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19

APRIL 26 - MAY 2, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Residential Rentals, Inc. 360-675-9596 www.whidbeyres.com 285 NE Midway Blvd • Suite #2 • Oak Harbor BOATS/PARTS FOR SALE 2007 Mercury Outboard Motor. 3.5HP, 4-stroke, used less than 30 minutes. Brand new condition, $900. (360) 6826003 (0)

GARAGE/ESTATE SALES Moving Sale: Friday, April 27 and Saturday, April 28, 8am4pm, 2287 Williams Road, Oak Harbor off Hastie Lake Road. Lifetime accumulation of Tools, Tools, Tools, Camping and Fishing equipment for sale. Many new or barely used. Also yard and garden items, furniture, and much more. (0)

ANNOUNCEMENTS Event Venue: BISC (babyislandsaratogaclub.org) in Langley, WA. Rent for wedding receptions, meetings, other events. Extensively renovated clubhouse. Off street parking. Reasonable rates. Contact website or call (206) 775-9370 (0) Pregnant? Need baby clothes? We have them and the price is right–FREE. Pregnancy Care Clinic, open most Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10am to 4pm. Call (360) 221-2909 or stop by 6th and Cascade in Langley. Be the difference in a child's life and become a foster parent today! Service Alternatives is looking for caring, loving, and supportive families to support foster children. (425) 923-0451 or mostermick@ servalt-cfs.com The Whidbey Island community is encouraged to try out the paddling sport of dragon boating with the Stayin' Alive team. Our team's mission is to promote the physical, social, and emotional benefits

of dragon boating. It has been shown to be especially beneficial to cancer survivors. Practice with us for up to 3 times for free. Life-jackets and paddles provided. Saturdays at the Oak Harbor Marina, 8:45am. Contact njlish@ gmail.com. More info at our Facebook Page: https://www. facebook.com/NorthPugetSou ndDragonBoatClub?ref=hl Medical Marijuana patients unite; If you need assistance, advice, etc. please contact at 420patientnetworking@gmail. com. Local Whidbey Island help. If you or someone you know has been a victim of Homicide, Burglary, Robbery, Assault, Identity Theft, Fraud, Human Trafficking, Home Invasion and other crimes not listed. Victim Support Services has Advocates ready to help. Please call the 24-hr Crisis Line (888) 388-9221. Free Service. Visit our web site at http://victimsupportservices.org

VARIOUS POSITIONS: Oak Harbor Ace Hardware is now accepting applications/ resumes from punctual, hard working and honest individuals to fill several positions within the store. Must like working with people and have exceptional customer service skills. Retail experience a plus but not required. Applications available at Oak Harbor Ace Hardware, 150 SE Pioneer Way (2) ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE: We are looking for a dynamic Account Executive. Applicant has to be able to work autonomously and be self-motivated; must possess exceptional customer service and organizational skills; marketing or advertising background desired. If you want to join a successful, growing organization and have a strong work ethic, we want to talk to you. Email your cover letter and resume to info@ whidbeyweekly.com

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES

LAWN AND GARDEN

Looking for Board Members to join the dynamic Board of Island Senior Resources and serve the needs of Island County Seniors. Of particular interest are representatives from North Whidbey. For more information please contact: reception@islandseniorservices.org

JOB MARKET DRIVERS: Drivers wanted for Whidbey SeaTac Shuttle. CDL/ P2 Preferred, Training available for those without. Full Time, Part Time and weekend openings available. Details at www. seatacshuttle.com or call (360) 679-4003 (3)

www.whidbeyweekly.com

Whidbey Weekly

25 aluminum silver deck post caps, $3 each; 200 feet new 8” heavy waterline, $4 a foot, obo. Can be used for waterline or drain line. (360) 321-1624 Natural Barnyard Topsoil: Good for gardens, flower beds, etc. Unscreened, 10 yard loads, $225 delivered. South Whidbey (360) 321-1624

MISCELLANEOUS Fujinon binoculars, 10 x 70 fmt-sx with case, mint condition, $400. Call (360) 240-0921 (1) Craftsman 16” Scroll Saw. Excellent, $85. (360) 5794643 (0)

LOCALLY OPERATED

Foster Homes Needed! Family Tails Dog Rescue needs foster homes! We can't save dogs from high kill shelters without homes for them to stay at while they wait to find their forever home. 1 week to 3 months, a fun and rewarding way to be involved with rescue and also have a dog without the full time commitment. We pay for everything, you just provide the love and the home. Please call 360-969-2014 for more info or for an application.

Traeger smoker/grill, used you want them mailed. CASH twice, $200; Aztek A470 preferred. Dimensions are: Airbrush, never used. With SA 5-6"W X 17”L. Contact me at compressor model Scorpion 1, ljohn60@gmail.com. Iwata Eclipse Airbrush along ANIMALS/SUPPLIES with numerous accessories, paints and easel board, $400; Black and white bunnies: New Grundpos cast iron jet 3 month only Dwarfs, very pump 3/4 hp JPF 4-A, $75. friendly, pets only. Males and Call (360) 240-1169 (0) one female. $25 each or trade for 50 lbs. rabbit chow; Also Rockwell Bladerunner X2 table-top jig saw with blades have one male and one female to cut wood, metal & cerambrown Lionhead. Looks like a ics. New condition, $60. Stu squirrel, $25 ea. (360) 929(360) 920-3806 (0) 5928 (0) We are in the process of a If you or someone you know making a serious downsizing needs help in feeding pet(s), effort, and we have items WAIF Pet Food Banks may be for sale in the following categories: costume jewelry; No Cheating! furniture; garden tools; hand tools; kitchen items; luggage (including duffel bags, tote bags & backpacks); puzzles and toys; sports items; storage racks; yard equipment (boat trailer winch, and 30 gallon sprayer); and other yard items. If you are interested in seeing what we have available, please call (360) 678-1167 to make an appointment. Looking for Xmas, Bday, Father's Day, or just Gifts in general? These are LOCAL made crafts, I have about 50-60 of these available. They are $16.00/ea, plus shipping if

able to help. Pet Food Banks are located at WAIF thrift stores in Oak Harbor (50 NE Midway Blvd) and Freeland (1660 Roberta Ave) and are generously stocked by donations from the community. If you need assistance, please stop by.

WANTED Wall Hugger Power Lift-chair Recliner, Brown/Black Leather, Call after 10 AM. (360) 5795436 (0) Collectibles, Art & Antiques. Cash paid for quality items. Call or Text (360) 661-7298 (1)

Puzzle 1 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.55)

3 9 4 8 7 1 2 5 6 6 1 8 9 2 5 3 4 7 2 5 7 4 3 6 8 1 9

4 2 5 3 1 7 6 9 8 9 8 6 2 5 4 1 7 3 7 3 1 6 9 8 5 2 4 5 6 2 7 4 3 9 8 1

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DID YOU KNOW MOST CLASSIFIED ADS ARE FREE? Contact us for more info! classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com

CLASSIFIED INFORMATION US Postal Mail

Whidbey Weekly Classified Department PO Box 1098 Oak Harbor, WA 98277

E-Mail............classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com Telephone..................................(360)682-2341 Fax.............................................(360)682-2344 PLEASE CALL WHEN YOUR ITEMS HAVE SOLD.

Please try to limit your classified to 30 words or less, (amounts and phone numbers are counted as words) we will help edit if necessary. We charge $10/week for Vehicles, Boats, Motorcycles, RVs, Real Estate Rental/Sales, Business Classifieds and any items selling $1,000 and above. We do charge $25 to include a photo. The FREE classified space is not for business use. No classified is accepted without phone number. We reserve the right to not publish classifieds that are in bad taste or of questionable content. All free classifieds will be published twice consecutively. If you would like your ad to be published more often, you must resubmit it. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date.

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20 APRIL 26 - MAY 2, 2018 www.whidbeyweekly.com

Whidbey Weekly

LOCALL LOCALL Y OWNED Y OWNED

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