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April 12 through April 18, 2018

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Your Community Theatre Whidbey Playhouse presents USE AYHO L P EY WHIDB

The Hollow

COMMUNITY THEATER

Directed by Kevin Wm. Meyer | Produced by Ken Grigsby

APRIL 13-29, 2018 Purchase Tickets $18 via website!

www.whidbeyplayhouse.com Produced by special arrangement with Samuel French | Mature Guidance Suggested More Local Events inside

Harvest Fest Races Coupeville Green Coupeville Page 6

Zumba & Hula by Ate Flo Knights of Columbus Oak Harbor Page 6

SW Syrian Refugee Project Langley United Methodist Church Langley Page 9


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APRIL 12 - APRIL 18, 2018

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Earth Day Plant Sale Saturday, April 21, 10am-2pm Greenbank Farm • 765 Wonn Rd • Greenbank Hundreds of locally grown plants to choose from. Perennials, shrubs, grasses and much more! Vegetable starts, herbs & fruits. New Garden Art to add something special to your landscape. “Garden Market” with some great finds. Great raffle items, try your luck! Fresh baked goods. Come early for the best selection! Presented by the Greenbank Garden Club

e h T W e h m a o c les l e W PARADE & FESTIVAL

Saturday, April 14, 11am-5pm & Sunday, April 15, 10am-5pm Langley, Whidbey Island, WA Part of Whidbey’s Earth and Ocean Month! Saturday, April 14

Sunday, April 15

11am - 1:30pm: Langley Methodist Church Educational displays, slide shows, family activities, costume making

10am - 12pm: Langley Waterfront

1:30pm: Downtown Langley

11am - 2pm: Langley Whale Center

2pm - 2:30pm: Langley Waterfront

3pm - 5pm: Mystic Sea

Music & celebration, whale watching from shore

3pm: Langley Methodist Church

Educational Presentations: Senior Ecologist Russ Holmes; and John Calambokidis, Cascadia Research

By Ken Drecksel

Farm & Forest Planner, Whidbey Island Conservation District

DO YOU KNOW YOUR SOIL? WHIDBEY’S SOIL BASICS THROUGH FIVE FORMING FACTORS

1609 E. Main Street • Freeland • 360-331-6799 • acehardware.com • Monday-Saturday 8am-7pm • Sunday 9am-6pm

Whale Parade (up 2nd St, down 1st St) Parade staging 1 pm @ US Bank parking lot. Come as your favorite critter!

Make a Difference

Beach clean-up. Help protect gray whale feeding habitat! Meet The Artist event with Sue Coccia of EarthArt International (artist of this beautiful Gray whale!) Orca Network gray whale cruise on board the Mystic Sea. Please contact cindy@orcanetwork.org for more information

Sponsored by Orca Network and the Langley Chamber of Commerce www.OrcaNetwork.org • www.VisitLangley.com

What is soil? Soil is the unconsolidated surface of the earth’s crust where plants grow. Soils are classified by a taxonomic system into “series” (individuals) that are mapped throughout the United States and its territories. Soils have specific characteristics that influence use and management. Let’s look at how the five soil forming factors – time, geology, climate, biology and topography – affect soils on Whidbey Island. A Glimpse Into Whidbey Island’s Soils Time Whidbey soils are young. They are generally only about 12,000 years old. That’s young for soil! This is how long ago the ice sheet covering Whidbey Island melted. Due to their young age, soils haven’t fully developed characteristics expected by the influence of these factors (low pH, weathering of soil minerals, highly leached, red subsoils, etc.) Geology The island’s soils are mostly of glacial origin. They have mixed mineralogy, because many types of rocks and minerals were collected, moved, mixed, and ground up together by the glaciers that existed here thousands of years ago. As the ice from these glaciers retreated, it left brackish and non-brackish lakes in areas with fine-textured materials. These finetextured materials are what we know as silts and clays. There were streams, too, that once existed and were localized to extensive areas of meltwater outwash that left layers and piles of sandy and gravelly material. Additionally, there were areas of compacted material, known as densic layers, which previously supported the weight of the glacier up to a mile thick. In more recent history, there have been additions of silt-sized volcanic ash to the surface of soils in many areas of Whidbey Island. Climate The cool, damp marine climate of Whidbey Island plays the role of weathering soil minerals and lowering pH over time. But this process has only just started because our soils are youngsters. Due to cool temperatures and lush growth of vegetation here on the island, our soils here tend to have higher organic matter in surface layers than would be expected in a warmer or dryer climate. Biology Dense coniferous forests historically covered most of Whidbey. Having large areas of conifer forests minimizes soil erosion, results in high organic matter in surface layers, and promotes chemical weathering and movement of iron and aluminum oxides – all important ecosystem functions. Again, the young age of soils on Whidbey has limited chemical alteration and weathering of its soils. High input of woody residue with forest vegetation has resulted in high organic matter content and brown color in surface layers. Native Americans who burned prairies on the island are responsible for dominance of grassy vegetation and dark colored topsoil in these areas. Present day humans are part of biology too; when doing land clearing and site development we can damage soils by removing more fertile topsoil layers, exposing less productive subsoil. When we add compost to our gardens, we can rejuvenate fertility of soils. Careful planning and consideration of your resources ensures that soils are taken into account in land use planning. Topography Topography affects soils on Whidbey Island by influencing the rate of erosion and drainage. Where we have steep slopes that are not well vegetated, like along bluffs, there is minimal soil development due to constant erosional losses. Wetlands, or even bogs, can form if soils in low lying areas are lakebed sediments or densic material with a combination of restricted drainage. Soils on convex (curved outward) surfaces generally tend to be better drained than soils in concave (curved inward) low lying areas. Well, how can you find out about soil on your property, or on land you are thinking of purchasing? USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service’s Web Soil Survey – https:// websoilsurvey.nrcs.usda.gov/ – is a great resource available online to obtain custom soil reports. These reports you create for your area of interest contain soil maps, soil map unit descriptions, and numerous tables and interpretations such as: Water Features, Soil Physical Properties, Forage Productivity (hay, pasture), Forest Productivity, Potential for Nitrate Leaching, Building Site Development Limitations, etc. Check it out! If you need assistance with your soil report, please give us a call at Whidbey Island Conservation District (360-678-4708) and we can assist you.

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Let us jump start our August celebration with some gems from the comedy vault of non-noted jurist, Judge Humerus. His topic– what children think of their grandparents. Grandparents alert She was in the bathroom, putting on her makeup, under the watchful eyes of her young granddaughter, as she'd done many times before. After she applied her lipstick and started to leave, the little one said, "But Grandma, you forgot to kiss the toilet paper good-bye!" My young grandson called the other day to wish me Happy Birthday. He asked me how old I was, and I told him, 80. My grandson was quiet for a moment, and then he asked, "Did you start at 1?" After putting her grandchildren to bed, a grandmother changed into old slacks and a droopy blouse and proceeded to wash her hair. As she heard the children getting more and more rambunctious, her patience grew thin. Finally, she threw a towel around her head and stormed into their room, putting them back to bed with stern warnings. As she left the room, she heard the three-yearold say with a trembling voice, "Who was THAT?"

A 6-year-old was asked where his grandma lived. "Oh," he said, "she lives at the airport, and when we want her, we just go get her. Then, when we're done having her visit, we take her back to the airport." Grandpa is the smartest man on earth! He teaches me good things, but I don't get to see him enough to get as smart as him! My Grandparents are funny, when they bend over, you hear gas leaks and they blame their dog. A Jean Shaw moment “This morning I could not find the book I was reading at 3 a.m. this morning when I could not sleep. Finally I did for a couple of hours, got up, made breakfast, then looked for my book again and COULD NOT FIND IT! I even stripped my entire bed this time. Was swearing to myself and returned to the kitchen where I had been, and there IN FRONT OF ME BY THE MICROWAVE OVEN! sat my water bottle and underneath it MY BOOK! I had made breakfast in the kitchen and never saw it. Put that one in your column!”

I didn't know if my granddaughter had learned her colors yet, so I decided to test her. I would point out something and ask what color it was. She would tell me and was always correct. It was fun for me, so I continued. At last, she headed for the door, saying, "Grandma, I think you should try to figure out some of these colors yourself!" When my grandson Billy and I entered our vacation cabin, we kept the lights off until we were inside to keep from attracting pesky insects. Still, a few fireflies followed us in. Noticing them before I did, Billy whispered, "It's no use Grandpa. Now the mosquitoes are coming after us with flashlights." When my grandson asked me how old I was, I teasingly replied, "I'm not sure." "Look in your underwear, Grandpa," he advised "Mine says I'm 4 to 6." A second grader came home from school and said to her grandmother, "Grandma, guess what? We learned how to make babies today." The grandmother, more than a little surprised, tried to keep her cool. "That's interesting." she said... "How do you make babies?" "It's simple," replied the girl. "You just change 'y' to 'i' and add 'es'." Children's Logic: "Give me a sentence about a public servant," said a teacher. The small boy wrote: "The fireman came down the

After about 25,000 copies had gone through the printer, the guy on duty running the printer noticed the word Calendar had been miss-spelled on the front cover. Nobody checked the obvious.” My oh my. Here is another reminder to proofread before you text, e-mail, or telegram your emotions. Bob, away on a fishing trip, penned a short, romantic note to his wife. Anxious to share his enthusiasm, Bob missed the letter e at the end of the word ending his only sentence. Bob's note – "Hi darling, I'm enjoying and experiencing the best time of my whole life, and I wish you were her!” This tiny error apparently caused Bob to seek police protection after returning home to gather the few of his belongings that had survived the fire. One more time If we do not see one another at the Nineteenth Annual Whidbey Jazz Fest at 7:30 p.m., this Friday the 13th, at the Oak Harbor High School, then we'll try again at the Whale Day Parade at 1:30 p.m. on the streets of Langley, the Village by the Sea. Either way, our toes will be tappin'. Have a super week. To read past columns of On Track in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

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Whidbey Weekly LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

390 NE MIDWAY BLVD | PO BOX 1098 | OAK HARBOR, WASHINGTON 98277 Publisher & Editor.......................................................... Eric Marshall Marketing Representatives................Penny Hill, Roosevelt Rumble Graphic Design............................................................. Teresa Besaw Production Manager......................................................TJ Pierzchala Circulation Manager.................................................... Noah Marshall

Contributing Writers Jim Freeman Wesley Hallock Kae Harris Tracy Loescher Kathy Reed Carey Ross

Volume 10, Issue 15 | © MMXVIII Whidbey Weekly

PUBLISHED and distributed every week. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The Whidbey Weekly cannot be held responsible for the quality of goods or services supplied by advertisers in this publication. Articles, unless otherwise stated, are by contribution and therefore the Whidbey Weekly is not in a position to validate any comments, recommendations or suggestions made in these articles. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. DEADLINES: The Whidbey Weekly is a submission based editorial with contributing writers. Please feel free to submit any information (please limit to 200 words) that you would like to share with the Whidbey Weekly. You may submit by email to editor@whidbeyweekly.com, by fax to (360)682-2344 or by postal mail to PO Box 1098, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date. For more information, please visit www.whidbeyweekly.com.

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“Easy. The USC Alumni calendar, listing every activity of every department for every day of each week of each month for the entire school calendar year. Nary a mistake had been seen or noticed after every department had verified, re-checked and authenticated each and every entry provided.

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My grandson was visiting one day when he asked, "Grandma, do you know how you and God are alike?" I mentally polished my halo and I said, "No, how are we alike?'' "You're both old," he replied.

Proof on Many years ago, I asked our local tech and graphics guru Scott Gaznier what might be one of the biggest typo or spelling mistakes he had ever seen in his career. One that had been proofed by the greatest number of eyes.

St. Augustine’s-in-the-Woods Episcopal Church • 5217 Honeymoon Bay Road • Freeland

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Browse through the thousands of items on sale, including plants, decorative items, tools, antiques, housewares, furnishings, toys, crafts, art, & much more! Lunch served in the Chapel Cafe. All profits go to local charities.

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A grandmother was telling her little granddaughter what her own childhood was like. "We used to skate outside on a pond. I had a swing made from a tire; it hung from a tree in our front yard. We rode our pony. We picked wild raspberries in the woods." The little girl was wide-eyed, taking this all in. At last she said, "I sure wish I'd gotten to know you sooner!"

Saturday, April 21, 9am-2pm

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President Jimmy Carter signed the proclamation, most likely smiling with every letter.

A grandfather was delivering his grandchildren to their home one day when a fire truck zoomed past. Sitting in the front seat of the fire truck was a Dalmatian dog. The children started discussing the dog's duties. "They use him to keep crowds back," said one child. "No," said another. "He's just for good luck." A third child brought the argument to a close."They use the dogs," she said firmly, "to find the fire hydrants."

56th Annual “Trash & Treasure” Sale

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ladder pregnant." The teacher took the lad aside to correct him. "Don't you know what pregnant means?" she asked. "Sure," said the young boy confidently. 'It means carrying a child."

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Bits & Pieces approximately 80 indicators across 10 categories: population health, equity, education, economy, housing, food and nutrition, environment, public safety, community vitality and infrastructure. Researchers then identified the top 500 healthiest communities.

Letters to the Editor Editor, Recently Island County Commissioner Rick Hannold shared his position on climate change stating that “the dangers are overstated” (tell that to the victims of last year’s hurricanes, mudslides, fires and droughts) and denying that humans have anything to do with it. In his statement, he referred to peer-reviewed studies supporting “climate skeptics” but did not cite sources. This is a common ploy of denialists and is not helpful except to polluting profiteers. We can, however, examine the many credible sources refuting his claims, including the very conservative, authoritative Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) unanimously agreed upon as the gold standard. Each successive IPCC study has rated the probability that global warming is human caused. That has increased from 60% in 1996 to 97% in 2013, its most recent report. To make it crystal clear for those not comfortable with numbers, they translated “97%” as “almost absolutely, extremely likely.” I challenge anyone to identify a bonafide scientific organization or government (excluding North Korea and now the USA) that disputes this. India and China are acting in response to this very real crisis. I refer readers to the 2016 Paris Climate Accord for verification. Furthermore, the Pentagon and the fossil fuel industry itself have been forced to admit, by the overwhelming evidence, that human produced carbon pollution is the primary driver. Leaked documents revealed that Exxon/Mobil knew in the 70s! Since Mr. Hannold claims to be concerned with fact-based decision-making, we extend a personal invitation to two coming events, open to the public, at which he can have his doubts addressed. The first will be Friday, April 13 at 7:00pm, describing the Health Consequences of Global Warming and what can be done to mitigate them. The second, Tuesday, April 24 at 6:30pm, two esteemed scientists from the University of Washington, leaders in climate and ocean acidification research, will update us on the impact of CO2 pollution for the Pacific Northwest. Both events are at Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Whidbey Island, 20103 State Route 525 just north of Freeland. We will reserve a chair for him and a friend and provide them an opportunity to quiz the presenters. He is encouraged to bring his “studies” and any scientists supporting his position. We expect that if he is truly open minded and sincere about facts, he will be there. We of course extend the invitation to all our elected officials and municipal planners. Hope to see you all there for this serious issue. Can we agree a problem ignored is a problem magnified? Sincerely, Gary Piazzon Coupeville, WA

Island County Makes National Honor Roll of Healthiest Communities WhidbeyHealth is proud to report Island County is as healthy as we thought it was. Island County made the top 36 of the 2018 U.S. News’ Healthiest Communities Honor Roll. The honor roll is a component of U.S. News & World Report’s inaugural healthiest communities’ rankings. According to Becker’s Hospital Review, the project scores nearly 3,000 counties on

Although the communities named to the honor roll vary in location from rural to urban and in other factors such as median income range, area of the country and population, the common factors among all of them are life expectancy to age 81 and health insurance coverage among their residents of close to 90 percent. Location and population have strong effects on healthcare delivery, the report concluded, and it seems the Pacific states averaged four times better than their South Atlantic counterparts. Read the full article here: https://www.usnews. com/news/healthiest-communities/articles/ honor-roll [Submitted by Patricia Duff, WhidbeyHealth]

3rd Annual “Whidbey Has Talent”

missions as the accident unfolded: the hydraulic malfunction, the aborted mission, the futile attempt to lower the landing gear, and finally the violent ejection into Puget Sound. Puzzled by the failed Navy search, Hunt long imagined the thrill of finding the A-6 and accomplishing what the U.S. Navy could not. But time was running out. At age 43, Hunt was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. After ten years of worsening symptoms, no longer permitted to fly, and barely able to scuba dive, Hunt knew he was losing the fight. Desperate for a rallying point to prove to himself life still mattered, Hunt struck out in 2014 to find the missing A-6. “The author’s prose is always crystal-clear and sometimes moving, particularly when he discusses the ways in which his quest revitalized his life in the face of physical decline. An inspiriting story related with journalistic rigor and disarming frankness.” – Kirkus Reviews

Peter Hunt will be signing copies of “The Lost Intruder” at The BBQ Joint at 601 NE Midway Ave. in Oak Harbor from 1:00pm to about 3:00pm on April 14. The book is also available for sale in print formats online at Amazon.com and other channels. Kindle and other electronic formats are also available at all major online retailers. Please go to www.peterhuntbooks.com for more information. About the Author

MC’s for Whidbey Has Talent: AJ Gibson, Paige Jenkins, Hailee Winch, Harrison Keating, Keelie Partridge and Jessica Turner.

The Whidbey Playhouse’s 3rd Annual “Whidbey Has Talent” competition will take place this weekend at the Oak Harbor High School Student Activity Building. The competition features over 50 youth performers, grades K-12. They will showcase their talents in three different shows; 2:00pm Grades K-4, 4:00pm Grades 5-8 and 6:30pm Grades 9-12. Tickets for the show are $5 and can be purchased at the door or online at www.whidbeyplayhouse. com. [Submitted by JR Russell]

Author Peter Hunt to Sign Copies of “The Lost Intruder” at The BBQ Joint

Peter M. Hunt, a native of New York, was an experienced wreck diver long before he joined the Navy in 1985. After ten years of active duty and three aircraft carrier deployments, Hunt left active duty to fly commercially until his Parkinson’s diagnosis in 2005. An alumnus of Brown University and the University of Washington Graduate school, Hunt has two adult children and lives with his wife on Whidbey Island. He is also the author of, “Angles of Attack, an A-6 Intruder Pilot’s War” and “Setting the Hook, a Diver’s Return to the Andrea Doria.” [Submitted by Peter M. Hunt]

Songs without Words: 1550 to 1750 The Salish Sea Early Music Festival presents Songs without Words: 1550 to 1750 with Montreal’s viola da gambist Susie Napper and renaissance and baroque flutist Jeffrey Cohan. An intimate tribute to the power of poetry and song as rendered instrumentally, this program will include Renaissance two-part settings of 16th-century French songs, virtuoso diminutions for viola da gamba and flute by Bartholmeo de Selma y Salaverde on Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina’s beautiful madrigal Vestiva e colli, selections from Giovanni Paulo Cima’s Concerti Ecclesiastici, examples of the luscious Baroque airs de cour from the time of Louis XIII and Louis XIV, and favorite Scottish and Irish airs as rendered by 18th-century instrumentalists. Also music by Johann Sebastian Bach, James Oswald and Georg Friderick Handel.

“The Lost Intruder, the Search for a Missing Navy Jet” (ISBN 1546334971) relates diver and former Navy pilot Peter M. Hunt’s successful search of Puget Sound for an A-6 Intruder while battling Parkinson’s disease. On a windy, Autumn day in 1989, a U.S. Navy A-6 Intruder crashed off the shores of Whidbey Island, Washington. The Navy mounted a comprehensive, four-ship search for the attack jet with advanced sonar systems and remotely operated mini-submarines. They came up empty-handed. Former Navy pilot Peter Hunt knew the lost Intruder well. The jet came from his squadron; he had flown it from the deck of the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Ranger. Standing in the squadron ready room, Hunt listened to the radio trans-

The concert takes place on Sunday evening, April 15 at 7:00pm at St. Augustine’s in-theWoods Episcopal Church at 5217 South Honeymoon Bay Road in Freeland. Please see www.salishseafestival.org/whidbey or call (360) 331-4887 for additional information. Admission is by suggested donation: $15, $20 or $25 (a free will offering), and those 18 and under are free. [Submitted by Jeffrey Cohan]

Rags, Rubbish, and Refuse: Artists Who Get Dirty An art exhibition sponsored in conjunction with Whidbey Earth & Ocean Month Featuring over 15 Whidbey Island artists, Rags, Rubbish, and Refuse is organized by Goosefoot, a local non-profit organization, in conjunction with Whidbey Island’s annual Earth & Ocean Month (www.whidbeyearth day.org). Rags, Rubbish, and Refuse: Artists Who Get Dirty will be on view April 20 – May 6 at the

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED Bayview Cash Store Hub Gallery, located at 5603 Bayview Road, Langley. Open daily 10:00am to 6:00pm. On display will be sculpture, textiles, and one and two dimensional wall art. Artists were asked to submit art made primarily–preferably exclusively–from recycled and repurposed materials. The participating artists have used as their inspiration and materials items as varied as kitchen utensils, wine bottle foils, vintage wood windows, fabric, paper, and cardboard, salvaged cedar, a stove leg, wallpaper, 2-liter soda bottles, auto parts, and much more.

Gaylen Whiteman used items salvaged from the EF5 tornado that hit her hometown of Joplin, Missouri in 2011 in her piece Aftermath. Whiteman recounts, “More than 1,150 people were injured and 162 people lost their lives. One third of Joplin was decimated. I went there a month later in late June to help my brother and his wife, whose house was damaged but on the surviving edge of the destruction zone. While I was there I took many photos and collected debris left by the tornado. In the midst of the devastation, I was struck by the resilience and courage of the victims, as evidenced by messages on the walls of their destroyed homes.” Aidan Rayner’s Rooster was made from the metal he finds at Island Recycling, his workplace on South Whidbey. He grew up on Whidbey and studied illustration at the California College of Arts in Oakland after graduating from South Whidbey High School in 2010. He moved back to be close to family after his twin brother, a welder and artist, passed away two years ago. He was inspired to try the metal arts to honor his brother’s memory and developed a real talent and enjoyment for it. He feels blessed to meet “all sorts of different artists who come through Island Recycling. That, along with the access to materials is such a unique opportunity for me.” Carrie Whitney, an oil painter, has started experimenting with cardboard and mixed media, interested in layers and being more mindful of the materials she uses. Referring to herself as an “art warrior,” she is a strong advocate for arts education and social justice issues. Whitney feels many artists are often on the front lines of social change, as they know what kind of resilience and sacrifice it takes to make change. The Angel of Peace is one third of a triptych, along with Liberty and Justice. Participating artists include: Jonathan Bartholick, Buffy Cribbs, Deborah Eimers, Richard Evans, Patricia Friedman, Lianna Gilman, Althea Holden, Katrina Hude, Melissa Koch, Wendy Manula, Pat McVay, Gina Michel, John Moritz, Natalie Olsen, Janet Pheifer, Aidan Rayner, Gaylen Whiteman, Sandy Whiting, Carrie Whitney. Whidbey Island is home to many artists working in this genre on a regular basis. A much anticipated annual art event – the CRAP Show (Creative Recycled Art Projects) – now in its 4th year, will be held early March 2019. Organized by local artists, the show will feature wall art, sculpture and jewelry by 12 local women artists. Visit www.whidbeyearthday.org for all of the activities and events hosted during Whidbey Earth & Ocean Month. Festivals, lectures, music, trips, and more that help us connect with, respect, and protect our earth and oceans are featured. For more information, please contact info@ goosefoot.org or call (360) 321-4145. [Submitted by Marian A. Myszkowski, Goosefoot] BITS & PIECES

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2 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU! FREELAND • 1592 Main Street

OAK HARBOR • 290 SE Pioneer

southstore@islandcountyhabitat.com

store@islandcountyhabitat.com www.habitatfurnitureandmore.info

360.331.6272

FREELAND STORE ONLY We carry building materials: Cabinets, hardware, doors and flooring. (Bring donations of building supplies to Freeland location)

360.675.8733

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED AT BOTH STORES!

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APRIL 12 - APRIL 18, 2018

Whidbey Weekly

LOCALLY OWNED

What’s Going On

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED The Event Leadership Meeting will be held from 5:30pm-6:30pm. Team Relay Rally is from 7:00pm-8:00pm. For more information, email relaywhidbey@gmail.com

Republican Women of North Whidbey Thursday, April 12, 11:30am Oak Harbor Elks Lodge 2362 Cost $10 per person

All entries are listed chronologically, unless there are multiple entries for the same venue or are connected to a specific organization (such as Sno-Isle Libraries) in which case all entries for that venue or organization are listed collectively in chronological order under one heading.

Island Herb Vendor Day Thursday, April 12, 3:00pm-6:00pm Island Herb, Freeland Representatives from Skagit Organics will be on site with product displays and information. Island Herb is located at 5565 Vanbarr Pl, Unit F. For more information, call (360) 331-0140 or visit whidbeyislandherb.com

“Health Impacts of Climate Change and What We Can Do” Friday, April 13, 7:00pm-8:30pm UUCWI, 20103 SR 525, Freeland The American Public Health Association declared 2017 “The Year of Climate Change and Health” to raise awareness of the many ways a rapidly changing world is affecting our health and communities. The impacts are expected to escalate. Retired, physical therapist and climate activist Gary Piazzon will describe the impacts as well as mitigation and preparation strategies. A panel of health experts will answer questions afterwards. No cost. Donations appreciated.

The Glass Menagerie Fridays, April 13 & 20, 7:30pm Saturdays, April 14 & 21, 7:30pm Sunday, April 15, 2:00pm Whidbey Island Center for the Arts, Langley Tickets: adult $22, senior/military $18, youth/ matinee $15 Few plays in the modern theatre have so captured the imagination and heart of the American public as Tennessee Williams’ elegiac masterpiece, The Glass Menagerie. Piano Bar opens one hour before each performance. For tickets or more information, call (360) 221-8268 or visit www.wicaonline.org

19th Annual Whidbey Jazz Fest Friday, April 13, 7:30pm-9:30pm Oak Harbor High School Showcasing the multi-talented middle and high school Whidbey Island jazz bands, this all-island fundraiser, sponsored by the Whidbey Island Jazz Society, has generated over $90,000 in college scholarships for Whidbey Island high school seniors. General admission tickets are available for $10 at Click Music and Whidbey Party Store in Oak Harbor, and Moonraker Books in Langley. A DVD recording by Wildcat TV will be available for $15. For more information, call Jerry Jones at (360) 679-2066.

Comedy Showcase #7 Friday, April 13, 8:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville No cover. For more information, call (360) 682-5747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

Sons of the American Legion AllYou-Can-Eat Breakfast Saturday, April 14, 9:00am-12:00pm American Legion, Oak Harbor Hosted by the Sons of the American Legion. $9 all-you-can-eat breakfast supports veterans and their families.

Book Signing Saturday, April 14, 1:00pm The BBQ Joint, Oak Harbor Come meet local author Peter Hunt as he signs copies of his latest book, The Lost Intruder. The BBQ Joint is located at 601 NE Midway Blvd. For more information, call (360) 679-3500.

Spaghetti Feed & Family Game Night Saturday, April 14, 6:00pm VFW Post 7392, Oak Harbor $15 per person

A team fundraiser for Relay for Life of Whidbey Island. Dinner starts at 6:00pm, games start at 7:00pm and include trivia, Bingo, Family Feud, Name That Tune, and more. Cash prizes for 1st, 2nd and 3rd place. For more information, email relaywhidbey@gmail.com or call (360) 675-8091.

Live Music: Steve DeHaven Saturday, April 14, 6:00pm-9:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville Fun, talented, creative and outgoing Steve DeHaven will get you up and dancing the night away. No cover. For more information, call (360) 682-5747 or visit www.penncove brewing.com

Black Umfolosi Saturday, April 14, 7:30pm McIntyre Hall, Mount Vernon Black Umfolosi were formed in 1982 by school friends in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, who named themselves after the Umfolozi Omnyama River in South Africa- to where their ancestors can be traced. Their performances are energy driven and completely engaging, mixing a great gentleness of spirit and song with an exuberance in dance. Their trademark harmonies mixed with intricate rhythms, clicking and clapping are highlighted during their brilliantly choreographed shows. For tickets or more information, call (360) 416-7727 ext. 2 or visit mcintyrehall.org

Whidbey Has Talent Sunday, April 15, 2:00pm-6:30pm Oak Harbor High School

2nd Friday Nonfiction Book Group Friday, April 13, 10:30am-12:00pm Coupeville Library Enjoy reading nonfiction? Bring a friend and join the discussion of “Lab Girl” by Hope Jahren. Library Open House Saturday, April 14, 10:30am-11:30am Coupeville Library Join us at an open house to learn more about the library levy election on April 24. Staff will answer your questions and share information about library funding and what will be on the ballot. Meet the Rebel Legion! Saturday, April 14, 2:00pm-3:30pm Coupeville Library Members of the Rebel Legion will be at the Coupeville Library for a show and tell on Star Wars costume creation! Whidbey Reads Presents - Northwest Maritime Center: Race to Alaska Monday, April 16, 1:30pm-3:00pm Coupeville Library Yeah, it’s a race. On boats. Up the Inside Passage to Alaska. 750 Miles of water along the Inside Passage - no motors, no support from Port Townsend to Ketchikan. If you don’t do the race - and why should you? It’s dangerous - come to this! Whidbey Reads Presents - 3rd Tuesday Book Group: Before the Wind Tuesday, April 17, 9:30am-11:00am Freeland Library

Celebrate the talents of students ranging from K-12, who reside in the school districts of Whidbey Island. Performers will compete in divisions by age. Your $5 ticket gets you into the show all day long. Meet the contestants at WhidbeyHasTalent.com, event updates at Facebook.com/whidbeyhastalent.

Join us for a great book discussion of Jim Lynch’s “Before the Wind,” this year’s Whidbey Reads book!

Pouring Poetry With AnastaciaRenee

This workshop covers the basic steps to starting a business focusing on working from the home. Learn about the advantages, disadvantages and other factors that must be understood.

Wednesday, April 18, 7:30pm Whidbey Island Center for the Arts, Langley Engage your palate and your mind at WICA’s first wine/brew tasting and poetry event. While you sample and sip local wines and beer, Seattle poet Anastacia-Renee will give a reading of her moving recent works. The event features delicious wines from Dancing Fish, Comforts, Blooms Winery, and beers from Double Bluff Brewery. All Seats $15, wine and beer sampling additional. For tickets or more information, call (360) 221-8268 or visit www.wicaonline.org

Adrian Legg Friday, April 20, 7:30pm McIntyre Hall, Mount Vernon Renowned and awarded for his unique amalgamation of acoustic and electric guitar and how he blends diverse musical styles and inspirations into a distinctive sound all his own, Legg has been hailed as “one of the wizards” of the guitar (Philadelphia Enquirer), “an adventurer” (Newsday) and “a genius” (Los Angeles Reader). For tickets or more information, call (360) 416-7727 ext. 2 or visit mcintyrehall.org

Upcoming Sno-Isle Library Events See schedule below Cost: Free Lit for Fun Book Group - The White Nile Thursday, April 12, 9:00am-11:00am Freeland Library Join us for a discussion of Alan Moorehead’s “The White Nile,” the daring 19th century exploration of the Nile River, which was the most mysterious and impenetrable region on earth. For adults.

Business Pros - Starting a Home Based Business Tuesday, April 17, 5:30pm-7:00pm Freeland Library

Galleries & Art Shows Featured Artist: Jim Short Artist’s Reception: Saturday, April 14, 2:00pm-5:00pm Artworks Gallery, Greenbank Farm Artworks Gallery introduces new member Jim Short as featured artist for April. Jim is a carpenter who discovered woodturning 15 years ago. He salvages Whidbey pieces of tree, connecting his creations to time and place in the community. Other Artworks Gallery artists will be on hand to greet visitors during the reception and there will be light snacks and beverages.

Meet the Artist: Sue Coccia, Earth Art International Sunday, April 15, 11:00am-2:00pm Langley Whale Center, 105 Anthes Ave. Meet the award winning Northwest artist and see her colorful, intricate, animal spirit-inspired drawings which depict animal totems from around the world. A portion of the proceeds from her sales go to organizations dedicated to the preservation of animals and their habitat, including the Langley Whale Center and Orca Network. Sue Coccia will be holding a Trunk Show at Langley Whale Center on Saturday, April 14, 11:00am-5:00pm and Sunday, April 15, 11:00am-2:00pm.

Meetings & Organizations Relay for Life Wednesday, April 11, 5:30pm Oak Harbor Elks Lodge, 155 NE Ernst St.

Join us for a tasty lunch and learn how to get involved in our community. The Elks Lodge is located at 155 NE Ernst St. For more information, contact Rita Bartell Drum at (631) 707-5980 or Ritaddrum777@gmail.com.

Greenbank Progressive Club Monthly Potluck Dinner & Meeting Thursday, April 12, 6:00pm Bakken & Firehouse Roads Clubhouse, Greenbank Meet and greet will begin at 6:00pm with dinner at 6:30pm. Everyone is invited and asked to bring a dish to share and their own table service. The program will be presented by Claire Creighton, Major Gifts and Planned Giving Officer for WAIF, and her WAIF alum Lord Byron. Claire will update us on WAIF today and thoughts about its tomorrows from her unique perspective.

Baby Island Saratoga Club Potluck & Social Friday, April 13, 6:00pm Baby Island Saratoga Club, Langley Bring a potluck food item, your plates, utensils and beverage. Our speaker will be George Henny, CEO of Whidbey Telecom. His topic will be History of Whidbey Telecom – including little known facts about the company and its founders. On April 11, Whidbey Telecom celebrates its 110th anniversary.

Whidbey Island Camera Club Tuesday, April 17, 6:30pm-8:00pm Oak Hall, Room 306, SVC, Oak Harbor The theme for April is “Spring.” You may submit up to three photographs for discussion during the meeting to absolutescience@ hotmail.com. Whidbey Island Camera Club, a community club, is open to the public. If you have questions, please email tina31543@ comcast.net

South Whidbey Garden Club Friday, April 20, 9:00am-12:00pm St. Peter’s Church, Clinton April’s program: “The Garden Spaces of Langley: Then and Now.” Cathy Rooks, a landscape designer and owner of Inspired Gardens Designs was a major force in transforming the sidewalk garden spaces around Langley that make the city such a lovely place to walk. She’ll show pictures of before and after, and talk about the many aspects of community involvement that made this project a big success. Refreshments provided. The public is welcome. For a list of continuous Meetings and Organizations, visit www.whidbeyweekly.com

Classes, Seminars and Workshops Learn to Dance at Dan’s Classic Ballroom.Com! Ballroom, Latin, Swing, Club Dances Groups, Privates, Wedding Prep (360) 720-2727 - dcb601@comcast.net

DUI/Underage Drinking Prevention Panel Thursday, April 12, 6:45pm Oak Harbor Library meeting room No pre-registration required, no late admittance allowed. Open to all and required by local driving schools for driver’s education students and parents. For more information, call (360) 672-8219 or visit idipic.org

DUI/Underage Drinking Prevention Panel Saturday, April 14, 12:45pm Trinity Lutheran Church, Freeland No pre-registration required, no late admittance allowed. Open to all and required by WHAT'S GOING ON

continued on page

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Whidbey Weekly

NEWS

Plant Sale Season p. 9 APRIL 12 - APRIL 18, 2018

LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

www.whidbeyweekly.com

Playhouse production a true mystery By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly Mystery lovers can’t help but appreciate “The Hollow,” opening Friday at Whidbey Playhouse in Oak Harbor. Add the fact it is an Agatha Christie original under the direction of Kevin Wm. Meyer, featuring a talented team of actors, and it becomes a production everyone will enjoy “I don’t think we do enough mysteries, so I go out of my way to look for them,” said Meyer. In choosing “The Hollow,” which Christie wrote for the stage based on her book of the same name, the cast takes on the challenge of a drama, but infused with memorable, colorful characters who lighten the seriousness of the crime. The story is set at the home of Henry and Lucy Angkatell. Henry’s cousin, Henrietta, a noted sculptor, is staying with the couple following a fire at her studio. Invited to spend the weekend are cousin Edward Angkatell, cousin Midge Harvey, Dr. John Cristow and his devoted wife Gertie. It has all the makings of a lovely weekend in the country, but there are some complications. It seems Dr. Cristow is well known for his bedside manner… with other women. Henrietta is his current flame, but it turns out his first love, well known Hollywood actress Veronica Craye, is vacationing just down the lane from the Angkatell home. Meanwhile, it’s clear Midge has feelings for Edward, who has feelings for Henrietta. Toss in the scatterbrained antics of Miss Lucy, and the audience gets to sit back and watch this concoction of love, lust and betrayal boil over. When the two-timing doctor is shot, it’s anyone’s guess who pulled the trigger. While Meyer took some poetic license, setting the play in Virginia rather than England, thus infusing it with southern charm, the characters Christie created in “The Hollow” are multi-faceted. All of them have something hidden under the surface, making it a challenge to solve this mystery. “I like a good script, with complicated characters,” Meyer said. “I look for the characters to have something I can find in me, or that we can find in ourselves, to help us identify with them. That’s why I chose this play. “I used to wonder where Christie got the name 'The Hollow' from,” he continued. “Then I realized all the characters have some kind of hollow space within them. We all have something we regret and that spoke to me.” Ben Honeycutt, who plays the role of Detective Calhoun, said there were two things that made him want to be involved in this production. “It’s Agatha Christie, of course, and the director, Kevin Wm. Meyer,” he said. “That man knows how to put a cast together.”

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly Tara Hizon and Jack McPherson play cousins Henrietta and Henry Angkatell in the Whidbey Playhouse production of Agatha Christie’s “The Hollow,” opening Friday in Oak Harbor.

“This is a fairly complex story,” he continued. “It’s unique for Christie, who changed it up from her book.” (The book featured well known character Hercule Poirot, whom Christie replaced with Detective Calhoun in the stage version.) The show is well cast. Ingrid Schwalbe, who plays eccentric Miss Lucy, and Desirae Bradley, who plays Doris, the enthusiastic maid, add lots of comic charm through their characters. Tara Hizon, who plays Henrietta, and Jack McPherson, who plays Henry, bring style and substance, anchoring the cast of characters well. Honeycutt is perfectly cast as Detective Calhoun, and Lisa Judd, who is also the assistant director, stepped in at the last moment to take on the role of Gertie. She does a fine job in her role as the soft-spoken, overlooked and underappreciated wife of the unfaithful Dr. Cristow, well played by David Penrod. Trinity Slowik as Midge and Warren Rogers as Edward shine in their scenes together. Shawna Wilson does a good job as Hollywood starlet, Veronica Craye, and David Frazer

See HOLLOW continued on page 10

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Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly One never knows what Miss Lucy (Ingrid Schwalbe) might be up to in Agatha Christie’s “The Hollow,” opening Friday at the Whidbey Playhouse in Oak Harbor.

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APRIL 12 - APRIL 18, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Need a New Mattress? Support the Oak harbor high Shool Band and Choir! 10am to 5pm

Saturday, April 21 OHHS Fieldhouse Custom Fundraising Solutions will convert the Fieldhouse to a “show room” with a variety of mattresses to choose from.

Twin from $275 • Full from $305 Queen from $315 • Kind from $515 EvEry purChaSE SuppOrTS ThE BOOSTErS! • New, Top Quality, Brand Name Mattresses (Simmons, Englander & More) • Wide Variety – Firm, Pillow-top, Memory Foam, Latex, Hybrid & More • Full Factory Warranties

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• Motorized Adjustable Bed Frames, Luxury Z Pillows, Protectors • Delivery and Haulaway Options Available • Great Customer Service

Cash | Credit Card | Check | Layaway | Financing (OAC)

www.CustomFundraisingSolutions.com

Quality Without Compromise Why go off island for custom framing? Gene’s Art & Frame has been serving the community for over 40 years with honest pricing, quality products and friendly service.

GENE’S ART & FRAME SINCE 1967

360-675-3854 • 250 SE Pioneer Way • Oak Harbor • genesartframing.com 9:30-6 Monday-Friday • 10-5:30 Saturday • Closed Sunday

BITS ‘n’ PIECES

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LOCALLY OPERATED 4

Benefit Concert for the Whidbey Veterans Resource Center Come see and hear the Stars of Whidbey shining in a benefit concert for the Whidbey Veterans Resource Center at 7:30pm Friday, April 20 and Saturday, April 21. The cabaret will feature more than a dozen of our island’s best performers singing solos and duets from Broadway musicals and the Great American Songbook. The show will be directed by Ken Merrell with music direction by Eileen Soskin.

tickets were over $12,000 for five local charities, with the playhouse built by No. 7 Development, for Children of the Valley winning Kid’s Choice and the playhouse built by Triple R Framing & Drywall, for the Children’s Museum of Skagit County, winning People’s Choice. Over $150,000 has been raised in 9 years for Charities in Skagit and Island Counties from this fun project. Awards from the 2018 Home & Garden Show included:

The WVRC (Whidbey Veterans Resource Center) helps those who have served in the military and their families. Whidbey Island has among the highest percentage of veterans of any area in the United States. Our veterans are served by offisland VA facilities that are not easily accessible. The WVRC helps fill a need for those Veterans and family members by providing transportation, discussion groups, assistance in obtaining benefits, and a place to meet with other veterans, and is working to provide mental health counseling. The WVRC is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that is about taking care of those who have served the United States of America without regard to politics or beliefs about war. The concerts will be held at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Whidbey Island, 20103 State Route 525, Freeland. Suggested donation of $20 (larger donations enthusiastically welcomed). Funds raised by these performances will be doubled by a matching grant (up to $10,0000) which has been offered to the WVRC. [Submitted by Gene Berg]

56th Annual Trash & Treasure Sale The 56th annual Trash & Treasure sale will be held Saturday, April 21 from 9:00am to 2:00pm by St. Augustine’s in-the-Woods Episcopal Church at 5217 South Honeymoon Bay Road, Freeland. Since 1962, St. A’s Trash & Treasure sale has raised approximately a quarter of a million dollars for Whidbey charities. Stop by to find housewares, jewelry, art and artifacts, craft and office supplies, linens, toys and sporting goods, furnishings and small appliances, tools, garden items and plants, and more!

Best of Show Booth went to Fresh Space Redesign / Visions Honorable Mention Booth Display was presented to Banner Bank Best Outdoor Display was awarded to Olympus Containers Playhouse Best of Show went to Triple R Framing & Drywall for the Children’s Museum Playhouse and Playhouse Charity Team Spirit Award went to the Humane Society of Skagit County. The 2019 Home & Garden Show will be March 22-24. For more information about the annual Home & Garden Show, please visit www. SICBAHomeShow.com. SICBA is a trade association of builders and associates involved in all phases of the home building industry. Chartered in 1979, SICBA represents some 500 construction-related businesses throughout Skagit and Island Counties. For more information please contact SICBA Marketing & Events Coordinator Lianna Neyens at (360) 488-4079 or Lianna@SICBA. org [Submitted by Lianna Neyens]

Whidbey Island Public District Hospital Commissioner Wallin Receives Rural Health Award

Don’t miss the Treasure Shop with antiques, silver and crystal, fine arts and collectibles, and many wonderful surprises at astonishing prices. All profits go to local charities. This year’s beneficiaries are Healing Circles (Langley), the Soup’s On soup kitchen in Langley, Time Together Adult Day Program’s Scholarship Fund (a program within Island Senior Resources), and WAIF. Donations may be brought to the church Tuesday through Thursday between 9:00am and 3:30pm. They do not accept clothing, books, computer or exercise equipment, TVs (unless flat-screen), large furniture, anything broken or stained or not in working order. [Submitted by Mary Laissue]

38th SICBA Home and Garden Show a Great Success The Skagit/Island Counties Builders Association (SICBA), with Major Sponsor, DeWaard & Bode; the Appliance & Mattress Giants, hosted the 38th Annual SICBA Home & Garden Show at the Skagit County Fairgrounds in Mount Vernon, March 23-25. The show was sold out of vendor spaces, comprised of a total of 140 inside and outside booths and displays that related to just about everything a homeowner might want for any project they might consider and had record attendance. New to the Home & Garden Show this year was the wine, beer and spirits tastings Friday and Saturday evenings, which attendees enjoyed and will be back next year. Additionally, there were five unique playhouses that were created, custom-built, and donated to the charity of their choice by SICBA members. Attendees of the Show and the general public had the opportunity to purchase raffle tickets from the charities and win one of the four playhouses. Proceeds from the raffle

WhidbeyHealth CEO Geri Forbes celebrates with hospital commissioner Ron Wallin in Spokane, Wash. last month where he received a WRHA award

The Washington Rural Health Association (WRHA) named its Rural Health Award Winners for 2018 and Whidbey Public Hospital District Commissioner and Board President, Ron Wallin, is one of its recipients. Wallin received the award for “Outstanding Contribution to Rural Health” at the WRHA Awards ceremony on March 27 at the NW Regional Rural Health Conference in Spokane, Wash. This award is based on the overall contributions a nominee has made to benefit rural health. This award is for nominees who have, over the course of their careers, made significant impacts in rural health across the state. Award recipients are selected based on their creativity, unselfishness, compassion and cooperative attitude in seeking ways to make lasting contributions to rural health care. Congratulations and gratitude for his service to our community were offered to Commissioner Wallin at the hospital board meeting in March and personally by CEO Geri Forbes, who accompanied Wallin to Spokane, where he accepted his award. [Submitted by Patricia Duff, WhidbeyHealth]

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APRIL 12 - APRIL 18, 2018 www.whidbeyweekly.com

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Whidbey Weekly

LOCALL LOCALL Y OWNED Y OWNED

APRILwww.whidbeyweekly.com 12 - APRIL 18, 2018 LOCALL LOCALL Y OPERA Y OPERA TEDTED

Whidbey plant sales will help your garden grow By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly It’s that time of the year. Leaves are budding, flowers are beginning to bloom, and lots of folks on Whidbey Island are itching to dig their fingers into the dirt if they haven’t already done so.

Greenbank Garden Club

Saturday, April 21 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Whether you’re an avid gardener or just pop in a few blooms for color, there is no shortage of fabulous plant sales coming up, put on by several different organizations. (Please see our list of upcoming sales at right.)

Greenbank Farm

Coupeville Garden Club

All of them have been around for a while, some going back as many as five decades. “The first [Coupeville Garden Club] plant sale was held in 1968, and half of the profit ($90) was used to purchase trees and shrubs to landscape the new Coupeville Fire Hall on N. Main St.,” said Nora “Chipper” Cromley. “Over the years the plant sale has grown to be more successful and the garden club’s contribution to community projects has increased.” Likewise, the South Whidbey Garden Club has been holding its annual plant sale since before 1988, so at least 30 years. And the Whidbey Island Eagles’ plant and garden sale in Langley is celebrating 20 years in May. The Greenbank Garden Club and Island County Master Gardeners also have long-running events. It seems the sales attract hundreds of customers of varying degrees of proficiency with just as varied tastes, although vegetables are a perennial favorite. “We do recognize returning customers,” said Christine Johnson with South Whidbey Garden Club. “I think it’s because our plants, gardening items, garden art and freshly baked goods are reasonably priced and attract both serious gardeners and beginning gardeners. Everyone seems to enjoy the excitement of spring and buying healthy, affordable plants.”

UPCOMING PLANT SALES

Photo Courtesy of Coupeville Garden Club Coupeville Garden Club members have been preparing for months for their annual plant sale, to be held April 28 at the Coupeville Rec Hall.

“Customers are most interested in our Northwest tomatoes, geraniums, early bedding plants and hanging fuchsias and flower baskets for upcoming Mother’s Day gifts,” said Bruce Howard, with the Eagles, whose sale will take place the first weekend in May. “This particular event focuses on tomatoes, geraniums, bedding plants, trees, hanging flower baskets and all things keyed to the spring planting season.” “The Coupeville Garden Club plant sale has been recognized for its tomatoes and specialty geraniums,” said Cromley. “Every year a committee investigates new tomato varieties and chooses five or six that will 'survive and thrive' in our Puget Sound gardens. Five hundred tomato plants have been started from seed.” When customers shop these local plant sales, they are not only getting good quality items, they are helping Whidbey Island communities. All the organizations put money back into various hometown projects. “Proceeds from the sales, along with the revenue from the various raffles, benefit

E E FR EARTH DAY

FESTIVAL

SATURDAY APRIL 21 12 — 4 PM at Bayview Corner 5642 Bayview Road, Langley LIVE MUSIC WORKSHOPS DEMONSTRATIONS ISLAND ORGANIZATIONS LOCAL EXHIBITORS GAMES & ACTIVITIES

a number of our chosen charities on the island,” said Howard. “The proceeds from our plant sale help fund horticulture-related beautification projects, student scholarships and educational programs through the community,” said Johnson. “Last year’s plant sale funded two scholarships for graduating high school seniors, Clinton Community Hall, South Whidbey Commons, South Whidbey Tilth Farmers Market and South Whidbey School Farm.” “The garden club has a laudable history of service to the community of Coupeville,” said Cromley. “Currently members contribute their time and gardening expertise to plant and maintain five community projects: Cook’s Corner Park, Captain Coup’s Park entry, Coupeville Rec Hall landscaping, the town welcome sign on Hwy. 20 and 60 spring and summer flower barrels in town.” Cromley said the club also sponsored the

See PLANTS continued on page 10

Saturday, April 28 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Coupeville Rec Hall

South Whidbey Garden Club Saturday, April 28 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Bayview Community Hall

Eagles Plant & Garden Sale Saturday, May 5 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Sunday, May 6 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. 16691 Hwy 525, Langley

Master Gardeners Plant Sale Saturday, May 12 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Barn A, Greenbank Farm

Meet the Artist Sue Coccia, Earth Art International Sunday, April 15th 11 am till 2 pm Award winning Northwest Artist, Sue, is from Edmonds, WA. See her colorful, intricate, Animal Spirit inspired drawings which depict animal totems from around the world. A portion of the proceeds from her sales go to organizations dedicated to the preservation of animals and their habitat, Including the Langley Whale Center and Orca Network.

Sue Coccia will be holding a “Trunk Show” Saturday April 14th 11-5 and Sunday April 15th 11-2 At Langley Whale Center 105 Anthes Ave, Langley, WA This event is part of the Welcome the Whales Festival www.orcanetwork.org

Visit www.whidbeyearthday.org for events & info! Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


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PLANTS continued from page 9 construction of a greenhouse at Coupeville High School in 2002, which provides students a unique opportunity for “hands on” science and horticulture lessons. One doesn’t need to be an expert to shop at these sales, because the organizations are full of experienced members who love to share their knowledge. Gardeners and plant enthusiasts of all levels are welcome to shop and learn, too. “Happily, we get everyone from the novice to the serious gardener,” said Howard. “There is even a kids table with gifts for Mom and crafts to make.” “The variety of plants offered will please both the novice and master gardeners,” said Cromley. “The tomato plants include instructions for 'hardening off' before placing them in your garden and several WSU Master Gardeners will be available during the sale to answer questions about the care and feeding of all the plants.” Sounds like the perfect opportunity to get growing. Information about these organizations is available online on Facebook, at coupevillegardenclub.org, southwhidbeygardenclub.com or http://georgebuehler.com/Eagles%20Web/ Whidbey%20Island%20Eagles%20Club%20Home%20Page.html.

Kathy Reed/Whidbey Weekly Dr. John Cristow (David Penrod) takes his former lover, Hollywood starlet Veronica Craye (Shawna Wilson) to task for visiting him at the Angkatell home in the Whidbey Playhouse production of Agatha Christie’s “The Hollow.”

and David Gibbs round out the cast well as Gudgeon, the loyal butler, and Detective Sgt. Penny, respectively. “Edward is a fun character to play,” said Rogers. “He’s an awkward sort, but that’s part of his charm.” “Midge is innocent and nice,” said Trinity Slowik of her character. “She tries to make everyone happy, but she’s afraid to speak up at the beginning. By the end, she realizes she can vocalize her feelings, finally.” “One of the most challenging things for me was getting into character,” said Wilson, who is playing her first dramatic role. “I have a music background, so this is a bit new for me. I’ve really been impressed with everyone’s portrayal of their characters. Everyone is so talented and so professional.” “At first I had some trouble connecting with Doris,” said Bradley about her role as the always bubbly maid. “But then I started seeing her as the little ball of fire she is.” Keeping the audience guessing is one of Meyer’s main goals.

“My favorite thing about this play is that it’s a guessing game,” he said. “I like leaving clues by having the actors finesse their lines or their expressions, making the audience question who the murderer might be. If you can keep people guessing you’ve done a good job.” “The Hollow” opens Friday at the Whidbey Playhouse in Oak Harbor. Performances will be offered Thursday through Saturday at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday at 2:30 p.m. through April 29. Tickets are available online at www. whidbeyplayhouse.com or call 360-679-2231 for information. The Playhouse is located at 730 SE Midway Blvd. “It’s a great way to get out and find something fun to do,” said Slowik. “Relax, have fun and try to figure out who the murderer is.” “I think people will enjoy the guessing game,” said Meyer. “Everybody loves a good mystery,” Wilson said.

Light the way to a cure. Last year, hundreds of candles burned brightly through the night as Relay for Life participants walked by their light. This year they’ll be there again, in memory of a loved one who lost their life to cancer, someone currently fighting cancer or in honor of a survivor.

Photo Courtesy of South Whidbey Garden Club Smiles adorn the faces of shoppers at Whidbey Island’s crop of plant sales, like this happy gardener at the South Whidbey Garden Club’s annual sale, which will be held April 28 at Bayview Community Hall.

OAK HARBOR MUSIC FESTIVAL PRESENTS

The Olson Brothers UNPLUGGED

Honor your loved one with a Luminaria. Luminarias can be ordered on our website www.relayforlife.org/whidbeyislandwa Relay For Life is a chance to make the greatest impact in the fight to end cancer. Each new team brings us one step closer to saving more lives. Join a team or form a team. Learn more at: www.relayforlife.org/whidbeyislandwa Email: relaywhidbey@gmail.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/whidbeyrelay

UNITED FOR A CURE

Come join us and see for yourself what Relay For Life is all about!

RELAY FOR LIFE OF WHIDBEY ISLAND

June 1-2, 2018 North Whidbey Middle School

Sunday, April 22nd • 6:00 pm DINNER SHOW BENEFITING OAK HARBOR MUSIC FESTIVAL FRASER’S GOURMET HIDEAWAY Admission $75 pp Contact Cynthia Mason (360) 544-2343 or Cheryl Jandzinski (360) 672-2251 NON PROFIT 501(c)(3) EIN#46-1637770

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Film Shorts Courtesy of Cascadia Weekly

APRILwww.whidbeyweekly.com 12 - APRIL 18, 2018 LOCALL LOCALL Y OPERA Y OPERA TEDTED

LOCKSMITH SERVICES 10% MILITARY DISCOUNT OR 5% SENIOR DISCOUNT

FARAWAY ENTERTAINMENT YOUR LOCAL MOVIE THEATER

RAMPAGE PG-13 I CAN ONLY IMAGINE PG READY PLAYER ONE PG A QUIET PLACE PG-13

By Carey Ross A Quiet Place: John Krasinski directs himself and wife Emily Blunt (who elevates every project she takes on) in this smart, truly terrifying creature feature in which silence isn’t just golden, it’s a matter of life and death. With a tagline of “If they hear you, they hunt you,” this one will haunt you. ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 30 min.) Beirut: Jon Hamm takes his world-weary– and booze-soaked–Don Draper act to the Middle East, where he plays a former diplomat called back to his old life to engage in high-stakes hostage negotiation for the life of a friend. Don’t worry. Don Draper’s got this. ★★★★ (R • 1 hr. 50 min.) Black Panther: This movie just blew by $1 billion in worldwide box office. Between this and "Wonder Woman" (the other topgrossing superhero origin story of all time), looks like that age-old Hollywood belief that it takes a white male to anchor a successful big-budget blockbuster franchise is like so many other age-old beliefs: untrue and outdated. Get with the times, Tinseltown. Representation = $$$. ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 14 min.) Blockers: A teen sex comedy that puts horny girls looking to lose their virginity at the center of the story, taps the considerable comedic gifts of Leslie Mann, and begs the question of who is the better pro-wrestlerturned-comedic-actor: John Cena or the Rock. ★★★★ (R • 1 hr. 42 min.) Blumhouse’s Truth or Dare: I guess when your company produces "Paranormal Activity" (budget: $15,000; box office revenue: $200 million-plus) and then you follow it up with a couple of Oscar nods (for "Whiplash" and "Get Out"), you get to tag your name onto your movie’s titles, like this one starring Lucy Hale about a game of Truth or Dare that has some horrific consequences. ★★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 40 min.) Chappaquiddick: Remember when a little thing like driving a car off a bridge with a woman inside and saving yourself and leaving her there to drown was enough to derail presidential aspirations? Time travel back to a more innocent era with this dramatization of the 1969 political scandal heard round the world. ★★★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 41 min.) I Can Only Imagine: I can only imagine how this true-life story behind the Christian megahit “I Can Only Imagine” was green-lit. I can only imagine how Trace Adkins, of all people, came to be cast in this thing. Actually, I can’t imagine any of it. But your imagination might be better than mine. ★★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 50 min.)

Isle of Dogs: Unlike everyone else of my general age range, I do not enjoy Wes Anderson movies. With one exception, that is: "Fantastic Mr. Fox." For some reason, when animated, all of the precious contrivances that irritate me so much about Anderson’s filmmaking become charming. Here he brings his stop-motion technique to a story about dogs, and I’m here for every last good boy and girl. ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 41 min.)

COUPEVILLE SECURITY INNOVATIONS

COMING SOON: BLOCKERS, AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR

360-929-7070 Wayne Funk

Movie Hotline 360-279-2226 Book A Party or Special Showing 360-279-0526 1321 SW Barlow St • Oak Harbor

UBI# 604086612

www.farawayentertainment.com

The Miracle Season: After 17-year-old high school volleyball star Caroline “Line” Found died in an accident, her teammates used her example and memory to cobble together an improbable championship season under the tutelage of their inspiring coach. ★★ (PG • 1 hr. 30 min.)

Now Showing! Friday, April 13 thru Sunday, April 15

Pacific Rim Uprising: The first installment of this now-franchise had two things going for it: 1. It was written by Guillermo del Toro. 2. It was directed by Guillermo del Toro. The second chapter has neither of those. Use at your own risk. ★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 51 min.)

RAMPAGE (PG-13) READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13)

Rampage: Just a few months ago, we were having a serious national debate about Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson as a possible presidential candidate and now here he is starring in this movie with a giant ape. America, get your shit together. ★★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 47 min.) Ready Player One: After a long run of Serious Films, Steven Spielberg is back in the cinematic comfort zone he created: fantastical stories in which young people are the heroes rife with nostalgia and good, old-fashioned teamwork. This time, he’s got Ernest Cline’s bestseller and a $175 million budget to work with and the results are predictably popcornworthy. ★★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 20 min.)

CSI

SPECIAL: $3.50 MEATBALL SUBS Box Office & Snack Bar Opens At 4pm • 1st Movie Begins At Dusk 11 & Over $6.50; Kids 5-10 $1.00; 4 & Under Free

Go Karts are now open Fri 4pm-Dusk, Sat 11am-Dusk & Sun 12:30pm - Dusk *Cash prices

1403 N Monroe Landing Rd • Oak Harbor • 360-675-5667 www.bluefoxdrivein.com MCINTYRE HALL PRESENTS

A DRIAN LEGG F ,A 20 7:30 RIDAY

Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero: This is the animated-but-true story of the U.S. military’s most decorated dog soldier, Sgt. Stubby. Currently, there are two animated movies about very good dogs in theaters, and I can’t help but feel like this is an incredible time to be alive. ★★ (PG • 1 hr. 25 min.)

PRIL

PM

FINGER STYLE GUITAR

“...dazzling technique with equally large dollops of spirit, humor, passion, eclecticism and spontaneity. Quite simply, there is no-one like him.” ~ ANDY KERSHAW, BBC RADIO

Tomb Raider: Finally, a female-fronted action-adventure movie that doesn’t trade on the main character’s sexuality and instead focuses on her other attributes. Just kidding. Sorry if I got your hopes up. Alicia Vikander, capable of more, picks up where Angelina Jolie left off. I’m sure you can fill in the rest. ★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 58 min.)

“British maestro Adrian Legg is a genius of acoustic guitar wizardry.” ~ LOS ANGELES READER

MCINTYREHALL.ORG

360.416.7727

For Anacortes theater showings, please see www.fandango.com. For Blue Fox and Oak Harbor Cinemas showings see ads on this page.

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Puzzle 1 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.57)

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Answers on page 15

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On a scale from 1 to 10...5.7 Every row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every column of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any order Every 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9

9

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Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/sudoku on Mon Apr 2 17:06:41 2018 GMT. Enjoy!

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APRIL 12 - APRIL 18, 2018

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happens to have some diced jalapenos in it, I’m not complaining. Many people thoroughly enjoy their pretzels with a side of a mustard dip of some sort. Whether it’s honey Dijon, spicy horseradish mustard or even a chipotle mustard dip, the key ingredient in these edible ‘dunk tanks’ is mustard. The pretzel itself, however, can take on countless flavors and still remain within the boundaries of what a pretzel is ‘supposed’ to be. Take, for example, the classic cinnamon sugar pretzel – a sweetened version of the original and yet it retains its trademark chewiness. These even come in small, little bite-sized pieces and while they are delicious by themselves, a smidgen of cream cheese dip or white icing on the side can never go wrong!

APRIL – A PRETZEL PERFECT MONTH What is April a month of? Well, besides the month that supposedly has showers to bring May flowers, it’s also National Soft Pretzel Month. So, why don’t we spend the month celebrating this twisty bread delight? Pretzels are not necessarily a favorite among the vast majority of people, like some other food items might be (chocolate for example). They tend to be something you either really like or something you refuse to waste your time on and thus avoid them. What are the origins of this take-me-or-leave-me food? Well, the early history of the pretzel was molded by the Catholic church. Around about the seventh century, the rules regarding lent were a lot more stringent than they are today. Because of all the prohibitions placed on foods such as dairy, meat, and eggs, pretzels in their very plain and simple glory were an excellent substitute for that which was given up, because well, you still need to eat. The name, ‘pretzel’ is thought to have come from the German word ‘bretzel,’ which in turn was supposedly derived from the Latin word ‘bracellae,’ meaning ‘little arms.’ I can see how that name befits the physical appearance of a pretzel, even those we have today, because they haven’t really changed much over the many hundred years they’ve been in existence. In fact, the first pretzels were said to be a soft and doughy bread – like the ones we have now. (But I don’t find pretzels to be ‘soft.’ I think they have more bite to them and require a little more effort to chew, but maybe that’s just personal opinion. What do you think?) There is some debate over the name. While it could have come from ‘bracellae’ to ‘bretzel’ to ‘pretzel,’ others think it may have been a derivative of the word ‘pretiolas,’ which means ‘little rewards.’ They were thought to be used as goodies handed out to students by monks when the learners recited their prayers just right. The shape of the pretzel is thought to come from the position taken up by monks in prayer – the crossing of the arms. The three ‘holes,’ so to speak, the crossed bread-arms made, were said to be symbolic of the Holy Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit).

That’s not all. Pretzels were a symbol of luck and prosperity and as they moved throughout the ages, they became synonymous with passion and marriage as the loops and cross that were intertwined came to represent unending love. It is also rumored in the early 1600s, pretzels were used to ‘seal the deal’ at weddings and the idea of ‘tying the knot’ stems from this. Makes sense if you think about it. So, when did these interlocking loops of edible love, these ‘little rewards’ make their way to America? Most definitely in the 1700s by German immigrants. Then in the early 1800s, a man by the name of Julius Sturgis was credited with founding and opening the first commercial pretzel factory in Lititz, Penn. Until the 1930s, pretzels were made by hand, with an average of 40 pretzels being churned out per minute by each worker. I can’t imagine fashioning two pretzels in a minute or under, let alone 40, so the abilities these pretzel-makers had to twist and twirl the pretzel dough into its signature shape is truly a remarkable feat, to say the least. By 1935 however, there was little need for pretzels to be spun and twisted by hand because a machine specific to this cause was manufactured and its output vastly outnumbered its human counter parts - 205 pretzels per minute, apparently. I suppose this attests to what appears to be a great love of this doughy delight. Pretzels have endured throughout time, traveling across oceans and largely maintaining their distinct shape and taste. I’ve eaten many pretzels in my life, and while the enormous chunks of salt on the glossy tops of pretzels are a nice addition, it's not my absolute favorite way to eat them. Did you know pretzels without salt are called ‘baldies?’ Me neither. I also didn’t know pretzels could weigh almost a half ton, but there was once a pretzel prepared which weighed in at 842 pounds. All that dough! But in what do you dip a pretzel so big? This is where it gets interesting, because the way in which pretzels can now be made, served and enjoyed, are numerous. I personally enjoy dunking a soft pretzel in cheese dip, and if the cheese dip

To be honest, my family and I prefer our pretzels stuffed with something and more often than not, that something is a hotdog. It’s a quick and easy way to take a traditional age-old favorite up a few notches and I guess you could say it does, in fact, fill you quicker. If you’re not a meat-eater, that’s okay, the vegetarian sausage links work just as well enveloped in pretzel dough and baked to golden perfection. A pretzel, I find, is a food which can be anything and yet hold on to its original identity through its taste. Whether small little pieces or the signature ‘crossed-arm’ look, a pretzel will always taste like a pretzel and that’s what makes it so unique – it is easily identifiable. Dear readers, as this is the month of the pretzel (the soft pretzel to be exact), I urge you to have at least one in celebration of an old fashioned yummy still going strong today! Perhaps you could try one with a new dip and for this reason, I am including a recipe for Dijon Mustard Bacon Dip I found online at www.atasteofhome.com (they have awesome recipes here). This recipe also makes a wonderful sandwich spread and burger or hotdog condiment! I hope you enjoy it and if you do make it, let me know what you think of it! Please send any and all comments, questions and recipes you would like to share to letsdish.whidbeyweekly@ gmail.com and we can do just that – Dish! Dijon Mustard Bacon Dip 1 cup mayonnaise ½ cup Dijon mustard ¼ to 1/3 cup cooked bacon, crumbled 1 to 2 teaspoons prepared horseradish In a small bowl, combine all ingredients. Cover with plastic wrap and chill for a couple of hours before serving with either soft or hard pretzels and enjoy! https://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/dijonbacon-dip-for-pretzels https://www.history.com/news/hungry-history/thepretzel-a-twisted-history To read past columns of Let's Dish in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

WHAT’S GOING ON

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local driving schools for driver’s education students and parents. For more information, call (360) 672-8219 or visit idipic.org

Tame Your Sugar Habit Monday, April 16, 5:30pm-7:00pm Foxtail Farm, Freeland In this free workshop you will learn three keys to overcome sugar cravings. Seating is limited, please RSVP to drjanehealthcoach@gmail.com or call (360) 331-1726.

Admiralty Head Lighthouse Docent Training Thursday, April 19, 9:30am-3:30pm Admiralty Head Lighthouse, Coupeville Have fun, learn history, and join a fun group of volunteers. Gift Shop Docents share information about the lighthouse and sell gift shop items. House Docents answer questions relating to the lighthouse and talk to people from all over the world. For more information, call Sharon Young-Hale at (360) 678-1186.

Free Shoreline Stewardship Forum Saturday, April 21, 9:00am-12:30pm Pacific Rim Institute: 180 Parker Rd, Coupeville Do you or your community own an aging tidegate, community septic system, water system or shoreline armoring? Then this workshop is for you! The Island County Marine Resources Committee invites you to join them for an interactive discussion with county staff, state experts and communities that have been successful at finding solutions to aging infrastructure repairs/replacement. This is a free event, but an RSVP is required: https://www. surveymonkey.com/r/QMDY7ZN For more information, contact Anna Toledo, a.toledo@co.island.wa.us, (360) 678-2349 or visit www.islandcountymrc.org

Basic Rifle Shooting Class Saturday, April 21, 9:00am-5:00pm Sunday April 22, 9:00am-5:00pm NWSA Range, Oak Harbor This class will teach the knowledge, attitude and skills to safely use a rifle. No experience necessary, and you can shoot your own gun or one of the trainers (.22lr caliber is recommended for new shooters for most effective learning). Make check out to NWSA and mark on the check “April NRA Class” in the comments section. Mail check for $35 per seat to NWSA treasurer: Frank Bergschnieder, 1468 SW 7th Ave Oak Harbor, WA 98277. You will be emailed a receipt. You will need hearing and eye protection for the shooting portion of the class. The shooting portion will use a minimum of 50 rounds of ammo. Bring 100 rounds and you’ll be well prepared.

Dining Guide

JOIN US FOR A BOOK SIGNING! Saturday, April 14, 1pm Meet local author Peter Hunt as he signs copies of his latest book, The Lost Intruder

601 NE Midway Blvd Oak Harbor

360-679-3500

JOIN THE FUN! Friday, April 13, 8pm Comedy Showcase #7 Saturday, April 14, 6pm Live Music w/ Steve DeHaven $3 Tacos every Tuesday Featuring Local Craft Beer, Wine & Ciders Televising all Seattle 103 S. Main • Coupeville • 360.682.5747 Mariners Games! www.penncovebrewing.com

HAPPY HOUR MONDAY-FRIDAY 3-6PM

Try Our Savory Sandwiches and Puff Pizzas! Breakfast & Lunch on the Water - Daily Fresh Baked Treats Homemade Soups & Sandwiches 360.678.5431 • 4 Front Street • Coupeville

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A savory croissant with prosciutto, provolone, arugula, roasted tomatoes and a balsamic glaze is just one of our available selections. 1191 SE Dock St, #2 • Oak Harbor 360-675-6500 chrisbakeryonwhidbey.weebly.com

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situation on the 12th guide you on where to begin.

CHICKEN LITTLE & THE ASTROLOGER By Wesley Hallock

ARIES (March 21-April 19) Dealings with people in high places go well this week. This is good, because chances are excellent that you will find yourself in a place where you’re glad to have the powers that be on your side. Whatever form that day takes for you, trust that the outcome will be one that you can live with comfortably. Negotiations might be tense at times on the 12th, but a meeting of the minds is within reach. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Emotions will in some way play a large role in your life this week, however briefly. If it’s your business to appear in public, this can be a busier than normal time. Unplanned displays of your inner feelings are also possible, such as a disagreement with someone in a public place. Tensions are high among people in general at this time, meaning that little things are easily made into more, especially on the 12th. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) A desire for new and unusual experiences is behind much of your thought and action this week. This should not be a problem and may actually make life easier, since much of your activity is likely to contain elements of the unexpected. Variety is always the spice of life, but never more so than at present. Travel is a distinct possibility. The 12th may take you away from home and farther afield than intended. CANCER (June 22-July 22) What begins as an unstable situation this week involves you as the major force in finding the fix and re-establishing stability. Empathy and understanding are likely to be the most essential elements of your task. A helping of common sense is of course welcome. Contributions of same may come to you from an unexpected direction. Events on the 12th are probably in some way connected. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Friends who know you well may have recognized that you are both more emotional than usual, lately, and also more communicative about what you’re feeling. The trend continues this week. You probably have lots to say about relationship dynamics, particularly the rough spots. It’s good to have a confidant to hear you out. Insights gained in the process are apt to be particularly cathartic on the 12th. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) The fine distinctions necessary to clarify your confusing financial situation are readily available to you this week. A minimum of sleuthing will reveal much, if you are willing to invest the time and effort. Since this is not necessarily a stress-free exercise, it’s not something to take lightly, especially where input from others is involved. Let the unfolding

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) The right company makes an otherwise challenging situation a fun one, instead. You’re excused for coming away from it with an optimistic view of your abilities, because faking your way is impossible here. Your successes if they come, and they probably will, are successes well-earned. You sink or swim on your own merits on the 12th, as you should. At the same time, don’t forget to give credit where credit is due. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Your challenge in recent weeks has been how to accomplish more while in possession of less. The good news is that this scarcity of some things has accomplished the irony of giving you more of other things. Your clarity around your strengths and skills and what you value in life has probably never been better. You are richer in the things that really matter. This happy circumstance figures into events on the 12th. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) A natural way of understanding outer world events that are confusing is to look within. Lately, you have probably been looking within a lot, comparing your personal experience of the world to the things you are seeing. This comes as part of your predictable life cycle and will continue this week and for a long time to come. Relax into the process on the 12th, even if the events themselves are less than relaxing. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Events this week may prompt you to reflect on your recent professional achievements. These are likely more than you realize, especially if you didn’t get due recognition for your successes at the time. Overdue congratulations are called for now. Take a moment to pat yourself on the back, if you must, as a way of giving yourself the will to keep moving forward. A can-do attitude on the 12th works wonders. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb 18) Recent clashes with people due to differences of opinion have likely made you critical of the company you keep. The need to keep your views to yourself for the sake of keeping peace may be with you again this week. Trust your spouse, family and inner circle of close partners for much-needed levity in tense moments. A different kind of friendship from what you’ve known in the past is possible on the 12th. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Events at this time are helping you to define your life goals or, if you already know what they are, to achieve them. If you feel in any way lost or wandering aimlessly this week, be sure it is part of defining who you are and where you want to go. It’s not time wasted, however much it feels so. Key insights on the 12th come from unexpected directions, and just when such weighty matters are furthest from you mind. © 2018, Wesley Hallock, All Rights Reserved

Chicken Little looks at what is and fears the sky is falling. Wesley Hallock, as a professional astrologer, looks at what is and sees what could be. Read Wesley’s monthly forecast, with links to Facebook and Twitter, at www. chickenlittleandtheastrologer.com. To read past columns of Chicken Little and the Astrologer in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

CLUES ACROSS 1. Maintained possession of 5. Dropsy 10. Type of music 12. One who is deliberately cruel 14. 411 16. Rhode Island 18. Follows sigma 19. Baked dessert 20. Craftsman 22. Austrian river 23. Distributed 25. Close 26. Midway between east and southeast 27. Thunderstorm code 28. Where wrestlers work 30. Away from (prefix) 31. Canadian law enforcers 33. Shade 35. Sir Samuel __, Brit. statesman 37. Della __, singer 38. Existing in fact 40. Tennis matches have at least two 41. Reunifying Chinese dynasty 42. Not just “play” 44. Angry 45. Photomultiplier tube

48. Slovenly person 50. __ and Diu 52. Cologne 53. What actors deliver 55. Campaigned 56. Cash machine 57. Spanish be 58. Animal that eats insects 63. Colonists who supported the British 65. Loved 66. A pair of people who live together 67. Work tools CLUES DOWN 1. Kilogram force (abbr.) 2. Your consciousness of your own identity 3. Score 4. A way to modify 5. Respect 6. Midwife 7. Region near the Dead Sea 8. __ Gerais: gold-rich state of Brazil 9. Equally 10. Monetary units 11. The mentioning of things one by one 13. Traveling entertainers 15. Small island

17. A way to sing 18. __-bo: form of exercise 21. “The Bard” 23. The best player 24. Male parent 27. Harm the reputation of 29. Allow for the tare of 32. Grand __: wine classification 34. Soak 35. Bother 36. Ophthalmologist 39. Preceded 40. __ Francisco, California 43. Touch gently 44. Lithuanian given name 46. Matched 47. Stomach 49. Mother of all gods in Scots’ Celtic mythology 51. Partner to cheese 54. Fit of irritation 59. Visit 60. Suffragist Wells 61. Swearing to the truth of a statement 62. Old Red Sandstone 64. Sacred Hindu syllable Answers on page 15

YOUR GUESS IS AS GOOD AS OURS WEATHER FORECAST Thurs, April 12

Fri, April 13

Sat, April 14

Sun, April 15

Mon, April 16

Tues, April 17

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

H-53°/L-45°

H-56°/L-49°

H-60°/L-47°

H-56°/L-43°

H-55°/L-41°

H-54°/L-41°

H-58°/L-42°

Mostly Cloudy

Rain

Showers Possible

Chance of Rain

Rain and Drizzle Possible

AM Rain

Wed, April 18

Rain and Drizzle Possible

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

H-51°/L-43°

H-53°/L-47°

H-59°/L-46°

H-54°/L-42°

H-54°/L-40°

H-55°/L-40°

H-56°/L-41°

A Little Rain

Rain

Mostly Cloudy

Chance of Rain

Rain and Drizzle Possible

Mostly Cloudy

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14 APRIL 12 - APRIL 18, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

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Whidbey Weekly

Life Tributes PAMELA SUE DEMOOR January 13, 1982 - February 25, 2018 Pamela Sue DeMoor was born in Honolulu, Hawaii January 13, 1982, and passed away February 25, 2018 as the result of a tragic automobile accident on Black Diamond Road in Auburn, Wash. Her unborn daughter, Lilly, was also lost in the accident. Pam’s family moved to Oak Harbor before she started school, and she completed her schooling there. While at Oak Harbor High School, Pam was very active in softball and volleyball, and also played on the Rising Stars traveling softball team. She graduated from Oak Harbor High School in 2000, and went on to play both softball and volleyball at Skagit Valley College in Mount Vernon. After college, Pam had multiple jobs she enjoyed (most recently at Blue Origin and Floform in Kent), but her favorite job in all of the world was being a mom to her daughter, Lola. Lola’s birth in 2012 changed everything for Pam and she immediately became very passionate about being the best mom she could be. In 2015, Pam fell in love with fishing and with her fiancé, Dan Gerard. The life, family, and adventures they shared together were the joy of her life and she was so excited to welcome their baby girl into the world. Pamela is survived by her daughter Lola Sellmer, fiancé Daniel Gerard, parents David and Hermiña DeMoor, sister Michelle (Brad) Passman, brother Dean (Tobie) DeMoor, brother Daryl DeMoor; and numerous nieces, nephews, aunts, uncles, and cousins in the US and the Philippines. A private family viewing at Wallin Funeral Home and a memorial open house at Grace Community Church were held March 3, 2018 in Oak Harbor. Family and friends wishing to financially help Pam’s daughter Lola are encouraged to contribute to the GoFundMe page set up in the name of Pamela DeMoor. To leave condolences or share messages please visit Pamela’s Book of Memories page on the funeral home website at www.wallinfuneralhome.com.

Life Tributes can now be found online at www.whidbeyweekly.com

LOCALLY OPERATED

Island 911

Seriously, we do not make this stuff up! MONDAY, FEB. 5 9:56 am, SE Pioneer Way Party reporting shopping cart filled with “weird belongings.” 10:02 am, Hilltop Dr. Caller advising ongoing problem with her children smoking pot in her house; states just arrived home to smell of pot. 11:30 am, S East Camano Dr. Reporting party advising just saw subject take his vehicle. States subject needed to get to work and reporting party's keys are left in vehicle or on counter. 11:57 am, Goldie Rd. Caller advising a “young lad” is threatening to burn down establishment. 3:53 pm, Eagle Ridge Rd. Party requesting call referencing location; house is for sale and there are two males bringing out black plastic bags and wearing masks; putting items into trailer.

2:10 pm, SE 4th Ave. Advising someone is removing trees and “it looks bad now.” 2:21 pm, N East Camano Dr. Caller renewed driver's license; it's still in the mail. Wants to know if he can drive. 6:51 pm, S Oak Harbor St. Party reporting daughter is being defiant; cussing, screaming and refusing to make good choices. 9:51 pm, NE Goldie St. Reporting theft of ukulele from location. WEDNESDAY, FEB. 7 7:53 am, SR 20 Reporting party advising male subject throwing his bike in street. 12:19 pm, SE Pioneer Way Caller found laptop on top of building.

4:52 pm, S Main St. Caller advising saw male subject in front of store with his pants down.

1:08 pm, SE Pioneer Way Caller reporting business has sign saying all dogs have to be service dogs. Owner has no right to have sign posted.

7:05 pm, Shamrock Ln. Reporting party is locked out of house with oven on; no one in house.

1:21 pm, SR 20 Reporting party requesting welfare check for subject laying on sidewalk.

8:46 pm, SW Barrington Dr. Advising male, “tall, drunk guy in town,” is throwing things into the road.

1:34 pm, SE Pioneer Way Reporting two disorderly “big guys” with backpacks at location.

9:30 pm, Swantown Rd. Party requesting call; wondering if law enforcement has had contact with named subject; wanting to know if he should be “worried for his safety;” hired subject for yard work and subject is threatening him.

2:21 pm, NW Madrona Way Caller states neighbor is screaming and throwing things at wall; has been going on for over an hour; ongoing problem.

TUESDAY, FEB. 6 9:32 am, N Sunrise Blvd. Caller reporting missing mini pony, last seen going east on Sunrise; dark brown with dark mane and tail. 11:47 am, Witter Rd. Requesting call referencing neighbor putting yard debris on caller's property; wants to know what to do. 12:11 pm, S. Main St. Reporting party advising young shoplifter at location; sent him back to school; called parents and are sending boy back to location to talk to law enforcement.

2:22 pm, SR 20 Reporting goats in the middle of SR 20 at location; states goats are off to the side with owner now. 6:54 pm, Campbell Rd. Reporting someone trespassed on caller's property; states subject defecated on caller's fence next to no trespassing sign; unknown when it occurred. 11:05 pm, East Harbor Rd. Reporting party is in area looking for vehicle, not sure of exact location. Requesting assistance to find vehicle so she can get it. Report provided by OHPD & Island County Sheriff’s Dept.

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ASK ABOUT FINANCING! Serving WhidBey & Anacortes www.islandheatpumps.com 360.321.4252 Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


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APRIL 12 - APRIL 18, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Property Management You Can Count On!

Whidbey Residential Rentals, Inc. We Manage Your Home As If It Were Our Own. 360-675-9596 • www.whidbeyres.com 285 NE Midway Blvd • Suite #2 • Oak Harbor GARAGE/ESTATE SALES Estate Sale–Art Supplies and Artwork: April 14, 9am-5pm, Pacific Northwest Art School, 15 NW Birch, Coupeville. Weaving supplies and Navajo loom, Singer knitting machine with attachments and instruction books, yarns, quilting supplies including fabric and batting, Pendleton wool by the yard, Huskylock Serger sewing machine, hook rug kits, misc. art supplies and books, frames and miscellaneous artwork (0) Annual Marine Swap Meet: Saturday, April 21, 8am–3pm, Oak Harbor Marina parking lot. Hosted by the Deception Pass Sail & Power Squadron. For reservations and information, please contact Mark Casteel, (360) 240-1546 or George Smith, (360) 929-7651 (1)

ANNOUNCEMENTS Pregnant? Need baby clothes? We have them and the price is right–FREE. Pregnancy Care Clinic, open most Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10am to 4pm. Call (360) 221-2909 or stop by 6th and Cascade in Langley. Be the difference in a child's life and become a foster parent today! Service Alternatives is looking for caring, loving, and supportive families to support foster children. (425) 923-0451 or mostermick@ servalt-cfs.com The Whidbey Island community is encouraged to try out the paddling sport of dragon boating with the Stayin' Alive team. Our team's mission is to promote the physical, social, and emotional benefits of dragon boating. It has been shown to be especially beneficial to cancer survivors. Practice with us for up to 3 times for free. Life-jackets and paddles provided. Saturdays at the Oak Harbor Marina, 8:45am. Contact njlish@ gmail.com. More info at our Facebook Page: https://www. facebook.com/NorthPugetSou ndDragonBoatClub?ref=hl Medical Marijuana patients unite; If you need assistance, advice, etc. please contact at 420patientnetworking@gmail. com. Local Whidbey Island help.

If you or someone you know has been a victim of Homicide, Burglary, Robbery, Assault, Identity Theft, Fraud, Human Trafficking, Home Invasion and other crimes not listed. Victim Support Services has Advocates ready to help. Please call the 24-hr Crisis Line (888) 388-9221. Free Service. Visit our web site at http://victimsupportservices.org

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Looking for Board Members to join the dynamic Board of Island Senior Resources and serve the needs of Island County Seniors. Of particular interest are representatives from North Whidbey. For more information please contact: reception@islandseniorservices.org

JOB MARKET

to talk to you. Email your cover letter and resume to info@ whidbeyweekly.com DRIVERS: Drivers wanted for Whidbey SeaTac Shuttle. CDL/ P2 Preferred, Training available for those without. Full Time, Part Time and weekend openings available. Details at www. seatacshuttle.com or call (360) 679-4003

JEWELRY Wide silver cuff bracelet with a 1-1/4" square blue green dichroic glass and wire wrapped beads, $49 OBO; Multi-stone (moss agate, chalcedony etc.) stretch bracelet, $20 OBO; Chrysoprase pendant with interesting silver chain, $75 OBO; Beautiful sterling silver and sapphire earrings, $49 OBO; Glass tube bead (blue/ purple tones) bracelet, $25 OBO; Interesting glass pin in shades of blue, $5. Call (360) 331-1063 (1) Oval amethyst ring set in sterling silver, $45 OBO; White button pearl earrings 8mm, $29 OBO; Pale blue Baroque pearl earrings 9-10mm, $39 OBO. Call (360) 331-1063 (1)

PART TIME EVENING JANITORIAL–FREELAND/CLINTON: Hiring IMMEDIATELY for part-time evening janitor, Monday-Saturday, 6 hours per week (one hour per shift) in Freeland, half hour per visit, 2x per week in Clinton. Start time flexible (after 6:00pm/ earlier on Saturday); $12 per HOME FURNISHINGS hour. Must have valid DL, cell phone, pass background/ Wall Hugger Power Lift-chair drug screening and E-Verify Recliner, Brown/Black Leather, (USCIS). Please provide name Call after 10 AM. (360) 579and phone number. Resumes 5436 (1) welcome. E-mail:  susan.valenzuela@ybswa.net (0) LAWN AND GARDEN ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE: We are 25 aluminum silver deck post looking for a dynamic Account caps, $3 each; 200 feet new Executive. Applicant has to be 8” heavy waterline, $4 a foot, able to work autonomously and be self-motivated; must No Cheating! possess exceptional customer service and organizational skills; marketing or advertising background desired. If you want to join a successful, growing organization and have a strong work ethic, we want Puzzle 1 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.57)

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Whidbey Weekly

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obo. Can be used for waterline or drain line. (360) 321-1624 Natural Barnyard Topsoil: Good for gardens, flower beds, etc. Unscreened, 10 yard loads, $225 delivered. South Whidbey (360) 321-1624

MISCELLANEOUS Over 50 LP (vinyl) albums for sale, various artists, pristine condition, $3 each. Call (360) 331-1063 (1) Blonde sofa set: sofa, matching chair and ottoman, comfortable, some minor cosmetic spots, $25; Hitachi Ultravision, 42-inch TV on 20-inch base, great picture and stereo sound, $45; Utility table, metal legs and laminate top, $15; Cherry wood kitchen/ dining room table, oval, 40x54 with 16-inch leaf, $10. (360) 678-7591 (1) We are in the process of a making a serious downsizing effort, and we have items for sale in the following categories: costume jewelry; furniture; garden tools; hand tools; kitchen items; luggage (including duffel bags, tote bags & backpacks); puzzles and toys; sports items; storage racks; yard equipment (boat trailer winch, and 30 gallon sprayer); and other yard items. If you are interested in seeing what we have available, please call (360) 678-1167 to make an appointment. Looking for Xmas, Bday, Father's Day, or just Gifts in general? These are LOCAL made crafts, I have about

LOCALLY OPERATED

OPEN HOUSE SATURDAY APRIL 18 1:30-5:30 Awesome West Beach Home w/105ft of HB Waterfront & so many extras you won’t believe, until you see it! Water & Mtn Views from all water side rooms & Master Suite Balcony. Gourmet Kitchen makes dinner parties a breeze. Enjoy BBQ’s on the deck, while sipping wine, watching passing ships & AMAZING Sunsets.

1375 Chatham Lane Oak Harbor $659,000 MLS# 1169461 Cheri English

“Your Agent For Life” (cell) 360-320-9764

Ask4cheri.com • Agent4life.net • Agent4life.com

cheri@ask4cheri.com

ADOPT US!

Dottie & Murphy were both rescued from high kill shelters in southern CA. They are available for adoption, separately or together, through familytailsdogrescue@gmail.com or call 360-969-2014 for more info and an application. 50-60 of these available. They are $16.00/ea, plus shipping if you want them mailed. CASH preferred. Dimensions are: 5-6"W X 17”L. Contact me at ljohn60@gmail.com.

LOST/FOUND Found: 14-karat gold woman's ring on road in front of Langley Library around March 12. May be a promise ring; has been run over by a car. Please call (360) 321-6031 to describe and claim (0)

ANIMALS/SUPPLIES Straw Hay for Sale: Good for bedding, erosion control, mulch, etc. $3 per bale, 10 bale minimum. (360) 321-1624

If you or someone you know needs help in feeding pet(s), WAIF Pet Food Banks may be able to help. Pet Food Banks are located at WAIF thrift stores in Oak Harbor (50 NE Midway Blvd) and Freeland (1660 Roberta Ave) and are generously stocked by donations from the community. If you need assistance, please stop by.

WANTED Harmonica player needs guitar player for jams. Call Scott at (360) 672-9098 (0) Collectibles, Art & Antiques. Cash paid for quality items. Call or Text (360) 661-7298 (1)

CLASSIFIED INFORMATION US Postal Mail

Whidbey Weekly Classified Department PO Box 1098 Oak Harbor, WA 98277

E-Mail............classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com Telephone..................................(360)682-2341 Fax.............................................(360)682-2344 PLEASE CALL WHEN YOUR ITEMS HAVE SOLD.

Please try to limit your classified to 30 words or less, (amounts and phone numbers are counted as words) we will help edit if necessary. We charge $10/week for Vehicles, Boats, Motorcycles, RVs, Real Estate Rental/Sales, Business Classifieds and any items selling $1,000 and above. We do charge $25 to include a photo. The FREE classified space is not for business use. No classified is accepted without phone number. We reserve the right to not publish classifieds that are in bad taste or of questionable content. All free classifieds will be published twice consecutively. If you would like your ad to be published more often, you must resubmit it. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date.

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


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$

95

Basic Oil & Filter

36

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95

Includes 4X4 & SUV

4295

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Most cars up to 5 qts. 5W20, 5W30, 10W30. Other grades extra. Some ďŹ lters cost extra. Vehicles with Skid Plates may be extra. Plus $1 Environmental Disposal Fee.

WE CAN SAVE YOU UP TO $250 ON BRAKE SERVICE VERSUS OUR COMPETITORS. WARRANTIED AT 30K LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE.

STARTERS ALTERNATORS TIMING BELTS SERPENTINE BELTS

BRAKES TIRES TUNE-UPS EXHAUST

UP TO

1

$ 00

Flat Rate Auto Repair only $7995 per hour

PER GAL LON D ISCOUNT T ODAY!

always

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FREE ESTIMATES!

At Hilltop Service Center we only repair and replace parts that are needed. We will not oversell or install unnecessary parts. We are highly trained brake technicians, not high pressure sales people.

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4 cyl

95

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8995*

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6 cyl

9995*

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8 cyl

79

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95

11995

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Whidbey Weekly, April 12, 2018  
Whidbey Weekly, April 12, 2018