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January 25 through January 31, 2018

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$15 - 22 360.221.8268 | WICAonline.org 565 Camano Ave. Langley, WA | Whidbey Island Center for the Arts More Local Events inside

Harvest Fest Races Coupeville Green Coupeville Page 6

Proud supporter of Whidbey Island

Zumba & Hula by Ate Flo SW Syrian Refugee Project community events and your source for Knights of Columbus Langley United Methodist Church What’s Happening on Whidbey Oak Harbor Langley Island www.whidbeyweekly.com Page 6 Page 9 390 NE Midway Blvd #B203 • Oak Harbor • 360-682-2341


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JANUARY 25 - JANUARY 31, 2018

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Family Guide by Amy Hannold Natural Beauties on Display: The Annual Whidbey Rock & Gem Show is February 10 and 11 at the Oak Harbor Senior Center. Show hours are Saturday 9 AM to 5 PM, Sunday 9 AM to 4 PM. Admission to this family-friendly event is free. A variety of demonstrations share the skills and creativity of turning rocks into jewelry and more. Learn about the creation of arrowheads, beadmaking, silversmithing, and stone cutting and polishing. Vendors will be selling rough rock, slabs, polished display pieces, rock and gem tools, jewelry and other items. Rock specimens including crystals, geodes, and minerals will be on display. Fun door prizes, silent auction, a kids’ “Spin-for-a-Rock” wheel and food. “Night to Shine”: Life Church of Oak Harbor is proud to be an official host church for “Night to Shine,” sponsored by the Tim Tebow Foundation, February 9, from 6 PM to 9 PM. This is an unforgettable prom night experience for people with special needs, ages 14 and older. Volunteers are needed to help make this an incredible evening. Whether you are only available during the setup stages, the night of the event, or in the clean-up process there’s a place for everyone ages 12 and older. To volunteer or attend as a guest, call (360) 679-3158.

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Roller Derby Season Opens: Whidbey Island Roller Girls’ first home bout of the 2018 season, against the Rainier Roller Girls, will be February 10. Doors of the Oak Harbor Roller Barn open at 5:30 PM, the action starts at 6 PM. Tickets at the door. Adults: $10, Children 12 and Under: $5. Whidbey Island Roller Girls is a skater-owned collaboration of professionally-minded female athletes focused on empowering women through the sport of roller derby. They foster individual athletic ability, selfdiscipline, integrity, and character. Women of all shapes, sizes, and skill levels are welcome. If you’d like to meet the Whidbey Roller Girls, they are featured as part of the “Public Skate” at the Roller Barn the fourth Friday of every month, 6 PM to 8 PM. WIRG.org.

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“Rhythm Works” for Special Needs: InMotion Company of Oak Harbor is excited to offer “Rhythm Works,” a hip-hop dance and movement program designed for kids with autism, downs syndrome, sensory processing disorder and other individual learning differences and physical challenges. This six-week class will help support your child’s therapy goals while making improvement fun. Skill activities include memory, focus, strength and flexibility, coordination, language, motor and more. IMCDanceLearnCreate.com.   Create Your Own Comic World: The Seattle Independent Comic and Game Artists (SICAGA) will be at the Coupeville Library February 8, from 4 PM to 5 PM, to give free instruction about drawing your own comic book. Teens and Tweens are invited. Sno-Isle. org. “Kindness Starts with One – Be That One”: “Random Act of Kindness Week,” February 11-17, serves as a reminder of the power each of us has to change the world for the better, every day, simply by being kind. Ideas and inspiration for everyone at Facebook.com/TheRandomActsofKindnessFoundation or RandomActsofKindness.org. Quest for a Glass Treasure: The Great Northwest Glass Quest is February 16-25.

It’s the greatest treasure hunt in the Pacific Northwest as almost 400 clue balls are hidden throughout Stanwood and Camano Island during this 10-day event. Find a clue ball and win a hand-blown glass ball. To begin your adventure, see the guide book at TheGreatNWGlassQuest.com. Your search for a clue ball will take you on a self-guided tour of “Quest Sites,” including parks, businesses and community sites. It’s free to participate, with the exception of the “Discover Pass” requirement for state parks. Visit Camano Island February 25 or 26 and also enjoy the Port Susan Snow Goose & Birding Festival (SnowGooseFest.org). Solve the Mystery: Sleuths of all ages are welcome to solve Langley’s annual “Whodunnit,” February 24 and 25. Enjoy a day in the “Village by the Sea” as you view the scene of the crime, interview suspects, and then solve the crime. Work through the clues either Saturday and/or Sunday, you need not be present to win in the prize drawing of correct solution entries at the “big reveal” Sunday at 5 PM. The cost to participate is just $10 per map ($8 for military, youth, & seniors), and includes a chance to guess who-dunnit, along with your chance to win great prizes. VisitLangley.com. Recreation Northwest EXPO: Explore Washington’s outdoor recreation opportunities as you meet with apparel and gear manufacturers, retailers, outfitters, outdoor media, activity clubs, stewardship organizations and representatives from your favorite local recreation events and races. This free event is held in Bellingham, February 24. RecreationNorthwest.org Learn to Save a Life: CPR/AED (Adult, Child and Infant), and First Aid Course will be held in Oak Harbor February 24 & 25, 10 AM to 12:30 PM. Ages 11 and older are invited to come and learn these vital skills. $135 Includes class materials, course book and certifications, $120 if you choose to download your own class manual. 360-675-7665.     Screenagers: Growing Up in the Digital Age: Delaney Ruston's documentary "Screenagers" will be shown at the Coupeville Library February 26 at 5 PM. This film probes into the vulnerable corners of family life and depicts messy struggles over social media, video games, academics and internet addiction. Through surprising insights from authors and brain scientists, solutions emerge about how we can empower kids to best navigate the digital world. “The Dark Crystal” Turns 35: Jim Henson’s 1982 epic fantasy-adventure “The Dark Crystal” returns to theaters nationwide, thirty-five years after it first stunned audiences with its mythic storytelling. This two-night presentation February 25 and February 28 will take place at Oak Harbor Cinemas: farawayentertainment.com “Co-Op Kids, Wine & Bids”: This fundraiser event for adults benefits the Central Whidbey Cooperative Preschool. Tickets to the March 24 event, held at the Coupeville Rec Hall, are $10 per person. Enjoy drinks, bites, and a silent auction. To purchase tickets, visit: CoupevillePreschool.org There’s less than 60 days until Spring – fill your family’s calendar with upcoming fun at WhidbeyIsland.MacaroniKid.com.

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.


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JANUARY 25 - JANUARY 31, 2018 www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALL LOCALL Y OWNED Y OWNED

ON TRACK with Jim Freeman

Some wind, eh? My maples were swinging, my alders were shifting, and my transformers were blowing.

So, I need to write a thank you note to the Puget Sound Energy crew who braved the windy wattage woes fearlessly and without any hot soup from me. Not knowing where these head-lighted heroes were from, should I send my neighborhood thank you to Bellevue or drop it off at the sub-station in Freeland? Do they have subs at the sub-station? Didn't you love it when you had a sub at school? No matter the class, substitute teachers were an open canvas to confusion. Kids imitating others. Changing seats. Using different voices. Passing notes. Asking stupid questions. Just like any other day at school, eh? So, here's my thank you poetry to PSE. Our working title, at least until lunch, will be, Wizards of the Wattage. The power went out, you came on Trucks in the driveway, crew on the lawn Climb that pole, dark in the night Next thing I know, here comes the light Thanks again, for risking your life I'd bake you a cake, but I have no knife Rainy day Malia Mae The above picture tells part of the story. Our grand one, Malia Mae, has experienced her first major rain puddle parade in pink. Who would say no to a parade, whether it be in the pink or in the rain? The pride in wearing a uniform was first experienced by me when I was able to don the Captain strap and badge to supervise the intersection of Eastcleft Drive and Cimmaron Road as Patrol Guard Boy of the Day. Being Captain of the Corner is a bit like being Officer of the Day, but holding a yellow flag on the end of a long pole. As a fourth grader at Wickliffe Elementary School, no higher honor had ever been bestowed on me. Sure, I had an opportunity to kiss Carol Saxton in the school play, and to imitate Fats Domino singing “I'm Walkin'” for show n' tell, but, Patrol Guard! Captain?

Koll Kudos Our conductor hat is off to Gloria Reinertson Koll of Freeland for her recent letter to the editors of area newspapers. Her information about Norway is worth sharing–Norway “ranked first place in the United Nations World Happiness Report, 2017. The understated Norwegians might use the word 'contentment' rather than 'happiness'–but why are they content? Beautiful scenery, of course, but also a sense of equality and security. 'Nok' is a Norwegian word for 'enough.' The ideal is not to have extremes of rich and poor, but rather that all have enough for a good life. Everyone should have good schools, good health care, and old-age security. And in Norway they do. So not many Norwegians are likely to move here, but Americans should pay attention and perhaps learn from them how to create such a functioning, humane country.”

Sights and sounds In a continuing effort to relive my childhood before I forget I had one, I bought a used DVD called Twilight Zone, The Essential Episodes. The caboose antenna signal does not grab the Twilight Zone marathons one gets on the Sci-Fi channel, but, for a few bucks, I can watch what I want, when I want. Were I a candidate for Harmony.com, I'd ask the prospective juror what her favorite Twilight Zone episodes were. That would weed out the unlike minded. Everyone of my fave episodes is on this essentials DVD. Burgess Meredith as Mr. Henry Bemis, the bank teller, book reader in “Time Enough at Last.” Inger Stevens in “The Hitch-Hiker.” “The Monsters are Due on Maple Street” may be the reason I live surrounded by maples, but not in a neighborhood. Surely I moved to South Whidbey because it reminded me of the life James Daly sought when he daydreamed on his Long Island commuter train in “A Stop at Willoughby."

Kids were arriving at school. Parents dropping them off in the rain, coming from all angles. Like a single envelopment in the Marine Corps, only more like a parallel-ogram underwater.

Part of the television ad I just saw during a commercial break of an old Columbo TV movie, Columbo: Rest in Peace, Mrs. Columbo, showcased this Red Copper utensil.

I can look back on it now and realize word of my performance that day at the intersection must have gotten around the playground during recess. After that day, none of the girls in gym class would square dance with me but Marilyn Schwartz. Marilyn understood. Her father had also been a patrol boy. Apparently, on his first day, at the intersection of Broad and High in Columbus, Ohio, Mr. Schwartz green-lighted two blue buses while both were going against the yellow light, causing them to careen into a scarlet and gray area, also known as the parking garage of the state capitol. Even today, it is known by the older locals in Columbus as the “Schwartz Shutdown.”

LOCALL LOCALL Y OPERA Y OPERA TEDTED

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Whidbey Weekly LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

390 NE MIDWAY BLVD | PO BOX 1098 | OAK HARBOR, WASHINGTON 98277 Publisher & Editor.......................................................... Eric Marshall Marketing Representatives................Penny Hill, Roosevelt Rumble Graphic Design............................................................. Teresa Besaw Production Manager......................................................TJ Pierzchala Circulation Manager.................................................... Noah Marshall

Shaped like a flat football, but with a lid and a trough base dug like a trenched out hoagie bun, the results of a five minute anything squished into that shape gives my stomach pause.

Volume 10, Issue 4 | © MMXVIII Whidbey Weekly

DEADLINES: The Whidbey Weekly is a submission based editorial with contributing writers. Please feel free to submit any information (please limit to 200 words) that you would like to share with the Whidbey Weekly. You may submit by email to editor@whidbeyweekly.com, by fax to (360)682-2344 or by postal mail to PO Box 1098, Oak Harbor, WA 98277. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date. For more information, please visit www.whidbeyweekly.com.

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FRIDAY & SATURDAY ONLY! JANUARY 26TH & 27TH, 2018

%

up to

OFF APPLIANCES 1

(1) Advertised savings range from 5%-30%. (1,3,4) Exclusions apply. See The Details section. See store for additional exclusions. Offers good thru 1/27/18.

PLUS

extra

5% off

OR

all appliances with your Sears card UP TO

3

12

months special financing4 on all appliances over $499 with a qualifying Sears card

OR

free delivery*

on appliances over $499 with your Sears card *For Shop Your Way members In participating stores. Local curbside delivery. Additional fees may apply. See store for details.

& GARDEN 20% LAWN OFF

‡Advertised savings range from 5%-20%. Offer excludes Everyday Great Price items, clearance, closeout, generators, accessories, attachments and snow throwers. Offer good thru 1/27/18.

Paramecium shaped turkey loaf with pimento cheese?

In conclusion, if you order now, you can get twice as much sarcasm for free, plus shipping and handling fees that will shock you when you get the invoice. Gotta go. That woman is cooking flat corn dogs again. Where is the mute button? To read past columns of On Track in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

AT YOUR LOCAL SEARS HOMETOWN STORE

PLUS EXTRA

10% OFF

ALMOST EVERYTHING

Flat corn dogs? I wouldn't eat a round one.

No offense to the sweet lady who does the voice over, but I felt under after watching some of her five-minute squishes while she squeaked. It could be my speakers, so please don't file a claim. We're judgment proof here, and I can prove it. No wonder the trick or treaters stay away.

Contributing Writers Jim Freeman Wesley Hallock Kae Harris Tracy Loescher Kathy Reed Carey Ross

PUBLISHED and distributed every week. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The Whidbey Weekly cannot be held responsible for the quality of goods or services supplied by advertisers in this publication. Articles, unless otherwise stated, are by contribution and therefore the Whidbey Weekly is not in a position to validate any comments, recommendations or suggestions made in these articles. Submitted editorial is NOT guaranteed to be published.

Certain episodes of the Twilight Zone still disturb me. I won't share specific information if it is okay with you. It is really dark right now and I am alone.

It was a morning I will never forget. I know it was a morning because I was fired before lunch.

I was in 4th grade. I did not know how to drive. I barely rode my bike. Dad would not let me have a basket on the front because he knew it would distract me. I might read Photoplay while pedaling.

JANUARY 25 -www.whidbeyweekly.com JANUARY 31, 2018

Can we get a hearty Skol for Mrs. Koll?

5 Minute Chef Have you seen those ads on TV for the Red Copper 5 Minute Chef? www. Buy5MinuteChef.com. I include the web address not to endorse the product, but to facilitate should you want to check the commercial. Potential laughter, guaranteed.

Within the first ten minutes, the multitasking nature of my position had overwhelmed me. Checking on the other guards, watching the traffic, making the big decisions of who gets to turn left, and why.

3

Whidbey Weekly

T

T

Exclusions apply. See The Details section. Offers good 1/26 & 1/27/18 only.

THE DETAILS IMPORTANT SPECIAL FINANCING/DEFERRED INTEREST DETAILS (when offered): Interest will be charged to your account from the purchase date if the purchase balance is not paid in full within the promotional period or if you make a late payment. Minimum payments required. With credit approval, for qualifying purchases made on a Sears card (Sears Commercial One® accounts excluded) Sears Home Improvement AccountSM valid on installed sales only. Offer is only valid for consumer accounts in good standing; is subject to change without notice; see store for details. May not be combined with any other promotional offer. Sears cards: As of 12/1/2017, APR for purchases: VARIABLE 8.24%-26.24% or NON-VARIABLE 5.00%-26.49%. MINIMUM INTEREST CHARGE: UP TO $2. See card agreement for details, including the APRs and fees applicable to you. Sears cards are issued by Citibank, N.A. APPLIANCE OFFER: (1) Advertised savings range from 5%-30%. (1,3) Bosch®, Whirlpool®, KitchenAid®, Maytag®, Amana®, LG® and Samsung® appliances limited to 10% off. Offers exclude Hot Buys, Super Hot Buys, Special Purchases, Jenn-Air®, Dacor, GE®, GE Profile™, GE Café™, Dyson®, air conditioners, water heaters, water softeners, dehumidifiers, clearance, closeouts and Everyday Great Price items. See store for additional exclusions. Offers good thru 1/27/18. (3) Cannot be combined with other Sears card discounts. Excludes Sears Commercial One® accounts and Outlet Stores. Sears Home Improvement AccountSM applies on installed merchandise only. (4) 12 months applies to appliances over $499 after discounts and coupons when you use a qualifying Sears card. See above for Important Special Financing/Deferred Interest Details. Excludes Outlet Stores. Offer good thru 1/27/18. EXTRA 10% OFFER: T10% savings off regular and sale prices apply to merchandise only. May not be used to reduce a layaway or credit balance. Not valid on Hot Buys, Super Hot Buys, Special Purchases, Everyday Great Price items, closeout and clearance, consumer electronics, Stearns & Foster, iComfort, iComfort Hybrid, Simmons Beautyrest Elite, GE®, GE Profile™, GE Café™, home appliance accessories, vacuum accessories, laundry pedestal and gift cards. Bosch®, Whirlpool®, KitchenAid®, Maytag®, Amana®, LG®, Samsung®, Frigidaire®, Electrolux® and Electrolux Icon® appliance brands limited to 10% off. Not valid on commercial orders or previous purchases. Tax and shipping not included. Valid on in-store purchases only. Offers valid 1/26 and 1/27/18 only. Only available at Sears Hometown Stores. We offer product warranty.

*See sales associate for details

Locally owned and operated by Carol TakeVinson it home today for a small deposit And just pennies a day w/our NO CREDIT REQUIRED and Jim Woessner 360-675-0660 230 SE Pioneer Way Oak Harbor

Sears Hometown Stores may be independently operated by authorized dealers of Sears Authorized Hometown Stores, LLC or by authorized franchisees of Sears Home Appliance Showrooms, LLC. The SEARS mark is a service mark of Sears Brands, LLC.

See associate at the store for details

Thank you for reading! Please recycle the Whidbey Weekly when you are finished with it.

HTS 0126 FLYER HIGH VOLUME


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JANUARY 25 - JANUARY 31, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

Bits & Pieces Tickets Now Available for 6th Annual Ryan’s House For Youth Dinner/Auction

This year’s Big Red Event will be held on Saturday, February 10 at the Coupeville Rec Hall. Doors open at 6:00pm and dinner is served at 6:30pm.

Land Trust Seeks Public Input Through Survey for Conservation Plan Where would you like to see conservation efforts focused most in Island County? Share your thoughts by taking an online survey to assist the Whidbey Camano Land Trust in updating its Conservation Plan. You can take the survey at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PPBT7FZ. The survey closes January 25. The Whidbey Camano Land Trust uses the Conservation Plan as a guide in selecting, prioritizing, and protecting the most important island landscapes. The Land Trust received public input at three community meetings last fall. The Conservation Plan will be finalized in March. The Whidbey Camano Land Trust is a nonprofit organization that actively involves the community in protecting, restoring, and appreciating the important natural habitats and resource lands that support the diversity of life on our islands and in the waters of Puget Sound. For more information, visit www.wclt.org, email info@wclt.org, or call (360) 222-3310. [Submitted by Ron Newberry, WCLT]

Good Cheer to Host Volunteer Appreciation Banquet Good Cheer will hold its Volunteer Appreciation Banquet at the South Whidbey Assembly of God Church on Sunday, February 11 from 4:00pm to 6:00pm. In keeping with its tradition as a true community organization – of the community, by the community and for the community -- the banquet is open to all Members of the Good Cheer Organization. A Member is anyone who has either volunteered for at least 50 hours in the past year, donated at least $100, or is a paid employee. A list of 2018 Members can be found on the Good Cheer website: www.goodcheer.org on the “Good Cheer Members” tab. Executive Director Carol Squire explains: “This year’s banquet will double as Good Cheer’s annual meeting so that we can be sure that those who support us all year have their say in the election of the new slate of board members.“ Squire is quick to reassure the many volunteers and staff who attend every year that good food and camaraderie remain the primary focus of the event and that the election will be done upon entry. Squire urges that those who intend to attend RSVP before February 1 so that the Assembly of God church has an accurate count for the delicious buffet spread they so graciously offer to the Good Cheer Community every year. Volunteers, staff and other members can RSVP on the www.goodcheer.org website, on the Good Cheer Facebook page, or at any of the Good Cheer locations. A list of current Board Members can be found on the Good Cheer website. Information on proposed new Board Members will be at the Banquet. If any Member of Good Cheer would like to put forward other names for consideration, they may send names and contact details to boardpresident@goodcheer.org before February 1. [Submitted by Shawn Nowlin, Good Cheer]

Tickets are $50 per person and include dinner along with a selection of local wine and beer. Dinner is a Greek themed three-course meal and will be served by the RHFY youth. Three options for the main course are offered, Slovaki chicken kabobs, lemon garlic panko crusted fish or a vegetarian option. Whidbey Island’s “Conductor of Fun,” Jim Freeman will host the evening of laughs, games and surprises. This is Freeman’s annual gift to the organization and every one of the five prior years have been unique. “It is never the case that if you have seen Jim once you have seen it all,” Executive Director, Lori Cavender states. “Each year he brings something new and hugely entertaining. In fact, most people come just to see what he will do next.” Auctioned this year will be a number of local getaways, local artistry, baskets from local businesses and much, much more. Last year people had to be turned away at the door, so order your tickets now. Go to www. ryanshouseforyouth.org, call Ryan’s House For Youth at (360) 331-4575, or text BRE to 41444 to make arrangements. Learn more at www. ryanshouseforyouth.org [Submitted by Lori Cavender, Executive Director/Founder RHFY]

Fort Ebey Kettles Trail Run It’s that time of year where trail runners and walkers come from near and far for the Fort Ebey Kettles Trail Run! This popular race, taking place on Saturday, February 24 at Fort Ebey State Park and Kettles County Park between Coupeville and Oak Harbor, is organized by Northwest Trail Runs and is in its seventh year. Run a 5k, 10k, half marathon, or marathon on a mostly rolling route that winds through and among forested kettle depressions. Many of the trails flow gently along the rims of these depressions, with some sections featuring tighter twists and turns. While there are no major climbs, the small ups and downs add up, making for a good workout. The marathon distance reaches a total elevation gain of 5500′, which is approximately 1500 more feet than you can gain running up popular peaks in the I-90 corridor. All courses include a stretch with a waterfront view along the scenic Bluff Trail. There are well-stocked aid stations along the clearly-signed course, and Northwest Trail Runs provides hot soup, yummy snacks, and a raffle with great prizes at the finish! For the third year in a row, Penn Cove Brewing Co. will donate to the raffle and offer participants post-run deals at its pub. Registration is open now but don’t wait - the race is 2/3 full! To register, or for more information about the Fort Ebey KettlesTrail Run, go to http://nwtrailruns.com/events/fort-ebey-kettles-trail-run/. Want to be a part of the fun and earn an entry credit to future events? We are looking for volunteers! Contact Gretchen Walla at (206) 550-4699 or wallagretchen@gmail.com for how you can help. [Submitted by Gretchen Walla]

A Whale of a Tail The village of Langley has a very cold case of murder, and a very fresh body as well.  This is the 34th February murder in Langley and it promises to be a whale of a mystery. During a recent remodel of one of the oldest buildings in the historic town, a skeleton was unearthed with remnants of clothing from around the turn of the 20th century clinging to the bones and a bone ivory carving of a whale hanging from a gold chain around its neck. 

But this was no normal archeological find. Right in the middle of the rib bones was a whale harpoon. Long time Langley residents were sure these were the remains of Captain Ahab Mariner who mysteriously disappeared in 1908. He was a much hated hunter of the native Puget Sound Orcas, which he sold for meat to a Chinese exporter on Vancouver Island.   The grisly discovery was considered ancient history until three months later when the body of another man was discovered at Whale Bell Park on First Street. At first people thought the two incidents were unrelated but the discovery of an identical bone ivory necklace under the shirt of the dead stranger seemed to tie the two cases together. Langley invites amateur sleuths to solve the mystery February 24-25 by purchasing a clue map, reading the sensational news stories, picking up clues around town, interviewing a zany cast of suspects and entering a guess to win prizes provided by local merchants.

Mystery Weekend XXXIV headquarters is the Langley Chamber of Commerce & Visitors Center at 208 Anthes Ave. Advance ticket and apparel purchases can be made online at www.visitlangley.com or at the Visitor’s Center, open 10:00am to 5:00pm Saturday and Sunday, February 24-25. [Submitted by Betty Freeman, Langley Chamber of Commerce]

The Organic Farm School Creates Opportunities for Future Farmers As the Organic Farm School prepares to welcome it’s ninth class of students, they are able to offer tuition assistance and post-graduation placement opportunities. Early in the life of the program, Nancy Sanford created a tuition assistance fund in honor of her late husband, John L. Sanford. It’s been supporting 1-2 students a year. “The John L. Sanford fund has been significant in making our program accessible to anyone who was serious about learning how to successfully run a small farm business,” says Executive Director, Judy Feldman. “What we’re so excited about is that after a great year in our new location even more donors have been inspired — they have joined the effort to make it easier for aspiring farmers to gain access to the training program.” The program is designed to prepare students to successfully manage a small-scale farm against financial, environmental, and social benchmarks. Classroom and field instruction address crop, soil, pest and disease science, but also business planning, marketing, equipment maintenance and repair, seed development, season extension, and community development. Tuition for the intense, full-time, 8-month, experiential program is $6,500. Once they are accepted into the program, students with a financial need are able to apply for up to half of that amount from the tuition assistance fund. Feldman is also encouraged by the growing number of post-graduation opportunities that have been presenting themselves. “Based on the skills demonstrated by graduates who are now working on farms across the country, retiring farmers, new property owners, and farms that employ managers are approaching us for connections to new graduates. In other words, there are farm jobs waiting for those who successfully complete the training program.” The 2018 season begins on March 19 and runs to November 16. Applications are currently being accepted, and housing opportunities are available. For more information, email judy@ organicfarmschool.org [Submitted by Judy Feldman]

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Put a Trusted ‘Quarterback’ on Your Financial Team

On February 4, the eyes of most of the country – and much of the rest of the world – will be on Minneapolis, site of Super Bowl LII. As a fan, you can admire the way Super Bowl quarterbacks direct their teams. But as an investor, you can learn something from the big game by putting together your own team to help you achieve your financial goals – and you may find it helpful to have your own “quarterback.” Who should be on your team? Your financial strategy will involve investments, taxes and estate planning, so you will likely need a financial advisor, a tax professional and an attorney. Ideally, your financial advisor – the individual with the broadest view of your financial situation – should serve as the quarterback of this team. And, just as a quarterback on a football team must communicate clearly with his teammates, so will your financial quarterback need to maintain consistent contact with the other team members. Let’s look at a couple of basic examples as to how this communication might work. First, suppose you are self-employed and contribute to a Simplified Employee Pension (SEP) IRA. Because your contributions are made with pre-tax dollars, the more you put in, the lower your taxable income. (In 2018, the maximum amount you can contribute is $55,000.) Your financial advisor can recommend investments you can choose from to help fund your SEP IRA. Yet you will want your financial advisor to share all your SEP IRA information with your tax professional. When it’s near tax-filing time, your tax professional can then let you and your financial advisor know how much room you still have to contribute to your SEP IRA for the year, and how much you need to add to potentially push yourself into a lower tax bracket. Now, let’s consider the connection between your financial advisor and your attorney – specifically, your attorney handling your estate planning arrangements. It’s essential that you and your financial advisor provide your attorney with a list of all your financial assets – IRAs, 401(k)s, investments held in brokerage accounts, insurance policies and so on. Your attorney will need this information when preparing your important legal documents, such as your will and living trust – after all, a key part of your estate plan is who gets what. But it’s imperative that you and your financial advisor convey some often-overlooked details that can make a big difference in the disposition of your estate. For example, your financial advisor might suggest that you review the beneficiary designations on your IRA, 401(k) and life insurance policies to make sure these designations are still accurate in light of changes in your life – new spouse, new children and others. These designations are meaningful and can even supersede the instructions you might leave in your will or living trust. Consequently, it’s important for you and your financial advisor to share this information with your attorney. It can be challenging to meet all your financial objectives. But with the right team in place, and a quarterback to help lead it, you can keep moving toward those goals – and you might cut down on the “fumbles” along the way. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Jeffery C. Pleet, CLU®, ChFC®

Financial Advisor 630 SE Midway Blvd. Oak Harbor, WA 98277 (360) 679-2558 jeffery.pleet@edwardjones.com

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

Pageant Wyse Proudly Announces Contestants The Miss Oak Harbor Scholarship Pageant, which takes place on March 10, 2018, at the Oak Harbor High School SUB, has accepted the following contestants:

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JANUARY 25 - JANUARY 31, 2018 www.whidbeyweekly.com

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LOCALL LOCALL Y OWNED Y OWNED Miss Division: Ashleigh Wasden, Autumn Coker, Chloe Christian, Danielle Lonborg, Gabby Harstad, Kirsten Polack, Megan Hauter, Megan Peek, Shelby Montoya, Tia Miesle. Teen Division: Audrey Young, Chelsea Lonborg, Cienna Brenner, Diandra Dominguez, Ella Langrock, Emily Evans, Jaelyn O’Hara, Jennifer Danielson, Lydia Welch, Michelle Consolver, Natasha Decker, Savanneh Dahl. As participants, contestants have the opportunity to compete for thousands of dollars in scholarships. This unique six-week program focuses on personal and professional growth through the development of leadership, communication, and marketability. The hope of pageant organizers is that participants will gain confidence, self-esteem, and a sense of accomplishment that will enable them to serve as role models for the youth of our community. The pageant is open to the public. Tickets may be purchased from one of the contestants or at the door on pageant night, if not sold out. For more information, visit www.pageantwyse. org, or email pageantwyse@gmail.com. [Submitted by Jes Walker-Wyse, Pageant Wyse Director]

Annual Ferry Ridership Swells by 250,000 to 15-year High Nearly 24.5 million customers sail on state vessels in 2017 A surge in boardings in 2017 pushed Washington State Ferries to its highest ridership since 2002. Last year, the nation’s largest ferry system carried nearly 24.5 million people, enough to fill CenturyLink Field every day of the year. Ridership grew by more than 250,000 over 2016, increasing for the ninth consecutive year. “We expect our ridership to continue to grow as more people move to Western Washington,” said WSF head Amy Scarton. “As part of the state highway network, the ferry system is a critical link between more affordable housing on the west side of the sound and key employ-

ment centers on the east side. Not to mention, we’re also a major tourist attraction and an iconic part of the state.” The increase in ridership includes an all-time high on routes serving the San Juan Islands, despite a decrease in total sailings due to vessel breakdowns during the busy summer months. In 2017, state ferries completed 161,072 trips and travelled 901,288 miles – nearly four times the distance to the moon. The largest growth came on the Fauntleroy/ Southworth segment of the “Triangle Route,” where ridership was up 8.2 percent, or more than 70,000 customers over 2016 totals. The Seattle/Bainbridge Island route had the biggest jump in total riders with nearly 100,000 more passengers compared to the previous year. Ridership highlights • System total: Customers up 1 percent from 2016, vehicles up 0.8 percent. • Seattle/Bainbridge Island: Busiest route for total ridership with customers up 1.5 percent and vehicles up 0.1 percent. • Edmonds/Kingston: Second highest total ridership with customers up 0.5 percent and vehicles up 1 percent. • Mukilteo/Clinton: Busiest route for drivers with vehicles up 0.9 percent and customers up 0.7 percent. • Fauntleroy/Vashon/Southworth: Customers up 1.7 percent and vehicles up 1.3 percent, led by the Fauntleroy/Southworth segment, which had the largest year-to-year growth with customers up 8.2 percent and vehicles up 8 percent. • Seattle/Bremerton: Welcomed system’s third Olympic class ferry, Chimacum, to the route in the spring. Customers up 1.4 percent, vehicles up 3.5 percent. • Anacortes/San Juan Islands: Record ridership despite summertime service disruptions for unplanned maintenance with customers and vehicles up 0.2 percent. • Point Defiance/Tahlequah: Second largest year-to-year growth for total ridership with customers up 3.8 percent and vehicles up 1.9 percent.

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JANUARY 25 -www.whidbeyweekly.com JANUARY 31, 2018 LOCALL LOCALL Y OPERA Y OPERA TEDTED

• Port Townsend/Coupeville: Summertime vessel breakdowns contributed to a small decrease in ridership with customers down 1.5 percent and vehicles down 1.8 percent. • Anacortes/Sidney, British Columbia: Noticeable drop because of summertime cancellations due to vessel breakdowns with customers down 10.1 percent and vehicles down 9.3 percent. • Route-by-route ridership numbers: Available on the second page of WSF’s Fact Sheet (bit. ly/2DrQ4va) Washington State Ferries, a division of the Washington State Department of Transportation, is the largest ferry system in the U.S. and safely and efficiently carries 24 million people a year through some of the most majestic scenery in the world. For breaking news and the latest information, follow WSF on Twitter (www.twitter.com/wsferries). [Submitted by Justin Fujioka, WSDOT]

the highest level of customer service, as well as outstanding store performance and quality standards. Located in the heart of downtown at 230 SE Pioneer Way, the Oak Harbor store was one of only 234 locations throughout the company’s 720-plus unit system to receive this national recognition this past quarter. “We strive to serve our community with the highest-level of customer service, so this recognition speaks volumes to the hard work and dedication of each and every one of our employees,” said Jim Woessner and Carol Vinson, owners and operators of the Sears Hometown Store in Oak Harbor. “To be honored as a Premier Store is a direct reflection of their tenacity as well as the support of our community. We couldn’t have earned this achievement without either and want to thank our customers for their continued patronage.” Approximately 35 percent of Sears Hometown Stores receive this prestigious award. As part of this honor, each Premier Store will be given the opportunity to participate in special events along with other Premier Stores throughout the year.

Local Business News

Jim Woessner and Carol Vinson, Owners and Operators of Sears Hometown of Oak Harbor with Carols Daughter Nicole and her two daughters Maikalia and Emma

Sears Hometown Store of Oak Harbor Named 2017 National Premier Store Local Sears Hometown Store Receives National Honor for Outstanding Customer Service; One of 234 Stores to Earn Prestigious Company Award The Sears Hometown Store of Oak Harbor, WA, has been named a 2017 “Sears Hometown Premier Store” for consistently offering

“Jim, Carol and their employees set a prime example for all other stores in our system to follow,” said Will Powell, CEO and President of Sears Hometown and Outlet Stores, Inc. (NASDAQ: SHOS), which operates Sears Hometown Stores. “Naming the Sears Hometown Store of Oak Harbor as a Premier Store is a testament to their strong commitment in serving their local community above and beyond what is typically expected.” Sears Hometown Stores are a unique retailing concept; they combine the value, selection and services associated with larger retail stores but are owned and operated by a member of the local community. Each location provides exceptional customer service along with a wide assortment of appliances, tools, electronics, fitness equipment as well as lawn and garden merchandise. BITS & PIECES

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What’s Going On

www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALLY OPERATED manage their pain and live better. Classes are free. Preregistration is required. Please contact Debbie Metz (360) 321-1621 to register.

Meetings & Organizations Island County Master Gardener Foundation Thursday, January 25, 6:00pm-8:00pm Coupeville Rec Hall, 901 NW Alexander St.

All entries are listed chronologically, unless there are multiple entries for the same venue or are connected to a specific organization (such as Sno-Isle Libraries) in which case all entries for that venue or organization are listed collectively in chronological order under one heading.

Lions Club Blood Drive Thursday, January 25, 11:00am-5:00pm Coupeville United Methodist Church Sponsored by the Coupeville Lions Club. One pint of blood can save three lives and together we have helped save hundreds of lives in our community hospitals throughout Western Washington. To donate, just drop in or you may schedule an appointment: DonorSched@ bloodworksnw.org or call (800) 398-7888. For more information, call Sue Hartin at (503) 789-3595. The church is located at 608 N Main St.

Island Herb Vendor Day Thursday, January 25, 3:00pm-6:00pm Island Herb, Freeland Representatives from Avitas will be on site with product displays and information. Island Herb is located at 5565 Vanbarr Pl, Unit F. For more information, call (360) 331-0140 or visit whidbeyislandherb.com

ISF Presents “Shakespeare’s Other Women” Thursday, January 25, 7:30pm Friday, January 26, 7:30pm Saturday, January 27, 7:30pm Sunday, January 28, 2:00pm Whidbey Island Center for the Arts, Langley It’s 1623. Shakespeare’s editors John Heminge and Henry Condell have finally finished assembling the Bard’s Complete Works; but what to do with the surplus materials, especially the unused women’s speeches? A bountiful cast of actresses showcases the deleted, unpublished, and forgotten eloquence the Bard set down for dozens of female characters, lovingly rescued from the oblivion of time. Written by Oregon Shakespeare Festival’s Scott Kaiser and brought to Whidbey in collaboration with Island Shakespeare Festival. Tickets are available at www.brownpapertickets.com

CWH&H Community Dinner Friday, January 26, 5:30pm-7:30pm Coupeville Recreation Hall Join Central Whidbey Hearts & Hammers for a delicious meal with your neighbors. The cost of the dinner is $5, all proceeds go to support CWH&H, an all-volunteer, nonprofit organization helping homeowners stay safe and healthy in their homes. If you or a neighbor are Central Whidbey homeowners, and need help with home repairs, please consider an application to be included as a project for this year’s Work Day, May 5, 2018. Homeowners from Greenbank to Coupeville, with limited resources and unable to do necessary work, can apply directly to CWH&H for assistance by e-mail to cwheartsandhammers@gmail.com or by phone at (360) 720-2114. The deadline for getting a house on the list for evaluation is February 15.

Whidbey Audubon Society Field Trip Saturday, January 27, see times below Deception Pass Come to observe the birds and hopefully hundreds of Red-throated Loons gathering to feed in the outflowing current. These birds feed in the northern coastal regions during the winter before heading to the arctic to nest. Meet at 10:00am at the north end of West Beach parking lot of Deception Pass State Park. Bring a spotting scope if you have one. Depending on weather and interest, the trip may end at about noon, with a possible stop to see birds at Dugualla Bay on the way back toward Oak Harbor. Dress warmly and prepare for wind. To carpool, meet at 9:00am in Coupeville at Prairie Station Transit Park on the east side of South Main Street or at 9:30am at Windjammer (City Beach) Park in Oak Harbor located at the end of South Beeksma near the water. Cars parking at the state park will need a Discover Pass. Trip leaders are Joe Sheldon, Steve Ellis and Sarah Schmidt. Questions? Contact Schmidt, at 4bats@ixoreus.com or call (360) 929-3592.

Transit Trivia Saturday on the Bus Saturday, January 27, see time below Celebrate the return of Saturday bus service with a fun outing on Island Transit. To play Transit Trivia ride from the WiFire bus stop in Freeland at 10:50am to Oak Harbor by noon. Or catch the 12:30pm Southbound bus from Harbor Station and ride to Langley by 1:47pm. Admission is free. For details call (360) 678-9536.

Basically Baroque with the Saratoga Orchestra Saturday, January 27, 2:30pm Island Church of Whidbey, Langley Sunday, January 28, 2:30pm Nordic Hall, Coupeville Music Director, Anna Edwards, will lead the orchestra in musical works by G.F. Handel, Antonio Vivaldi and Jennifer Higdon. As a special event, the concert on January 27 will also include members of the 18th century Genteel Society of the Pacific Northwest, dressed in their finery clothing and offering sweets and treats from the period during intermission. General Admission tickets are $25 Adult and $20 Senior/Military. The January 27 concert is a suggested donation. Students under 18 admitted free (under 14 must be accompanied by a paying adult). Cash/Check/CC accepted at the door. For more detailed information and on-line tickets, please visit www.sowhidbey. com or call (360) 929-3045.

Live Music: Tom Mullin Saturday, January 27, 6:00pm-10:00pm Penn Cove Taproom, Coupeville

Film Presentation – 13th

Tom Mullin is a veteran multi-faceted musical performing artist: guitarist, vocalist and keyboardist. A pro acoustic solo artist since the 70’s, he brings a wide variety of cover material well known to the Woodstock generation. No cover. For more information, call (360) 682-5747 or visit www.penncovebrewing.com

Friday, January 26, 6:30pm UUCWI, 20103 SR 525, Freeland

Treble Viol, Baroque Guitar & Flute

Ava DuVernay’s 13th is a documentary about how the Thirteenth Amendment led to mass incarceration in the United States. It is also an evocative exploration of words: of their power, their roots, their permanence. Acclaimed by film critics, and the winner of the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Documentary and many other awards, this is a film to seen more than once! All are welcome. A facilitated discussion will follow the showing of the film. Admission is free.

Sunday, January 28, 7:00pm St. Augustine’s in-the-Woods Episcopal Church, Freeland The treble viol was widely used during the 17th and early 18th centuries but is extremely seldom heard today, as is also true of the renaissance transverse flute. This exploration of mostly French and Italian repertoire for treble viol, baroque guitar and flute from about 1625 to 1725 will present solos, duos and trios by Buonamente, Sweelinck, Heudelinne, Lully, De

Visee and Cheron. Please see www.salishseafestival.org/whidbey or call (360) 331-4887 for additional information. Admission is by suggested donation: $15, $20 or $25 (a free will offering), and those 18 & under are free.

Upcoming Sno-Isle Library Events See schedule below Cost: Free South Whidbey at Home Book Group: “Braving the Wilderness” Thursday, January 25, 2:00pm-3:15pm Freeland Library

Continuing Education: Botanical Latin for Gardeners-Helping to demystify scientific plant names with Vanca Lumsden. Everyone is welcome at this free event!

Gamblers Anonymous Every Friday, beginning January 26, 7:00pm St Augustine Catholic Church, Oak Harbor The church is located at 185 N. Oak Harbor St., the meeting is held in the north end of the building. Enter through the double doors next to the parking lot. For more information, email OakHarborga@gmail.com

Join us for a discussion of Brene Brown’s book “Braving the Wilderness: the Quest for True Belonging and the Courage to Stand Alone.”

Washington GA hotline: 855-222-5542

Mystery Lovers Book Group Thursday, January 25, 3:00pm Oak Harbor Library

Saturday, January 27, 9:00am 1 N.E. Sixth Street, Coupeville

Share your love of mysteries. Read any mysteries by Mari Jungstedt, and join the discussion facilitated by Friends of the Oak Harbor Library. All are welcome. Oak Harbor Book Group Friday, January 26, 11:00am Oak Harbor Library Share your love of reading! Check out a copy of “A Little Life” by Hanya Yanagihara, and join the discussion in the library’s Center for Lifelong Learning. All are welcome. Get Your Game On! Friday, January 26: 2:00pm-3:30pm Coupeville Library Did you know the library has a collection of board and card games? Join us for this chill tabletop gaming program to see which ones you like best! Feel free to bring your own games too. Snacks provided. For grades 4-12. Made By Hand - Have a Heart Saturday, January 27, 10:00am-12:00pm Freeland Library Create a beautiful heart-shaped wreath while enjoying time with friends old and new. All materials are provided. Please preregister. Read the Classics with Rita Drum Monday, January 29, 1:30pm Oak Harbor Library Join us as we discuss the literary classic "The Little Prince" and apply the book’s timeless truths to daily life. We would so enjoy your insights as we explore the many truths found in classic literature! For more information, contact Rita Bartell Drum at ritadrum777@ gmail.com or call (631) 707-5980. Minecraft Monday Monday, January 29, 4:00pm Oak Harbor Library Play Minecraft with your fellow tweens and work together or on your own to build the greatest structure! Space is limited to the first 20 participants; please preregister for this event at sno-isle.org. Any unfilled spaces will be first come, first served on the day of the program. For grades 4-12.

Island County Amateur Radio Club

The meeting is held in the Island County Commissioner’s hearing room. Guests are always welcome. Visit www.w7avm.org or email ai7f@w7avm.org for more information.

Keepers of the Admiralty Head Lighthouse Annual Meeting Saturday, January 27, 9:30am-12:00pm Coupeville Library Enjoy the annual meeting of the Keepers of Admirality Head Lighthouse supporters. Discussion will focus on current lighthouse restoration projects, docent training, and future development of the lighthouse interpretive displays. Guest speaker is Janet Hall, Washington State Parks Interpretive Specialist. She will present “A Day in the Life of the Keepers of AHLH.” All Keeper members, and any other individuals interested in the operation and support of the lighthouse are cordially invited to attend.

WSDOT Updates SR 20 Sharpes Corner Roundabout Wednesday, January 31, 5:30pm-7:30pm North Whidbey Middle School, Oak Harbor Crews from Tapani, Inc. will build two large roundabouts along State Route 20 in spring 2018. The Sharpes Corner intersection at the east end of Anacortes has averaged 14 crashes a year for the last 10 years. Both roundabouts are expected to lower collision numbers by 40 percent. WSDOT is hosting this event to help travelers understand the upcoming construction schedule, roundabout design and help travelers educate themselves on how to drive through this area once construction is complete. Drop in anytime during the event to talk to WSDOT engineers and members of the construction team. There will be an interactive display of the Sharpes Corner roundabout, and Washington State Patrol will be available to clarify traffic laws at roundabout intersections. If you have further questions please contact: WSDOT, Andrea E. Petrich, communications, (360) 757-5963.

Issues That Matter: Youth Mental Health Tuesday, January 30, 6:00pm-8:00pm Oak Harbor Library

Whidbey Island Weaver’s Guild

Youth mental health issues are on the rise, both on the local and national level. Join us for a panel presentation and community discussion with key Island County organizations, including Compass Health, Oak Harbor School District, Island County Public Health, Oak Harbor Police Department, and WhidbeyHealth EMS. Learn about available resources, and how youth mental health issues are handled in crisis situations.

Business meeting plus Show & Tell. 1:00pm Program: Martina Celerin: Dimensional Weaving. Bring a brown bag lunch and your own beverage cup. For more information, visit www.whidbeyweaversguild.org

Chronic Pain Self-Management Workshop Thursdays, February 1, 8, 15 & 22, 1:00pm-3:30pm Coupeville Library Meeting Room This workshop offers tools support and information for those with ongoing pain to help

Thursday, February 1, 10:00am-2:00pm Pacific Rim Institute, Coupeville

For more Meetings and Organizations, visit www.whidbeyweekly.com

Classes, Seminars and Workshops Learn to Dance at Dan’s Classic Ballroom.Com! Ballroom, Latin, Swing, Club Dances Groups, Privates, Wedding Prep (360) 720-2727 - dcb601@comcast.net

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JANUARY 25 - JANUARY 31, 2018

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WICA production is anything but “elementary” By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly

characters because I cannot 'make her my own.' I had to instead strive and reach for the real, living person that was surrounded by sensationalism during most of her life. I hope I have achieved a likeness her descendants would approve of.”

Victorian England collides with the American Wild West in a fast-moving, murderous mystery hitting the stage in Langley Friday, February 9.

While there is plenty of entertainment to be had in this production, cast and crew have various thoughts about what its underlying message might be.

“Sherlock Holmes and the American Problem,” written by Seattle actor and director R. Hamilton Wright, opens Friday, Feb. 9 at Whidbey Island Center for the Arts, 565 Camano Ave.

“Each woman in this play is a trail blazer in their own right,” Morell said. “It may seem subtle, but with so many women characters written by men dependent upon a male character in a play, it’s incredibly exciting to have several strong, independent female characters on stage.”

Just how these two very disparate worlds come together in the first place is a bit of a mystery, but there’s a simple explanation. It is 1887. Queen Victoria is celebrating her Jubilee and Buffalo Bill Cody has brought his entire Wild West show to England to join in the festivities.

“Something that is explored very deeply in this piece is the idea of brotherhood, or fraternity,” said Soder. “It is especially so when it comes to Sherlock and his brother, Mycroft, though they are not the only brothers in this show. Family in general has deep meaning in this show.”

“People from all over the world have come to view both events,” said Kylie McKenzie Soder, director, fight choreographer and costume designer for this production. “In the play, Sherlock Holmes receives an interesting case from none other than the famous American sharpshooter, Miss Annie Oakley,” said Soder. “This leads him and his companion, Dr. John Watson, into a flurry of plot, intrigue and murder.”

“This play talks a lot about the love shared by siblings, even when their lives take different paths,” agreed Jordan. “Sherlock/Mycroft is only one of the interesting and complicated sibling relationships Wright has created for us.” The timing of this play is also no mystery.

“Sherlock Holmes is brought into an unfolding mystery that includes the Americans now in town for the Jubilee,” added producer and WICA Production Director Deana Duncan. “As the murders and coincidences pile up, we see a brand new Sherlock Holmes story unfold.”

“WICA consistently tries to put on a mystery during the local Murder Mystery month in Langley,” said Duncan. “We’ve looked at a few Sherlock pieces…as soon as we read [this one], we knew it would play well here. The fast pace, small cast size, humor, intrigue and just plain fun of this script made it a top choice for us.”

Saturday Service Returns on January 27!

This is a production with many different layers. On the one hand, it’s new, having been written in 2015. On the other hand, there aren’t many more iconic fictional characters than Sherlock Holmes nor more recognizable historical figures than Annie Oakley. There’s a trick to finding that balance.

As with any WICA play, there are plenty of other reasons to check out this production. “People should come for an evening of thrilling, adventurefilled theater and to support their fellow community members,” said Soder. “Every actor is a volunteer who dedicates many hours of their free time to bring something beautiful and entertaining to Langley.”

“The characters of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson are the definition of iconic,” Soder said. “However, the fact this play was written by a local playwright and produced so few times gives us the unique opportunity to play with backstories and motives for these iconic characters.” “Taking on any script with the words Sherlock Holmes in it can be tricky,” agreed Phil Jordan, who plays Mycroft Holmes, Sherlock’s “older, smarter brother,” as he put it.

Photo courtesy of Whidbey Island Center for the Arts Nichole Morell brings Miss Phoebe Anne Moses, better known as Annie Oakley, to the stage in the WICA production of “Sherlock Holmes and the American Problem,” opening Friday, Feb. 9 in Langley.

“The audience has a lot of expectations about who the characters are, but so many different actors have taken on these roles that audience expectations have been effectively stretched,” Jordan continued. “We get to go back to the original stories and create a version of the characters that is both recognizable and unique.”

to bring something new to the portrayal. I like to avoid creating simple archetypes or 'doing' someone else’s version. “As with any performance, the director and I then work to find the character that would say and do everything written. It’s always a bit of a mystery,” Mayer said with a wink.

David Mayer plays the title character.

Puzzle 1 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.56)

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“It’s such a fun ride, mixing thrills, mystery and laughs with sincere questions of family and even politics – questions that are certainly relevant to many today,” said Mayer. “Sherlock Holmes and the American Problem” opens Friday, Feb. 9 and runs through Saturday, Feb. 24. Show times are 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets and information are available online at www.wicaonline.org.

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are incredible fight scenes and suspenseful mental chess games and great shoot ‘em up moments.”

“Everyone loves a good Sherlock mystery and everyone has a “It’s also quite daunting taking on Annie Oakley, as she is place in their heart for trick-shooting wonder woman Annie the only historic character in the play,” said Nichole Morell. Oakley,” said Morell. “Stick ‘em together and I think it’s a horizontal color Whidbey Weekly x two great show$140 people of allweeks ages will enjoy.” “Approaching her was harder than1/8 approaching fictional

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Life Church offering special “Night to Shine” By Kathy Reed Whidbey Weekly Everyone deserves a chance to feel special. That is part of the premise behind “Night to Shine,” a program expected to provide a delightful evening for many at Life Church in Oak Harbor Friday, Feb. 9 from 6 to 9 p.m. Night to Shine is a program of the Tim Tebow Foundation, which provides a prom night experience for people with special needs ages 14 and older. More than 540 churches around the world come together on the same night to host this event. This is the second year Life Church has participated. “It was a pretty big event last year and we intend for it to be even larger this year,” said Josh Hubbard, associate pastor at Life Church. There were 75 attendees last year and 225 volunteers. Those attending are given the royal treatment that evening. They can dress up, have hair and makeup touchups, get their shoes shined, enjoy dinner, music and dancing, all at no cost to them. “People with special needs are often overlooked,” said Hubbard. “This is one way we can show our community we love them, we care for them. “It’s been something the church has really been able to get behind,” he continued. “It’s been a great blessing to our community, especially a part of it that is often overlooked.”

Photos Courtesy of the Tim Tebow Foundation More than 500 churches from around the world, including Life Church in Oak Harbor, will take part in Night to Shine on Feb. 9, a prom night experience for people with special needs ages 14 and older.

a relaxing evening. Every attendee gets a buddy specific to them for the evening, so their caregivers get the night off.” And, while the Tim Tebow Foundation is a Christian organization, Hubbard said this is not a religious event. “It really is a community event,” he said. “Even though it happens at a church, it’s a community-driven event.” Life Church had to fill out an application with the Tim Tebow Foundation to participate in Night to Shine. The Foundation provided a small grant to help with some of the expenses, but the church has also received sponsorships from businesses in the community to help defray costs as well. As of last Friday, Hubbard said there were eight corporate sponsors signed up, along with 62 participants and nearly 200 volunteers. He hopes and expects that number to grow as the suggested Jan. 31 registration deadline approaches. Night to Shine was started by the TTF four years ago and attendance has grown a thousand-fold since then. According to the Foundation’s website, more than 90,000 guests will be honored this year. Churches representing more than 30 denominations from all 50 states and 16 countries will participate in the event simultaneously Feb. 9. Life Church is one of 10 churches in Washington state to take part.

Hubbard said the term “special needs” is a broad one as it relates to Night to Shine. It can be anything from someone with “autism to an amputee” and everything in between that constitutes a special need. All ages over 14 are welcome to attend and the night offers something very special to those who do.

caretakers. This helps us bring some people back together, so they have a community to be a part of.”

“It helps them connect,” he said. “We saw a lot of people last year who have lost some of the connection they had with others after high school; for many it’s just them and their

“We also take care of all the caregivers,” said Hubbard. “We have an entire other building, which we call our respite area, where they can have a massage, eat some food and just have

New Orleans fare at the Taproom and Whidbey Doughnuts!

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While the guests of honor will be fussed over and treated as the prom queens and kings, the caregivers will also be given some special attention.

MARDI GRAS PARTY!

Anyone who is interested in more information on the Night to Shine event can find it at www.timtebowfoundation.org. For those interested in attending, volunteering or becoming a sponsor, go to the events page at www.life-church.co for information and registration. A background check will be performed for all volunteer applicants. “It really is a once-in-a-lifetime kind of experience that will be so much fun,” said Hubbard. “For volunteers, I would encourage you to take this opportunity to give back to the community in such a way it will put a smile on your face. You’re going to love being there.”

FORT EBEY KETTLES TRAIL RUN

FEB 24, 2018

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Fat Tuesday, February 13 6–8:30 pm Bayview Community Hall 5642 Bayview Road, Langley

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Laissez les bon temps rouler!

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JANUARY 25 - JANUARY 31, 2018 www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALL LOCALL Y OWNED Y OWNED

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Island Angler

JANUARY 25 -www.whidbeyweekly.com JANUARY 31, 2018 LOCALL LOCALL Y OPERA Y OPERA TEDTED

CASCADIA EYE COMES TO WHIDBEY ISLAND

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Chinook Salmon have been in the spotlight a lot lately - or should I say the lack of Chinook salmon - and this decline is making headlines again because the 2015 “baby boomer” group of orcas is not surviving. According to agencies and groups like the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Orca Salmon Alliance, many of our young southern resident orcas could be (are) starving to death. One of the findings is salmon, which make up most of our local orca pods' diet, are just not there in sufficient numbers. These skilled hunters will also eat porpoise and herring, but salmon are what they really rely on for their survival. Transiting Alaska orca pods are the only ones who regularly feed on seals, which are abundant in the Puget Sound, which could save orca lives with their rich fat, but for now our resident pods normally pass them by. Gov. Jay Inslee has been approached and challenged to help stop these whale deaths. One proposal that has some traction is open water Puget Sound rearing of Chinook; the intent is to quickly, and as naturally as possible, increase the numbers of Chinook and possibly other species of Pacific salmon to ramp up the food supply for the orcas. Here is the basic idea: Designated WDFW and Tribal-managed fish hatcheries would begin incubating more eggs; once hatched, the smolts would then be delivered to predetermined locations in and around the San Juan Islands and possibly the South Sound. Then private businesses, technical college students, universities, high school students, and community volunteers would monitor and tend the young salmon for a three- to fourmonth saltwater acclimation period. After this short stay in confinement, they would be released into the surrounding waters, where the majority would migrate out to the open Pacific Ocean, grow to adults and return to their release points, thus increasing the overall numbers and locations of fish and feeding opportunities for the orcas. A potential good side note is seasons and catch quotas for recreational salmon fishermen may also benefit if the extra open water rearing efforts are successful. Time is critical. In this same time frame, the state is also massaging a 334-page “Chinook Management Plan.” At present, this plan would restrict Puget Sound Chinook fishing (salmon encounters) even further than it already is in an effort to increase numbers of wild fish. In my opinion, this Puget Sound rearing plan

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Winning Blackmouth (Chinook) salmon being weighed in at the Resurrection Derby.

would certainly have a positive effect on the management plan because it provides an option (wild clipped broodstock-reared salmon) for the orcas to feed on, it gives the orcas a natural food source to eat other than wild Chinooks, and orcas do not care if the adipose fin is missing from their favorite “meal.” If political bickering and legislative red tape is avoided, it sure sounds like a win-win situation to me, plus right now most of the Native American Tribes are receptive to the open water rearing plan. I have my fingers crossed.

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A couple of Blackmouth salmon derbies have taken place during the month of January. The “Resurrection Derby” was held in Anacortes January 5-7, where a total of 337 anglers fished marine area 7 and 50 fish were weighed in. The $10,000 first prize Blackmouth was a beautiful 18.28 pound clipped fish. The “Roach Harbor Derby” was scheduled for January 18-20; it will be exciting to see how fishing went that weekend due to the fact this derby winner can win an additional $30,000 in prize money if the fish is over 30 pounds; not very likely for a Blackmouth, but possible. The WDFW announced it will re-open marine areas 8-1, 8-2, and 9 for Blackmouth fishing beginning February 16, so winter salmon fishing opportunities are once again expanding. The Washington Sportsman’s show will be held at the State Fair and Event Center in Puyallup starting at noon January 24, lasting through January 28. This show is filled with events from chuck wagon-style cooking with cast iron, a kid’s catch and keep trout fishing pond, a live steelhead fly fishing seminar, new ideas and gadgets in fishing and hunting gear, raffles, drawings for prizes, a food court with freshly made hot scones with butter and jelly, and much more. There is something for the whole family to enjoy. Fishing report from area 7: Winds are making it hard to fish at times but fish are biting; 3.5-inch Goldstar “cop car” and Goldstar kingfisher “herring aid” were two spoons that produced chrome bright fish in the 10-pound range. A couple of articles ago I talked about fishing the Pacific Coast for surf perch, along with some basic baits and rigs to catch them. At left is a great picture of Kelly Malone (left) and his nephews with some tasty perch caught at Ocean Shores the first weekend in January. Not even the wind and rain can stop you from fishing when the bite is on! There are a lot of ideas for salmon enhancement this year. I’ll keep us up to date when I hear of any solid decisions being made. Weather permitting, get out and fish if you can; winter Blackmouth can be very exciting. Be safe and GOOD LUCK!!

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10 JANUARY 25 - JANUARY 31, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Island 911

Seriously, we do not make this stuff up! FRIDAY, NOV. 24 12:44 pm, Evening Glory Ct. Caller advising a male is hunched over with needle sticking out of arm; caller did not stop to check on male. 2:41 pm, Pinewood Way Reporting party advising female postal driver speeds out of area at 50 MPH plus; ongoing issue. Was just in the area a few minutes ago. 6:27 pm, SE Barrington Dr. Reporting party requesting welfare check on subject screaming and speaking in different personalities. 7:08 pm, Tarragon Ave. Caller reporting neighbor speeds up and down street, revs his motor every weekend. Caller is very upset. Advising neighbor is a “disrespectul motherf*****.” 7:44 pm, NW 6th St. Party advising truck has been driving back and forth on grass on city property; now it seems to be stuck on grass. Too dark for description, has Christmas lights on it. SATURDAY, NOV. 25 9:47 am, SE 8th Ave. Party advising that while watching house for a friend, it was burglarized. 2:01 pm, SW Erie St. Caller advising people are yelling and accusing her of being different people. 2:17 pm, SR 20 Reporting party has a 75-pound pig missing for an hour; can give out information if found. 5:40 pm, Tarragon Ave. Caller making noise complaint referencing neighbor coming down road in vehicle revving all the way down the road and then goes into house and plays loud music; Caller states last night almost hit her with car. SUNDAY, NOV. 26 1:59 pm, NW Calista Ct. Reporting party advising chicken coop broke due to wind; missing chickens. 6:12 pm, Schay Rd. Party requesting call referencing cat laws in Island County; states friend who resides in area of Northgate was warned by a neighbor their cat cannot be loose during the day. MONDAY, NOV. 27 2:55 am, East Harbor Rd. Party calling for person who says she's high on a hill in a park, past Langley in southwest area of the island; party is in newer silver Chrysler with two blue racing stripes; says boyfriend left her there. 11:41 am, SE Pioneer Way Caller advising there is trash and human feces behind location. THURSDAY, NOV. 30 11:04 am, SE Hathaway St. Caller reporting a shouting match in parking lot. 2:56 pm, SW Robertson Dr. Reporting party advising of hidden camera found in bathroom. 3:56 pm, NW Crosby Ave. Caller reporting someone broke into house and stole a ferret.

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4:25 pm, SW Putnam Dr. Party requesting assistance with children living with him and not listening to him. FRIDAY, DEC. 1 8:22 am, SW 6th Ave. Reporting party advising heard from others at location someone wants to hit him. 9:57 pm, SW Thornberry Dr. Caller advising she hasn't been home in a long time and calling to advise she is going home and spending the night; neighbors have mistaken her for breaking in recently so wanted to let law enforcement know.

LOCALLY OPERATED

Life Tributes LEANNE M. SAHLI Leanne Mae Sahli passed away peacefully at home Tuesday, January 16, 2018, surrounded by her devoted family. She was 80 years old. She is finally free from pain and is at peace. She will be deeply missed. She is survived by her loving husband Tom of 63 years, 4 children; Gerry, Libbe, Tami, and Tommie, 5 grandchildren, 12 great grandchildren, and three brothers; Howard, George, and Dale. The Sahli family suggests donations can be made in Leanne’s name to The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America online at: https://alzfdn.org/support-us/ donate/ or https://alzfdn.org/support-us/other-ways-to-donate/ There will be a graveside service Friday, January 26, 11am, at Sunnyside Cemetery in Coupeville, WA, with Pastor David Engle presiding. A reception will follow at Coupeville Recreation Hall. Arrangements entrusted to Wallin Funeral Home, Oak Harbor, WA.

SUNDAY, DEC. 3 3:04 am, Goldfinch St. Reporting party states male subject attempted to come into residence, then realized it was the wrong house.

ALLENE LOIS HOWARD

1:00 pm, SW 24th St. Caller advising younger cousin has a problem with stealing.

Allene was born July 26, 1947 in Yakima, WA. She was the fourth child of Allen (“Butch”) and Lois (Steckel) Dibbert. Allene was raised in Yakima, along with one sister and two brothers. She worked after school for McCormick Floral and graduated valedictorian of her 1965 class at A.C. Davis High School. After graduating from Yakima Business College in 1966, she moved to Seattle and later found her dream job working at the UW Child Development Center. In 1968 she married her high school sweetheart, Bill Howard in Yakima. After Bill graduated from UW, they moved back to Yakima, and had two children, daughter Jennifer and son Karl.

MONDAY, DEC. 4 6:14 pm, SR 20 Caller reporting female subject throwing pizza at customers' vehicles. 10:16 pm, SR 20 Reporting party requesting assistance changing tire. 11:13 pm, SE Barrington Dr. Caller advising subject was soliciting sex online. TUESDAY, DEC. 5 3:51 am, SR 20 Party advising someone is ringing the door bell and not expecting anyone. 9:39 am, SR 20 Reporting party requesting female subject bathing herself in bathroom be removed and trespassed. 1:24 pm, SE Midway Blvd. Party advising male subject without pants is in front of location. 4:09 pm, SE Pioneer Way Caller advising someone “blew something up” in park area. WEDNESDAY, DEC. 6 10:30 am, SE Bayshore Dr. Reporting party advising disorderly male is yelling at hat; when someone gets near him he yells at them and wants cigarettes. 1:58 pm, SW Erie St. Party reporting male subject is not wanting to pay for shoes. FRIDAY, DEC. 8 9:21 am, SR 20 Caller reporting male in parking lot is acting crazy, moving trash can lids to the roadway. 9:48 am, NE Midway Blvd. Reporting party advising female subject across street at smoke shop acting weird; hunched over, head swirling around, started to take clothes off then put them back on. SUNDAY, DEC. 10 3:51 pm, SW Stremler Dr. Caller reporting loud music; tried to ask neighbor to turn it down, but thinks they turned it up instead. Report provided by OHPD & Island County Sheriff’s Dept.

Allene Lois (Dibbert) Howard, 70, of Greenbank, WA, went to be with her Heavenly Father near dawn Saturday, January 13, 2018 at her home, after a courageous battle with cancer.

In 1978, Bill and Allene decided they wanted to live a rural country lifestyle, and moved to a split-level ranch home on 7-1/2 acres in Cowiche, WA. They raised their children there, and enjoyed gardening, a small orchard, growing hay, and many animals, including horses, cows, chickens, cats and several dogs. Allene worked tirelessly caring for their home and her family, and made the choice that was near to her heart, to be a stay-at-home wife and mother. After Jennifer and Karl left home, Bill and Allene returned to Yakima. During this time, Allene made the decision to earn her college degree. She graduated from Yakima Valley Community College with an Associate Arts degree in 1998, and from Heritage College with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology in 2001. She worked for a time with women at Central Washington Comprehensive Mental Health. The Lord had other plans for them, however. During a quick getaway trip to Whidbey Island, WA, Allene and Bill fell in love with the island’s peace and beauty. They eventually purchased property overlooking the water and began building their dream home. For several years, their Whidbey house served as a weekend retreat. Once they retired in 2009, they made Whidbey their permanent, full-time home. Their place served as an idyllic refuge for them and their family. They devoted their time to reading, gardening, feeding and attracting many varieties of birds, and relishing the view of Saratoga Passage and the Cascade Mountains. Their home served as a gathering place for many special times with family. It was during this time Allene and Bill also adopted their beloved Sheltie, Toby. Allene’s faith was always an integral and critical part of who she was. Early in her marriage, Allene studied The Bethel Series as a student, pursued the teacher/discipleship training, and finally became a full-fledged Bethel teacher. Later on, Allene became involved in Bible Study Fellowship, first as a student, then as a discussion leader. Allene’s faith was strong, firmly rooted in God’s Word and in Jesus Christ. Her love for the Lord was plain to see in the way she lived her life. Allene’s other loves included her husband Bill, to whom she was devoted. They were constant companions and thought of themselves as a single unit, rather than as individuals. She was also dedicated to her family, and spent much of her time as a companion to her beloved mother, Lois, as well as with her children and their families. She had a deep appreciation of nature, and enjoyed many years hiking, camping, picnicking, huckleberry-picking, caring for her flowers (especially roses) and bird-watching. She delighted in the Anna’s hummingbirds that visited her feeders year-round. One of her favorite getaways was to Mt. Rainier, with the smell of wildflowers in the wind. Allene is lovingly survived by her husband, Bill, of Greenbank; her daughter, Jennifer Adams and her husband Tylon of Birch Bay; her son, Karl Howard and his wife Rose Braden of Portland; one brother, Lee Dibbert and his wife Barbara of Yakima; and one sister, Cheryl Swenson and her husband Carl of Vancouver; two grandsons, Travis Adams of Birch Bay and Grant Howard of Portland; and many nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her parents and one brother, Bruce Dibbert. A private committal service will be held at Terrace Heights Memorial Park, followed by a private family memorial service at Brookside Funeral Home in Moxee, Saturday, January 27, 2018. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle c/o Brookside Funeral Home, P.O. Box 1267 Moxee, WA, 98936. To share a memory with the family, please visit www.brooksidefhc.com

Life Tributes can now be found online at www.whidbeyweekly.com

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11 JANUARY 25 - JANUARY 31, 2018 www.whidbeyweekly.com LOCALL LOCALL Y OWNED Y OWNED

Whidbey Weekly

Film Shorts Courtesy of Cascadia Weekly

By Carey Ross 12 Strong: Chris Hemsworth and Michael Shannon star in this based-on-actual-events recounting of a group of Green Berets sent into Afghanistan to complete a near-impossible mission in the wake of 9/11. Oh, and they did it on horseback. ★★ (R • 2 hrs. 10 min.) Call Me By Your Name: In a year of truly excellent indie movies, this coming-of-age love story between 17-year-old Elio (Timothee Chalamet) and Oliver (Armie Hammer) set during the summer of 1983 in the north of Italy is easily one of the standouts. ★★★★★ (R • 2 hrs. 10 min.) The Commuter: After punching wolves, battling nefarious Turks and then equally nefarious Albanians, taking on whoever the enemies were in "The A-Team," and then going to war with Milton Bradley (I guess?) in the ill-advised "Battleship" adaptation, Liam Neeson takes on the NYC train system during rush hour as well as a director way too obviously influenced by Alfred Hitchcock in this by-the-numbers thriller. ★★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 35 min.) Darkest Hour: Marvel as newly minted Golden Globe winner Gary Oldman transforms into Winston Churchill, single-handedly keeps Britain from surrendering to Nazis with great speechifying and is nominated for a Best Actor Oscar right before your very eyes. ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 5 min.) Den of Thieves: This bank-heist movie starring Gerard Butler and 50 Cent is two hours and 20 minutes long, which begs so many questions. How much exposition can this plot possibly need? Can Butler even handle that many lines? Was this movie made to be watched on airplanes where people have a surplus of time and are really bored? ★★ (R • 2 hrs. 20 min.) Forever My Girl: I will probably watch this movie, dubbed “Nicholas Sparks lite” by critics, when it shows up on the Lifetime Movie Network, but I won’t promise to like it. ★ (PG • 1 hr. 44 min.) The Greatest Showman: I can think of few people more equipped to portray P.T. Barnum, i.e. the “showman” in question, than Hugh Jackman, who is a bit like a charismatic human circus himself. ★★ (PG • 1 hr. 45 min.) Insidious: The Last Key: On the one hand, the subtitle “The Last Key” implies this might be the final chapter of this paranormal film franchise. On the other hand, the series is called “Insidious,” so you just never know. ★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 43 min.)

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Paddington 2: This lovable bear and his penchant for marmalade and good-natured mischief are back with a mystery caper that suffers from nary a misstep, thanks to its endlessly endearing ursine star and a freewheeling supporting turn by Hugh Grant. ★★★★★ (PG • 1 hr. 45 min.) Phantom Thread: Daniel Day-Lewis, world’s greatest living actor, reteams with filmmaker Paul Thomas Anderson for a sumptuous, intoxicating look at 1950s high fashion, and a relationship between visionary designer and his muse. Day-Lewis is retiring after this movie, so don’t miss seeing the legendary actor on the big screen one last time. ★★★★★ (R • 2 hrs. 10 min.)

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Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle: How can anyone ever replace the inimitable Robin Williams in this now-franchise about a mystical board game that comes to life? The answer: One person cannot. However, four people– Dwayne Johnson, Kevin Hart, Jack Black, and Karen Gillan–can make a decent go of it. ★★★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 52 min.) Maze Runner: The Death Cure: This was the film that almost didn’t happen when its star, Dylan O’Brien, was seriously injured in an on-set accident. After a long, arduous recovery, he returned to finish out the actionpacked YA film franchise which gave him his film career–and then almost took it away. An inspiring story. Shame the movie itself isn’t as good. ★★ (PG-13 • 2 hrs. 22 min.)

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The Post: When I watched Steven Spielberg’s star-studded (Meryl Streep, Tom Hanks, Alison Brie, Bob Odenkirk) recounting of the race to publish the Pentagon Papers by "The Washington Post" and the legal battle that ensued, the audience in the theater clapped and cheered at a couple of points along the way. See it, applaud if you are so inclined and be reminded of the power of the press in protecting America from itself. ★★★★★ (PG-13 • 1 hr. 55 min.) Proud Mary: When Taraji P. Henson, not to be trifled with, faced inevitable backlash about whether people would be interested in seeing a 47-year-old woman of color star in an action movie, her response was succinct: “F*** that. If men can do it, why can’t we?” Five stars for the sentiment, Taraji, but sadly your movie is not worthy of you. ★ (R • 1 hr. 28 min.) For Anacortes theater showings, please see www.fandango.com. For Blue Fox and Oak Harbor Cinemas showings see ads on this page.

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12

JANUARY 25 - JANUARY 31, 2018 LOCALLY OWNED

Let’s Dish! with Kae Harris

CONNECTING FOOD HISTORY DOTS I often think about people in history. The ones in books, the ones who write books, the movers and shakers, doers and thinkers and I wonder what their favorite things were. Sometimes their writing or correspondence alludes to these favorite things, but it often doesn’t. And then I especially wonder what these prominent historical figures, whether literary figments of the imagination or actual humans, ate? What were their favorite foods? I’m especially thinking of a rather well known 19th century detective. I’m sure you’ve heard of him, because, well, many books have been written about him and his cases. On top of this, movies and series have been produced about this very character. By now you probably already know I’m talking about Sherlock Holmes. I used to love reading about him when I was younger. The very mention of his name conjured up images of a man shrouded in mystery and an Inverness cloak or great coat pulled together with a deerstalker hat. Mr. Arthur Conan Doyle had, it seems, a fashion sense befitting the time. Did his exceptionally detail-oriented works, however, encompass the food he fed his characters? This would give us insight into what people ate at the time, and that’s always so interesting! Sherlock Holmes, I suspect, was a coffee drinker; the evidence lying in the fact many of the books start out with him seated at the breakfast table, pouring himself coffee. There’s the first snippet of information, the first idea we get of what Victorianera people might have eaten during the day. As with everything 100-plus years ago, socio-economic status dictated every aspect of life of course, namely the diet. Those who lived in Victorian-era slums were more prone to malnutrition than those who weren’t. With a staple diet of bread, gruel and watery broth, it’s a wonder how people living in such abject poverty survived. And when we compare the quality of life of the poor, to those who fared better, we can see this stark contrast and the clear divisions in society. In fact, a Victorian diet for the not-so-poor was surprisingly healthy. A breakfast might have included unprocessed (of course) bread, with a pat or smear

of lard, and whatever the local market offered up in the produce line. This could be anything from turnips and carrots, to water cress, leeks, onions cabbage and more, making the diet rich with the building blocks for a relatively healthy diet. In addition to this, street vendors were to be found with their carts of hazelnuts and chestnuts which they roasted there and then, selling to whomever decided they needed a fiber rich, “good fat”-filled snack. The health benefits of nuts have long been touted for their ability to add to our lives. They are nutrient-dense and contain superior quality vegetable protein, not to mention all the minerals and vitamins they contain. Over the years of course, we humans have taken the nut and turned it into something more commercial. Nothing wrong with making new foods for all to enjoy, of course. But I wonder if we haven’t, since the Victorian era, left something behind when we turned to commercial goods to supply our energy needs? Maybe nuts have become less of a feature in our daily diet and more of the odd introduction here and there. Whatever the case may be, it would appear a Victorian person attained their vitamins and minerals from purer sources than we do now. I wonder what Mr. Holmes might think about that? Although it was Mrs. Hudson who did all the cooking and catering, so we might have to ask her. She was known to serve a pretty filling breakfast by all accounts, bringing to Mr. Holmes and Dr. Watson’s table, the likes of ham, eggs, kidney and kedgeree. I love how food has now become a multicultural fusion. It’s transformed from defined dishes consigned to specific areas, into an eclectic mix of everyone loves everyone else’s food! Even back in Victorian England this was occurring. Kedgeree has its roots steeped in Indian culture with a British spin on it. Consisting of rice, butter, sultanas, flakey fish, hard boiled eggs and curry spices, it was popular over a century ago, and while we mightn’t hear of it often, perhaps it's because it’s fused with another cuisine, taken on a new moniker, or we just don’t expose ourselves to it. Whatever the case may be, it sounds delicious. It would be a meal to try for sure with our proximity to the water being what it is sourcing sustainable fish might be easier than if we didn’t have this ability.

Dining Guide

The information I came across during this snippet of time was so vast, I wouldn’t have enough space to write about it if I wrote for six weeks! It’s fascinating, honestly, and of course the food itself always eye-opening. If we go back in time, we’ll likely see the evolution of certain dishes and foods, we’ll link it to our ever expanding ability to travel, meet new people and try new foods. If we follow all the clues, we’ll see food is connected at the very heart of it all – irrespective of culture, tradition or religion. The evidence suggests food is about the necessity for it, the ability to work creatively with it, and tantamount to those, how we bond over it. I wonder if Mr. Holmes would come to the same conclusion. Dear readers, because I found kedgeree so unique, a cultural fusion almost, I thought I would include a recipe for it! I will be trying it this week, so if you make it, let’s compare notes! Please send all your comments, questions, and any recipes you would like to share to letsdish.whidbeyweekly@gmail.com and lets do just that! Kedgeree 4 large eggs 2 oz butter 6 oz rice 2 medium/large onions peeled, finely sliced 7 fl oz milk 1 lb smoked haddock 4 teaspoons curry powder 2 bay leaves 4 or 5 cardamom pods Fresh lemon juice Salt and pepper to taste Boil the eggs until they are hard boiled. When they are cool, peel them and set aside. In a large saucepan, bring the rice, ½ a pint of cold water and salt to boil. Reduce heat to low/medium and simmer until the rice is cooked and tender. In a large skillet, sautée the onion in a little oil for ten minutes and remove from heat. Place the fish in a saucepan and cover with the milk. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer the fish for 6 minutes or until completely cooked through. Remove fish from the milk, de-bone, and remove skin. Heat the onions again and add curry powder, cardamom, bay leaves and rice. Flake the fish into large chunks and add to the onions and rice. Quarter the boiled eggs and add. Stir gently. Add lemon juice, salt and pepper and stir again to mix. Remove from heat, serve and enjoy! www.thespruce.com www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3257681 www.bbc.com/news/magazine-37654373 To read past columns of Let's Dish in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

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And of course, every home is different, the way people serve and eat their food varying from household to household. The same of people and their homes during the Victorian era. Though it must be said more people tended to follow a rigid guideline for eating, or at least strict serving protocols. With the actual utensils occupying so much room on tables, it’s no wonder their tables were so lengthy.

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BITS ‘n’ PIECES

continued from page

5

In addition, Sears Hometown Store associates can order customers any product from the entire merchandise selection offered by Sears Holdings Corporation, including apparel, footwear, jewelry and much more. This unique format allows customers in small communities to have access to the great products and brands usually found only in Sears’s stores. To learn more about Sears Hometown Stores, visit www.searshometownstores.com.

Oak Harbor Chamber of Commerce Launches Career Café The Oak Harbor Chamber of Commerce proudly launches Career Café, sponsored by Whidbey Coffee. The Chamber has partnered with WorkSource Whidbey and Career Café is held on the first Friday of every month from 9:00am to 11:00am at the Chamber of Commerce. The program’s goal is to connect island wide businesses with job seekers to meet staffing needs in the business community. Every month, Career Café will feature an industry specific theme and six businesses will have the opportunity to recruit, interview, and meet qualified job seekers. January’s event kicked off with over 100 job openings! Employers included two hospitals, two assisted living facilities, one home caregiving company, and a doctor’s office. Job seekers lined up at the door waiting anxiously to meet hiring managers and/or recruiters face to face and make a great impression. Participating Chamber members expressed their satisfaction with this event for providing such quality candidates and they were thrilled to have participated. Job seekers also expressed their excitement with planned interviews because of this event specifically. “It was a great experience and it provided me the chance to personally meet and talk with the employers. As a result, I was able to get a job interview right away.” – Jobely Carrillo The remaining monthly themes for 2018: February: Production/Manufacturing/Transportation March: Management & Office Admin April: Food, Hospitality, and Retail May: Construction & Other Trades June: Finance/Legal July: Education August: Animal Care/Farm September: Technology & Media October: Seasonal November: Government & Public Safety December: Social Service If you are interested in participating as an employer or a job seeker for this Career Café, please contact Crystal Armitage at WorkSource Whidbey, at (360) 279-4992 or carmitage@ esd.wa.gov

We have a variety of wonderful, good for you breads. Feed your family the best. Skip the preservatives! Choose from Frontier, French, Sour dough, Cinnamon twirl, Caraway Rye and Bavarian Farmers bread. 1191 SE Dock St, #2 • Oak Harbor 360-675-6500 chrisbakeryonwhidbey.weebly.com

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Dinner: Wednesday through Sunday 4pm to 8pm. Lunch: Noon to 4pm Friday, Saturday and Sunday. 2072 W. Captain Whidbey Inn Road • Coupeville 360-678-4097 • www.captainwhidbey.com

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hand, may demand that you adopt a more conservative approach. Watch the 28th for clues on how to put it all together.

CHICKEN LITTLE & THE ASTROLOGER By Wesley Hallock

ARIES (March 21-April 19) Busy-busy describes your week. No matter how you look at it, there’s always somewhere else to be, something else to do. Regardless of your actions, you’re likely to get the nagging feeling that something more important begs your attention. In that case, it will be tempting to cut corners and bend rules in your effort to get ahead. Set your priorities ahead of time on the 28th and try your best to stick to them.   TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Expect the wisdom and guidance of someone whom you look up to with respect to be yours at key junctures this week. Whether that is a physical person in the now or a teacher remembered from long ago matters not. Just rest easy in the assurance that the help is there when you need it. Fast and furious communications of a superficial sort rise to a crescendo on the 28th. Read between the lines for hidden meanings that day. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) Music and intellectual discussion form the perfect backdrop for your social interactions this week and do much to even out life’s ups and downs. Financial topics can be emotionally volatile, making it easy to say things you normally wouldn’t. You’ll need to feel your way, one cautious step at a time, in your activities on the 28th. A lot is happening that you won’t see in advance, a delight if you’re one who enjoys variety in life. CANCER (June 22-July 22) Your tendency toward kindness and generosity is your vehicle to interesting people and places this week. Many are deserving of your gifts, certainly, while a few may be more than willing to take unfair advantage of you. Trust your own inner wisdom to distinguish the truly needy from the freeloader. Don’t overlook spouse and family as the rightful and deserving objects of your nurture on the 28th. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) People in need of a sympathetic ear to hear them out are likely to find themselves gravitating toward you this week. It may be the expertise you bring to bear on their problems that attracts them, or simply your willingness to listen. Watch for this to happen in both your personal and professional activities. Your natural warmth is an ever-powerful attractor. The 28th is subject to changes of direction on short notice.   VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) The possibility is high this week of being led by a partner into speculations and activities with uncertain outcomes. This may put you in unfamiliar or uncomfortable territory, while also opening your eyes to how much is possible for those who dare. Career and professional responsibilities, on the other

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You will quite likely be bombarded with tantalizing tidbits from your social connections this week. The gossipy things that set others abuzz aren’t necessarily what you want to hear, so don’t be surprised at how little of the information coming your way is truly useful. Steering the conversation in directions more to your liking is easily done on the 28th, when attention spans will be short and the range of interests wide.   SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) It’s the things you don’t say that pack the most power this week. Like the iceberg whose bulk lies mostly invisible underwater, your reservoir of unspoken words is the center of your personal stability. Draw from it as you see fit. The chatter of others is likely to fill the air on the 28th, showcasing your ability to listen. A few well-timed comments on that day may be about as much as you can hope to convey. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Joy is a precious commodity this week, as well as being your personal stock in trade. The naturally jovial you is all you must be to get where you’re going. The size of your entourage will naturally increase in proportion to your willingness and ability to lighten the mood of others in the room. The doors that you would most like to see opened are likely to swing wide on the 28th. Be ready to respond.   CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) People and resources continue to gravitate your way this week. You have the opportunity before you now to make progress in the direction of your choice. How you choose to utilize the opportunity will do as much as the wheels of fate to determine your future. Preparedness plays a large role here. The better you set yourself up, the more you will prosper. The 28th brings circumstances together in your favor.   AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb 18) People and circumstances are seemingly in a race to make you aware of your unconscious habits. Be sure this is happening if you find yourself in an undesirable situation this week and wondering, “How on earth did I get here?” The simple answer is always, you set yourself up for it. And then it becomes up to you to fill in the always fascinating details. The 28th should provide food for thought.  PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You are in a period when sudden new interests that grab your attention and refuse to let go are normal and something to be expected. You will of course find these irresistible and wish to pursue them. Chasing after dreams will trigger resistance from those who identify you with your old goals. Choosing between old friends and new dreams is a dilemma you must face. Watch the 28th for prompts and clues. © 2018, Wesley Hallock, All Rights Reserved

Chicken Little looks at what is and fears the sky is falling. Wesley Hallock, as a professional astrologer, looks at what is and sees what could be. Read Wesley’s monthly forecast, with links to Facebook and Twitter, at www. chickenlittleandtheastrologer.com. To read past columns of Chicken Little and the Astrologer in the Whidbey Weekly, see our Digital Library at www.whidbeyweekly.com.

CLUES ACROSS

47. Fast plane

14. Entryway

1. Put within

48. Bahrain dinar

15. Support pillars

6. Learned person

50. Urgent request

25. Aquatic mammal

12. Resistance

52. Raccoon genus

26. __ Farrow, actress

16. Female title

54. Millisecond

27. Unhappy

17. Logical basis for a belief

56. Atlanta rapper

29. Holds molecules

18. Of I

57. Rural delivery

31. Thrifty

19. Indicates position

59. Intrauterine device

33. French dynasty

20. Article

60. The Wolverine State

36. Scottish port

21. Insignificant organizational member

61. Free agent

38. Irish militant organization

22. __ route

63. Reduces

23. Expression of disapproval

66. Lincoln’s state

24. Microelectromechanical systems

67. Quit

62. For instance

39. Dawn 41. Musical group of seven 42. Used to fry things 43. Carrot’s companion

70. Midsections

26. Ponds

46. Rough stone landmarks

71. Bullfighting maneuvers

28. Satisfy 30. Dad 31. Spanish soldier “El __” 32. Pouch-like structure 34. Obscure unit of measurement 35. Okinawa prefecture capital

CLUES DOWN

47. Fourth son of Jacob and Leah

1. The arch of the foot

49. Goes against

2. Canadian peninsula

51. Passion

3. Koran chapters

53. Hard white animal fat

4. Abba __, Israeli politician

54. Soybean pastes

5. Youngster

55. Beckon

6. Burns

37. Platforms

7. Comedienne Gasteyer

58. Mountain and morning are two

39. Jazz singer Irene

8. Valley

60. Self-referential

40. Benefits

9. Belongs to sun god

64. Data executive

41. Hellenistic governors

10. Nickel

65. Retirement plan

43. Brownish-green fruit

11. Great in salads

68. Star Trek character Laren

44. Needed to see

12. Leader

69. You and I

45. Political action committee

13. Forced through a sieve

Answers on page 15

YOUR GUESS IS AS GOOD AS OURS WEATHER FORECAST Thurs, Jan. 25

Fri, Jan. 26

Sat, Jan. 27

Sun, Jan. 28

Mon, Jan. 29

Tues, Jan. 30

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

North Isle

H-48°/L-42°

H-47°/L-41°

H-47°/L-40°

H-52°/L-44°

H-49°/L-40°

H-45°/L-36°

H-45°/L-37°

Rainy and Breezy

Showers

Windy and Rainy

Rain

Showers Possible

Rain

Wed, Jan. 31

Rain

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

South Isle

H-46°/L-41°

H-46°/L-40°

H-45°/L-37°

H-52°/L-43°

H-48°/L-37°

H-45°/L-34°

H-45°/L-36°

Rainy and Breezy

Showers

Windy and Rainy

Rainy and Breezy

Showers Possible

Rain

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Family Tails Dog Rescue needs foster homes! We can't save dogs from high kill shelters without homes for them to stay at while they wait to find their forever home. 1 week to 3 months, a fun and rewarding way to be involved with rescue and also have a dog without the full time commitment. We pay for everything, you just provide the love and the home. Please call 360-969-2014 for more info or for an application.

We Manage Your Home As If It Were Our Own. 360-675-9596 • www.whidbeyres.com 285 NE Midway Blvd • Suite #2 • Oak Harbor ANNOUNCEMENTS JEEPERS! Let’s start a new club! The inaugural meeting of the Whidbey Wranglers, an all Jeep vehicle organization, will be at the Oak Harbor El Cazador restaurant Saturday, February 24 at 5pm. Feel free to contact me at spillerr@ comcast.net for any questions or just show up! Pregnant? Need baby clothes? We have them and the price is right–FREE. Pregnancy Care Clinic, open most Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10am to 4pm. Call (360) 221-2909 or stop by 6th and Cascade in Langley. Be the difference in a child's life and become a foster parent today! Service Alternatives is looking for caring, loving, and supportive families to support foster children. (425) 923-0451 or mostermick@ servalt-cfs.com The Whidbey Island community is encouraged to try out the paddling sport of dragon boating with the Stayin' Alive team. Our team's mission is to promote the physical, social, and emotional benefits of dragon boating. It has been shown to be especially beneficial to cancer survivors. Practice with us for up to 3 times for free. Life-jackets and paddles provided. Saturdays at the Oak Harbor Marina, 8:45am. Contact njlish@ gmail.com. More info at our Facebook Page: https://www. facebook.com/NorthPugetSou ndDragonBoatClub?ref=hl Medical Marijuana patients unite; If you need assistance, advice, etc. please contact at 420patientnetworking@gmail. com. Local Whidbey Island help. If you or someone you know has been a victim of Homicide,

Burglary, Robbery, Assault, Identity Theft, Fraud, Human Trafficking, Home Invasion and other crimes not listed. Victim Support Services has Advocates ready to help. Please call the 24-hr Crisis Line (888) 388-9221. Free Service. Visit our web site at http://victimsupportservices.org

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Looking for Board Members to join the dynamic Board of Island Senior Resources and serve the needs of Island County Seniors. Of particular interest are representatives from North Whidbey. For more information please contact: reception@islandseniorservices.org

JOB MARKET Regency on Whidbey is seeking a part-time Community Relations Assistant. Candidates must have excellent communications and organizational skills and be able to work effectively in a fast pace industry. Primary task is actively be involved in outreach and promoting our community. CRA will work with external and internal groups, including other organizations and be responsible for coordination of internal and external events. CRA will help to distribute promotional materials to clients and will provide general support for public relations related in all business area. CRA will work directly with the Community Relations Director. Looking for an individual whose embedded in the community. Apply in person at 1040 SW Kimball Drive to complete your application, ensure you bring your cover letter, resume and references or visit www.

regencywhidbey.com and click on Career Center. (1) PT Evening Janitorial in Oak Harbor: Hiring IMMEDIATELY for part-time evening janitor, Monday-Saturday, 9 hours per week. Start time flexible (after 6:30pm/earlier on Saturday); compensation, $12 per hour. Earn part-time income of $500+ per month! Must have valid DL, cell phone, pass background/drug screening and E-Verify (USCIS). Please provide name and phone number. Resumes welcome. Email:  susan.valenzuela@ ybswa.net (0) We are looking for a dynamic Account Executive. Applicant has to be able to work autonomously and be self-motivated; must possess exceptional customer service and organizational skills; marketing or advertising background desired. If you want to join a successful, growing organization and have a strong work ethic, we want to talk to you. Email your cover letter and resume to info@whidbeyweekly.com DRIVERS: Drivers wanted for Whidbey SeaTac Shuttle. CDL/ P2 Preferred, Training available for those without. Full Time, Part Time and weekend openings available. Details at www. seatacshuttle.com or call (360) 679-4003

JEWELRY Oval amethyst ring set in sterling silver, $50 OBO; White button pearl earrings, 8mm, $35 OBO; Pale blue Baroque pearl earrings, 9-10mm, $45 OBO. Call (360) 331-1063 (0)

Foster Homes Needed!

able Feb 3. U-haul, Coupeville, (360) 678-7591. Leave number & I’ll call back. (1)

HOME FURNISHINGS Baby grand piano, Baldwin organ and Chromcraft dinette set. Oak Harbor, (360) 6798778 (1) Joining two households: Trundle bed, stylish curved wooden frame with two mattresses, one slides under, great for the guest room or as twin beds for kids, $65; Blonde sofa set - sofa, matching chair and ottoman, comfortable, some minor cosmetic spots, $25; Utility table, metal legs and laminate top, $15. Items available Feb 3. U-haul, Coupeville, (360) 678-7591. Leave number & I’ll call back. (1)

MISCELLANEOUS Fujinon binoculars, 10 x 70 fmt-sx with case, mint condition, $400. Call (360) 240-0921 (1) 6 ProMag Springfield Magazines, M1A/M14.308 Cal 20 round, Black phosphate steel, $15 each. Steve Bennett (360) 331-4779 (0) Over 50 LP (vinyl) albums for sale, various artists, $3 ea. Call (360) 331-1063 (0) Looking for Xmas, Bday, Father's Day, or just Gifts in general? These are LOCAL made crafts, I have about 50-60 of these available. They

are $16.00/ea, plus shipping if you want them mailed. CASH preferred. Dimensions are: 5-6"W X 17”L. Contact me at ljohn60@gmail.com.

ANIMALS/SUPPLIES If you or someone you know needs help in feeding pet(s), WAIF Pet Food Banks may be able to help. Pet Food Banks are located at WAIF thrift stores in Oak Harbor (50 NE Midway Blvd) and Freeland (1660 Roberta Ave) and are generously stocked by donations from the community. If you need assistance, please stop by.

No Cheating!

LAWN AND GARDEN Used split rail fence available, you haul. 63 rails at 10 or 12 feet long, 23 posts. $100 for all, obo. In Freeland. Call Jim at (360) 840-0115 (0) 25 aluminum silver deck post caps, $3 each; 200 feet new 8” heavy waterline, $4 a foot, obo. Can be used for waterline or drain line. (360) 321-1624 Natural Barnyard Topsoil: Good for gardens, flower beds, etc. Unscreened, 10 yard loads, $225 delivered. South Whidbey (360) 321-1624 Puzzle 1 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.56)

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E-Mail............classifieds@whidbeyweekly.com Telephone..................................(360)682-2341 Fax.............................................(360)682-2344 PLEASE CALL WHEN YOUR ITEMS HAVE SOLD.

Please try to limit your classified to 30 words or less, (amounts and phone numbers are counted as words) we will help edit if necessary. We charge $10/week for Vehicles, Boats, Motorcycles, RVs, Real Estate Rental/Sales, Business Classifieds and any items selling $1,000 and above. We do charge $25 to include a photo. The FREE classified space is not for business use. No classified is accepted without phone number. We reserve the right to not publish classifieds that are in bad taste or of questionable content. All free classifieds will be published twice consecutively. If you would like your ad to be published more often, you must resubmit it. Deadline for all submissions is one week prior to issue date.

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Business Spotlight Caring Goes The Extra Mile

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By Kae Harris What’s better than walking past windows that wink back at you? The way in which they’re cleaned perhaps? If there’s one business on Whidbey Island that knows how to get the greatest gleam out of your viewing portals every time, it’s Crystal Clean Windows LLC. Using the RODI (Reverse Osmosis Deionization) system, Jason, owner of Crystal Clean, raises the bar on window cleaning more than just a few notches. The unique filtration system used in RODI cleaning method prevents contaminants from dulling the shine on your windows. With pure water on-demand, your spot-free finish is assured! And that’s not all. Your interior windows are able to get a new lease on life too. Using only the most eco-friendly products, safe around both people and pets, Jason always places the needs of his customers among the top of his priorities in a job well done every time. No matter the shape or size of your windows, whether a home or commercial residence, Jason ensures every job epitomizes Crystal Clean’s superior quality services.

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If it’s your gutters that need a little TLC, no problem, because Crystal Clean Windows takes care of those too. With all of Mother Nature’s adornments being blown and washed into these channels, it’s easy for them to become clogged – and a backed up gutter can cause a whole host of problems from leaks and drips to even more extensive long term problems. Don’t let it get that far. Call Jason, because in addition to ensuring your gutters are not only clear of nature's bounty of twigs and leaves, Jason can whiten and brighten them too. Functionality and aesthetic value second to none – your home or business will look brand new. And if these services aren’t invaluable enough, Crystal Clean Windows does roof cleaning and moss control, too. The Pacific Northwest is a very conducive environment for this blanket of green to make a home on our homes. To avoid potential problems down the road and sidestep unnecessary costly repairs, it’s best to have this fuzzy green fiend removed from any roof. Employing the most gentle of methods and non-toxic cleaners, Jason is able to maintain the integrity of your roof by just sweeping away the moss, leaving every single shingle not only intact, but moss-free and super clean to boot! For more information about how Crystal Clean can give your windows back their glimmer, get your gutters going again or move moss on its way, call them at 360-675-3005 and schedule your free estimate today, or visit their web site at www.crystalcleanwindowswhidbey.com.

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www.whidbeycleaners.com 1025 NE 7th Ave, Oak Harbor, WA Hours Mon-Fri 7:30am - 5:30pm Offer expires February 9th, 2018

A Clean House Is A Happy House! Call Us Today For Window Cleaning Residential & Commercial Gutter Cleaning Roof Cleaning Moss Removal 360-675-3005

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HARADA PHYSICAL THERAPY Your Hometown Therapists

• Sports Rehab • Post-Op Treatment • MVA/L&I Claims • Injury Screening • Concussion Rehab • BikeFit

Michael Bagby, PT, DPT Oak Harbor

Coupeville

210 SE Pioneer Way #2 101 S Main Street www.HaradaPT.com 360-679-8600 360-678-2770 Your Hometown Therapists

www.HaradaPT.com

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Whidbey Weekly, January 25, 2018  

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